Medicine https://scienceblogs.com/ en COVID-19: The Downside To More Testing Could Be Overflowing Hospitals https://scienceblogs.com/conversation/2020/03/30/covid-19-downside-more-testing-could-be-overflowing-hospitals-151446 <span>COVID-19: The Downside To More Testing Could Be Overflowing Hospitals</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"You can’t fight a virus if you don’t know where it is."</p> <p>These were the words of Director General of the World Health Organisation (WHO), Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, at his <a href="https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-mission-briefing-on-covid-19---12-march-2020">briefing</a> on the COVID-19 pandemic in mid-March.</p> <p>He made the statement in a bid to underscore the need to test many more people as key to containing the spread of the disease.</p> <p>Ordinarily, that makes sense and I would agree with it. It is the right thing to do in the face of a disease which would show mild to no symptoms in the majority of those that are infected but does not inhibit their ability to infect others.</p> <p>Countries that follow the <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/technical-guidance/laboratory-guidance">WHO view</a> have sought to buy test kits and increase the number of tests conducted daily. Others have been more cautious and have set up guidelines to ensure that they only test people with significant history of risk for COVID-19 or symptoms of the disease.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Lagos treatment camp" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="c675c966-9ea7-44bd-a11f-971063782f61" src="/files/inline-images/Lagos%20treatment.JPG" /><figcaption><em>An aerial view of a new isolation and treatment centre established by the Lagos State government at the main bowl of the state-owned Stadium. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images via The Conversation</em></figcaption></figure><p> </p> <p>Looking at the various models and the progression of the pandemic, I wish to offer some views on testing and the attendant issues and challenges.</p> <p>I believe that there are a myriad of factors to consider and that, particularly in Africa, countries have to take them all on board when making their decisions to curtail the spread of the virus.</p> <p>The factors include the dangers posed by false test results, the fact that testing data is being badly communicated leading to a rise in panic levels and the fact that testing capacity is limited in many countries.</p> <h2>The fear factor</h2> <p>It is quite clear that the world is now dealing with two pandemics instead of one. The first is the virus. The second is fear and, in many cases, outright panic. That is why landlords are <a href="https://www.irrawaddy.com/news/burma/myanmars-nurses-doctors-face-eviction-landlords-panic-covid-19.html">kicking out</a> health workers from their houses. That is why we get reports of <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/23/africa/chloroquine-trump-nigeria-intl/index.html">chloroquine toxicity</a> within 24 hours of US President Donald Trump saying that might be the treatment for COVID-19.</p> <p>What has panic got to do with testing? Panic is being driven by the way in which the outcome of testing is being communicated. For example, most countries are releasing data about how many more cases there are. But they are not telling their citizens how many of these people have no symptoms at all, or have mild ones.</p> <p>Knowing how many of those who tested positive were not considered to be in a critical state would be helpful.</p> <p>The other area in which data is being badly handled, and adding to panic levels, is that countries are reporting new cases on a daily basis. These aren’t necessarily new infections but, rather, new <em>detections</em>. Most are people who already had it and (for whatever reason were able to get tested) were found to be positive. They are people who, just the day before, did not know they had the virus and therefore weren’t provoking fear in others. Also, the number of new confirmed cases alone may not be the best indicator for the challenge the disease poses in a country or community.</p> <p>Knowing their status now should not cause panic. It should simply inform about the importance of the preventive measures, including testing, to prevent spread of the disease.</p> <h2>Limited resources</h2> <p>Countries are being urged to test as many people as possible in the face of limited test resources. The mainstay polymerase chain reaction test is quite limited and relatively slow. It is also expensive given the requirements even of staff and laboratories.</p> <p>Enter rapid test kits to the rescue. But there aren’t enough. Even the US <a href="https://www.pulse.ng/bi/tech/the-us-is-struggling-to-test-more-people-for-coronavirus-now-its-facing-a-shortage-of/82647n6">doesn’t</a> have enough test kits to meet the demand.</p> <p>In addition, not all the kits in use have been tested properly. For example, there are reports that thousands of test kits imported by the Spanish health authorities were found to be <a href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1260805/spain-coronavirus-tests-chinese-testing-kits-false-results">faulty</a>.</p> <p>The challenge of a test kit giving false negatives is that the people are told, erroneously, that they do not have the virus. They go away and continue to infect others freely. In the event that they have any symptoms, they are likely to ignore these, and some may become severely ill before seeking care. If they do seek care early, the health care workers may be exposed to COVID-19 thinking that this person had tested negative and could only have some other disease.</p> <p>A false positive, on the other hand, means that the number of cases reported continues to rise along with the panic created and attendant socio-economic disruption.</p> <p>The Jack Ma Foundation has donated 20,000 <a href="https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/magazines/panache/jack-mas-coronavirus-testing-kits-reach-nigeria/articleshow/74829029.cms">test kits </a>to Nigeria. But what are these among so many? Consider two statistics alongside this number. The <a href="https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/nigeria-population/">population</a> of the country – about 200 million people. And the fact that with 65 confirmed cases (as at the time of writing this), Nigeria is tracking over <a href="http://apanews.net/en/pays/nigeria/news/six-covid-19-patients-well-as-nigeria-trails-4000-contacts">4,000 contacts</a> already.</p> <p>A further complication in Nigeria is that the allocation of available tests kits could become subject to social and political whims. Government officials are scrambling to get tested along with their families and wealthy friends. Unfortunately, the guidelines for determining who to test won’t apply to this category of people. This means that limited resources will be used up.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Overwhelming hospitals</h2> <p> </p> <p>The fatality rate for COVID-19 has not yet been <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(20)30244-9/fulltext?rss=yes">definitively established</a>. Nevertheless, the fatality rate – particularly among older people – has been one of the major factors stoking fear. It is also one of the reasons hospitals are overwhelmed with COVID-19 positive cases.</p> <p>This is why the decision to increase testing needs to be made along with ensuring that the facilities are in place to manage the increase in numbers of people identified with COVID-19. Without additional measures, hospitals will simply become overwhelmed, as has <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/03/15/hospitals-are-overwhelmed-because-coronavirus-heres-how-help/">happened in the US</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.pulse.ng/bi/politics/a-construction-expert-broke-down-how-china-built-an-emergency-hospital-to-treat-wuhan/260wvrz">In China,</a> for example, several new health facilities were built in just a few weeks along with the deployment of thousands of health workers to Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak in that country. For its part the <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-51969104">UK recalled</a> about 10,000 retired health workers and the US is <a href="https://www.channelstv.com/2020/03/27/us-asks-health-workers-to-apply-for-visas-amid-covid-19-pandemic/">offering visas</a> to health workers who might want to come and work there.</p> <p>In Nigeria, the approach being taken is similar to that of China. <a href="https://businessday.ng/coronavirus/article/lagos-island-coronavirus-isolation-centre-now-ready-for-use-sanwo-olu/">New facilities </a>are being established and equipped to handle COVID-19 cases.</p> <p>But the strain on the health system must not be underestimated. Admission of a case of a highly infectious disease, like COVID-19, stretches the health system many times over and increases the risk of health care workers being infected. Of course, as the numbers rise, the health care workers are soon <a href="https://www.pulse.ng/bi/tech/thousands-of-chinese-doctors-volunteered-for-the-front-line-of-the-coronavirus/83jtyw5">overwhelmed </a>and the fatalities could rise along.</p> <p> </p> <h2>What needs to be done</h2> <p> </p> <p>I would argue that we should not just follow the admonition of the WHO to “test, test, test” without examining it in the context of our local peculiarities. Testing is important but countries should adapt guidelines for testing that work for them, knowing also the dangers of having asymptomatic disease spreaders – that is those who have the virus but aren’t showing any symptoms.</p> <p>They should also consider reporting confirmed cases along with their clinical status as well as recoveries and discharges (all to encourage reporting of possible cases). The bigger worry is the fatalities and that is what countries must work to avoid.</p> <p>Lastly, lock downs must be considered – the socio-economic challenges weighed into it – as a means to minimise the spread in the face of limited facilities. This would allow those who might require hospital admissions to show up, while those who don’t will stop spreading the disease while they recover on their own.</p> <p><span>By <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/doyin-odubanjo-667074">Doyin Odubanjo</a>, Executive Secretary, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/nigerian-academy-of-science-2114">Nigerian Academy of Science</a>. This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/covid-19-to-test-or-not-to-test-134934">original article</a>.</span></p> <p><img alt="The Conversation" height="1" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/134934/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" width="1" /></p></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/conversation" lang="" about="/author/conversation" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">The Conversation</a></span> <span>Mon, 03/30/2020 - 22:25</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 31 Mar 2020 02:25:10 +0000 The Conversation 151446 at https://scienceblogs.com Coronavirus Isn't a Pandemic, But That Doesn't Change Its Relative Risk https://scienceblogs.com/conversation/2020/02/14/coronavirus-isnt-pandemic-doesnt-change-its-relative-risk-151437 <span>Coronavirus Isn&#039;t a Pandemic, But That Doesn&#039;t Change Its Relative Risk</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Is the coronavirus a pandemic, and does that matter? 4 questions answered</p> <p>The new coronavirus has now <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/04/world/asia/coronavirus-china.html?action=click&amp;module=Top%20Stories&amp;pgtype=Homepage">affected more than 20,000 people</a> in China and claimed more lives as of Feb. 4 than the SARS epidemic from 2002 to 2004. Hong Kong has reported its <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/coronavirus-cases-rise-above-20-000-in-china-as-hong-kong-reports-first-death-11580799736">first death</a>. Some public health officials have said the outbreak is <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/02/health/coronavirus-pandemic-china.html">likely to soon be a pandemic</a>, but the <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-51368873">World Health Organization</a> said Feb. 4 that it isn’t, yet.</p> <p>Just what is a pandemic anyway? An epidemiologist and public health researcher explains.</p> <h2>1. What is a pandemic?</h2> <p>When a disease outbreak, or epidemic, crosses international boarders and spreads across a wide region, we public health professionals typically call it a <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/lesson1/section11.html">pandemic</a>. The term “pandemic” tells us that the outbreak is occurring in many places but says nothing about its severity.</p> <p>Because of their wide geographic distribution, pandemics usually affect a large number of people. While we usually think of pandemics in relation to <a href="https://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/en/">serious</a>, life-threatening diseases, even outbreaks of mild diseases could cross borders and become pandemics.</p> <h2>2. Does it matter if it is or isn’t called a pandemic?</h2> <p>Calling an outbreak a pandemic is simply a reflection of where the disease is spreading. The terminology doesn’t change anything about the severity of the disease or how we are responding.</p> <p>Since the day the outbreak was identified, health officials worldwide have been taking steps to <a href="https://emergency.cdc.gov/han/han00424.asp">isolate ill people to try and prevent any spread</a> and <a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/press-briefing-members-presidents-coronavirus-task-force/">quarantine people who have traveled to certain areas of China</a>. The World Health Organization <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/30-01-2020-statement-on-the-second-meeting-of-the-international-health-regulations-(2005)-emergency-committee-regarding-the-outbreak-of-novel-coronavirus-(2019-ncov)">declared it to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern</a> Jan. 30, which improves information sharing and coordination throughout the world.</p> <p>These actions will continue no matter what it is called.</p> <p><img alt="Flight attendants check temperatures of passengers aboard an Air China flight from Melbourne to Beijing on Feb. 4, 2020. AP Photo/Andy Wong" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="48275465-29d2-4d85-b6dc-1fa212527111" src="/files/inline-images/coronavirus%20pandemic.jpg" width="500" /></p> <p><em>Flight attendants check temperatures of passengers aboard an Air China flight from Melbourne to Beijing on Feb. 4, 2020. <a href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/APTOPIX-China-Outbreak/50184f4d18db47c7933892aa1b538c24/2/0">AP Photo/Andy Wong</a></em></p> <h2>3. Would it being a pandemic put me at greater risk?</h2> <p>Your risk wouldn’t changed simply because of a change in terminology. Though the virus has been identified in <a href="https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200204-sitrep-15-ncov.pdf">23 countries</a> as of Feb. 4, over 99% of the cases have occurred in China.</p> <p>Local transmission outside of China has generally been limited to people who had direct contact with ill travelers from China. In a <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2020/02/03/business/31reuters-china-health-germany.html">cluster reported from Germany</a>, several employees of a company were infected by a co-worker who returned from travel to China, and one of the employees infected one of their children. This clearly shows that person-to-person spread is possible, but it doesn’t mean that the disease is spreading extensively in the community.</p> <p>Even if an outbreak is spreading worldwide, how it is spreading locally and how people respond is what determines your risk.</p> <h2>4. So what happens next?</h2> <p>Public and global health experts and health care workers will continue to respond to this outbreak as they have for the last month. Doctors and nurses in the community will continue to quickly identify ill people and test them for the coronavirus. Sick people will be isolated so that they don’t spread their illness to their family, friends or co-workers. Public health officials will track the spread of this outbreak and will use that information to prevent the spread of the disease in the community.</p> <p>The next move is up to the virus.</p> <p><span>By <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/brian-labus-788583">Brian Labus</a>, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Labus received past funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for disease surveillance activities while working at the local health department. This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-the-coronavirus-a-pandemic-and-does-that-matter-4-questions-answered-131128">original article</a>.</span></p> <p><img alt="The Conversation" height="1" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/131128/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" width="1" /></p> <p> </p></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/conversation" lang="" about="/author/conversation" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">The Conversation</a></span> <span>Fri, 02/14/2020 - 10:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> Fri, 14 Feb 2020 15:41:58 +0000 The Conversation 151437 at https://scienceblogs.com To Reduce Risk of Coronavirus and Flu, Wash Your Hands https://scienceblogs.com/sb-admin/2020/02/11/reduce-risk-coronavirus-and-flu-wash-your-hands-151441 <span>To Reduce Risk of Coronavirus and Flu, Wash Your Hands</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A new study finds an easy way to reduce the spread of many infectious diseases, from coronavirus to influenza; washing hands more frequently in just 10 airports. </p> <p>Though <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.13438">the findings</a> were published in late December, just before the recent coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China, the study's authors say that its results would apply to any such disease and are relevant to the current outbreak. The methods included epidemiological and data-based simulations.</p> <p>People can be surprisingly casual about washing their hands, even in crowded locations like airports where people from many different locations are touching surfaces such as chair armrests, check-in kiosks, security checkpoint trays, and restroom doorknobs and faucets. Based on data from previous research, the team estimates that on average, only about 20 percent of people in airports have clean hands -- meaning that they have been washed with soap and water, for at least 15 seconds, within the last hour or so. The other 80 percent are potentially contaminating everything they touch with whatever germs they may be carrying.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Wash those hands " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2f0262ef-dcb8-4165-bfda-bf33d1da6de9" src="/files/inline-images/image-040915_golden_staph.jpg" /><figcaption>Use soap and water in airports. And everywhere else. </figcaption></figure><p> </p> <p>"Seventy percent of the people who go to the toilet wash their hands afterwards, and of those that do, only 50 percent use soap. Others just rinse briefly in some water. That figure, combined with estimates of exposure to the many potentially contaminated surfaces that people come into contact with in an airport, leads to the team's estimate that about 20 percent of travelers in an airport have clean hands.</p> <p>Improving handwashing at all of the world's airports to triple that rate, so that 60 percent of travelers to have clean hands at any given time, would have the greatest impact, potentially slowing global disease spread by almost 70 percent, the researchers found. Deploying such measures at so many airports and reaching such a high level of compliance may be impractical, but the new study suggests that a significant reduction in disease spread could still be achieved by just picking the 10 most significant airports based on the initial location of a viral outbreak. Focusing handwashing messaging in those 10 airports could potentially slow the disease spread by as much as 37 percent, the researchers estimate.</p> <p>They arrived at these estimates using detailed epidemiological computer models that involved data on worldwide flights including duration, distance, and interconnections; estimates of wait times at airports; and studies on typical rates of interactions of people with various elements of their surroundings and with other people.</p> <p>Even small improvements in hygiene could make a noticeable dent. Increasing the prevalence of clean hands in all airports worldwide by just 10 percent, which the researchers think could potentially be accomplished through education, posters, public announcements, and perhaps improved access to handwashing facilities, could slow the global rate of the spread of a disease by about 24 percent, they found.</p> <p>The researchers used data from previous studies on the effectiveness of handwashing in controlling transmission of disease, so these data would have to be calibrated in the field to obtain refined estimates of the slow-down in spreading of a specific outbreak.</p></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/sb-admin" lang="" about="/author/sb-admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sb admin</a></span> <span>Tue, 02/11/2020 - 21:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> Wed, 12 Feb 2020 02:03:09 +0000 sb admin 151441 at https://scienceblogs.com Rural health report card - three reasons for higher mortality https://scienceblogs.com/sb-admin/2020/02/05/rural-health-report-card-three-reasons-higher-mortality-151435 <span>Rural health report card - three reasons for higher mortality</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A <a href="https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/10.1377/hlthaff.2019.00722">recent paper</a>, "Higher U.S. Rural Mortality Rates Linked To Socioeconomic Status, Physician Shortages, And Lack Of Health Insurance," published in Health Affairs Journal, seeks to explain differences in rural and urban people when it comes to mortality, but also rank states using county level data on outcomes and health care access.</p> <p>The study focused on five explanatory variables within each county: socioeconomic (e.g., poverty status, access to housing and education, employment), uninsured rates, the supply of and access to primary care physicians, the percentage of racial or ethnic groups and the number of rural and urban residents.</p> <p>However, after compiling all of the data, the researchers believed that only three of their explanatory variables were applicable: socioeconomic deprivation, percentage of uninsured and the primary care physician supply. Those three variables were linked to 81.8% of the total variance of mortality. Correlation is not necessarily causation but it is well known that people who claim their supplements and organic food and fitness crazes led to their better health often leave out that a lot of issues correlate with greater wealth. It isn't the special label on the food making people live longer, it is the other trappings of wealth. The percentage of racial and ethnic groups and the number of rural or urban residents were not significantly associated with mortality even though the percentage of African Americans was positively associated with mortality. After adjustments for socioeconomic deprivation, uninsured rates and supply-access to primary care physicians were factored in, the percentage of African Americans was no longer significantly associated with mortality. They used the rural-urban continuum codes put out by the USDA to break down and divide by counties, and because the health data tends to be by counties, they feel like the data are better matched.</p> <p><img src="https://scienceblogs.com/files/blogs/mortality%20rural%20areas.JPG" /></p> <p>"We're not saying that African Americans across the country don't have higher rates of mortality because they absolutely do," said Scott Phillips, editor in chief for theTexas Tech University Health Sciences Center Rural Health Quarterly magazine and a co-author to the study. "What we are saying, and what we discovered with this study, is that other disparities that African Americans face, particularly socioeconomic status and access to care, account for the higher African American mortality rates across the country."</p> <p>The study also showed the percentage of Hispanic Americans is negatively associated with mortality, another facet of the "Hispanic paradox", an epidemiological confounder showing that Hispanic Americans tend to have health outcomes that are comparable to or better than whites even though Hispanic Americans on average tend to have lower socioeconomic status.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Rural residency does not negatively affect mortality but it does favor lower mortality - except in these western states</strong></p> <p>The results indicate that rural dwellers would have lived <em>longer</em> than their urban counterparts had their socioeconomic conditions and access to health care been similar. </p> <p>Now the authors want to further analyze the three states that proved to be exceptions to those findings: Colorado, Montana and Wyoming. Those three contiguous states in the Mountain West have higher urban mortality than rural mortality.</p></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/sb-admin" lang="" about="/author/sb-admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sb admin</a></span> <span>Wed, 02/05/2020 - 10:38</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> Wed, 05 Feb 2020 15:38:35 +0000 sb admin 151435 at https://scienceblogs.com Coronavirus: Less Hype, More Perspective, Worry About The Flu Instead https://scienceblogs.com/conversation/2020/02/04/coronavirus-less-hype-more-perspective-worry-about-flu-instead-151431 <span>Coronavirus: Less Hype, More Perspective, Worry About The Flu Instead</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>With a new infectious disease outbreak on our doorstep, we might ask ourselves: are we reacting to the coronavirus in a way that is proportional to the threat?</p> <p>The problem is that when it comes to infectious disease epidemics, we have a strong tendency to overreact emotionally and under-react behaviorally. The overreaction aspect may be attributable to the fact that we are primed to fear infectious diseases appearing suddenly within our population, in the same way that <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3223(02)01669-4">we are evolutionarily prepared to fear snakes and spiders</a>.</p> <p>Most of us fear snakes and spiders without ever having been harmed by them. Compare that with automobiles, which harm many more of us, yet are only feared by a small number who have been in accidents themselves. In the same way, we fear infectious disease outbreaks much more readily and intensely than we fear diabetes epidemics.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Amygdala in red is where we fear" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0b98f57c-71ab-4046-b2e1-d1ca734fb5f6" src="/files/inline-images/amygdala%20fear.JPG" /><figcaption>The amygdala (in red) is largely responsible for fear learning. <a href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/amygdala-female-brain-anatomy-lateral-view-134423381">(Shutterstock)</a></figcaption></figure><p>From the perspective of the brain, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.neuro.24.1.897">the amygdala is largely responsible for fear learning</a>, a process by which fear responses become attached to formerly neutral cues that are now viewed as signifying something genuinely threatening.</p> <p>This explains fearful emotional responses to a formerly innocuous sneezing sound in a crowded subway train. Such amygdala-driven learning more readily occurs when the threat in question is an infectious disease than, say, a chronic disease epidemic of a much larger scale that poses an authentic personal threat.</p> <h2>Déjà vu</h2> <p>In 2003, SARS infected more than 8,000 people worldwide and caused <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/sars/about/fs-SARS.pdf">774 deaths</a>. In Canada, <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/migration/phac-aspc/publicat/sars-sras/pdf/sars-e.pdf">438 people were infected and 44 died</a>. Those figures yield about a 10 per cent death rate for SARS. To be sure, it was a lethal virus, and it spread at an alarming rate with tragic consequences, particularly in places where infection protocols were not enacted quickly and decisively.</p> <p>Now, 17 years later, we are facing a very similar-looking threat from another coronavirus, again originating in China, and quickly spreading around the globe. The mortality rate is difficult to estimate so early, but signs so far suggest a mortality rate similar to or lower than SARS.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="It's not SARS" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="55d0f255-d34b-4861-9300-cb8b407584a0" src="/files/inline-images/SARS%20mask.JPG" /><figcaption>A man wearing a protective mask carries flowers at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto during the SARS outbreak in March 2003. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer</figcaption></figure><p>In just over a week, mass travel restrictions are been enacted overseas, and governments (appropriately) are <a href="https://travel.gc.ca/destinations/china">advising against travelling to the epicentre of the outbreak</a>, the city of Wuhan, China.</p> <p>Highly alarming stories and images are <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-01-29/coronavirus-misinformation-is-incubating-all-over-social-media">circulating on social media</a> depicting an epidemic out of control, about to overtake North America. Netflix even just launched a (very) hastily prepared docu-series on the horrors of infectious disease epidemics (just like coronavirus). If that isn’t a sign of the coming apocalypse, I’m not sure what is.</p> <h2>Viral information</h2> <p>The world seems riveted to media content pertaining to the coronavirus outbreak. From many perspectives, this is not surprising.</p> <p>We respond quickly and intensely to information about infectious disease threats, even in faraway places or if they’re unlikely to have an impact on us. A reader’s attention is captured by the topic even when the coverage itself is intentionally not sensationalistic. I would read a responsibly written Ebola article over an excitingly written heart disease article any day.