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Just a quick note for you Brits out there (and specifically Londoners I guess). Tonight (Sept 24th), the Natural History Museum is hosting a “Science Uncovered” evening, whereby scientists and staff from various departments will be on hand. As well, there will be a place where cocktails can be purchased, which will probably make all…

The laws of thermodynamics are empirical laws – they were not derived from some first principles of the universe: they were derived by doing thousands and thousands of experiments, and then coming up with some relationships that could quantitatively explain all those experiments. In biological thermodynamics, we are at the beginnings of trying to define…

Robots, hamsters, and biodiversity.

Or something like that:… I just noticed, with some amusement, that the 2010 Toy of the Year is something akin to a cute robotic rodent. Specifically, they are called Zhu Zhu Pets, a mechanical universe of furry and mobile hamsters, expandable with a hamster-like ecosystem complete with wheels, balls, and see through tunnels. The fact…

Heat Capacity in Biology 101

Scienceblogs is promoting the writing of “Science 101” general topic posts all through the “back to school” month of September. So, here is the first in a multi-part series on Heat Capacity in Biology: Heat Capacity in Biology 101: What is it? Heat capacity is basically a proportionality constant. For any substance, the heat capacity…

Image: Nagoya Congress Center plus Millenium Falcon reworked from original photo by Paula Pedrosa. link. Originally made for a series of Nagoya COP10 primers at Boing Boing (1 | 2 | SB | 3 | 4) I: SORTING OUT THE VERNACULAR So what is up with this Nagoya thing? Well, it’s a big international meeting…

The Speed of Money

Wow! Either it’s an odd coincidence, or the Latisse marketers are highly vigilant monetizers, because in less than 24 hours after I posted yesterday’s rambling little piece about the eyelash wonder drug, a tasteful little ad for it showed up on the Scienceblogs homepage (cue spooky music now). Robot voice: “Oh yes, I will go…

Latisse!

The existence of the drug Latisse is clearly a harbinger of the end of modern civilization, in more ways than one, but it is also intensely fascinating and creepy. When I first heard of it, about a year ago, I really thought it was some sort of satirical article about the current status of big…

Part 1 of “Do You Like the Big Bang Theory?”, addressed whether one emotionally “likes” the scientific theories one works on – and how or if that should impact one’s work. Here I’d like to talk about the television show. “The Big Bang Theory” has been highly touted and praised as being the best science-in-fiction…

Our lab has a new paper coming out this week in the Journal of Molecular Biology (JMB): The Glutamate Effect on DNA Binding by Pol I DNA Polymerases: Osmotic Stress and the Effective Reversal of Salt Linkage I’m going to talk about a few highlights here, but if you actually want the full article, say…

(Lifted, 2009, 40″x30″, acrylic on panel) You can see more at this link. Let me know if you find yourself both quietly mesmorized and disturbed as you take in his images. From his “about” page: Biography Josh Keyes was born in Tacoma, Washington. He received a BFA in 1992 from the School of the Art…