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Aye-Ayes Have “Color” Night-Vision

Aye-ayes do not respond well to light, and you must never, ever feed them after midnight. According to a new study conducted by Brian Verrelli a researcher at the Biodesign Institute, aye-ayes, a rare primate found only in Madagascar have the genes to see in color, even though they are completely nocturnal and have been…

Transition to ScienceBlogs

Zooillogix has been invited to join ScienceBlogs and we have decided to take them up on the offer. ScienceBlogs is a unique community of science related blogs that run the gamut from highly informed and technical to… errr…. us. What this means for you the reader (e.g. the bored desk slave, bored 12 year old…

Waiter, There?s a Spy in my Soup

Harvard professor Robert Wood unveiled his newest creation recently, a robotic fly that can be used as a spy, according to this posting on engadget.com. The fly weighs only .002 ounces and has a wingspan of 1.18 inches. Due to light weight carbon joints, the fly’s wings beat 110 times per minute and the creature…

Anteater Wrestlemania

Now this is how you provoke a tamandua! Tamandua mexicana

Cyborg Pigeon Makes Debut in China

Chinese scientists have made a remote controlled pigeon. By planting micro electrodes in the pigeon’s brain, the scientists can make the bird fly up, down, left or right.“I’m looking for a boy named John Conner. Have you seen him?” Chief scientist Su Xuecheng explains, “”The implants stimulated different areas of the pigeon’s brain according to…

Bear with us on this one…it might get a little complicated: Wasps from the genus Copidosoma lay two eggs into a host egg (for example a moth or butterfly egg). One of these two eggs is male and one is female. The male and female larvae then begin multiplying–much like single celled organisms–into a thousand…

A small pod of narwhals, Monodon MonocerosFor centuries, humans have speculated on narwhals’ bizarre horns, believing them to be everything from supernatural appendages to spear fishing weapons to tools for poking around on the ocean floor. In 2005 a team from Harvard and the National Institute of Standards and Technology put a horn under an…

Spider Monkeys Use Cologne

Researchers in Mexico have documented wild spider monkeys rubbing themselves with fragrant, chewed up leaves. Though the exact purpose of this behavior is yet to be proven, it appears as if the scents “may play a role int he context of social communication, possibly for signaling of social status or to increase sexual attractiveness,” according…

Crab spider preparing for take off, Misumenoides formosipes Humans have known for quite a while that some spiders engage in a kind of flying called “ballooning.” To balloon, spiders release a parachute-like web into the air (with themselves attached) and allow the wind to pick them up and deposit them in greener pastures. What humans…