</p> <p>In this age of social media, sharing is an individual choice and one made almost reflexively. In our brains, this relatively unconscious level of processing is disproportionately in the domain of the amygdala and largely unimpeded by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.neuro.24.1.167">higher cortical centres</a> known to be implicated in thoughtful deliberation.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Surprise, media is hyping coronavirus" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="16f186d5-7a2d-4f28-9e7b-ca6c7b568ac8" src="/files/inline-images/coronavirus%20media.JPG" /><figcaption>Sensationalized news and misinformation about infectious diseases can spread quickly through social media. <a href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/person-hoodie-laptop-hacking-creative-digital-1466220044">(Shutterstock)</a></figcaption></figure><p>The tendency to share emotionally evocative images and text is even more unchecked than in conventional media. This results in selective spread of highly sensationalistic content via social media, and motivation for media outlets to shape their offerings to be more sensational. An old dynamic on steroids.</p> <p>There is also a trend evident in some media outlets to intentionally <a href="https://j-source.ca/article/tips-for-journalists-and-media-organizations-in-canada-covering-the-coronavirus/">counter this</a>. All of us, when we catch ourselves, can recognize and limit our indulgence of overly sensationalistic content and reactions, including when it comes to infectious disease outbreaks.</p> <h2>Word to the wise</h2> <p>What should we do while we wait for things to unfold? My advice, if I were a physician dispensing it, would be to encourage people to pay attention to official information as much as possible, the <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection.html">Public Health Agency of Canada</a>, for example, or its provincial counterparts. It will be there, and will be up to date and accurate for the most part.</p> <p>The behavioural advice is relatively straightforward: wash your hands often, cover your mouth (with your arm) when you cough, avoid touching your face (surprisingly difficult to do consistently) and, for now, avoid travelling to Wuhan.</p> <p><em><strong>Read more: <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-fear-of-a-pandemic-or-a-pandemic-of-fear-130934">Coronavirus: Fear of a pandemic, or a pandemic of fear?</a> </strong> </em></p> <p>The situation is more complicated in mainland China, where the state-controlled media is struggling to compete with social media sharing, in part because of lack of trust. One advantage that the Chinese government does enjoy, however, is the ability to quickly and decisively implement <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-fear-of-a-pandemic-or-a-pandemic-of-fear-130934">top-down actions to limit disease spread</a>.</p> <p>So really, there are very different challenges for <a href="https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2020/01/28/to-stop-coronavirus-we-could-learn-from-how-vancouver-handled-sars.html">capitalist</a> and communist countries when attempting to stem the flow of infectious disease epidemics.</p> <h2>Food for thought</h2> <p>Long story short, don’t lose sight of the larger picture in terms of risks in everyday life.</p> <p>Spending too much time watching television while snacking on potato chips is probably riskier than shaking hands. But maybe avoid both for now, just to be safe.</p> <p>And to end where I began — recalling how SARS overtook our collective consciousness in 2003 — it’s important to also remember that <a href="https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080481">five times more deaths are attributable to the seasonal flu every year</a>. If there is an infection we should fear, could it be that one? Or should we stop fearing infections altogether?</p> <p><span>By <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-hall-952834">Peter Hall</a>, Professor, School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo. Hall receives funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-coronavirus-should-we-take-a-deep-breath-130859">original article</a>.</span></p> <p><img alt="The Conversation" height="1" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/130859/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" width="1" /></p></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/conversation" lang="" about="/author/conversation" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">The Conversation</a></span> <span>Tue, 02/04/2020 - 13:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 04 Feb 2020 18:05:50 +0000 The Conversation 151431 at https://scienceblogs.com “A gift to the construction industry”: catchy quotes from Court of Appeals argument on OSHA’s silica standard https://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2017/10/14/a-gift-to-the-construction-industry-catchy-quotes-from-court-of-appeals-argument-on-oshas-silica-standard <span>“A gift to the construction industry”: catchy quotes from Court of Appeals argument on OSHA’s silica standard</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OSHA <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/03/24/sorry-it-took-so-long-osha-issues-rule-to-protect-workers-exposed-to-silica-dust/">took the long road</a> to adopt a standard to address respirable crystalline silica. Although the final rule was issued in March 2016, it is being challenged by both industry and labor groups. The first says OSHA went too far, the other says OSHA didn’t go far enough.</p> <p>The long road, however may be coming close to end. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit heard oral arguments last week from parties that are challenging the rule. Judges Merrick Garland, David Tatel and Karen LeCraft Henderson spent more than two hours listening to arguments from the National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association (NSSGA), the Brick Industry Association (BIA), the U.S Chamber of Commerce, the North America Building Trades, the United Steelworkers and others.  Attorneys with the Department of Labor’s Office of the Solicitor were there, too, to defend the OSHA rule.</p> <p>I enjoyed listening (and relistening) to the <a href="https://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/recordings/recordings2018.nsf/FBB1D597702702BE852581A70057DDFE/$file/16-1105.mp3">court’s audio</a> of the oral argument. What made it particularly enjoyable was listening to the judges---they did their homework!</p> <p>Judges Garland and Tatel, in particular, probed, cajoled, and challenged the attorneys to clarify their arguments. The judges pressed the attorneys on issues concerning economic feasibility, health risks, and the legal standard for substantial evidence. There were plenty of references to prior litigation on OSHA health standards. They mentioned significant previous court decision on OSHA standards, such as for asbestos, lead and formaldehyde.  I felt a bit like an outsider, listening to the attorneys speak about those rulings. They described them as if they were old friends who remain relevant today. And like relationships with old friends, we don't always agree about what she said or remember events in the same way.</p> <p>There were times during the oral arguments that the presenting attorney rose to a judge’s challenge for a cogent response. But I cringe a few times when I heard nervous laughter from an industry attorney who knew he was stumped by the judge’s question.</p> <p>Below are just some of my favorite quotes and exchanges. The text doesn't capture the animation I heard in the audio from the courtroom or the commitment of the attorneys to their arguments. I've included a time stamp at each quote so you can listen for yourself. (I had difficulty distinguishing Judge Garland’s from Judge Tatel’s voice. If I incorrectly attribute the quotes, please leave a comment and I’ll correct it.)</p> <p>NSSGA and BIA argue that OSHA overstates the risk of health harm caused by exposure to respirable crystalline silica. Their attorney, William L. Wehrum, said:</p> <blockquote><p>“We assert that OSHA had a thumb on the scale. We believe the record makes clear that OSHA came to this rulemaking with a determined goal of reducing the level of the standard. We believe it clouded OSHA’s judgement and caused it to lose objectivity, which we believe permeates the entire proceeding." [00:02:36]</p></blockquote> <p>Judge Tatel chimed in:</p> <blockquote><p>"You say that OSHA had its thumb on the scale, which is a curious statement given our standard of review. The question is: is there significant evidence in the record to support OSHA’s position for what it did? <em>You</em> can certainly point to contrary evidence, but OSHA has explained <em>all</em> that. ...You have to make your argument in terms of our specific standard of review, which is the substantial evidence question. Our case law is very specific about that."</p></blockquote> <p>Sounding like a law professor Tatel added:</p> <blockquote><p>"What’s your <em>best</em> argument regarding the substantial evidence test?" [00:04:19]</p></blockquote> <p>Wehrum had difficulty providing a short and sweet and precise answer.</p> <p>Judge Garland addressed the problem for the court of dueling scientists. William Wehrum tried to describe the evidence from his side's experts, but Garland interrupted:</p> <blockquote><p>"We have scientists on both sides and the law here is quite clear. When there are scientists on both sides, OSHA is permitted to take the ones that are most likely to protect worker safety. There is <em>supposed</em> to be a thumb on the scale in terms of safety. ...That's what our own case says. It is perfectly appropriate for OSHA to weight in favor of worker safety. That's right, isn't it. [00:09:56]</p></blockquote> <p>William Wehrum: "Correct your honor to a point, but that dosen't insulate OSHA from review.</p> <p>Soundly a bit frustrated, Garland said:</p> <blockquote><p>"That's what we doing here, but it is not enough to say there is a plausible mechanism. You have to be able to show that OSHA's studies are not <em>themselves</em> substantial evidence."</p></blockquote> <p>The attorney representing the U.S. Chamber of Commerce was also schooled by Judge Garland. This time it was a math problem.</p> <p>Attorney Michael Connolly argued that there are so few deaths today is the U.S. from silicosis that OSHA has not met its burden of demonstrating that exposure to respirable silica poses a significant risk of harm to workers. Connolly pointed to the low number of silicosis deaths reported on death certificates and compared to the millions of workers in silica-related industries.</p> <p>Judge Garland asked [00:18:50]:</p> <blockquote><p>"Is that the right <em>division</em>? Dividing the total number of deaths that are reported on the death certificates by the total number of workers in <em>industry</em>? Or is the right number the total number of deaths at a certain level of exposure? That is, in terms of the 1 in 1,000 test.</p></blockquote> <p>(The "1 in 1,000" comes from a <a href="https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=preambles&amp;p_id=748">1980 Supreme Court ruling</a> about OSHA's benzene standard. The Supreme Court justices did not offer a specific ratio but indicated that the threshold likely fell somewhere between 1 death per 1 billion (which would not be considered significant) to 1 death per 1,000 (which would be significant.))</p> <p>Judge Garland continued:</p> <blockquote><p>"It's not supposed to be just 1 over the entire population of the United States, or 1 over everybody who works. It’s supposed to be 1 over 1,000 people who work at a certain exposure level, isn’t that right?"</p></blockquote> <p>Michael Connolly: "Sure. That’s correct."</p> <p>Judge Garland:</p> <blockquote><p>"Isn't it exposed to silica <em>at a certain exposure levels</em> that matters? Not all people who may have been exposed to silica? [20:03]</p></blockquote> <p>Score one for the judge.</p> <p>I wish I'd been in the courtroom for that exchange. I would have turned my head to see if Judge Garland's remark brought a smile to the attorneys who were defending OSHA's rule.</p> <p>Labor Department attorney Kristen Lindberg was charged with responding to some of the arguments raised by the industry petitioners. Among her excellent synopsis was this:</p> <blockquote><p>[00:35:00] "It's worthwhile to step back a little bit and review the support OSHA had in the record for its findings. Their risk assessment findings were supported by nearly all of the occupational health and medical organizations that commented on the rule, including NIOSH, the American Cancer Society, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the American Thoracic Society, the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics, and the American Public Health Association."</p> <p>"... Industry petitioners want you to reject conclusions that have overwhelming support among scientists and that were supported by the independent peer reviewers who scrutinized OSHA’s risk assessment. They want you to reject this extensive body of scientific evidence on the flimsy basis that there are flaws in some of the studies that OSHA relied upon and that there is uncertainty in epidemiology. They want you to impose a legal burden on OSHA that the agency could never meet."</p> <p>[00:36:53] "The broad support for OSHA’s conclusions within the scientific community should increase the court’s confidence that OSHA’s analysis is sound. The courts understand that OSHA, in marshalling scientific evidence to support a risk assessment, cannot ever reach perfection because the science those risk assessments are based on is not perfect. There <em>will be</em> flaws in studies, there <em>will be</em> stronger and weaker studies, there may be some uncertainty, but what OSHA has done here, its extensive analysis based on a huge body of evidence conforms fully with the OSH Act and with the requirements of courts that have interpreted the OSH Act."</p></blockquote> <p>Bradford Hammock argued the case on behalf of the National Association of Home Builders and other industry groups. He tried to convince the judges that OSHA's requirements for the construction industry are not technological feasible.</p> <p>Victoria Bor, the counsel for North America’s Building Trades Unions dismissed Mr. Hammock's assertions. Her argument began with the following [00:67:40]</p> <blockquote><p>"By way of context, Table 1, which is the centerpiece of the construction standard, is a <em>gift to the construction industry</em>. Most OSHA standards set a permissible exposure limit and require employers to monitor their workplaces and devise their own strategies following the hierarchy of controls to bring exposures below the permissible exposure limit (PEL). The silica standard gives employers options. They can follow the traditional approach or they can follow Table 1, which is in effect is a manual that lists 19 of the 23 construction tasks that most commonly generate significant silica exposure, and specifies control strategies for each. Employers who fully and properly implement the controls listed on Table 1 are freed from monitoring their workplace and have a safe harbor for complying with the PEL.</p> <p>"...OSHA assumes that most employers will follow table, which is a completely reason assumption because it tells employers exactly what they have to do, frees them from monitoring, and gives them a safe harbor for complying with the PEL."</p> <p>"Now rather than accepting this gift, as Mr. Hammock already explained to you, the industry petitioners point to Table 1 and argue that to the extent it requires the use of respirators....OSHA is conceding that the standard isn't feasible. ...The petitioners’ argument completely ignores that Table 1 does not require employers to comply with the PEL. What it requires is for employers to implement the listed controls. So whether the PEL can be reached without the use of respirators---the question that the industry petitioners focus on--- is actually completely irrelevant."</p></blockquote> <p>Victoria Bor continued:</p> <blockquote><p>"What is relevant, as Ms. Goodman [of the Labor Department] said, is that the typical employer can comply with Table 1 most of the time. On this question, the petitioners argument on feasibility rests on vague assertions that in <em>certain</em> circumstances,<em> certain</em> employers may not be able to use <em>certain</em> of the wet methods listed in Table 1 at <em>some</em> time. …Petitioners point to <em>no</em> evidence that undermines OSHA’s conclusions that most employers will be able to comply with Table 1 by utilizing those controls most of the time."</p></blockquote> <p>There was dead silence after her rebuttal. None of the judges asked Victoria Bor to clarify or further defend her arguments. They seemed convinced.</p> <p>The excerpts above are just some of memorable moments from the oral argument. Another was a lengthy argument by the unions and rebuttal by the Labor Department about OSHA's provisions for medical surveillance and medical removal protections. It was the one time that the Labor Department's case seemed on shaky ground.</p> <p>If you  <a href="https://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/recordings/recordings2018.nsf/FBB1D597702702BE852581A70057DDFE/$file/16-1105.mp3">listen to the audio</a> for yourself you'll hear the word "grapple" used numerous times by attorneys for the unions. You'll hear the Labor Department attorneys repeat the phrase"de minimis benefit." You'll hear one judge say to an industry attorney "it's not your principle argument, it's your <em>only</em> argument" and another judge mention "a shopping list." You'll hear all the parties claim that OSHA's decisions are, or are not, "supported by the record." Finally you'll hear many references to previous Supreme Court and Appeals Court decisions on other OSHA standards.</p> <p>It's been many years since OSHA started down the road toward a comprehensive silica standard. People will disagree on when the agency actually hit the road, but they know that last week's stop at the U.S. Court of Appeals means the road may soon be coming to an end.</p> <p>Judges Garland, Henderson, and Tatel are now at the wheel. They will decide whether OSHA's rule will stand as is, or whether the agency needs to make a U-turn.</p> <p>I relished listening to the oral arguments. I'll be eager to read the judge's opinion when it's issued.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/cmonforton" lang="" about="/author/cmonforton" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmonforton</a></span> <span>Sat, 10/14/2017 - 11:19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/crystalline-silica" hreflang="en">crystalline silica</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/occupational-health-safety" hreflang="en">Occupational Health &amp; Safety</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/osha" hreflang="en">OSHA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/regulation" hreflang="en">regulation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/silica" hreflang="en">silica</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chamber-commerce" hreflang="en">Chamber of Commerce</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/david-tatel" hreflang="en">David Tatel</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/legal-challenge" hreflang="en">legal challenge</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/merrick-garland" hreflang="en">Merrick Garland</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/us-court-appeals-dc-circuit" hreflang="en">US Court of Appeals DC Circuit</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/regulation" hreflang="en">regulation</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/thepumphandle/2017/10/14/a-gift-to-the-construction-industry-catchy-quotes-from-court-of-appeals-argument-on-oshas-silica-standard%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sat, 14 Oct 2017 15:19:29 +0000 cmonforton 62941 at https://scienceblogs.com Gun control laws can impact death rates. But we need more research to find what works. https://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2017/10/05/gun-control-laws-can-impact-deaths-rates-but-we-need-more-research-to-find-what-works <span>Gun control laws can impact death rates. But we need more research to find what works.</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Guns are the third leading cause of injury-related death in the country. Every year, nearly 12,000 gun homicides happen in the U.S., and for every person killed, two more are injured. Whether Congress will do anything about this violence is a whole other (depressing) article. But there is evidence that change is possible.</p> <p>Last year, a <a href="https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article/38/1/140/2754868/What-Do-We-Know-About-the-Association-Between" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">study</a> published in <em>Epidemiologic Reviews</em> “systematically” reviewed studies examining the links between gun laws and gun-related homicides, suicides and unintentional injuries and deaths. Researchers eventually gathered evidence from 130 studies in 10 countries, finding that in certain places, gun restrictions are associated with declines in gun deaths. For instance, laws that restrict gun purchasing, such as background checks, are associated with lower rates of intimate partner homicide; while laws addressing access to guns, such as safe storage policies, are associated with lower rates of unintentional gun deaths among children. Study co-authors Julian Santaella-Tenorio, Magdalena Cerdá, Andrés Villaveces and Sandro Galea write:</p> <blockquote><p>This heterogeneity in approaches and implementation methods makes it critical to identify approaches that are less likely to be effective and to identify which strategies, looking forward, may be more likely to work. In addition, examining the associations between specific policies and firearm-related deaths across countries can improve our understanding about which types of laws are more likely to be successful in reducing firearm mortality rates in similar contexts or within diverse legal frameworks.</p></blockquote> <p>The study’s findings are a mixed bag — some of the gun laws studied seemed to reduce gun deaths, while others seemed to make no difference or increase deaths. For example, a number of studies examined found no association between concealed carry laws and gun homicides in the U.S. However, one study using injury data from southern Arizona found higher proportions of firearm injuries and deaths associated with concealed carry. Yet another study in Colombia examined the effects of laws banning the carrying of guns during weekends after paydays, holidays and elections days in two Colombian cities, Cali and Bogota. That study found a 14 percent reduction in homicide rates in Cali during no-carry days and a 13 percent reduction in Bogota.</p> <p>Studies on background checks and waiting periods came in mixed as well. For example, one study cited found no association between waiting periods and homicides and suicides. On the other hand, researchers have found that gun purchase bans for people with certain mental health conditions were associated with fewer homicides. One study found more stringent background checks were linked with fewer gun homicides. States with laws banning people with domestic violence restraining orders from owning and purchasing a gun also experienced reductions in intimate partner homicide. But one study found no homicide effect for laws that restricted gun access among those convicted of domestic violence.</p> <p>Two cross-sectional studies analyzed found that gun permits and licenses were associated with lower rates of gun suicide. In Missouri, researchers studied the effect of repealing requirements that people need a valid license to buy a gun, finding the repeal was associated with a 25 percent increase in homicide rates. On laws regulating gun storage, one study found that such child access prevention laws were associated with fewer unintentional gun deaths among children younger than 15, but not among older teens. Another found child access laws were linked to a reduction in all suicides among people ages 14 to 17. A study using hospital discharge data found that such storage laws were associated with lower nonfatal gun injuries among those younger than 18.</p> <p>The <em>Epidemiologic Reviews</em> study included research on particular laws as well. For example, a study on the U.S. Gun Control Act of 1968 — which restricted the sale of so-called <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturday_night_special" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Saturday night specials</a>, among many other measures — did not find associated changes in homicide rates. But a study on Washington, D.C.’s 1976 law banning ownership of automatic and semiautomatic firearms and handguns found an “abrupt” reduction in homicide and suicide rates. Globally, Australia’s 1996 National Firearms Agreement, which banned certain kinds of firearms, was linked with a significant reduction in gun death rates. In addition, Australia has not experienced a mass shooting since the law was enacted. Control gun laws in Brazil, Austria and South Africa were also associated with fewer gun deaths.</p> <p>Overall, researchers were able to identify some “general observations” in combing through the 130 studies — most notably finding that the simultaneous enactment of laws targeting multiple gun regulations were associated with fewer gun deaths in certain countries. Another big finding: we simply need more research to understand what works and what doesn’t to prevent gun deaths. The researchers also noted that few studies have delved into the impact of gun safety laws on particular populations or whether such laws affect social attitudes, norms and behaviors. The authors write:</p> <blockquote><p>To conclude, we have provided an overview of national and international studies on the association between firearm-related laws and firearm injuries/deaths. High-quality research overcoming limitations of existing studies in this field would lead to a better understanding of what interventions are more likely to work given local contexts. This information is key for policy development aiming at reducing the burden posed to populations worldwide by violent and unintentional firearm injuries.</p></blockquote> <p>In more recent gun research, a <a href="http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/36/10/1729.abstract" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">study</a> published this month in <em>Health Affairs</em> set out to quantify the clinical and economic burden associated with emergency room visits for gun-related injuries in the U.S. Researchers examined data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, identifying 150,930 people between 2006 and 2014 who showed up to an ER alive, but with a gun-related injury. That number represents a weighted estimate (that’s a fancy term for adjusting data to represent the greater population) of 704,916 patients.</p> <p>ER visits for gun injuries was lowest among those younger than 10 and highest among ages 15 to 29. Incidence of gun injury was about nine-fold higher for male patients — among men ages 20 to 24, more than 152 patients per 100,000 visited the ER for a gun injury. Most of the patients had been injured in an assault or unintentionally. The proportion injured in an attempted suicide was more than two-fold higher among Medicare beneficiaries. Handguns were the most common cause of the injury, followed by shotguns and hunting rifles.</p> <p>Among the more than 150,000 cases of gun injury at the ER, 48 percent were discharged home, 7.7 percent were discharged to other care facilities, about 37 percent were admitted to the hospital and just more than 5 percent died during their ER visits. Overall, 8.3 percent of the gun injury patients either died in the ER or as an inpatient. The average charge for gun injury in the ER was about $5,250; the average charge for those admitted was more than $95,000. Over the entire study period, gun-related injuries cost $2.9 billion in ER charges and $22 billion in inpatient care.</p> <p>Authors of the <em>Health Affairs</em> study also pointed out the need for more research, citing a 1996 federal measure known as the Dickey Amendment that said injury research funds at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could not be used to advocate or promote gun control. Co-authors Faiz Gani, Joseph Sakran and Joseph Canner write:</p> <blockquote><p>Researchers, politicians and government officials must work together to ensure that research funds are allocated to promote the understanding of the complex interplay between social, economic and medical factors associated with firearm-related injuries. Only through the adoption of an evidence-based public health approach can the resulting substantial medical and financial burden be reduced.</p></blockquote> <p>To request a full copy of the ER study, visit <a href="http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/36/10/1729.abstract" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><em>Health Affairs</em></a>. For a copy of the gun policy study, visit <a href="https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article/38/1/140/2754868/What-Do-We-Know-About-the-Association-Between" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><em>Epidemiologic Reviews</em></a>.</p> <p><em>Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for 15 years. Follow me on Twitter — <a href="http://www.twitter.com/kkrisberg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@kkrisberg</a>.