Links to interesting sites and discussion of them

World's Fair

Category archives for Links to interesting sites and discussion of them

The Martian is a feel-good, science positive, uplifting film about the power of the human spirit, botany, and engineering. It looked, from the credits, like it had at least 8 scientific advisors from NASA (and possibly other places). Too bad that Ridley Scott only half listened to them. As one of the primary sci-fi filmmakers…

Antarctica: Links and Lack of Links

Internet Links and Social Links at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Here are some links of interest related to Trish Suchy and my NSF Antarctic Artists and Writers Project: Trish Suchy’s blog about our Artist’s and Writer’s project. David Ainley’s website about his research on Adelie penguins: Penguin Science The weather in McMurdo is here. Zach Sudman’s…

I’ve been strangely fascinated by the “arsenic-eating” and maybe “arsenic-utilizing’ bacteria report from NASA researchers and the so-called “backlash” (“arsenic-gate”) in the blogosphere. Many others have posted on this topic. What I’ve found most interesting is that there seem to be several parallel and barely intersecting universes: 1) the scientific literature, 2) the traditional media,…

If so, you should join this facebook group. Or to discuss further, please go to http://friendfeed.com/phylomon. Here’s part of what started this group and project: a friend of mine passed on this “letter to Santa:” It quite nicely demonstrates an issue with advocates of biodiversity – that is, what can we do to get kids…

This would be the headline from 25 years ago at Bhopal, India, when the Union Carbide plant there leaked a toxic cloud of methyl-isocyanate. My headline is indicative of the complexity of this disaster: the causes, responses, and historical path since then of regulation, cross-national legislation, and corporate attempts (or lack thereof) at responsibility to…

Realclimate.org has a great post today called “An Open Letter to Steven Levitt.” In case, you haven’t heard, this is the economist, and one of the noted authors of the Freakonomics, who recently published Superfreakonomics, a book that is fast gaining notoriety as being fraught with many errors on the issue of Global Warming. Essentially,…

Not the best title for a post, and by best, I mean most accurate. If you’d like to get to the bottom of it, though, try this new dispatch over at McSweeney’s: “The Elevator to Room 1028.” It has elevators. It has intrigue. It has secrecy. It has stacks of books. And it has elevators.…

I haven’t been here much, but I did begin a new series over at McSweeney’s called “Days at the Museum.” It’s a limited-run set of dispatches (summer-length, let’s say) about research at the Smithsonian and related miscellany. Tuesday was the first one, called “Ronzoni All the Way Down.” This is the central image of the…

The photographer Jade Doskow is capturing and creating images of the once-grand spectacles called World’s Fairs. Her photographs do triple duty: they track down those old sites, in cities across the world (from Brussels to Seville, from New York to Spokane, from Paris to Philadelphia); they call back to the technological grandeur such exhibitions sought…

A slow June at the Fair (see here for an explanation), but I’m popping in to share what constitutes a different sort of landscape image(s) below. Here’s the first: The Citarum River in Indonesia. Here we have landscapes of garbage, scenes of environments overwhelmed with waste, with excess, with disposed and disposable items. The images…