World's Fair

Archives for September, 2006

Here’s Jeremy Rifkin in the LA Times on why we should pursue a range of decentralized energy technologies — solar, wind, geothermal, hydro and biomass, for example — and not the nuclear that’s become in vogue of late. (For the record, here, here, and here are some posts from the past few weeks that hit…

(The Science Creative Quarterly is a science writing webzine I run at UBC) PDF | JPG The Science Creative Quarterly seeks science humour pieces for entry into our awesome new contest. Judging will be based on a number of criteria that can be annotated as follows:

(terry.ubc.ca is a webzine on global issues that I coordinate at UBC) TERRY’S WRITING CHALLENGE There once was a website named Terry1 That wanted to make people wary Of things going on In the world that are wrong Without making it all seem too scary. So this is a call for submissions To write or…

If so, please say “hello.” And just to make it a bit more interesting, I’ll treat the first five commenters currently at UBC to a cup of coffee. Those on board first can then give me an email at tscq@interchange.ubc.ca. No creationists or scientology recruiters please…

(Hello folks from Kottke.org, just a note that it just so happens that today is contest day at the World’s Fair – check out our front page, where the last few or so entries contain details of contests concerning coffee, limericks and mathematical notation) Well, Ben has beaten me to the punch with an invite…

It’s the Ecological Footprint Quiz. Yeah! If you’ve never taken it, give it a whirl. About a 3 minute process. My test results: If everyone lived like me, we would need 3.7 earths to get by. Some background on Ecological Footprints, you ask? Here and here. And, for the faint of link clicking, two summaries:…

This groundbreaking report–”Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center offers new treatment for lameness“– just out, is riveting. And I think this says it all: “Lameness is a condition that affects many [people] and this therapy is a very promising alternative to traditional treatments.”

First, a quote, then (below the fold) the book I found it in (and, incidentally, the post title about infinite variability, is taken from the book, below): W.H. Auden: “The historical world is a horrid place where, instead of nice clean measurable forces, there are messy things like mixed motives, where classes keep overlapping, where…

The diagnosis we would all shudder to get. The below image is actually a joke (reprinted from an issue of Esquire in July of 2000)

However, unlike the MRI (which had strong personal significance), this time the sequencing data, hung by the lamp to the right, is of nothing in particular. Thanks everyone for the comments – it was interesting and also valuable. Nice to know that readers appreciate the nuances in scenarios such as this. Nuances are important in…