</em></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/kkrisberg" lang="" about="/author/kkrisberg" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kkrisberg</a></span> <span>Thu, 10/05/2017 - 12:30</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/government" hreflang="en">government</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-controlviolence" hreflang="en">Gun Control/Violence</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/legal" hreflang="en">Legal</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mental-health" hreflang="en">mental health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health-general" hreflang="en">Public Health - General</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/regulation" hreflang="en">regulation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/safety" hreflang="en">safety</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-control-0" hreflang="en">gun control</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-deaths" hreflang="en">gun deaths</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-injury" hreflang="en">gun injury</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-safety" hreflang="en">gun safety</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-violence" hreflang="en">gun violence</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/homicide" hreflang="en">homicide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/injury-control" hreflang="en">injury control</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/prevention" hreflang="en">Prevention</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health" hreflang="en">public health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/suicide" hreflang="en">suicide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mental-health" hreflang="en">mental health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/regulation" hreflang="en">regulation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/safety" hreflang="en">safety</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/thepumphandle/2017/10/05/gun-control-laws-can-impact-deaths-rates-but-we-need-more-research-to-find-what-works%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 05 Oct 2017 16:30:31 +0000 kkrisberg 62938 at https://scienceblogs.com If Rigvir is effective "virotherapy" for cancer, why are quack clinics selling it and quackery promoters like Ty Bollinger promoting it? https://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2017/10/02/if-rigvir-is-effective-virotherapy-for-cancer-why-are-quack-clinics-selling-it-and-quackery-promoters-like-ty-bollinger-promoting-it <span>If Rigvir is effective &quot;virotherapy&quot; for cancer, why are quack clinics selling it and quackery promoters like Ty Bollinger promoting it?</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>Last week, I <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/09/25/rigvir-a-cancer-cure-imported-from-latvia-that-cancer-patients-should-avoid/">wrote about Rigvir</a>, a highly dubious cancer therapy developed in Latvia. Rigvir is an oncolytic virus, and its proponents claim that it targets only cancer cells for destruction, leaving normal tissue alone. Its history and how it came to be approved in Latvia in 2004 and added to the Latvian Health Ministry's list of reimbursable medications in 2011 remain rather mysterious, but how it is being marketed does not. For example, Rigvir has become a new favorite treatment at a number of quack clinics, such as the Hope4Cancer Institute in Mexico, where Rigvir is offered along with <a href="https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/ask-the-science-based-pharmacist-what-are-the-benefits-of-coffee-enemas/">coffee enemas</a> and a wide variety of quackery. Moreover, as I described last week, there is a striking paucity of evidence supporting the efficacy of Rigvir against any cancer, even melanoma, the cancer for which Rigvir is approved in Latvia and for which there appears to be almost no published evidence at all. Certainly there is nothing resembling well-designed randomized clinical trials supporting the efficacy of Rigvir. Basically, few outside of Latvia and Eastern Europe had heard of Rigvir, as it had flown under the radar, most likely because Latvia is a small country. Then Ty Bollinger featured Rigvir in <a href="https://www.cancertutor.com/ttac-global-quest-cancer-killing-viruses-cancer-stem-cells-gmos-juicing/" rel="nofollow">Episode 3</a> of his alternative medicine propaganda video series <a href="https://www.cancertutor.com/global-cancer-documentary/" rel="nofollow"><cite>The Truth About Cancer</cite></a> (<cite>TTAC</cite>), complete with "miracle cure" testimonials, and suddenly Rigvir wasn't so obscure any more.</em></p> <!--more--><h2><cite>The Truth About Cancer</cite> promotes Rigvir</h2> <p>As I've discovered since last week, the people who run the International Virotherapy Center, where Rigvir is manufactured and sold, are not particularly happy about the increased level of attention directed at them. Indeed, within 15 hours of last week's post going live, I had received an e-mail from someone named Lelde Lapa, whose title was listed as Assistant of Business Development Department at the International Virotherapy Center (IVC). She was quite…unhappy with my post. Personally, I was amazed at how fast I received such a long e-mail after publishing my post. Clearly the IVC has many Google Alerts set for Rigvir and its name and is fast to act.</p> <p>As of this writing, the exchange is up to four e-mails, two from Ms. Lapa and two responses from me. One thing stood out, and that was how my charge that IVC irresponsibly markets Rigvir using patient testimonials seemed to produce the most defensive response. Based on that, I thought I would look a bit more at how Rigvir is actually marketed, starting with how Ty Bollinger featured it in Episode 3 of <cite>TTAC</cite>. (After all, Ty Bollinger's video series is where most cancer patients interested in alternative medicine learn about Rigvir.) Although I couldn't force myself to watch more than about the first half hour of the first episode of <cite>TTAC</cite> when it was first released, fortunately <a href="https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-truth-about-cancer-series-is-untruthful-about-cancer/">Harriet Hall could</a> and I did download all the episodes off of YouTube when they were briefly available for free. This allowed me to watch the segment on Rigvir, which starts at around the one hour mark and takes up most of the last half hour of the episode.</p> <p>The segment begins with an interview with Kaspars Losans, MD, IVC's medical director. Dr. Losans claims that Rigvir is a "very good" virus that specifically targets cancer cells and leaves normal cells alone. Next up, we meet Ivars Kalvins, PhD, who is the Director of the <a href="http://www.osi.lv" rel="nofollow">Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis</a>, which is a "state research institute specializing in pharmaceutical research, organic chemistry, molecular biology and bioorganic chemistry." (The appearance of a scientist from a Latvian state research institute made me wonder a bit about collusion between the government and the IVC, for obvious reasons.) In his narration, Bolinger notes that Dr. Kalvins is a member of the European Academy of Sciences and <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/european-inventor-award-can-a-british-inventor-win-in-the-oscars-of-innovation-10306192.html">one of three finalists for the European Medicine Award in 2015</a> and has many publications and patents. In contrast, he does not mention that Dr. Kalvins <a href="http://www.delfi.lv/bizness/uznemumi/vairakas-arstu-organizacijas-prasa-izvertet-rigvir-kompensesanu.d?id=48494303">owns a 3% stake in Rigvir</a>. Googling him, I found that he is best known for developing a heart medication, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meldonium">Mildronate</a> (generic name: meldonium). Interestingly, although Bollinger claims Kalvins has over 650 publications, I could only find ten in PubMed.</p> <p>In any case, my first thought was: If such a seemingly good "conventional" scientist is behind Rigvir, then why is it that the IVC has not published anything resembling good science supporting its claims for Rigvir? This is not a person who doesn't know how to publish. Oddly enough, he is not co-author of any of the few publications I could find in PubMed about Rigvir. Less oddly, given his support of Rigvir, he is not well-regarded outside of Latvia, basically because he makes claims for meldonium that are <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/08/health/sharapova-doping-meldonium-mildronate/">equally unsupported</a>. Indeed, meldonium was the alleged performance-enhancing drug that Russian tennis player Maria Sharapova was <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/08/health/sharapova-doping-meldonium-mildronate/">caught using last year</a>, leading to her suspension. Although it is approved in Latvia and several former Soviet Republics, it is not approved in the U.S. or European Union. Maybe Dr. Losans isn't quite the good conventional science that the first impression gave me.</p> <p>Be that as it may, Dr. Kalvins goes through the standard "history" of Rigvir, specifically about how Prof. Aina Muceniece discovered it. Interesting to me is Dr. Kalvins's claim that Rigvir is used "very, very successfully" to treat melanoma and "not only melanoma." I also wondered about his claim that Rigvir is a native, non-modified virus. That, of course, is likely true, as Rigvir is an Echovirus, specifically ECHO-7. As I mentioned last time, Echoviruses are RNA viruses that were thought to be orphan viruses (viruses with no known disease associated with them) but in fact do cause mostly (but not always) mild febrile diseases. In any case, Dr. Kalvins claims that Rigvir is a "non-mutating" virus, which, of course, also set my skeptical antennae a'twitching given that there is no such thing as a totally non-mutating virus. I suppose it's possible that he means the ECHO-7 strain used in Rigvir doesn't cause mutations in human cells, but who can tell for sure?</p> <p>We also meet another physician, Peteris Alberts, MD, PhD, who is IVC's Head of Research &amp; Development. After Bollinger says that Rigvir's activity was first demonstrated in mice, Dr. Alberts says:</p> <blockquote><p> <strong>Dr. Peteris Alberts:</strong> They found that if you take a tumor from a patient, put it into a hamster, then it will start growing, or something like that. If you put [it] on the virus, it will just fade away. Do you know who did that observation first? Ms. Garklava, the lady you saw this morning.</p> <p><strong>Ty:</strong> Really? </p> <p><strong>Dr. Peteris Alberts:</strong> Yeah. She did that. </p></blockquote> <p>There is a very brief shot of Bollinger interviewing an old woman, but none of the interview is heard, which I found odd.</p> <p>Indeed, there are a lot of claims made for Rigvir, none of which seem to be supported by any publications that I've been able to find indexed in PubMed. For example, Dr. Kalvins is shown saying:</p> <blockquote><p> There are at least ten different cancers, locations of cancer like renal cancer, like breast cancer, like stomach, lung, many others, also prostate cancer, which is very, very common for men. But, approved officially, it is only for melanoma now, but this is a very, very big success because we see that the people who use this virus for other indications of other types of cancers also can be healed. </p></blockquote> <p>If this is true, then the IVC should publish these results. One of the excuses that IVC makes for not having published clinical trials to support Rigvir's efficacy and safety against cancer is lack of finances. However, if the IVC has already done preclinical work that shows all this, there is absolutely nothing preventing it from publishing those results. It hasn't. Why is that? (I think I know the answer.)</p> <p>Another claim is made by Elita Shapovalova, MD, an oncologist at Riga East Clinical University Hospital:</p> <blockquote><p> In melanoma cases, in earlier stages when patients receive Rigvir, the percentage survived is 92 percent. And later stages, for example, if they receive Rigvir it's 60 percent. If they don't receive it, it's only 9 percent. There's no chemotherapy medicine that can treat melanoma, at least not found. In the beginning, we were using radiotherapy. But then, it got rejected. So we could not use it because it kills the immune system and it's very hard to fight. We come back to chemotherapy — the medicine in the chemotherapy field is not found to cure melanoma. And the second negative is that it has side effects, which simply destroys the immune system, which lowers the quality of life of the patient, and simply changes the whole life of the patient by these side effects. </p></blockquote> <p>Again, if this is true, then the IVC should publish these results. As I <a href="hhttp://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/09/25/rigvir-a-cancer-cure-imported-from-latvia-that-cancer-patients-should-avoid/">discussed last week</a>, the existing publications indexed in PubMed supporting the efficacy of Rigvir against melanoma are <em>very</em> unconvincing, and there are no randomized clinical trials to speak of, at least none to which I have access. (In actuality, in our e-mail exchanges, Ms. Lapa basically admitted that the IVC has no clinical trial results that meet modern standards.) For other cancers, the paucity of evidence is even more obvious.</p> <p>None of that stops Dr. Kaspars Losans from claiming:</p> <blockquote><p> Then comes the second mechanism of RIGVIR. Whenever those RIGVIRs are attracted to cancer cells, those cancer cells become visible for the human immune system. Until that time, they are invisible, they have the natural ability to be hiding from the immune system. And due to the RIGVIR guidance, because RIGVIR is attached, and attach to cancer, and RIGVIR is inside the cancer cell. So the immune system, due to RIGVIR, recognizes cancer and starts to react against this cancer. </p></blockquote> <p>One more time, if this is true, than IVC should publish these results. This is the sort of immunological mechanism that would take a lot of cell culture, animal, and clinical work to demonstrate properly. That's a detailed mechanism that Dr. Losans is claiming. If IVC has the experimental and clinical results to demonstrate such a mechanism, it should publish them. If it doesn't, it has no business making claims like this on a documentary by a well-known proponent of cancer quackery, or anywhere else, for that matter.</p> <p>Also, Dr. Alberts should stop making the ridiculous claim that prefaced Dr. Losan's description of Rigvir's mechanism of action that Rigvir is "the first real cancer therapy where you have an oncolytic virus which also has immunomodulating activity." There are lots of oncolytic viruses under study with immunomodulatory activity. <em><strong>That's the point!</strong></em> <a href="http://www.nature.com/nrd/journal/v14/n9/full/nrd4663.html?foxtrotcallback=true">That's the whole idea behind oncolytic viruses</a>, that they "promote anti-tumour responses through a dual mechanism of action that is dependent on selective tumour cell killing and the induction of systemic anti-tumour immunity." Seriously, even if everything the IVC and its minions say about Rigvir is true regarding its mechanism of action, Rigvir is not the only oncolytic virus with a dual mechanism of action!</p> <p>Finally, having Antonio Jimenez, the director of the Hope4Cancer Institute opining about how Rigvir boosts the immune system doesn't help the credibility of Rigvir:</p> <blockquote><p> Often times, in clinical practice, we focus on optimizing the immune system – getting the best immune system possible. And that's great. But still, cancer cells have now developed a way to bypass immune recognition. And the International Virotherapy Center here in Latvia, with the studies on RIGVIR, they have concluded that the RIGVIR is binding to the receptor site on the cancer cell surface, called the CD55. When it binds to this receptor, now the T-cells, the B-cells, the natural killer cells, will recognize the cancer cells and mount a specific immune response. </p></blockquote> <p>Again, that's a very specific mechanism that Jimenez is proposing. Where's the evidence to support it?</p> <p>Again, seriously, any truly scientific institute that had developed a drug would not want a quack like Ty Bollinger or Dr. Jimenez endorsing its discovery. That's the kiss of death as far as scientific credibility goes. Yet IVC embraces these quacks, sells to the Hope4Cancer Institute, and gladly lets its product be featured on a video documentary series designed to attack conventional oncology and promote alternative cancer quackery.</p> <p>I also can't help but scoff at the claims, made by several IVC boosters, that Rigvir has "no side effects." For one thing, there is no such thing as an effective medicine that has absolutely no side effects. It's clearly just not true. After all, even in the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4560272/"><cite>Melanoma Research</cite> paper from 2015</a> that I trashed last week as being so badly done, the authors noted that in previous clinical studies Rigvir had caused subfebrile temperature (37.5°C for a couple of days), pain in the tumour area, sleepiness, and diarrhea. Again, whenever anyone claims that an anti-cancer medication (or any medication, for that matter) is completely without side effects, I start becoming very suspicious.</p> <h2>But what about the testimonials?</h2> <p>A key part of <cite>TTAC</cite>'s segment on Rigvir consists of three testimonials. The first was from a woman named Khrystyna Yakovenko, who in 2012 was diagnosed with melanoma that had metastasized to the liver:</p> <blockquote><p> It all started in the end of 2012. When I contacted my doctor, he diagnosed melanoma of the fourth stage, with a metastasize of the liver. They prescribed the plan of chemotherapy and at that time, I even didn't understand what is what. I completely trusted our Ukrainian doctors and I trusted the methods they are using. I trusted this plan of chemotherapy. So I simply didn't realize — I didn't realize the effect of this diagnosis completely, entirely at that moment. </p></blockquote> <p>I can't help but note that here Bollinger invokes a typical trope used by quacks, that you have to "believe" in the therapy, saying, "one of the very important parts about a successful cancer treatment is that you believe in it and you're ready to fight to save your life." After that, Yakovenko relates:</p> <blockquote><p> I was not feeling afraid. I was not falling into panic. Simply, I understood that I had no right to leave it. I had to fight. When I first came to my therapy center, doctors didn't say, "Yes, we will do it." They said, "We will try." Because the stage was late. I think that sometimes on the earlier stages — on the initial stages people who have this very scary diagnosis, they sometimes are by themselves. They lose hope. They stop the fight. And they simply leave it. But, sometimes there are people who, even at late stages, they continue to fight, and continue to find the out of the situation. In this case, as the disease simply just is overwhelming. </p></blockquote> <p>So, basically, Ms. Yakovenko is a woman who was given a "maximum" of a couple of years to live, but was alive in late 2015 or early 2016, when this film was being made. That's about three years, which is very good but not evidence that Rigvir prolonged Ms. Yakovenko's life. Melanoma can have a highly variable course, and there are patients who survive with stage 4 melanoma for years. They are the outliers, of course, but there are too many of them to take someone who survived less than twice as long as predicted as slam dunk evidence that whatever cancer treatment she chose worked. I also can't help but notice that no scans are shown, and no mention is made of whether her cancer shrank, was stable, or progressed. Yes, this is yet another unconvincing <a href="http://oracknows.blogspot.com/2004/12/understanding-alternative-medicine.html">cancer cure testimonial</a>.</p> <p>A more recent interview, dated December 2016, is published on the <a href="https://virotherapy.blog/2016/12/05/i-have-personally-met-this-brave-lady-just-a-few-days-ago/">blog of the Virotherapy Foundation</a> (mentioned last week). Thus, Ms. Yakovenko's story is continuing to be used to promote Rigvir, with her saying, "I have already been alive for 2 years and 7 months thanks to Rigvir," which suggests that this interview occurred in the latter half of 2015, given that she started Rigvir in February 2013.</p> <p>The next testimonial is a man named Ruslan Isayev, who reports that he was only given seven months to live. In the interview, we are not even informed what kind of cancer Mr. Isayev had, other than that he had surgery for it. I presumed that he had melanoma, which turned out to be correct, as you will see, but it's very sloppy not to have specified the cancer. In any event, Mr. Isayev states that he tried chemotherapy after his surgery but couldn't take it and stopped, living "for one year more without chemotherapy," after which he decided to start Rigvir. Naturally, he credits the Rigvir with saving his life and even holds up a picture of his son, noting that he had been told that it would be very difficult for him to have any more children and that when he learned that his wife had become pregnant he vowed that "if were to be a girl, a daughter, I would name her after Aina Muceniece — after Professor Aina Muceniece, who was the discoverer, the great person, so Aina. And if it were to be a boy, then I would name him after the chairman of virotherapy, Jurgis, who is the grandson of Professor Aina Muceniece." It was a boy, and he named him Jurgis.</p> <p><a href="https://sites.google.com/a/njit.edu/yzs3portfolio/hum-102/research-paper">A little Googling revealed</a>, though:</p> <blockquote><p> In an interview on May 28, 2014, Ruslan Isayev gave a personal account of his experience with stage III skin melanoma. When he was diagnosed in 2010, the Chechen Republic doctors refused to operate on Ruslan. He went to Dagestan for surgery and after two weeks of lying in bed, the doctors gave Ruslan just seven months to live. He went to Grozny for chemotherapy, but after four doses he began to feel worse and worse. A local doctor then prescribed Interferon Alfa, a pharmaceutical drug meant to slow down tumor growth. Ruslan took this drug for one and a half years until a friend mentioned RigVir, an oncolytic virus created by the Latvian Academy of Sciences. After his third injection of RigVir, the doctors said his lymphonodus had shrunk and metastases disappeared. After a year of taking RigVir, Ruslan is alive and healthy. </p></blockquote> <p>Stage III melanoma is curable, I note. True, its survival rate is not great, but if the surgery is adequate long term survival is possible. I also note that Isayev received what sounds like considerable conventional therapy, including chemotherapy and a year and a half of interferon-alpha. As is the case with most such testimonials, it's very difficult to ascertain whether the treatment had anywhere near the effect claimed because too little information is given. <a href="http://es.allreadable.com/3160GnON">An account in Spanish</a> reveals a rather convoluted story in which Mr. Isayev had surgery, had a number of complications, briefly underwent chemotherapy, and then underwent treatment with interferon-alpha, during which time he claims that his disease did not progress but that it "didn't help me, either." (Stable disease is actually a desirable outcome.) He then claims that after he switched to Rigvir his lymph nodes shrank, his metastases disappearing. Overall, it's a convoluted story that does not really show that Rigvir is the reason why he's still alive. Again, most likely, it's the variable course of melanoma progression, the surgery, and interferon-alpha that have resulted in his continued survival.</p> <p>Finally, there is a Russian woman named Zoya Sokolova, who states that she was diagnosed with "third stage cancer." Again, the cancer isn't identified, and I assumed that it was melanoma as well. This time, I was incorrect. It was sarcoma, as you will see. (Google is my friend.) In any case, in <cite>TTAC</cite>, Ms. Sokolova reports:</p> <blockquote><p> It was— the diagnosis was very sudden for me. It was after a very strong stress, and then after a month and a half, I was diagnosed with a third stage cancer. Already after the surgery I had my chemotherapy, then they assigned another six chemotherapy and a full course of radiotherapy. My condition allowed only for chemotherapy to be handles, and after the fourth, I wasn’t able to stand up from the bed. I became a bed patient. Before these courses of chemotherapy I was told about a center, about a treatment, but I believed in our doctors and their treatment methods. So I decided to follow that path. </p></blockquote> <p>Then:</p> <blockquote><p> It seemed that they wanted it to be so for me, but they couldn’t give a warranty, they couldn’t say for sure that I would [beat] this disease. That moment when I couldn’t stand up from the bed on my own. I was so weak, and my relatives decided to take a van, to make a bed for me, and simply drive me to Riga, to the center. Before coming to Riga I made a blood test and a complete observation for the doctors here to have the full picture of my condition. When the doctor saw my blood test she was really astonished because all the blood tests was lower than for a live person. She was astonished how I managed to get here, staying alive. </p></blockquote> <p>Here's what it sounds like to me as a surgeon, based on the account above and the <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=ktdKDQAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PT226"><cite>TTAC</cite> book</a> that told me she was being treated for sarcoma. <a href="https://www.cancer.org/cancer/soft-tissue-sarcoma/detection-diagnosis-staging/staging.html">Stage III sarcoma</a> means that either the cancer is larger than 5 cm in diameter and grade 3 histology or that it has spread to nearby lymph nodes. I note that stage III sarcomas are still potentially curable. Actually, even some cases of stage IV sarcoma are potentially curable if the distant metastases can be completely resected by surgery. Indeed, surgeons frequently resect lung and liver metastases from sarcoma, when they are few enough and small enough to be completely resected.</p> <p>My reconstruction of the testimonial is that Ms. Sokolova underwent radical surgery for her cancer, followed by chemotherapy and radiation, both of which are frequently used to treat sarcoma. She obviously had a very bad time of it, suffering multiple complications to the point where she was bedridden. After she began the Rigvir, she slowly recovered from the complications that she had suffered and, of course, attributed her recovery to Rigvir. At no point in this testimonial is any evidence provided that the Rigvir had any effect on her tumor. As far as I could tell from every description of her case, she was tumor-free at the time she chose to use Rigvir, just very ill from complications of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Rigvir almost certainly did not save her, as much as Ms. Sokolava believes that it did, <a href="https://virotherapy.blog/2017/03/02/some-earlier-videos-from-zoya-sokolova/" rel="nofollow">tells the Virotherapy Foundation that it did</a>, and now uses virotherapy to "<a href="https://youtu.be/5InWy4_fVBo">strengthen her well-being</a>" and prevent recurrence. Again, there is no evidence that Rigvir prevents the recurrence of sarcoma.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, Bollinger laps up this story as evidence of how great Rigvir is as a cancer treatment.</p> <h2>A previously discussed testimonial revisited</h2> <p><a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/09/25/rigvir-a-cancer-cure-imported-from-latvia-that-cancer-patients-should-avoid/">In my post last week</a>, I briefly mentioned a testimonial that is featured on the <a href="https://www.virotherapy.eu/testimonials.php" rel="nofollow">International Virotherapy Center website</a>:</p> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yUdhf4rFqDY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p> In brief, Nadine is a British woman who had melanoma in 1999 that recurred in 2009. We know that she's undergone surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, but that she still has cancer. She is portrayed in the video as doing well after having started Rigvir, even though she is not cancer-free. What I didn't know (but perhaps should have discovered through Googling) last week is that Nadine has a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/nadineking">GoFundMe page</a> that paints a much more dire picture of her situation. It was last updated six months ago, which makes me worry about whether she is still alive:</p> <blockquote><p> Recently, she has seen huge success from a treatment she had at the Global Virotherapy Cancer Clinic in Latvia. The centre there offers holistic care and a course of virotherapy. Incredibly, just one week after returning from Latvia, Nadine's scan showed that the 2cm tumour on her lung had completely disappeared and all-but-two of her other tumours had shrunk significantly. This is a huge breakthrough and so now Nadine needs to obliterate all the other ones too and go back to Latvia every three months for further treatment at a cost of around £7,000 a time.</p> <p>Although this treatment isn't available in the UK, it is something that is now being trialled in the USA in combination with immunotherapy, which Nadine is receiving through our amazing NHS.</p> <p>This treatment is working amazingly well at keeping surface lumps and bumps at bay - a few injections at sites near them sees them shrinking and vanishing - so this must be kept going.</p> <p>Unfortunately though, the cancer has managed to take up residence in her lower intestine, making it impossible to eat or drink. Nadine, as resilient and incredible as ever, hasn't taken this lying down and has insisted the surgeons try to clear enough of her stomach to allow fluids to pass. As soon as this happens, she will be heading to Hungary for Gerson Therapy. This holistic therapy has been responsible for some fantastic results in other melanoma patients, and Nadine is determined to get out there and get this thing back under control. This therapy will cost around £7,000 too. So, Nadine really needs YOUR help! </p></blockquote> <p>Malignant small bowel obstruction due to melanoma is definitely not good. Fortunately, update #2 shows that she did undergo surgery for her bowel obstruction:</p> <blockquote><p> Just a little note to say Thank you to everyone who's checked in with me after my operation on Tuesday. </p> <p>I've been using the cannabis oil instead of morphine and codeine for pain relief, with the added bonus that I can't be bothered to speak or move.... My kids and sister are delighted!!!! Lol</p> <p>I am soooooo happy too, that with your help I'm almost at my target to help towards my next batch of treatment...I can't thank you enough.xxx<br /> I promise to send each of you a thank you message , bear with me... Xxxxx</p> <p>So next week once the shoulder starts to heal I have a full on week of getting back on track.