World's Fair

Archives for March, 2009

You know the story: we can have Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock costarring and filmed in scenes where they are frantically blogging to make sure they reach a certain number of readers per day. Why? Because a crazy Dennis Hopper has rigged their computers to explode if they get less than 1000 visitors per day!…

With the exception of my slip up during the introductions (I introduced Charles as “Sir Charles…”), here is a pretty great video of old Chuck talking to a class of high school students.

Just an accounting of the last month of local food, sustainable agriculture, and science/food/safety articles is difficult to produce. Let alone a full understanding of them. One problem with studying the topic is that the proliferation of literature on sustainable ag and its associated elements brings with it sifting and organizing difficulties. It’s a microcosm…

Engineering Design Failure

Eight choices for the best example of a design flaw.

This post was written by guest contributor Jody Roberts. Follow this link for his most recent contribution to The World’s Fair. The philosopher Marjorie Grene passed away on Monday, 16 March, at the age of 98. Grene’s life is difficult to sum up in a few words, and I don’t want to do that anyhow,…

Landfills are leading consumption indicators. Their use is declining in the recession. The Washington Post reported over the weekend that the Loudon County landfill (that’s in Northern Virginia) has seen a decrease of 30% in the past year; nearby Prince William’s County has seen a 20% decrease. Loudon County’s landfill was slated to close in…

The Morning News’s Fifth Annual Tournament of Books, real March madness, is a true highlight of the near-Spring calendar. I’m told there is some other tournament this month, also capitalizing on the month “March” in its title. We’ll have to look into that. This TMN tourney has thus far seen four colossal upsets. In one…

Pt. I | Pt. 2 | Pt. 3 | Pt. 4 — Part 4 with Christopher Henke, discussing his book Cultivating Science, Harvesting Power, follows below. All entries in the author-meets-blogger series can be found here.

Pt. I | Pt. 2 | Pt. 3 | Pt. 4 — Part 3 with Christopher Henke, discussing his book Cultivating Science, Harvesting Power, follows below. All entries in the author-meets-blogger series can be found here.

Wherein the author, Dave Frye, finds in his doctoral research that “it remains fairly safe to say that the modern science of cereal studies began no earlier than with the 1764 publication of Linnaeus’s De Cerialibus.” This, despite some early finds about “the famously lactose-intolerant Pythagoreans.”