About writing generally

World's Fair

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Crickets chirping and Collider Whales

Sorry it’s been a bit quiet here lately. Things have been busy at the museum, and I’ve also been writing in other places. In particular, These days I’m a guest blogger at Boing Boing, and on top of that, I’m also having fun starting a children’s novel. This novel has a mouthful of a title,…

Robots, hamsters, and biodiversity.

Or something like that:… I just noticed, with some amusement, that the 2010 Toy of the Year is something akin to a cute robotic rodent. Specifically, they are called Zhu Zhu Pets, a mechanical universe of furry and mobile hamsters, expandable with a hamster-like ecosystem complete with wheels, balls, and see through tunnels. The fact…

A few months ago, for fun, I took a course on “Writing Books for Children.” It was pretty good, in that it kind of forced me to sit down and come up and work through an idea. Or at least, work through it enough so that it was close to the stage of maybe querying…

I was listen to the radio as we were coming to the lab this morning, and one of the things that caught my ear was a quick mention of collective nouns. Now these are instances where there is a special and specific term that is coined for a group of things. Wiki describes it as…

I’ve just had a piece published in the Walrus, and it’s also available to read at their website. Basically, the piece is about how this 85ft Blue Whale skeleton was discovered and prepped for a new museum at the University of British Columbia. It was really quite amazing to chat with Mike deRoos, the aforementioned…

Philip Graham is a writer and professor at the University of Illinois. Friend of the World’s Fair Oronte Churm recently interviewed him. (Mr. Churm, aka John Griswold, also teaches at Illinois and is also a writer — check out his beautiful new novel Democracy of Ghosts.) It’s a good interview, right here at this link.

If you know where the Spy Museum is, I encourage you to read “Days at the Museum #4: International Week” over at McSweeney’s. If you don’t know where the Spy Museum is, well, help me help you find out. Albert Bierstadt, Among the Sierra Nevada, California,1868 (from the Smithsonian website) Some other things you may…

I had the chance to interview Rebecca Solnit for The Believer. It’s on shelves now, in their September issue. They’ve also put the full text of it on-line at their website. (Here it is.) To quote the interview’s intro, Solnit is the author of twelve books. She is a journalist, essayist, environmentalist, historian, and art…

On we go, with the third entry in “Days at the Museum” over at McSweeney’s, titled “Mind the Gap.” It ran yesterday. It’s theme? Beyond relating to a subway conversation, I’d summarize it as being about the gap between what I expected here and what I’m finding. This is part three of “Days at the…

Science scout twitter feed The reason why there were two ways of saying the element aluminum/aluminium has always been one of the those things that made me go “hmmm” But by the same token, it’s also always been one of those things that never stuck around in my consciousness long enough for me to look…