</p> <p>Monday I'm meeting a lady to discuss Biomagnetism therapy, Tuesday follow up at the nutritionists, weds back to hospital for checks, Thursday we get back on the virotherapy injections.....and Saturday I start the spring mindfulness course, this is key in keeping my mind focused and living in the moment.xxxxxxxx</p> <p>Some times people ask me what I'm doing for work, as you can see, my full time job is trying to stay as well as possible and keep plugging away at trying to find why I've got this disease in the first place. </p></blockquote> <p>That was six months ago. It is unclear when the video featured on the IVC website was shot, but it's dated August 11, 2017. However, in it Nadine doesn't mention any surgery for a bowel obstruction; so either that was intentionally not mentioned, with the bowel surgery falling under the rubric of "many operations," or this video was recorded before her bowel obstruction, which, I note, happened while she was undergoing virotherapy, as was made clear to me reading her GoFundMe page. Obviously, the Rigvir didn't stop her tumor from progressing. Yet, the IVC is still using Nadine's testimonial in a deceptive—dare I say irresponsible—manner to sell Rigvir. Yes, I stand by my original assessment, and unfortunately that irresponsible and unethical use of patient testimonials to promote Rigvir is having an effect, particularly now that more and more alternative cancer clinics appear to be offering it.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Rigvir marketers appear to be using <a href="http://www.delfi.lv/news/national/politics/rigvir-versas-pret-rsu-asocieto-profesori-purvinu.d?id=49269519">using legal thuggery to try to silence Latvian critics</a>. For example, Riga Stradiņš University recently received a letter from Sorainen, a law firm representing Rigvir Holding, regarding Dr. Santa Purvina, who is faculty there. The letter asked whether Dr. Purviņa's <a href="http://www.delfi.lv/bizness/uznemumi/vairakas-arstu-organizacijas-prasa-izvertet-rigvir-kompensesanu.d?id=48494303">statement</a> that the studies upon which the approval of Rigvir were based were inadequate represented the view of the University. If that isn't an attempt at intimidation, I don't know what is.</p> <p>The more I learn about Rigvir and the International Virotherapy Center, the more I think the whole operation stinks to high heaven. It should be interesting to see what lands in my e-mail in box this week. Be assured that I do plan on publishing the entire e-mail exchange eventually. I merely held off because I was particularly interested in how the IVC will respond to the e-mail that I sent on Friday. In the meantime, the whole Rigvir operation is starting to remind me of the Burzynski Clinic, only worse given the marketing to alternative cancer clinics and the even more transparent than usual excuses for not doing clinical trials. What I do see is the marketing of Rigvir using the same methods that <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2011/11/29/burzynski-the-movie-subtle-its-not/">Stanislaw</a> <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2011/12/12/what-dr-stanislaw-burzynski-doesnt-want/">Burzynski</a> uses to market antineoplastons, patient testimonials and through alternative medicine-promoting hucksters like Ty Bollinger, whose documentary has <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/06/05/cassandra-callenders-cancer-is-progressing-and-the-quackery-isnt-stopping-it/">persuaded cancer patients</a> to <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2016/04/19/another-young-woman-with-cancer-lured-into-quackery-by-ty-bollinger/">eschew effective treatments</a> in <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2016/05/27/yet-another-woman-with-breast-cancer-lured-into-quackery-by-ty-bollinger-and-holistic-medicine-advocates/">favor of quackery</a>.</p> <p>That's not a good strategy for a company marketing a science-based treatment. It is, however, a good strategy if you're marketing quackery. Which is it, Rigvir?</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a></span> <span>Sun, 10/01/2017 - 21:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cancer" hreflang="en">cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/complementary-and-alternative-medicine" hreflang="en">complementary and alternative medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/medicine" hreflang="en">medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pseudoscience" hreflang="en">Pseudoscience</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/quackery-0" hreflang="en">Quackery</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/skepticismcritical-thinking" hreflang="en">Skepticism/Critical Thinking</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aina-muceniece" hreflang="en">Aina Muceniece</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/antonio-jimenez" hreflang="en">Antonio Jimenez</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/coffee-enema" hreflang="en">coffee enema</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/echo-7" hreflang="en">ECHO-7</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/echovirus" hreflang="en">Echovirus</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/elita-shapovalova" hreflang="en">Elita Shapovalova</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hope4cancer" hreflang="en">Hope4Cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/international-virotherapy-center" hreflang="en">International Virotherapy Center</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ivars-kalvins" hreflang="en">Ivars Kalvins</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kaspars-losans" hreflang="en">Kaspars Losans</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/latvia" hreflang="en">Latvia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/melanoma" hreflang="en">melanoma</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nadine-king" hreflang="en">Nadine King</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/peteris-alberts" hreflang="en">Peteris Alberts</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/quackery" hreflang="en">quackery</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/riga-east-clinical-university-hospital" hreflang="en">Riga East Clinical University Hospital</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rigvir" hreflang="en">Rigvir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ruslan-isayev" hreflang="en">Ruslan Isayev</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sarcoma" hreflang="en">sarcoma</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/truth-about-cancer" hreflang="en">The Truth About Cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ty-bollinger" hreflang="en">Ty Bollinger</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/zoya-sokolova" hreflang="en">Zoya Sokolova</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cancer" hreflang="en">cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/complementary-and-alternative-medicine" hreflang="en">complementary and alternative medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/medicine" hreflang="en">medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366521" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506914282"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ah, so the Verita Life clinics have their snouts in the Rigvir trough! Dispositive proof that it is a worthless scam.</p> <p>Verita (the other buttock of the "Regenerasia" bum) started out working the stem-cell side of the street, back when stem-cells were the cure for everything. With a focus on harvesting their victims from newly-wealthy Asian markets. Then it was live-fetal-cell injections from sheep and such as, though I think they've moved on from that to the fetal-cell <b>extracts</b> -- processed to distill the Vital Essence -- with a side-line in placenta products. They leapt aboard the GcMAF scamwagon as it passed, too.</p> <p>For Medical Director they have recruited one 'Dr' Richard Deandrea, who does not seem to have attracted any Respectful Insolence in the past. You really should look him up.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366521&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xtvtW2aCzntMHmQNoP5Jj-GgJTYCg87Gikd1B4j1tSw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 01 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366521">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366522" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506929037"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Anytime someone tells you that you have to believe in something for it to work, you are guaranteed they are full of bovine feces. That is the best thing about science, no belief is necessary. Don't believe in gravity, you will still fall to your death when you step off a tall building. Don't believe in germ theory, Influenza will still lay you out, and Hemorrhagic fever will still liquefy your innards. </p> <p>As a wise man once pointed out: "Science, It works Biatches"</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366522&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="V4Ag6OjxKhuFI0ulehxydvxpX8S8XDQKMGgXeHYCIiU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous Pseudonym (not verified)</span> on 02 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366522">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366523" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506938070"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>generic name: meldonium</p></blockquote> <p>If only meldonium would loosen up the meibomian, I'd be all in today.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366523&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="txHkUs-E_Bn4-OLQRtFXukmA87pJt6fZCJ4BBmgmDuY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 02 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366523">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366524" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506938526"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The claim that Rigvir lacks side effects reminds me of my favorite fictional drug, Provasic (RDU-90), the miracle heart drug in "The Fugitive" (it also had no side effects whatsoever, except for wiping out patients' livers).</p> <p>An enjoyable list of fictional drugs (a good one is Hibernol, the cold and flu remedy that lets you sleep through the entire flu season):</p> <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_medicines_and_drugs">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_medicines_and_drugs</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366524&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hNfVzRiP23tJa_4Qu3atUAyA5_P-_pfhPaZ-9s2uOeU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dangerous Bacon (not verified)</span> on 02 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366524">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366525" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506945689"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wait, CD55 and the approval is for melanoma? I'm stuck on a phone, but this doesn't seem like an obvious starting point.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366525&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2mddiFBd5om4lO-Ms0sBdyJvTbC3cLXmroy_1fIrBhI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 02 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366525">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366526" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506950795"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Probably not the latest, but <a href="http://brianduriemd.myeloma.org/content/whatever-happened-measles-vaccine-therapy-status-report">here's</a> one item on what's been going on at Mayo since that whole curing multiple myeloma with measles vaccine thingamabob.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366526&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="19pHaWIcMeJMHfS0CBeJiLEuaGeRAvWHi79KNdxrCBc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 02 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366526">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366527" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507015210"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Aug. 15, 2017:<br /><a href="https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-08-clinical-trial-genetically-virus-cancer.html">https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-08-clinical-trial-genetically-virus…</a></p> <p>The Phase I immunotherapy trial is for those ages 18 and older with metastatic solid tumors that have not responded to standard treatments. The treatment injects an oncolytic (cancer-destroying) virus—vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)—into the tumor. The virus is engineered to grow in cancer cells, destroy these tumors, and then spread to other cancer sites. During this process, it recruits the immune system to the area with the goal of triggering an immune response.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366527&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="durw8Y6h2RDyjc9XLsKGMSYVAsLGzW4goXH39t8Ea84"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike McCants (not verified)</span> on 03 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366527">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366528" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507050139"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wikipedia tells me the putative receptor for Rigvir, CD55, is distributed primarily in blood cell lineages, both red blood cells and lymphocyte lines, but also in lung and adrenal tissues. Not exactly a target one would expect to be free of collateral damage (side effects). </p> <p>Furthermore, human viruses such as coxsackie and enteroviruses that use this receptor in human diseases do not easily recognize the rodent version of CD55</p> <p> Spiller OB, Goodfellow IG, Evans DJ, Almond JW, Morgan BP (January 2000). "Echoviruses and coxsackie B viruses that use human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor do not bind the rodent analogues of DAF". J. Infect. Dis. 181 (1): 340–3. </p> <p>This would seem to cast some doubt on the origin story for Rigvir. All the more reason that the lack of published research on preclinical work for this drug is a serious red flag. No legitimate government regulatory body would approve trials in humans with an infectious agent without a substantial body of published, peer reviewed in vitro and animal work. </p> <p>Logic therefore leads to the inescapable conclusion that the drug regulatory apparatus in Latvia is illegitimate. </p> <p>I know, I'm shocked:<br /><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjbPi00k_ME">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjbPi00k_ME</a></p> <p>Capt</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366528&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BUmDunou7DYmLYdpFs8zULHyagTONaAAJ3VEkvoHkc8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">captian_a (not verified)</span> on 03 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366528">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366529" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507051372"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Every time I look at the picture at the start of the article, I think they photo shopped Salmonberries as the Rigvir virus bodies. Then I think do they have salmonberries in Latvia? Maybe they are replacing coffee beans with salmonberries. </p> <p>I just needed something a little stupid to help get past the recent horror.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366529&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="YXatOq9xrvKx9UfoyoZfNl17eRIS2hJH2xHqzqoNR2M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 03 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366529">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366530" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507051770"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hope4Cancer's "Dr Tony" bangs-on at-length about Rigvir® here ... <a href="https://youtu.be/4Z0A2tR1EgQ?t=20m17s">https://youtu.be/4Z0A2tR1EgQ?t=20m17s</a> .<br /> This Rigvir® computer-animation shows virus-particles as big as red-blood-cells, &amp; virus multiplying like bacteria ... <a href="https://vimeo.com/178891587">https://vimeo.com/178891587</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366530&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6Tm5lOrnFdJ97DGUvEa5eKA4dHW8xt5UaYFGVvL5vQk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">John Q. Public (not verified)</span> on 03 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366530">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366531" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507072710"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>Wikipedia tells me the putative receptor for Rigvir, CD55, is distributed primarily in blood cell lineages, both red blood cells and lymphocyte lines, but also in lung and adrenal tissues.</p></blockquote> <p>What I was looking at before was <a href="https://www.proteinatlas.org/ENSG00000196352-CD55/pathology">from the Human Protein Atlas</a>.</p> <p>And no, I am not the slightest bit competent here.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366531&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="j-Mmg-wh51VnR1XuDBJLVTTTJUCHLLxb10Onqnsbn6s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 03 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366531">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366532" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507116242"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I have no opinion on the efficacy of this product (the fact that a given Bad person believes in it meaning nothing whatsoever). However, you are, let's assume accidentally, wrong in your assessment of the publication history of Ivars Kalvins. First, PubMed indexes primarily Western journals and is far from complete. A search of the less-limited Google Scholar makes it appear that he may well have hundreds of publications - especially when it quickly becomes apparent that the correct orthography of his name includes a number of diacritical marks, and that in many of his publications his last name is rendered as "Kalvinsh" to represent phonetically the modified S at the end of the name. And indeed, when I search PubMed for "Ivars Kalvinsh" it returns 50 publications.</p> <p>Those silly Easterners do not understand that when we say Science is universal, we really mean that they are to study only the hypotheses that Americans have already given the thumbs-up to, which means that they are always to be behind us intellectually, trailing in our wake, and not incidentally paying royalties and never collecting them. Rather like those pesky Cubans, having the nerve on a tenth the per-capita income to come up with a cancer treatment that white people had not already patented. Shame, really.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366532&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Ad1CgFU-5weGVF2twJZyK5I2CjLPNkGIdTtrhs5bzKU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jane (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366532">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366533" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507118149"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>jane: "PubMed indexes primarily Western journals" and "Those silly Easterners do not understand"</p> <p>Please advice us which longitudes divides this planet between "East" and "West"? Does that mean Latvia is in the "East", and Japan with its DTaP and varicella vaccines is in the "West"?</p> <p>Or are you just being a clueless racist? Do you even know where Latvia is? (it is two countries away from where homeopathy was dreamed up a bit over two centuries ago)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366533&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qtkKYLd-1UDw87Y8OeaM-vAz2MOhej4OEMiU9dFBCo4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366533">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366534" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507120724"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Oh, yay, the medical weeaboo is back.</p> <p>One quibble, jane, do you use "West" as a generic snarlword for all industrialized countries, or do you actually not know where Cuba and Latvia are located?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366534&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="E86LYASsPJ8Jp4hsSzfLJoJMvERe2lPDDKJrsKbzGcU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Politicalguineapig (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366534">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366535" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507123081"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The divide between "East" and "West" is an interesting thing. It basically got its start as "Old World" views about "the Orient" (Asia Minor, the Middle East, Asia.) We definitely still talk about "Eastern philosophy" or "Eastern mysticism" as opposed to Western philosophy or mysticism.</p> <p>Then there was a divide between "Eastern Europe" and "Western Europe." (Russia has always had this interesting identity crisis about whether it is part of "the East" or "the West.") Nowadays, every former Eastern Bloc country is trying to distance itself from Russian hegemony and the whole notion of "Eastern Europe." So Poland very firmly defines itself as Central European, Lithuania is kind of riding Poland's coattails into "real Europe" by way of shared history. Estonia wants to be Nordic. Ukraine is kind of a mess, but Western Ukraine sort of looks up to Poland (or used to?) as "real Europe," positioning itself closer to Poland, despite many historical grievances. Latvia is essentially the odd man out. (Belarus seems perfectly happy to be Russia's little brother, or at least the Belarusian government.)</p> <p>And then there's "Western imperialism" in terms of colonialism, which has definitely been a real thing, and still is. (Hell, just look up the colonial history of <i>Belgium</i> even, it's awful.) Western Europeans have been screwing over the rest of the world for ages. They still do, just in a less overt way.</p> <p>And there's the "Western imperialism" of the Soviet era, which was also definitely real, although by that point, the US was in the forefront. (We essentially installed Pinochet; just one example among many.)</p> <p>Of course, Japanese imperialism and Russian imperialism have also been real things.</p> <p>Some people now prefer to talk about the "global north" vs. the "global south," but the geography of that is also weird, since a lot of former colonized nations are above the equator, and Australia and New Zealand are below it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366535&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="p4lEApUuK6rKySopwujFqqdlfDFH1N4P6iXmY6qa1iU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366535">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366536" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507123186"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>^ the Cold War era would probably be a better phrase than "the Soviet era.'</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366536&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Z-pasdm-sPJgOCXYnF5OT4Of-KWZlgyRNNbLt8__2xM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366536">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366537" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507135103"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Narad,</p> <p>That is a great reference. </p> <p>I too am way out of my league on this topic. No worries. No qualifications required for commenting .</p> <p>Jane,<br /> If you think Orac has erred on his critique, namely there is a paucity of science to support this company's claims, the proper rebuttal is to present this hidden science. Your argument that there COULD BE supportive publications that he might find if only he weren't so biased toward "Western" science is basically akin to arguing that there could be intelligent life on the far side of the moon. </p> <p>I wont hold be holding my breath that the PR contact Orac has been emailing is filling his inbox with links to peer reviewed science supporting the use of Rigvir.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366537&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="VDZxTFUoxM30pqKPNgM6fusVOAzga7yT0Z_NRz-Vbo8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Captian_a (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366537">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366538" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507140373"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>JP: "Ukraine is kind of a mess, but Western Ukraine sort of looks up to Poland (or used to?) as “real Europe,” positioning itself closer to Poland,"</p> <p>Where there are several areas where the border was moved in both directions. </p> <p>The way Jane was using "East" versus "West" is to suggest that magic actually works, and only certain cultures know about it. She neglects that magic does not work, and those "Eastern" cultures do not live in the past. They even use smartphones.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366538&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cFV5nyUSTll7KMUC-BY9gjbTgVrkfe-SEX5xOY-e4-I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366538">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366539" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507142879"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What I have learned from skimming the backstory:</p> <p>1. Ivars Kalviņš (of the USSR Latvia Institute of Organic Synthesis) and Rigvir's other enthusiasts were all well-placed in the old Soviet-era science establishment, and therefore it is totally above-board and respectable.</p> <p>2. Rigvir has always been marginalised and non-establishment and that's why its enthusiasts have never hard the resources to test it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366539&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zN0IfTCtvHVT5TnSlFrpqsLk-Uc379Yuho-KK3XZJiE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366539">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366540" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507143563"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>Latvia is essentially the odd man out. </i></p> <p>I get the impression that Latvia is the Baltic country most thoroughly integrated into the Russian economy and Russian politics and Russian criminal circles (to the extent that these are separable). There's a Latvian resort, Jurmala, that's esentially a playground for Russian oligarchs and mafia types. They have the best money launderers in Europe.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366540&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="flTwi2Evw5LbxN0_uYKiTDsFp9qpxuSHNT-YHvXDC8E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366540">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366541" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507143663"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hemo. It's not just some red thing that fcks with your life anymore:</p> <blockquote><p>What makes this protein, called Hemo, so unusual is that it’s not made by the mother. Instead, it is made in her fetus and in the placenta, by a gene that originally came from a virus that infected our mammalian ancestors more than 100 million years ago...</p> <p>A team of French researchers engineered healthy human cells to make a viral protein found in many tumors and watched the cells grow in a petri dish.</p> <p>The protein caused the cells to behave in some suspiciously cancer-like ways. They changed shape, as cancer cells do, becoming long and skinny. And they also started to move across the dish.</p></blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/04/science/ancient-viruses-dna-genome.html">https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/04/science/ancient-viruses-dna-genome.h…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366541&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xQ08sjYr2-Qsn-cx_B2s83rUYxAtt2gJSpT62M3YO4Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Tim (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366541">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366542" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507145000"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@HDB:</p> <p>The over mafia control of Russia has been suppressed; really it's just higher up, I guess.</p> <p>I haven't really spent much time in Latvia (just passing through on the train, so not at all I guess), but one of the people who [was] on my committee is from Riga. She definitely grew up in the Russian-Jewish-Soviet culture there. (She has said that it just doesn't feel like the holiday season without a "New Year's" tree." She is fluent in Latvian, though.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366542&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2ezBUce24iB2tGxVr9kKtAYvp-eayOTl8z56nLvTxb0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366542">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366543" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507145034"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>*overt, not over.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366543&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6tngkHYTa1WKPZqAwAfYEbW2tf-7kQvUe5Bnorvggts"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366543">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366544" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507148187"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>Estonia wants to be Nordic. </i></p> <p>In case anyone is all "[citation needed]", here is SATW:<br /><a href="https://satwcomic.com/party-crasher">https://satwcomic.com/party-crasher</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366544&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NfiR3D5kpRsIitOt_YcRGOtFTTwMz5z3o63W1rZZ8qM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366544">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366545" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507153886"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What the hell, I made a comment and it disappeared.