World's Fair

Archives for October, 2008

Recently, we had an opportunity to host a variety of great talks for science teachers. One of the talks was by Dr. William Rees. It was a nice little introduction into the conundrum of our reliance on “progress” to fix things. In any event, here is the link that will lead you to a 25…

The data presented below were first published after Halloween in 2006, here at The World’s Fair. After further (non-anonymous) peer review, we pushed into the second phase of the research in 2007, as published here. We are proud to acknowledge that these earlier efforts–pilot studies, both–led to further funding. We’ve now been able to pursue…

I lectured today on technology and progress in my big-lecture class (the main thrust being: in what way is technology progress, and who says so, and why). Just before I’d watched a documentary, Our Daily Bread (and here), about the modern industrial agriculture process. It pairs very well with another documentary, Manufactured Landscapes, and in…

So, this is one of the things that has been keeping me busy the last couple of weeks. Essentially, the lab hosted a largish conference for high school science teachers (about 95 registrants) – as well, we took the tact of blogging the conference so that almost all of the content is already up (by…

Engineers and poetry

Friend of the Fair Oronte Churm has a note on engineers over at The Education of Oronte Churm, “The Engineers Think On It.” Eating at a diner with a book of poetry in hand, he posits the engineer’s quest for utility–and for order and rationality, it seems–over poetry and spirit (or so my own poetic…

These offer another set of landscape images (here were some others: one; two), these punctuated by the contrast of nuclear sky, horizon, and military maneuver. I saw them at this site, though that site was reposting images from the book How to Photograph an Atomic Bomb, by Peter Kuran. The Cal Lit Review site says…

I think the poem below, by Edward Hirsch, is in league with the one by Vijay Seshadri, “Memoir,” posted a few months ago. Hirsch’s was apparently inspired by the poem “Account,” by Czeslaw Milosz.

The Telegraph’s website has an “Atlas of the Real World.” There are 18 different versions of the world map, where software depicts “the nations of the world, not by their physical size, but by their demographic importance on a range of subjects.” Here is the Nuclear map:

I’m just the messenger. Given Dave’s Jedi kid post, I figured what the hell. Link to the original at Topless Robot, via The Morning News. 4) Refusing to Listen to the Only Living Jedi in the Galaxy Luke gets a vision of his dead mentor Obi-Wan telling him to go to Dagobah to get training…

Keeping Up with Michael Pollan

In the essay I wrote for the HSS Newsletter about blogging (here) I noted in passing that one virtue of the blog space was that it provided a place to store notes. It is an electronic version of note cards. This post is one example, a placeholder that I’ll come back to. Let’s hope.