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366545&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Lht0tdOCS6yvgYyMfJx4wLcdpWqjiO4K5jMWzd3HNcM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 04 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366545">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366546" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507204625"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@herr doktor bimler</p> <p>"There’s a Latvian resort, Jurmala, that’s esentially a playground for Russian oligarchs and mafia types. They have the best money launderers in Europe."</p> <p>True, politics are highly influenced by this and state institutions are lax in the oversight of many sectors, not just banks. You can also read the following article and related ones to realize how deeply integrated corruption and blatant scheming in highest echelons has been and still is: <a href="http://eng.lsm.lv/article/politics/politics/latest-oligarch-transcripts-reveal-media-manipulation.a241609/">http://eng.lsm.lv/article/politics/politics/latest-oligarch-transcripts…</a> </p> <p>Considering the fact that back in 2004 the situation was even worse, corruption in the process of registering Rigvir seems highely likely. </p> <p>As to Jurmala, that little Rigvir "family company" strangely had enough money to buy a fancy clinic there, in the most expensive real estate area in Latvia (imagine what the prices are if you can count on Russian oligarchs being interested in buying). To the average Latvian this would seem quite suspicious: <a href="https://www.virotherapyclinic.eu/">https://www.virotherapyclinic.eu/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366546&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MsQOFrZdNHNfhtS8_fu-dbmn4SKSVkgh3F8tUHJzZ_c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">z (not verified)</span> on 05 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366546">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366547" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1507791057"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Kalvins is not a director of Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (LIOS) for a few years. <a href="http://www.osi.lv/en/contacts/">http://www.osi.lv/en/contacts/</a></p> <p>Rigvir is neither developed or studied in LIOS. LIOS has never received any grant (esp from Latvian government) to study Rigvir. As you mentioned, Kalvins has shares in a company and is rather representative of Rigvir, not LIOS. </p> <p>I strongly agree that Rigvir has no published confirmation of activity either in preclinical and clinical studies. To my knowledge, Rigvir even doesn't have appropriate (if any) quality and batch to batch reproducibility control as well.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366547&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rPLFfaNkdGBMUigU8YyGHX27xWsX0TliNjORQLV4ZPs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Scientist from Riga (not verified)</span> on 12 Oct 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366547">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/insolence/2017/10/02/if-rigvir-is-effective-virotherapy-for-cancer-why-are-quack-clinics-selling-it-and-quackery-promoters-like-ty-bollinger-promoting-it%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 02 Oct 2017 01:40:29 +0000 oracknows 22634 at https://scienceblogs.com Gwyneth Paltrow's goop: Psychic Vampire Repellent as female "empowerment" https://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2017/09/22/gwyneth-paltrows-goop-psychic-vampire-repellent-as-female-empowerment <span>Gwyneth Paltrow&#039;s goop: Psychic Vampire Repellent as female &quot;empowerment&quot;</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Back in the day I used to do a weekly feature every Friday that I used to call <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/category/friday_woo/">Your Friday Dose of Woo</a>. For purposes of the bit, woo consisted of particularly ridiculous or silly bits of pseudoscience, quackery, or mysticism, such as the <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2007/01/19/your-friday-dose-of-woo-miraculous-quest-1/">Quantum Xrroid Consciousness Interface</a>. Amazingly, I managed to keep that up for a couple of years, but over time I started sensing that I was getting a bit too repetitive. The same bits of pseudoscience kept recurring. Over time I had to dig more and more to find suitable bits of woo that amused me enough to inspire me to ever more over-the-top heights of sarcasm.</p> <p>Earlier this week, it occurred to me that, should I ever want to resurrect YFDoW, I could easily just do a weekly column about some bit or other of utter nonsense from <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/06/23/gwyneth-paltrow-shows-that-the-quantum-xrroid-consciousness-interface-was-ahead-of-its-time/">goop</a>, the website and now lifestyle magazine developed by actress turned into this generation's Oprah Winfrey (at least with respect to promoting self-indulgent, New Agey nonsense like <a href="https://drjengunter.wordpress.com/2017/01/17/dear-gwyneth-paltrow-im-a-gyn-and-your-vaginal-jade-eggs-are-a-bad-idea/">jade eggs</a>). I don't plan on doing that, mainly because it's been a long time since I've been able to tie myself to an artificial schedule of having to do a specific kind of post on every Friday. That doesn't mean that I can't take today to thank Gwyneth Paltrow for providing me with what is likely to be a long-term go-to source of pseudoscience and quackery, a well that I can draw from whenever the mood hits me.</p> <!--more--><div style="width: 460px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/insolence/files/2017/09/open-uri20170711-9401-p7dtp6.jpeg"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/files/2017/09/open-uri20170711-9401-p7dtp6-450x450.jpeg" alt="" width="450" height="450" class="size-medium wp-image-11067" /></a> Only $30? What a bargain! </div> <p>After all, where else could I purchase <a href="https://shop.goop.com/shop/products/psychic-vampire-repellent">Psychic Vampire Repellant</a>? That's right. You read that right. goop is selling <em>actual psychic vampire repellent</em>! But what is this product, actually? Glad you asked:</p> <blockquote><p> A spray-able elixir we can all get behind, this protective mist uses a combination of gem healing and deeply aromatic therapeutic oils, reported to banish bad vibes (and shield you from the people who may be causing them). Fans spray generously around their heads to safeguard their auras. </p></blockquote> <p>This is how you use it:</p> <blockquote><p> Shake gently before each use. Spray around the aura to protect from psychic attack and emotional harm. Avoid contact with eyes. Do not ingest or inhale. </p></blockquote> <p>And such a bargain, at a mere $30 for a 3.4 oz bottle!</p> <p>But, I ask (that is, after asking where I can get me some of this), what the heck is in this stuff? Only the highest quality ingredients:</p> <blockquote><p> Sonically tuned water, rosewater, grain alcohol, sea salt, therapeutic grade oils of: rosemary, juniper, and lavender; a unique and complex blend of gem elixirs, including but not limited to: black tournaline, lapis lazuli, ruby, labradorite, bloodstone, aqua aura, black onyx, garnet, pyrite and mummite, reiki, sound waves, moonlight, love, reiki charged crystals. </p></blockquote> <p>Skeptics that goop's customers are, I'm sure they want to know who the reiki master is who's charging those crystals up. Inquiring minds want to know. (Too bad Paltrow's customers aren't exactly what you would refer to as "inquiring minds.") Fortunately, I am, although I have to question whether wasting my inquiries on the sort of mystical, "empowering," New Age bullshit that Paltrow sells is a good use of my brain cells. Probably not, but it amuses me, at least to a point, and if it helps explain why what she's selling is bullshit it's worth it. It's also worth it because I can point out that Paltrow's minions over at goop are learning a bit about how to protect themselves from charges of selling quackery and unproven medical treatments:</p> <blockquote><p> Disclaimer: This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. Gem Elixirs are not intended to diangose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition. Gem Elixirs are not intended to replace the advice or care of a medical professional. </p></blockquote> <p>This is what we refer to a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/whitecoatunderground/2008/01/14/quack-miranda-warning/">Quack Miranda warning</a>.</p> <p>Of course, psychic vampire repellent is so silly that there's really not much to do with it but to point at it and mock. However, it's also of a piece with everything that Paltrow is trying to do, as was revealed by an <a href="http://goop.com/goop-magazine-cover-story-full-qa-gwyneth/">interview with her published</a> by her new goop Magazine that appeared earlier this week. It's almost as though she's trolling her detractors in a way. The photo of her portrays here in a bikini covered in mud. Then she describes the origin of her interest in quackery (I know, I know, to her it's "health and wellness"). It began when her father became ill and required a feeding tube after surgery:</p> <blockquote><p> But yes, getting back to wellness: Long story short—when my dad got sick, I was twenty-six-years-old, and it was the first time that I contemplated that somebody could have autonomy over their health. So while he was having radiation and the surgery and everything, and eating through a feeding tube, I thought, “Well, I’m pushing this can of processed protein directly into his stomach,” and I remember thinking, “Is this really healing? This seems weird. There’s a bunch of chemicals in this shit.”</p> <p>It was where I started to make the connection, or to wonder if there was a connection, and started doing a bunch of research on sugar and cancer and environmental toxins and pesticides and everything else. And I think what happens is, as soon as you test something and it works and you feel better, you really catch that “wellness” bug. </p></blockquote> <p>"There's a bunch of chemicals in this shit"? I have news for Paltrow: There's a bunch of chemicals in <em>everything</em>, including each and every thing goop sells. Heck, her psychic vampire repellent is full of chemicals. She named some of them. Of course, whether the chemicals that are advertised as being in there actually are in there, who knows?</p> <p>It turns out that Paltrow has become so credulous that she'll try almost anything, no matter how ridiculous. She views this as being brave, inquisitive, and adventurous. I view it as being so "open minded" that her brains fell out long ago. I could tell from her interview that she had tried <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2016/06/30/a-clinical-trial-of-foot-bath-detoxification/">detox foot baths</a>, one of the most outrageous health scams out there. She didn't feel any better after that (surprise! surprise!); so she moved on. She also tried some sort of "color therapy," but apparently it wasn't fo her.</p> <p>She's also very, very much into "cleanses," like the Master Cleanse and the Alejandro Junger cleanse:</p> <blockquote><p> It’s only a three-day cleanse, and also I’m very “all or nothing.” So I was very amped up on the idea of seeing it through to completion. My best friend did it with me and she ate a banana on the second day, and I was like, “You f%$ked it up. All results are off.” I felt very toxic and sluggish and nauseous on the second day, and by the third day I started to feel really good. And in the book, some people do it for seven days, ten days, thirty days. I was like, “I’m good with the three-day introductory cleanse.” And I remember the next day, I was like, “Oh wow, I just did this cleanse and I feel so much better, so I can have a beer and a cigarette now, right?” It was the nineties.</p> <p>But I do remember feeling that that’s where I caught the bug. And then the Alejandro Junger cleanse was really instrumental in terms of explaining to me that, especially as detox goes, our bodies are designed to detoxify us, but they were built and designed before fire retardants and PCBs and plastic, so we have a much, much more difficult time, and the body needs some support, which is why cleanses can help. I just anecdotally felt great and so I started doing more and more. And by the time goop came around and we started writing about wellness content, then it started to get really fun. And the girls make me try everything. I’m always the one. </p></blockquote> <p>As I like to say, "detoxification" is <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2011/06/06/detoxifying-fashionably/">fashionable nonsense</a>. There are a couple of "flavors" (if you'll excuse the term) of rationales for "detoxification." One is that we're "poisoning ourselves from within," also known as autointoxication. The idea here is that the poop accumulating in our colons is leeching "toxins" into the bloodstream through our colons and slowly poisoning us, causing all manner of chronic disease. Never mind that we don't have 20 lbs of built up fecal matter in our colons, as those claiming that "death begins in the colon" often opine. The colon is very good getting rid of the body's solid waste; it doesn't accumulate except in the case of significant disease. When it does, it usually results in acute, not chronic illness. (Toxic megacolon, anyone?) The second rationale is more like the one that Paltrow makes, that "chemicals" are assaulting out body in such quantity and new forms that our livers are no longer able to "detoxify" our body without help. The problem, with this claim is that it's just not true, either. There is no need to "detoxify.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, Paltrow is now starting to think that medical marijuana will be an important "natural" health aid and treatment for various things that we evil, reductionistic "Western" doctors don't accept. Never mind that the <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/?s=marijuana+cannabis">evidence for the utility of medical marijuana</a> for most of the conditions for which it is advocated is, at best, thin and, at worst, nonexistent.</p> <p>Paltrow also has a—shall we say?—rather loose interpretation of what constitutes good medical evidence:</p> <blockquote><p> And then we are as a culture, very resistant to more natural options.</p> <p>I think there’s a general reticence to this idea that we can be autonomous over our own health, that there are other options. So, that if you have arthritis or IBS, you can maybe, possibly, make a diet change that’s really impactful. There might not be board-certified physicians doing double-blind studies that can lay out the results in the same way; the empirical evidence is anecdotal. But, you’ll have people really resistant to the idea, like it’s better to be on five prescription drugs than to maybe cut gluten out of your diet.</p> <p>And at goop, our job isn’t to recommend, or to have an opinion: We’re just like, this is fascinating. Let’s ask this doctor this, let’s ask this doctor that. I think we know that, for example, we’ve tried certain things that are more holistic, and they’ve had incredible effects. But it doesn’t behoove a pharmaceutical company or chemical company to spend lots of money on trials about whatever it is. </p></blockquote> <p>Hmmm. If only there were a way to determine whether going "gluten-free" helps irritable bowel syndrome or arthritis... If only... Oh, wait, there is! It's called science. It's called randomized clinical trials, which Paltrow just dismissed in favor of a much weaker form of evidence prone to all sorts of biases, including the human tendency to confuse correlation with causation and the regression to the mean of symptoms, in which people tend to take remedies when their symptoms are at their worst and then attribute the regression to the mean of their symptoms to whatever they took or did, regardless of whether it actually affected the course of their symptoms or not.</p> <p>How convenient, though. Paltrow washes her hands of responsibility for selling quackery by, in essence, invoking a variant of <a href="https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Just_asking_questions">JAQing off</a>. <em>We're not recommending anything</em>, Paltrow is saying, <em>we're just asking questions that you can ask your doctors! Oh, and big pharma isn't interested in our questions or remedies because it can't profit off of them. Profiting off of them is our business model, after all! <a href="https://gizmodo.com/is-this-the-beginning-of-the-end-for-goop-1802113804">We make false health claims for profit!</a></em></p> <p>Now here's what's irritating. There's no denying that it's an unfortunately effective tactic, but it's irritating nonetheless. But what do I know? I'm just a middle-aged white male. Obviously my criticism of the pseudoscience and quackery peddled by goop is a product of my wanting to oppress women—or at least my being afraid of women "empowered" by goop to—gasp!—ask questions. So spake The Paltrow:</p> <blockquote><p> I really do think that the most dangerous piece of the pushback is that somewhere the inherent message is, women shouldn’t be asking questions. So that really bothers me. I feel it’s part of my mission to say, “We are allowed to ask any question we want to ask. You might not like the answer, or the answer might be triggering for you. But we are allowed to ask the question and we are allowed to decide for ourselves what works and what doesn’t work. We’re allowed to decide for ourselves what we want to try or not try.” </p></blockquote> <p>Oh, bullshit. Paltrow and her minions are more than allowed to "ask questions." Paltrow just doesn't like the answers she gets because her questions are premised on belief in pseudoscientific quackery. None of that stops her from bravely marching deeper and deeper into the swamp of pseudoscience for profit disguised as female "empowerment":</p> <blockquote><p> Yeah, I mean, I think it’s our mission to empower women. Our mission is to support women with content, product, ideas, where they can get closest to their real identity and have the courage to speak and operate from that place. Whatever it is that they want to do in the world, whether they want to stay home with children, whether they work, whether they want to start a second career, whether they want to understand, like, you know, how an alternative health modality might benefit them.</p> <p>Our mission is to have a space where curious women can come. We are creating an opportunity for curiosity and conversation to live. That the knock-on effect of that conversation is that somebody might think to themselves, “Oh, wow. This is how I can manage a difficult relationship at work.” Or, “Wow, like, maybe I can improve my relationship with my mother or my understanding that this is her personality.” Or, “Wow, maybe if I up my vitamin C intake, let me try it, let me speak to my doctor or see if it’s something I should do.” You know, whatever it is. So, we know that the world follows the consciousness of women. So we’re just trying to create this environment where, really, women again, can just feel okay about getting close to themselves and working from that place. </p></blockquote> <p>That space? Well, one example was Paltrow's ridiculous "wellness summit" earlier this summer. Oh, and haters gonna hate, not because they support science and recognize Paltrow for the snake oil saleswoman that she is. Oh, no. It must be because they're afraid of "empowered" women:</p> <blockquote><p> Yeah, when we had our wellness summit a few weeks ago, it was so incredible to see all of these curious like-minded women congregating in a space, making friends, having conversations, exploring all these different avenues together. It was really powerful. You know, it’s like, how do you control that? If there is an inherent cultural fear of women getting together and talking, pushing boundaries, you control it by ridiculing them for talking to each other. </p></blockquote> <p>No, women weren't being ridiculed for "talking to each other." <strong><em>Gwyneth Paltrow</em></strong> was being ridiculed for being a con artist, selling bogus "wellness" to women in the name of "empowerment." And she didn't like it. Not one bit. <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/07/21/are-gwyneth-paltrow-and-goop-winning-against-skeptics/">She did richly deserve it, too</a>. </p> <p>Basically, goop is a scam. It is nothing more than an online vessel to sell old-fashioned snake oil. Paltrow no more "empowers" women by selling her snake oil than, for example, <a href="https://www.csicop.org/si/show/stanislaw_burzynski_four_decades_of_an_unproven_cancer_cure">Stanislaw Burzynski</a> "empowers" cancer patients by selling them his ineffective cancer "cure."</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a></span> <span>Fri, 09/22/2017 - 01:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/complementary-and-alternative-medicine" hreflang="en">complementary and alternative medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/friday-woo" hreflang="en">Friday Woo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/medicine" hreflang="en">medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/paranormal" hreflang="en">Paranormal</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/popular-culture" hreflang="en">Popular Culture</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pseudoscience" hreflang="en">Pseudoscience</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/quackery-0" hreflang="en">Quackery</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/skepticismcritical-thinking" hreflang="en">Skepticism/Critical Thinking</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/empowerment" hreflang="en">empowerment</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/goop" hreflang="en">Goop</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gwyneth-paltrow" hreflang="en">Gwyneth Paltrow</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pseudoscience-0" hreflang="en">pseudoscience</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/quackery" hreflang="en">quackery</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vampire" hreflang="en">vampire</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/complementary-and-alternative-medicine" hreflang="en">complementary and alternative medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/medicine" hreflang="en">medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366230" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506060266"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This woman...is a moron.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366230&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="slRhfW-VSNcawYgk1N7Y9lZhqYWfIPm8CPR47pZSh8c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Zach (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366230">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366231" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506063256"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Would her psychic vampire repellent, help to keep her and here kind out of my way? Because they are not good for my wellbeing.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366231&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="R4ASemqe8MCx4Hrw9FphmgcyK2Q4anMkaN5xx30Zfn0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renate (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366231">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366232" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506068518"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I think all that sand would gum up a spray bottle.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366232&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OblT91r9EWb3F-EoMoXl7i78D2B9SHXatkmsb66GsUI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Christine Rose (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366232">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366233" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506069063"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The thing about "just asking questions" is that there are often already science-based answers. Paltrow and her quacky ilk count on their marks not to be smart enough to find them.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366233&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="VBJfDjJxLNx8gcH_Yx6pZak6f1wdaVIbQNXk7gckxKQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">daustin (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366233">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366234" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506069424"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So... that psychic vampire repellent. It's a $30 room spray, then? Or is it a $30 body mist? At that price, I hope the stupid thing at least has the decency to smell pleasant.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366234&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5erkxSmJqJzi7bxYwgmoC3vW4CI4lWqbkSGdU43NW_A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ruth (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366234">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366235" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506069490"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renate@2: Sorry, but the product in question is not effective against non-psychic vampires. Just as it says on the label, it only repels psychic vampires.</p> <p>As for "empowerment", I do not think that word means what Paltrow thinks it means. I would not consider people who are the marks of a scam to be "empowered". As <a href="https://genius.com/Fleetwood-mac-oh-well-lyrics">the old song says</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>But don't ask me what I think of you<br /> I might not give the answer that you want me to</p></blockquote> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366235&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="TZ9YuYA8S0D3pE3CNXdNmoXR9mR_1wo3CE1eIR50BDA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366235">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366236" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506070191"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>To me she functions as a psychic vampire, because she brings bad vibes to me.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366236&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zL_2sZeAdTKjlSP7RIbK_3gQu5RJSSWvqhlBAk1HyzI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renate (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366236">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366237" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506070453"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>So, that if you have arthritis or IBS, you can maybe, possibly, make a diet change that’s really impactful.</p></blockquote> <p>Should I tell her that drinking Soylent for at least one meal a day is what had a huge impact on my IBS? (From 2 or more flareups a week, to less than one a month.) Most of the ingredients don't pretend to not be chemicals; it would probably blow her mind.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366237&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1XCNzPNjfva6RuHmqMfbCENI5VDPbtpeap5ddyvN5Pg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Nancie K (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366237">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366238" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506070605"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"Psychic Vampire" refers to a toxic person who drains the mental energy and undermines the emotional wellbeing of others. Why that phrase was chosen is puzzling.<br /> In addition, how does this spray work to counteract psychic vampires? Surely it's better to just cut them out of your life?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366238&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GONkCDHWvU3gNM-3nH0Ze5JO1hH9AADx1JcE7uNtn_M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Julian Frost (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366238">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1366239" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506070949"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I know! If all it took to block the malign effects of psychic vampires was some fairy dust made of reiki infused crystal essence and various flower extracts, that'd be awesome. :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366239&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="04NgKnu6mZESbDBfYphe_XbykC_TmXAXN3j8WgFfbAQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366239">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1366238#comment-1366238" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Julian Frost (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366240" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506072940"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I would expect pepper spray to be more effective as a "psychic vampire [whatever that means] repellant" than the stuff Paltrow is peddling, but pepper spray may be illegal in some jurisdictions. IANAL. TINLA.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366240&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DeyNuDWWzRKeM_wM5R8y3LGJ5NdGBG0QATgWYXi32X0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366240">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366241" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506073184"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I know of something that works for both psychic and regular vampires.</p> <p>Go out and trap a skunk. Then on a daily basis have your, now pet skunk, liberally spray you. Not only will this keep any type of vampire away from you but will isolate you from all those disease carrying people out there.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366241&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CWfpNktCQeCc6uNCf6rTYNJczVb33aBA4pX4pyLbH-M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366241">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366242" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506073269"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Eric, I think skunk spray beats your pepper spray.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366242&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CPhwBaFePdU0UQpnDdD_jLAiJuyXJ1FdFK2t2rHsxt4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366242">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366243" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506073369"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Frankly women like Paltrow make the rest of us look bad. How 'bout education, reproductive rights and equal opportunites for female empowerment? We just don't need stupid over-priced spritzes or vag eggs Gwynnie.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366243&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CyoJZ2RLzecUTmPpx5iRSobLrblAkEHTVY7HpmF1Buw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Science Mom (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366243">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366244" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506073625"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The first time I heard the phrase "Psychic Vampire" was from the mouth of William S. Burroughts.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366244&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="c-2bx0WPKByDul8QTuwb7TGXPFu-ixCTBEkBUd-9FzY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Christine Rose (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366244">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366245" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506076124"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So vampire spray is real? I saw this pop up in a few places and kind of thought it was a joke. $30 for this stuff? </p> <p>@Science Mom: I agree, Paltrow is doing the opposite of empowering women.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366245&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="__jQdjwAE7g0mYPcXmJBZIG_1XAsG2TT4jUlNKgiFJQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Angela (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366245">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366246" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506076334"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So this stuff is real? I saw it pop up in a few places and thought it was a joke. $30? Really?</p> <p>@Science Mom: I agree. Paltrow is doing the opposite of empowering women. She's actually perpetrating the old stereotype of women using "feelings" instead of rational thought.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366246&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="iD_9wjRDYTC0u3319RqFFxgrAisWx1c5kCZnhnQNJfY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Angela (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366246">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366247" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506076489"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Interestingly enough, Paltrow's own mother, Blythe Danner, is a shill for Big Pharma: she does commercials for an osteoporosis drug, Prolia. There are also advertorial artciles wherein she discusses how she copes with the illness ( kale is great- as well as meds).</p> <p>It's funny how woo-slingers sometimes use 'women's empowerment' as a selling point. See also anti-vax and altie nutritionists.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366247&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1UHmvM_9KjHmpoHAtG1ulwOcSWNOCnOjfL4-L1C5E7E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366247">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366248" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506076794"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What is Paltrow but a greedy vampire preying on the finances and fears of women? Her goop empire is seriously in need of a stake through its heart.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366248&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="appU2BQAzNEU3mlKH5ZBaq8f3G5VXnn0PXnZ1KQAkh4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">doug (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366248">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366249" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506079846"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It is so typical of woo-sters to try to sell you something when all you need is natural mind-power to ward off psychic vampires.</p> <p>Better yet, fight fire with fire - learn to become a psychic vampire yourself. I found a great site that discusses the technique, beginning with complete relaxation:</p> <p>"...Now, feel every nerve in your body. Be aware of each and every one. Feel your energy traveling through you, out you, around you, and back into you. Feel the energy pulsate in you. Once you are able to do this comfortably, any time, any where, you are ready for the next step."</p> <p>"Now to feed. You should now be able to meditate and draw energy through you. The only difference is that instead of directing your energy, you must will someone else's. To do that, feel around. Find someone who has an abundance of energy. Once You have picked out your "victim" or "source", concentrate on them. If you must look at them, then do so. If not, picture them in your mind. Imagine their energy coming out of them and entering you. Continue to do this until you feel satisfied. You may feel the life force coming from them become too weak. In that case, stop, you do not want to leave them overly exhausted or be noticed. If you do not feel satisfied you may need to feed off more than one person."</p> <p>"As you get more practice, you will be able to this from a distance and over the phone. Perhaps you have a compassionate heart towards the unknowing victim, you can learn to feed off a crowd collectively."</p> <p>This is way cool! I am already feeding quite well off skeptical websites like this one. Feeling just a bit fatigued, minions? Bwa-ha-ha-ha!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366249&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fYN7zT89W6KAgj9e8KPU48Qf7s6kiE7HrT8MhKCTTTA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dangerous Bacon (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366249">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366250" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506081455"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Paltrow's audience is people spending somebody else's money. They are narcissists needing no sympathy. Paltrow is a con and and in this case, so are marks.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366250&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IBCSbewyy47ACQul4dfHaXeh9WD1oN6pfjBD8nITT_s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Spectator (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366250">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366251" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506081771"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Her audience is likely inclined to accept the science behind climate change; that many people accept science selectively, when it suits their world view is most troubling of all. What a bunch of hypocrites.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366251&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KquuqDJbkRCrNs13PRQNbrMKMl0oefby3ZhObFdXHoU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alena (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366251">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366252" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506082090"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Tom Brady (and his new book) are turning out to be target-rich environments for science-based commentators.</p> <p>The Patriot quarterback's book suggests that drinking lots of water protects you against sunburn, and attacks GMOs. It seems that Tom is also tight with a "personal guru", Alex Guerrero who was warned by the FTC to stop falsely referring to himself as a doctor, and who has reportedly peddled a supplement claimed to be effective against terminal cancer and other life-threatening diseases.</p> <p>"Brady and Guerrero are not merely inseparable; they are now also business partners in TB12, LLC, which has a sports therapy center headquartered at Patriot Place next door to Gillette Stadium. Over the past year, major profiles in Sports Illustrated and the New York Times magazine have focused on the unique relationship between Brady and Guerrero, without even hinting at Guerrero’s checkered past. As Guerrero continues to be monitored by the FTC under his lifetime ban, TB12 will likely be under a microscope to back up claims about the extraordinary training regimen Guerrero has sold Brady—and which Brady and Guerrero are now selling to the world."</p> <p>"Already, the Brady-Guerrero venture has produced a major misstep—one that brought the FTC storming back into Guerrero’s life. Though Guerrero had promised the FTC never to make outrageous claims about his supplements, by 2011 he had a new company, 6 Degree Nutrition, and a new miracle potion. Introduced at a time when NFL players, in particular, had become hyper-aware of the effects of head injuries, it was called NeuroSafe—a “seatbelt for your brain” that promised to protect users “from the consequences of sports-related traumatic brain injury.” The label boasted that the product was “Powered by TB12.” Guerrero, the snake-oil salesman, was back in business.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366252&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7IDu6Nm36GarMdrwdx1XXCB-RiHlhpw_4XezN0ynBhY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dangerous Bacon (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366252">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366253" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506082408"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Paltrow is missing a golden marketing opportunity. She could market wooden eggs for the man who thinks his female friend(s) are physics vampires instead of jade eggs.</p> <p>I don't have any citations on the effectiveness of this technique.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366253&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AxvtbBaHJHSWV6qU7_WK35yZDPnK8cT3AXxnu-A298A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366253">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366254" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506083337"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Zach- I get it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366254&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4Ib6hTIz0KINiFsfdL-KXFfGix9nBfvkG1_H1VwVc9c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">BBBlue (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366254">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366255" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506084152"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ DB</p> <p>Brady and Geurrero are so much worse than goop. Psychic vampire repellent and jade vagina eggs aren't going to keep anyone away from real medicine, or let them believe they're protected from some illness for which they're at risk. NeuroSafe is just as bad as the dangerous cancer scams that got Guerrero kicked out of California. TB12 isn't just a fly-by-night operation by these two guys. The Patriots have made heavy investments in it, I think in part as a means of giving Brady $$ under the table to avoid salary cap issues. But that makes it a billionaire-backed sports quackery operation. No surprise to me, both Brady and Pats owner Robert Craft are big fans of MAGA Trump.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366255&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="J4dM9_LydBfTQn4vOD8f7LlkkOBDQ7RudKaAhDn0il8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sadmar (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366255">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1366258" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506088537"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hmmm. I wasn't that familiar with this particular scam. I might have to look into it...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366258&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jaBk_l5oOX5ZxPD4y7GZpHR19cQTvAoQjOYuWngo1Dw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366258">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1366255#comment-1366255" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sadmar (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366256" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506085837"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I believe the best way to ward off psychic vampires is to stay far far away from Facebook and other social media outlets. ;-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366256&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="TXHfo5WFHS03_U8_XxrszUd40h_LnRrDH9p29FZD7KQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366256">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366257" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506088509"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>It’s funny how woo-slingers sometimes use ‘women’s empowerment’ as a selling point. See also anti-vax and altie nutritionists.</i></p> <p>See also the <b>tobacco industry</b> (a few decades ago).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366257&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FCAGQqp2hS1vcl7L_fjo3E2J3wX-10LKNkP8mAZdzFM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366257">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366259" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506090926"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>“Psychic Vampire” refers to a toxic person who drains the mental energy and undermines the emotional wellbeing of others. Why that phrase was chosen is puzzling.</i></p> <p>Think of it as weaponised projection mechanism, or New-Age witch-sniffing. "I am feeling low-energy and emotionally messed-up, therefore <b>someone else</b> must be to blame."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366259&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GAI28iijVB2SE2ghdRhuvbAYpf2aEUL3yrugstRz89g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366259">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366260" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506091043"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>Paltrow is missing a golden marketing opportunity.</i></p> <p>"Lisa, I would like to buy your rock wooden egg."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366260&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XHN1bzBIkw2xpC_RZ86qLV5SUI2ntZY017ONhjZuwdY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366260">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366261" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506091645"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sound waves? Moonlight?? LOVE?!?!? These are ingredients? I'm fascinated by the implication that there are more sound waves than moonlight in this stuff.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366261&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xGu-NviHvrDW4naQrz93UrYUWsPTloqIJBEBs7MoVQo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Harold Gaines (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366261">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366262" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506092452"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I third the idea that Gwynneth is doing the opposite of empowering women, she is reinforcing stereotypes about the irrationality of women. And "we know that the world follows the consciousness of women"... what? That is a vacuum of a sentence, it sounds like it came from the Chopra woo generator.</p> <p>Also, "toxic megacolon, anyone?" - thanks, but I'm trying to quit.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366262&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="l6nGiWFEdscbvzjky0A4sm6ImDipGeT8YHXATOE-Id8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="can&#039;t remember my &#039;nym">can&#039;t remember… (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366262">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366263" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506100149"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i> Feeling just a bit fatigued, minions? Bwa-ha-ha-ha!</i></p> <p>Yap, but then, your 3 previous paragraph hadn't had any effect. Just got off from a medical clinic with a script for good'Ol penicilin 875mg twice daily, 14 days.</p> <p>Radiography indicated infected sinus and right lung lobe. Doc told me to take one (pill) ASAP and come back if it's still infected.</p> <p>At the very least, I gave myself a good bday gift (tomorrow), It's been 2 days I stopped smoking cold turkey.</p> <p>Al</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366263&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Gz9lsRNbEEQEzeXmF7j3tpNxT7zqOZsLsqDrQ38rSzc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alain (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366263">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366264" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506102842"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The link to the article about Brady and his sidekick Guerrero quoted earlier:</p> <p><a href="http://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/blog/2015/10/09/tom-brady-alex-guerrero-neurosafe/">http://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/blog/2015/10/09/tom-brady-alex-guerr…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366264&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="suxMKG9tplORmJfY3v0F5uB1J4rsaJhJQtXdoKET7ns"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dangerous Bacon (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366264">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366265" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506106951"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Sadmar</p> <p>Tom Brady is a truly excellent quarterback, one who achieves through immense discipline despite being an antique (age ~40) in a brutally physical contest. You can see him working for every one of his team's wins, and often pulling them through when the other team has superior firepower (bigger, stronger, or faster players). He has every day for the rest of his career mapped. Every meal, every training session, every rest period is scheduled, it is how he can still be on the field playing opposite steroidal 20 year olds. </p> <p>Shame that's he's gotten associated with quackery, but nobody (well, nobody sane) goes to an NFL QB for supplements etc. Brady is an example of dedication, teamwork, skill and perseverance. Considering the number of people like Hernandez in the league, jumping on what is perhaps some undue influence from his trainer diminishes one of the positive examples in the NFL.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366265&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GalOyGE4X_eOwXHtOETqY13Wh4ZN-E_mSjCtbLbGGTo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">DrivingBy (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366265">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366266" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506108595"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Alain: Happy birthday and congratulations on quitting smoking. Good luck with eradicating the infection. Lungs are the worst when they're not working properly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366266&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Nnt0XAhmjl3yZSRat4YU6I9YfUXj5kKmtf4RA3kcS4Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Politicalguineapig (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366266">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366267" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506108996"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How is it supposed to repel a psychic vampire without garlic?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366267&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vf2bUGyfMNwWKQFPQcFRgot06eTdBlG5DE3xIQW-a7M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Mephistopheles O&#039;Brien">Mephistopheles… (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366267">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366268" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506123271"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Orac #27</p> <p>Do read the Globe article DB linked in #35. It's really good. It is however, from 2015, so it may not provide a timely hook for a blog post. The only update revealed by a quick web search is here: <a href="http://tinyurl.com/y9ke5cro">http://tinyurl.com/y9ke5cro</a>, from May of this year: Brady says his regimen (including NeuroSafe) has protected him from concussions, but his wife reports he's had enough of them she's worried about it. IIRC, Guerrero no longer runs the risk of selling and advertising his woo to the public at large. Rather it's incorporated into the 'comprehensive training and wellness' programs TB12 markets to 'elite' athletes (at an 'elite' price), the exact details of which aren't generally publicized. The Globe article on the Pats payments to TB12 is here: <a href="http://tinyurl.com/y9ke5cro">http://tinyurl.com/y9ke5cro</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366268&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Tz1Yo7sR_FlFJ0hi0e2djOp25KV-SYpzP7Bdqdi3tNs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sadmar (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366268">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366269" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506125253"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sadmar: No surprise to me, both Brady and Pats owner Robert Craft are big fans of MAGA Trump.</p> <p>Like I needed more reasons to dislike football.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366269&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PeHbufcyc_V4yHhz56VPGVRBI3Y6Xztr_PUfmJIHI10"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Politicalguineapig (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366269">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366270" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506161606"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I ward off psychic vampires by consuming the essences of juniper, coriander, quinine, and lime mixed with carbonated water and alcohol. While listening to "Tattoo Vampire" by Blue Öyster Cult.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366270&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mZoKNlxILubXiy9cYyDo5jpNUQwSOmp_1K5rKPkoglQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Mephistopheles O&#039;Brien">Mephistopheles… (not verified)</span> on 23 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366270">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366271" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506161659"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dear Orac,</p> <p>Whatever I did to first be put on permanent moderation and then move directly to your spam filter, I apologize.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366271&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pERAzAsd4ZWnmvpc5ehY0icIkLVVREliJGu0XwpClAQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Mephistopheles O&#039;Brien">Mephistopheles… (not verified)</span> on 23 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366271">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366272" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506166962"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Commentary on Tom Brady's quackery-laden new book (he's also into alkalizing woo):</p> <p><a href="https://deadspin.com/sports-illustrated-nakedly-shills-for-tom-bradys-danger-1797276280">https://deadspin.com/sports-illustrated-nakedly-shills-for-tom-bradys-d…</a></p> <p>Looks like Sports Illustrated is feeling the heat about promoting the book:</p> <p><a href="https://www.si.com/eats/2017/09/22/tom-brady-book-recipes-avocado-ice-cream-tb12">https://www.si.com/eats/2017/09/22/tom-brady-book-recipes-avocado-ice-c…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366272&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fjlQ00Uq3hXYL8elvVL50RXQW8DuSqleJMIAxJhNK8g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dangerous Bacon (not verified)</span> on 23 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366272">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366273" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506182634"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Is a "gem elixir" some kind of very finely ground crystal, or is this something that has met a gem in the past? I'm thinking either light passed through a gemstone to fall on a container of water or alcohol, or a small piece of that gemstone put into the container for some arbitrary amount of time. </p> <p>For the sake of the customers and those around them, I hope it's not tiny bits of rock being aerosolized into the air around them. That reminds me of the lung damage caused by all the crap people downwind of Lower Manhattan inhaled in the weeks after the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center.</p> <p>[Realistically, my suspicion is that whatever they're claiming, that part is just distilled water, making it harmless, like most homeopathic nostrums.]</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366273&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8l2WMx6Qq0L0JHtVVtpIfy8sF8Q6GpK4FGjE2OLiwS0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Vicki (not verified)</span> on 23 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366273">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366274" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506219084"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>My best friend did it with me and she ate a banana on the second day, and I was like, “You f%$ked it up. All results are off.”</p></blockquote> <p>Me thinks her friend needs some psychic vampire repellent against her bad vibes...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366274&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6d0B7HwGVmV1hIzsOXhV_MZU7yc9zSg5MtgABUILoTw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">LouV (not verified)</span> on 23 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366274">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366275" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506264749"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Last night I warded off vampires with the essences of juniper, cardamom, quinine, and other botanicals infused in alcohol and carbonated water.</p> <p>However, I don't believe it can be an adequate vampire repellent without garlic.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366275&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-QP0PImCU-SQTY2JgxYJAx3oJbktzuuH0TFcDvxa9Cw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cullen Johnson (not verified)</span> on 24 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366275">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366276" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506271086"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>so how much poop does a person have in them? i wonder that w/e i hear the weird 20+ pound people. someday i will get over my fear and google it</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366276&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rKncjbNbnzJeXVg1SS-DZnGpfwQyGjmqrGwM3wG5Eik"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kerlyssa (not verified)</span> on 24 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366276">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366277" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506293564"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Er, judging from my exposure to babies, about a pound.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366277&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="d_UpI1CPCjysPzv1biZ2-eqgkp8ZJ2ISoKEsdNuLpzM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Politicalguineapig (not verified)</span> on 24 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366277">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366278" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506358787"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Quoth GP: <i>So while he was having radiation and the surgery and everything, and eating through a feeding tube, I thought, “Well, I’m pushing this can of processed protein directly into his stomach,” and I remember thinking, “Is this really healing? This seems weird. There’s a bunch of chemicals in this shit.</i><br /> So, I'm curious. How else did she think her father was going to get the nutrients he needed while modern medicine went about healing him from whatever he had (I'm guessing cancer)?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366278&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="S9j9JHdFvqBRWzToERfKldw9JiYi17zIG8aU8h9PqRo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">alison (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366278">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366279" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506360801"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Alison: Photosynthesis?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366279&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="w-1nHsrE3I4rI1Q6MHb9mrb8bkrFaMcliXCXmx4Erd8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Politicalguineapig (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366279">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366280" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506361021"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p> so how much poop does a person have in them? </p></blockquote> <p>I tried to answer this question. While preparing for a colonoscopy, I tried to keep track of my weight. However, it takes a coupla days - first there is low fiber diet, then liquids, then a gallon (call it eight pounds) of some nasty, thick, salty tasting mixture, consumed and lost over a coupla hours, that not only leaves you with zero poop, you're lucky to have any bones left.</p> <p>With all of that, I couldn't get a good read, but it can't be more than a pound or two at most.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366280&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jOWB4l04RcWTzkTfoXoS8QLJTfLQWRX5ne0gz3A5dx8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366280">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366281" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506370140"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"... some nasty, thick, salty tasting mixture ..."<br /> probably a solution of polyethylene glycol with added electrolytes</p> <p>Great stuff, PEG. All sorts of uses.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366281&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9eoiY2VTM9LHjGs8d5TVv1Y1uJPpSOSkhmytvhBhPos"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">doug (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366281">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366282" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506372900"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>When I used to do autopsies, we didn't weigh fecal matter but could certainly estimate the amount. It was usually less than a kilogram. 20 lb is absurd.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366282&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cV_ZOCCdHaV0lmSn9Vtee_Kzp1taQ85HhfrGr-GiAeo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">TBruce (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366282">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366283" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506379585"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p> Great stuff, PEG. All sorts of uses. </p></blockquote> <p>If the intended use is "produce a case of the squirts that can only be described as 'copious, sudden, and undeniable'", then I would agree.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366283&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qyUjZREgddn8JN2fLOidljEFm1nuotYrklIqyEeYsSw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366283">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366284" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506381717"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>TBruce -when I was younger and more foolish, I used to weigh myself obsessively and found the difference between one bowel movement and another was negligible So much for the mythical 20 lbs,. By the by, I first heard that story about 30 years ago. At least two colonoscopies later, and I've still haven't lost 40 lb from preps </p> <p>Guess it sucks to be human!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366284&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gX40rOF0MvipEWV6IlEewz3kqKHNhF6jeS5SfNEQ37o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jane Ostentatious (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366284">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366285" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506392963"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I've had a proper detox* - due to acute kidney failure, I'd advise people against experiencing that - and that involves sticking a great big tube in the vein in your neck and cycle your blood through a big machine.</p> <p>I'm pretty sure that there were no mystical crystals involved. Definitely felt much better afterwards. Strange that Gwyneth dosen't offer it.. </p> <p>*OK, plasma exchange.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366285&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2WqUO-lY2GEemvqD5Hdvwpg9l9SF8CMfmrQJpvdT7kY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Andrew Dodds (not verified)</span> on 25 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366285">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366286" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506412717"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>what a bunch of prissy shit posting.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366286&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ymTqyF7uznN81pR91eNEqtw78xihK33AdBpuVwm2iic"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="quacks accusing quacks">quacks accusin… (not verified)</span> on 26 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366286">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366287" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506417927"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>what a bunch of prissy shit posting.</p></blockquote> <p>Fainting couches and clutching pearls can be rented at reasonable rates.<br /> You may apply for a position as tone troll, but given the current waiting list it is unlikely that a position will come open in this decade.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366287&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8icSn8NGx5fY2WUwrMn-c-3iu6Gy3eH-GkLPvD9UOIA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">doug (not verified)</span> on 26 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366287">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366288" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506448091"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>If the intended use is “produce a case of the squirts that can only be described as ‘copious, sudden, and undeniable'”, then I would agree.</p></blockquote> <p>Balistic spring to mind too.</p> <p>Al</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366288&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MdGmZlx0GFaoI8bvz_9sMc7VQUlXNViJdUuFVnO_rCQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alain (not verified)</span> on 26 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366288">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366289" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506526627"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"Whatever I did to first be put on permanent moderation and then move directly to your spam filter, I apologize."</p> <p>So it's not just me? I thought I was being moderated due to my psychic vampirism. :p</p> <p>Let me try my other email...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366289&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="wuHlBpX6R8MapkO8CP7dtW63XiQXlSJ122SA4Jxpqoo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Roadstergal (not verified)</span> on 27 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366289">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1366290" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1506530990"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Inasmuch as I can't leave my current kitten socialization/HDD replacement spot to go get a T6 screwdriver (nor does copying and pasting work on this phone), I'll mention that a pair of closely spaced colonoscopies has led me to consider GoLytely merely an acquired taste. Best served cold.</p> <p>And I never scored better than a C on my prep, despite absolute determination for the second one.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1366290&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="R4ria5JXJtPpzzsMk8rklXw4WgtbmJZLNml8hw0Z4m8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 27 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1366290">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/insolence/2017/09/22/gwyneth-paltrows-goop-psychic-vampire-repellent-as-female-empowerment%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 22 Sep 2017 05:00:39 +0000 oracknows 22628 at https://scienceblogs.com Does the flu vaccine cause miscarriages? https://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2017/09/14/does-the-flu-vaccine-cause-miscarriages <span>Does the flu vaccine cause miscarriages?</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The reason there wasn't a post yesterday is simple. The night before, I was feeling a bit under the weather. As a result, I went to bed early, neglecting my blogly responsibilities. As I result, I missed the release of a whopper of a study that normally would have been all over like...well...choose your metaphor. On the other hand, the one day delay isn't necessarily all bad because it lets me see the reaction of cranks to this study, the better to apply some not-so-Respectful Insolence to it. The crankiest of these cranks, of course, is Mike Adams, a grifter deep in the thrall of any form of pseudoscience that he can sell to burnish his brand and keep the rubes buying and who knows how to whip his minions into a fine frothy head of anti-pharma conspiracy mongering. In actuality, though, I was a little bit disappointed, as Adams was <a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20170914014113/http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-09-13-cdc-funded-study-confirms-flu-shots-linked-to-spontaneous-abortions-vaccine-experts-rush-to-explain-away-the-findings.html" rel="nofollow">almost restrained</a>, at least by his usual crazed standards:</p> <!--more--><blockquote> A CDC-funded medical study being published by the medical journal <em>Vaccine</em> has confirmed a shocking link between flu shots and spontaneous abortions in pregnant women. The study was rejected by two previous medical journals before <em>Vaccine</em> agreed to publish it, further underscoring the tendency for medical journals to censor any science that doesn’t agree with their pro-vaccine narratives. <p>“A study published today in <em>Vaccine</em> suggests a strong association between receiving repeated doses of the seasonal influenza vaccine and miscarriage,” <a href="http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2017/09/study-signals-association-between-flu-vaccine-miscarriage">writes CIDRAP</a>, the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy.</p> <p>“A puzzling study of U.S. pregnancies found that women who had miscarriages between 2010 and 2012 were more likely to have had back-to-back annual flu shots that included protection against swine flu,” reports <a href="https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-09-prompts-flu-vaccine-miscarriage.html">Medical Xpress</a>, a pro-vaccine news site that promotes vaccine industry interests. Notice that the opening paragraph of their study assumed the study couldn’t possibly be true. It’s “puzzling” that mercury in flu shots could cause spontaneous abortions, you see, because these people have no understanding of biochemistry and the laws of cause and effect.</p></blockquote> <p>Actually, as has been documented so many times before, it is Mike Adams who has no understanding of biochemistry—or any other science—other than what it takes for him to portray himself to his gullible followers as a "real scientist." As for the "laws of cause and effect," whenever someone says something like that in reference to an epidemiological study, I know he's really, really clueless, because if there's anything that's very difficult to do in an epidemiological study with reliability it's determining cause-and-effect. That's why the cardinal rule of epidemiology is that correlation does not equal causation. It might, but usually it doesn't, and it usually takes a whole lot more than just one study with a correlation to start to suggest causation. This is particularly true when a study like the one Adams is gloating about is such an outlier, which this study most definitely is, as you will see. It's also an exercise in data dredging that illustrates the danger of small numbers in studies like this.</p> <p>Let's go to the <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X17308666">study</a> itself. I can't help but note that Frank DeStefano of the CDC is a co-author. DeStefano, as you might recall, is one of those CDC investigators that antivax conspiracy theorists like those who made the propaganda film <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2016/07/18/in-which-andrew-wakefield-and-del-bigtrees-antivaccine-documentary-vaxxed-is-reviewed-with-insolence/">VAXXED</a> portray as one of the main villains in the <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/2015/08/25/kevin-barry-you-magnificent-bastard-i-read-your-antivaccine-book/">"CDC whistleblower" conspiracy theory</a>. Also, several of the authors receive pharma money for research support. Nicola Klein, for instance, receives research support from GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi Pasteur, Pfizer, Merck, MedImmune, Novartis, and Protein Science, while Allison Naleway receives funding from GlaxoSmithKline, MedImmune, and Pfizer. Others receive support from MedImmune and Novavax. So basically, this was a study funded by the CDC and carried out by CDC scientists and scientists receiving significant pharma funding. I just couldn't resist pointing that out. I know, I know, antivaxers will claim that the findings were so compelling that not even the CDC and pharma shills could hide them, but it would amuse me to point these things out to antivaxers.</p> <p>Yet, here we see Del Bigtree, producer of VAXXED, gleefully citing J.B. Handley gloating over this study:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr" xml:lang="en">Tough breaking news for <a href="https://twitter.com/ChelseaClinton">@ChelseaClinton</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/DrPanMD">@DrPanMD</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/doritmi">@doritmi</a> FLU SHOT linked to MISCARRIAGE! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/endvaxinjury?src=hash">#endvaxinjury</a> <a href="https://t.co/6JwjnsAviY">https://t.co/6JwjnsAviY</a></p> <p>— Del Bigtree (@delbigtree) <a href="https://twitter.com/delbigtree/status/908085483799928833">September 13, 2017</a></p></blockquote> <script async="" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script><p> I wonder if he knows that DeStefano is a co-author. He probably doesn't care, because DeStefano, like any scientist, can be a hero or a villain depending solely upon whether he produces information or studies that agrees with the antivaccine narrative that the flu vaccine is not just useless but dangerous. Be that as it may, the article above is a typical bit of Handley's Dunning-Krugger arrogance of ignorance, even more full of hyperbole and nonsense than the usual Mike Adams' endeavors in that area. Indeed, Handley even uses the <a href="https://www.skepticalraptor.com/skepticalraptorblog.php/vaccine-package-inserts-debunking-myths/">argumentum ad package insert</a> gambit. (Whenever I see that gambit used by an antivaxer, my estimation of his cluelessness goes up several notches, which for Handley is really saying something.) In any case, you can get a feel for how much the authors of this study are stretching to find a correlation—any correlation—between influenza vaccines and miscarriages that they're looking at combinations of vaccines by their brief justification for the <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X17308666">study</a>:</p> <blockquote><p> Since 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and other organizations have recommended routine influenza vaccination for pregnant women regardless of gestational age [1,2]. Influenza in pregnancy can cause serious, life-threatening illness in both the mother and fetus, as demonstrated during the 2009 pandemic [3,4]. Numerous studies of influenza vaccine during pregnancy have not identified serious safety concerns [5–12], but relatively few investigations have evaluated vaccination in the first trimester, a period when the embryo is highly vulnerable to teratogens and other factors [5,13]. A case-control study conducted by the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) demonstrated that influenza vaccination during early pregnancy in the 2005–06 and 2006–07 influenza seasons was not associated with spontaneous abortion (SAB) [14].</p> <p>The emergence of a pandemic influenza virus, A/California/ 7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1), led to rapid development and widespread use of vaccines containing pH1N1 antigens. Several studies have evaluated the safety of vaccines containing pH1N1 in pregnancy, but few have focused on outcomes in early pregnancy [15–19]. Using a design and protocol similar to the previous study [14], we conducted a case-control study to determine if receipt of influenza vaccine containing pH1N1 was associated with SAB.</p></blockquote> <p>Notice the eight studies cited (references 5-12) that failed to find significant safety issues with the vaccine in pregnancy, and a study (<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23262941">reference 14</a>) using VSD data failed to find an association between flu vaccination with spontaneous abortion. That's actually a lot of data for the safety of the flu vaccine during pregnancy, which makes me wonder what the justification for yet another study looking for an association between influenza vaccination and miscarriages. If I were a funding agency and received a grant application to do a study like this with text above in the "Background and Significance" or the "Impact" section, my first reaction would be: Why on earth would we fund this? It's all been done before, many, many times. Yet the CDC funded this study. So much for antivax claims about the CDC not being concerned about vaccine safety and not being willing to look for adverse reactions due to vaccines.</p> <p>I also find it rather odd that the authors would say that few studies have been done looking for a correlation between vaccination against influenza, when in fact there have been a lot, many well-designed, and they've pretty much all been negative. Whenever you see a study that finds something a lot different from the bulk of the studies that have been done before, the first question to be asked is: Are the results of the current study so robust that they indicate a hole in the existing data addressing the question asked that we should begin to question the cumulative results of all the studies that have gone before? Keep that question in mind as I continue.</p> <p>Also consider the bias that exists in journals to publish novel findings. As this <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/09/13/researchers-find-hint-of-a-link-between-flu-vaccine-and-miscarriage">news report</a> points out, this is the "first study to identify a potential link between miscarriage and the flu vaccine." That's almost certainly the reason that it was published. Adams, in his haste to portray as a conspiracy to silence, inadvertently tells me something. That this paper was rejected by two previous journals is not surprising to me. What is surprising is that <em>Vaccine</em> ultimately accepted it. Of course, how Adams would know that this paper was submitted elsewhere and rejected, I don't know, which is why I have my doubts about Adams' claims.</p> <p>So what about the study itself? First, it's a case-control study. Basically, that means that the authors found a cohort of women who had miscarriages (the cases) and compared them to a cohort of women who didn't have miscarriages but instead delivered full term infants or had stillbirths during the study period (the controls). The authors chose two flu seasons (2010 to 2012) and asked if women who had miscarriages were more likely to have been vaccinated for influenza within 28 days prior to miscarriage, as well as for different time periods before miscarriage.</p> <p>The most critical aspect of any case control study if, of course, the matching of cases to controls. The idea is to match them as closely as possible on all relevant factors other than the condition under investigation (in this case, miscarriage). Not uncommonly, investigators will do a 2:1 match, controls to cases, in order to make the comparison more robust. It's not mandatory, and Donohue et al chose not to do this. In this study, cases had SAB and controls had live births or stillbirths and were matched on site, date of last menstrual period, and age. I also note that the database they used was the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD). As I like to say, the VSD is an excellent rebuke to antivaxers who claim that doctors don't care about vaccine safety. It's a database designed to document adverse events associated with vaccination, and it's a huge database. I've discussed it before on <a href="http://respectfulinsolence.com/?s=%22vaccine+safety+datalink%22">more than one occasion</a>.</p> <p>So what did the study find? Here's a summary of the cases analyzed:</p> <p><a href="/files/insolence/files/2017/09/StudySchema2.png"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/files/2017/09/StudySchema2-450x282.png" alt="" width="450" height="282" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-11052" /></a></p> <p>if you look at the tables in the paper, the first thing you will notice is that the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for miscarriage as a function of having received the flu vaccine are nearly all around 1.0 or not statistically different from 1.0. Obviously, there are exceptions. Basically, the study found that, if a woman had consecutively received a flu vaccine containing the 2009 H1N1 virus the season before and had the flu vaccine in one of the two seasons studied, the aOR in the 1–28 days was 7.7 (95% CI 2.2–27.3). Otherwise, the aOR was 1.3 (95% CI 0.7–2.7) among women not vaccinated in the previous season; i.e., not statistically significant from 1.0, meaning no detectable difference in miscarriage rates compared to women who had not been vaccinated. This effect was noted in both seasons.</p> <p>Now here's where you should be skeptical.</p> <blockquote><p> This study has several important limitations. First, the most striking findings relate to the association between SAB and IIV [inactivated influenza vaccine] in women who previously received pH1N1-containing vaccine. This interaction effect was not an a priori hypothesis; the results were generated in a post hoc analysis with small numbers of women in the various subgroups. Although the interaction was observed in each of the two seasons studied, the point estimates were substantially larger (though not statistically different) in the first season for reasons that are unclear. Second, although most cases had an ultrasound, assignment of a precise date of SAB was challenging. With guidance from an obstetrician we integrated different types of information from the medical record (e.g., ultrasound results, clinical and laboratory findings, provider notes) to estimate the timing of the SAB. Estimation of SAB dates was independent of vaccination status so any error should bias the results toward the null (i.e., non-differential misclassification). Third, we studied only women who had clinically confirmed SAB; the proportion of women with clinically unrecognized pregnancy loss is uncertain but may be substantial [50,51]. Our results could be biased if women who sought care for SAB were more likely to be vaccinated in the 28-day exposure window.</p></blockquote> <p>So what we're looking at is an association, nothing more. It's an association with a lot of caveats, too. Basically, having found nothing more than one association with an aOR of 2.0 for the 1-28 day window of exposure to the influenza vaccine before miscarriage that was barely statistically significant (95% confidence interval: 1.1-3.6), the authors did a post hoc analysis looking for other associations. (Never mind that the "association" they found was eminently unimpressive given the size of the confidence intervals.) "Post hoc" means that they did additional analyses not originally specified. Basically investigators don't usually do post hoc analyses if there is a robust association in their data. They do it when they fail to find an association or only find an unimpressive association that is not robust. Also, post hoc analyses are <a href="http://journals.lww.com/epidem/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2010&amp;issue=05000&amp;article=00017&amp;type=abstract">prone to type 1 errors</a>, which means finding a statistically significant "association" where there is none; i.e., finding a false positive. When the numbers in the subgroup are so small and the study is observational (i.e., retrospective), that tendency is even stronger. Then there was the issue that the cases and controls were not as comparable as one would like in a case control study. For example, cases were significantly older than controls and more likely to be African-American, to have a history of 2 spontaneous abortions, and to have smoked during pregnancy. The authors did some correcting for age and history of spontaneous abortions, but it's questionable to me whether it was adequate.</p> <p>Basically, the authors did what we refer to as a subgroup analysis, in this case the subgroup being women who had received H1N1 vaccination the season before they received the flu vaccination in the seasons examined? That clearly wasn't a primary hypothesis being tested. Rather, it was a hypothesis the authors clearly came up with while doing the study. One wonders if this analysis was prespecified or whether the protocol was changed midway through. I only ask that because antivaxers went wild over claims by the "CDC whistleblower" that the Atlanta MMR study changed its protocol part way through the study, but, here, where the analysis seems to suggest such an "adjustment" during the study (although it is certainly possible that the H1N1 analysis was prespecified in the original protocol, given the choice of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 flu seasons), we hear...silence. Whatever the case, there clearly was post hoc analysis strongly resembling p-hacking going on here, in which the investigators, having failed to find much, started looking at other potential associations. Certainly, it smells that way.</p> <p>Speculations about the protocol aside, the investigators found what they found, namely an aOR of 7.7 for cases versus controls for exposure to the H1N1 vaccine the year before plus the flu vaccine within 1-28 days before their miscarriages. This was based on some very small numbers, though, namely 14 miscarriages and 4 controls. In other words, this is almost certainly a statistical fluke, given that it was only found for women who had received H1N1 the season before and had received the flu vaccine within 28 days of their miscarriage, and that the association was not observed for pretty much any other time window or combination. When considering such a result, one also has to consider biological mechanism and plausibility, and it is just not very plausible from a biological or immunological standpoint that this combination of flu vaccines—and only this combination—given only during a specific time window will cause miscarriages. Like Dr. Gregory Poland, the editor of <em>Vaccine</em>, I don't believe these findings, either.</p> <p>I particularly don't believe them in light of what we already know, based on studies Tara Haelle <a href="http://www.redwineandapplesauce.com/2014/01/08/the-real-story-on-the-flu-vaccine-during-pregnancy/">summarized the data</a> with respect to flu vaccines and miscarriages, stillbirths, and birth defects in 2014, using mainly studies published during the prior two years, and the results were very consistent and overwhelming: There was no association between vaccination for influenza and adverse fetal outcomes. Just for yucks, I did some PubMed searches myself for more recent studies, and found basically the same thing, but instead of listing those studies, I'll just refer you to a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25409473">recent large meta-analysis</a> that found that the risk of stillbirth was actually lower in women vaccinated against influenza and no difference in the risk of spontaneous abortion. In other words, this new study is an outlier. It's such an outlier, that scientists are correct to be very skeptical of its results. Heck, even the authors are skeptical of its results. Unfortunately, they're not so skeptical that they don't resist making the call for "more research." They'll probably get the funding for that "more research," and then when the inevitable negative study is finally published, no one will remember it. They'll all remember this study, and, of course, the antivaccine movement will be flogging it for years to come.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a></span> <span>Thu, 09/14/2017 - 02:50</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/antivaccine-nonsense" hreflang="en">Antivaccine nonsense</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/clinical-trials" hreflang="en">Clinical trials</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/medicine" hreflang="en">medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/case-control-study" hreflang="en">case control study</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/frank-destefano" hreflang="en">Frank DeStefano</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/h1n1" hreflang="en">H1N1</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/influenza" hreflang="en">influenza</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/jb-handley" hreflang="en">j.b. handley</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/miscarriage" hreflang="en">miscarriage</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vaccine" hreflang="en">vaccine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/clinical-trials" hreflang="en">Clinical trials</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/medicine" hreflang="en">medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365541" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505373868"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Me. Adams seems to have taken the point about two rejections from this article. Which did a reasonable job at pointing out the nuances, though without your more in depth analysis of the science.</p> <p><a href="https://t.co/qBGRBZKaJk?amp=1">https://t.co/qBGRBZKaJk?amp=1</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365541&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6N5EgLNFVsvREPdybB-ZocpOumYFc0SnjNk83rIncBw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dorit Reiss (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365541">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365542" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505375396"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>And just to add, miscarriage can certainly follow H1N1 infection. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/21345415/">https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/21345415/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365542&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="h5EDKTPC5nfKKLVrXUAKW7aAwW3F9suhxzbTkms_968"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dorit Reiss (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365542">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365543" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505375718"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks you for this review. As I suspected, the confidence intervals include 0 in which one with a basic understanding of statistics would realize the association is more likely due to chance and therefore is not significant. </p> <p>Anti-vax sites are already spreading this as "evidence" for the evils of the influenza vaccines. Yet one would have to believe a sub-group analysis of a tiny group of patients(which is prone to bias and error as mentioned above) over meta-analyses with much larger number of patients which reveal the opposite trends. This is an immense error in deductive reasoning and is a classic example of "cherry-picking."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365543&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2GAzjMhsXkJkF1VQknL9zm7HFkJKBX9VcSYjbLwDrfA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Internal Medicine Resident">Internal Medic… (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365543">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365544" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505376708"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As a retired epidemiologist, according to my education, training and experience, post hoc analyses can only be used to generate hypotheses to be possibly tested in additional research which is exactly what the authors concluded with: "This study does not and cannot establish a causal relationship between repeated influenza vaccination and SAB, but further research is warranted." I guess Mike Adams and the gaggle of morons at Age of Autism missed this part. </p> <p>However, as you said, the sample size was too small, as can also be seen by the wide confidence intervals. In addition, as the number of analyses of any research increases, multiple comparisons, the risk of "randomly" finding something significant increases. So, given the strength of the already existing evidence, I disagree, as you do, with the authors that "further research is warranted."</p> <p>Typical also of antivaccinationists is downplaying the risks from the actual disease: "Certainly the risk is far worse than the sickness." (Yesterday's article, Flu Vaccine and Miscarriage, in Age of Autism). I guess in their minds that getting flu while pregnant doesn't pose a risk. Sometimes, when reading them, I ask the question: "What planet are they from?"</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365544&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="e-sN3qsrIMfPICQiE6PPfnGagd_4gfAi4BbhmzPp5CY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH">Joel A. Harris… (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365544">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365545" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505377019"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I don't recall where I read it, but didn't the group with more miscarriages have women at higher risk, anyway, than the controls? IIRC, there were more smokers, older women, diabetics in that group. And they are statistically more likely to miscarry anyway. (If I wasn't working, I'd go search my home computer for the item).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365545&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="B6r_ROtRvo3iBZngAXehvVO9lfyJazqj5ZgV_lqQbp8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MI Dawn (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365545">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365546" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505378095"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dawn, it was included in a comment I made yesterday, quoting from this source -</p> <p><a href="http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2017/09/study-signals-association-between-flu-vaccine-miscarriage">http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2017/09/study-signals-associ…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365546&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yaGSy5O0rCd8fdvL2jatud6spTd0UaV12mt8ryOgqBU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365546">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365547" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505379365"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm in my first trimester and I'm getting my flu shot.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365547&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lKzp1EjBeg5zgMGXoQvQdRmNO2sJDnexCYEWJS9l5bk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">PandaDeath (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365547">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365548" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505379619"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks, Johnny!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365548&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4WfpPEtRQJFrcFI0UA98w-gxDbkBRu5QPAfYPFj5uiA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MI Dawn (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365548">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365549" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505380527"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Refresh my memory here: is the VSD the database that includes a rather generous definition of vaccine-associated injuries, or is that some other database? Because if it is the database I am thinking of, then the failure of earlier studies to find an association is especially damning, given that database's bias toward overreporting adverse reactions to vaccines (which presumably would include miscarriage).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365549&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aP2GrV4tHHhYcNI_SnewrMOY_gSiUlE-RQArOo_9QaA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365549">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365550" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505381665"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So it's another case of picking out the one outlier and deciding that it must be proof of absolutely everything evil they believe about vaccines?</p> <p>And of course that's without even bearing in mind that people who get flu vaccines are more likely to have health conditions that put them at greater risk of miscarriage to begin with, such as smokers, asthmatics, people with COPD, people with heart disease, advanced maternal age, etc.</p> <p>To Adams, of course, rejection by two journals is evidence of a conspiracy. To the rest of us, it's reason to ask why the paper got rejected twice. Since the paper gave a whisper of evidence that he desired, he skipped that question and just went straight for the conspiracy theory.</p> <p>The obligatory XKCD on statistically significant outliers: <a href="https://xkcd.com/882/">https://xkcd.com/882/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365550&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1LrrW6-I0HuuuIetGZnNFUP25afB36MNr6bJhqEVHwE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Calli Arcale (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365550">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365551" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505381842"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm throwing this study out to the epidemiology students to see who can point out the most sources of bias and confounding. I would say that this a jump-off to more studies, but, truth be told, there is a lot of understanding of what the flu vaccine does for pregnant women at a population level: IT PREVENTS COMPLICATIONS FROM INFLUENZA. And that understanding comes from better studies than this one as well as observational studies gained from outbreak investigations.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365551&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1Vd1oXoDk5ENGSQ7H3tjOfy98-n8k6UsAWJ-GAf25MU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ren (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365551">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365569" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505393383"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Those sources of bias and confounding don't happen to include the older age, higher rate of smoking, and higher proportion of African-American women among the cases compared to controls, now would it?</p> <p>I was actually wondering: Why is it that the investigators couldn't match their controls to cases better? Why didn't they do a 2:1 match, which could have decreased this problem?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365569&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rwe0zKVmja9AKViLEVP-0Q6IYhKSRlh_Wlk8AOZJ6AI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365569">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365551#comment-1365551" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ren (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365552" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505381988"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Side note: JB Handley has blocked me on medium.com from seeing his posts... If I'm signed in. I've been very critical of his pseudo-science, and he seemed to have difficulties replying to the facts I've prevented. So much for transparency and open discussion. Then again, it's JB. He compared Wakefield to Jesus, so...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365552&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yVoWR6szqk0waY9NvgUyuefBjyoIA0VNt2JEoJ4MuPM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ren (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365552">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365553" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505384259"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>-A few days ago, AoA ran an article by Ginger Taylor which claimed that the CDC placed a ' gag order' on its employees so that they wouldn't speak to the media...<br /> NOW WE KNOW WHY!!!1! </p> <p>- TMR's 'Professor' O'Toole has been ranting against the AAP's position on Hep B vaccines at birth<br /> -btw- TMR has much less posts recently.</p> <p>- Just before the article quoted above, Mikey Boy fumed about celebrities' support of Planned Parenthood (which is solely abortion, in his mind).</p> <p> Knowing Mike as I do I can imagine a parody he might write:</p> <p>" Hello LADIES!<br /> Are you bothered by one of those pesky unwanted pregnancies? Are you worried about the HIGH price of abortions over at BabyKillers, LTD?<br /> Well, here at HexAll drugs, your local toxin pusher, we have a great solution for your problems! Get one of our flu vaccines and you can dodge both a minor illness and 18 years od caretaking all in one shot! **</p> <p>** I know, I know my grammar is too good</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365553&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="QxFZs0iJMgPRI0KhjdetPQXoL9X0DKVeplouwjU3Sgw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365553">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365554" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505385209"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>He compared Wakefield to Jesus, so…</p></blockquote> <p>Both Handley and Wakefield are legends in their own minds. So it makes sense for them to compare each other with a certain first century CE carpenter-turned-rabbi.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365554&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2j_3fDBit9qLAGY17T37PbRoKTnFTUDTyNEr82hXbk0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365554">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365555" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505386210"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Eric Lund #9, I think you are referring to the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS). Vaccine Safety Datalink uses data from AVERS and other sources to monitor Vaccine safety.<br /><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/ensuringsafety/monitoring/vsd/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/ensuringsafety/monitoring/vsd/index.h…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365555&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UxKzq3Y3_ZROmWRSlbsSVZJ7UnQD_vT7TEoHb_CXJXA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Julian Frost (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365555">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365556" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505388438"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"an aOR of 2.0 for the 1-28 day window of exposure to the influenza vaccine before miscarriage that was not statistically significant"</p> <p>It was: "The overall adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.6) for vaccine receipt in the 28-day exposure window"</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365556&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Hjlb5_b0VRFpFp55wr4reuDeDLRo9vgvwCMUZ2nD_XQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jake Crosby (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365556">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365557" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505389096"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>Both Handley and Wakefield are legends in their own minds. So it makes sense for them to compare each other with a certain first century CE carpenter-turned-rabbi.</p></blockquote> <p>Or Gene Simmons, but even that's probably too charitable.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365557&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tigleGqSZ48J8si-Wv1UrdnEKcx_lO9D3RiOQ41d9LY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365557">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365558" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505389575"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OK, Jake. Now explain to us all, as someone who *should* understand statistics, why that's not statistically significant. (Hint...I hated, loathed, despised stats and I can do it).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365558&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fuuTUKc70u-Sy7byfgC2fZOe-lhgRWKQxUUwWbxsHuk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MI Dawn (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365558">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365565" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505392150"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The text was originally intended to read "barely statistically significant," which is accurate. I have altered the text to be in line with my intent. When one writes blog posts in one's spare time late at night, such things occasionally happen; one occasionally makes mistakes. The difference between a certain Gnat and me is that I correct my editing errors.</p> <p>In any event, "statistically significant" or not, given the very wide confidence intervals, the lack of robustness, and the differences between the cases and the controls in the frequency of known risk factors for spontaneous abortion (the cases being older, more likely to smoke, and more likely to have had a history of &gt;2 spontaneous abortions) the association reported is eminently unimpressive. Hmmm. I think I'll add some text very much like that to the post. :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365565&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Su1t38Dc3p9hBaOSnLLJTontbA-VOIW8QSq_j4nQa_Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365565">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365558#comment-1365558" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MI Dawn (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365559" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505390865"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My only comment today is going to be this: To all Orac minions a virtual cigar. My Daughter was born at about 6am PDT in Chiang Mia. She is healthy and weighed 6.2 lbs and was 19 inches long.</p> <p>Everyone have a very good day; I am going to.</p> <p>Rich</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365559&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jgS-nK3CW8ZfFCxdn06SrLIFnack03Rk-BdsqVuBpSY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365559">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365560" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505391057"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Mazal tov!!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365560&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jQi6EFa5wo3ICej-sBAYNAolkSeVOYcA7tfZK8iO-Kk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dorit Reiss (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365560">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365559#comment-1365559" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365568" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505393271"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congrats!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365568&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PpOrGh3EClRRGw_Et5gSLB3MC8G4Zn_oLQ5u8b10Qdc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365568">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365559#comment-1365559" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365561" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505391397"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congratulations Rich, but please keep those cigars very far away. I really hate that smell.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365561&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Hhfx2G-J-UoFUq9zyAsK0yADazejjKCvlPVp_i4mKVw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renate (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365561">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365562" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505391551"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renate, that is why I said virtual cigars. I don't like them myself.</p> <p>Thanks Dorit</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365562&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FI1EBdjDbAoAF9uBS8WswYadCpjYxkPeYsr3J1jKKjQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365562">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365563" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505391667"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congratulations, Rich! Honored to share a virtual cigar with you.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365563&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="QtjWixFgoVdvpbPSpsNiK8p04HDAkHikxGeea5Fl3bY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365563">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365564" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505391697"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@MI Dawn:</p> <p>I won't, because it is statistically significant. Orac is wrong and should retract.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365564&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2xbxM0ceBmTygAd546jwfwU7C7moSdRwrtlTpJoJtiU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jake Crosby (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365564">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365566" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505392842"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congrats, Rich! May you know much joy in your daughter. They are wonderful things to have (I know - I have 2 of them.)</p> <p>@Jake: barely, as Orac noted. My stats prof (to whom I showed this) said I was wrong, it is statistically significant. And if I tried to use such a wide CI and pass it off as significant, she'd mark me wrong unless I noted it was <b>barely significant</b>, as Orac noted above.</p> <p>And hey, unlike you, I can actually admit it if I'm wrong. Provided I ask people whose opinion I respect, and who point out my errors honestly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365566&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6oP7KGVwC60-iG1Al2VeUF-kvobFL_lRQDCLoBzgz40"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MI Dawn (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365566">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365567" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505393221"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Amusingly, The Gnat has nothing to say about the rest of my discussion, particularly the part about the post hoc subgroup analyses. If there's one thing physicians are appropriately taught about statistics, it's to distrust post hoc subgroup analyses.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365567&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AQjgFmxlAV6LvjAsfMjNPYbaSWsjkNQ65ZPnnIDDyWw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365567">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365566#comment-1365566" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MI Dawn (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365570" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505393606"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>“an aOR of 2.0 for the 1-28 day window of exposure to the influenza vaccine before miscarriage that was not statistically significant”</p> <p>It was: “The overall adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.6) for vaccine receipt in the 28-day exposure window”</p></blockquote> <p>That is an error (which seems to derive from CIDRAP; they will eventually fix things if E-mailed), but you're also grasping at a single clause while missing the point, which is that there's no reason why two specific seasons would amount to something when neither does on its own. (<i>P</i> = 0.03 on that CI, for those scoring at home.)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365570&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bPM00kECnes--O60fEOkiUWY0kTYFq5_ithyyuHdK3s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365570">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365573" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505394606"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I think I was confusing a passage for individual seasons with the combined seasons, which explains the text slip. Oddly enough, I looked at my saved versions in BBEdit and saw that I originally had it right, then for some reason in an edit it changed. Ah, well. I stand by what I said about its being "barely" statistically significant, and I also note that robustness is important. This finding just isn't robust. It barely achieves statistical significance, and only then for one analysis. That's the sort of result that screams false positive.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365573&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4O3nIGFHIpNBgeJt-C2dSBJW-eXvkALpcf9VH3TAscQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365573">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365570#comment-1365570" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365571" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505393995"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There is nothing magical about using p&lt;0.05 as a threshold for statistical significance. It is frequently done because there are many fields where one rarely has enough data to use a more stringent criterion, but the downside is the danger of false positives. Remember that if you are drawing data from something that has no correlation, you have a 5% chance of your sample producing p&lt;0.05. See the <a href="https://xkcd.com/882/">obligatory XKCD link</a>.</p> <p>That's even before we get into issues of systematic bias, which statistical tools generally don't handle well. The assumption is that the case group and control group are equally likely to suffer an adverse result in the absence of whatever intervention you are testing to see if it changes the risk. It sounds like the case and control groups here are not well matched, such that one would expect a priori that the case group would have more miscarriages than the control group. When that's the case, you shouldn't be surprised that the case group actually does have more miscarriages.</p> <p>So no, Jake, Orac is not wrong to say it's not statistically significant, just because it barely meets an arbitrary threshold.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365571&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GBtSdDHMsiYpOm2tmDDRVBORy-5eIIxYWpGkdiv26Jg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365571">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365574" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505394778"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Heheh. Thanks. I'm aware of all these issues, of course, but didn't see this post as the place to discuss them. For instance, in the context of discussing John Ioannidis' work, I've pointed out on at least a couple of occasions that setting the threshold for statistical significance at p≤0.05 means at least a 5% chance of a false positive but that it's actually a much higher chance than that, even in randomized clinical trials, due to undetected biases and shortcomings in carrying out the studies. In retrospective studies like this one, it's higher still. In post hoc subgroup analyses, it's the highest of all.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365574&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DPPh-hOLmQBYM9PnBp_Jmdy3wLxyscApD9XHsqKAFwg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365574">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365571#comment-1365571" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365572" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505394446"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks, Rich, but I will pass on the virtual cheroot, and instead hoist an actual adult beverage this evening in honor or the young Miss Bly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365572&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gsUZWBhu1paXZcn8TuY-6HExVBEUJJ42K4K89IIlhFU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365572">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365575" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505394867"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>Orac is wrong and should retract.</p></blockquote> <p>How's your batting average with that routine lately, Jake. It might be time to outgrow amounting to basically just being a whiny little shit.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365575&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="f1yAgqxYW13L3cjp31jyYcSzvHsJycoPIsdH-Z6Fm4U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365575">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365576" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505395996"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>There is nothing magical about using p&lt;0.05 as a threshold for statistical significance. It is frequently done because there are many fields where one rarely has enough data to use a more stringent criterion,</p></blockquote> <p>There is that, but there is also the point that a small p-value <b>is not</b> any evidence against your null, as its calculation is based on the null being precisely true.</p> <p>The original intention of a small p-value was that it was a signal of something that might be worth further investigation. We (statisticians) got off course when Neyman and Pearson ritualized classical hypothesis testing, and the teaching of p-values and their meaning has been generally poor ever since. </p> <p>And -- there is no a single bit wrong with Orac's take on the "significant" result here (as he knows, others know, and anyone who claims to understand statistics and is <b>honest</b> should know).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365576&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gdQcNI7WZSVrQ02K1ocmRG_pfn5dKQ-LjaEk0yOjrr8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dean (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365576">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365577" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505396053"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>The difference between a certain Gnat and me is that I correct my editing errors.<br /></p><blockquote> <p>Lord Jake Whorfin: When's the PNAS paper coming?</p> <p>Red Socktroids: Real soon!</p></blockquote> </blockquote> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365577&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0MaqvRMBHxzZYIEJu_mT8uWgrI6xRBtvLZXA5DcW0Ks"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365577">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365578" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505396740"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congrats Rich!<br /> May Baby Bly long continue to be healthy and happy...</p> <p>I have a virtual cigar joke, but I'll leave it to the minions' imaginations. :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365578&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BLEFnp7TssZUcENs-PbVYW9gSmD8i1K0OxKzoGhmXtg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sadmar (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365578">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365579" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505397234"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For those of you seeking a moment of comic relief, Levi Quackenboss suggested that this was published by the media - who, in her world, is of course controlled by pharma (that's why they didn't publish articles when flu mist was shown ineffective, or about the problems with mumps vaccines, and so on - oh, wait) because a universal flu vaccine is nearing completion.</p> <p><a href="https://leviquackenboss.wordpress.com/2017/09/14/why-is-the-media-attacking-the-flu-vaccine/">https://leviquackenboss.wordpress.com/2017/09/14/why-is-the-media-attac…</a></p> <p>I don't think she's joking, even though it reads like satire to me.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365579&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="heIXjUYH6TaSS8zNBDPAsPe9wjrAaVD_HKVrI-2B1QU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dorit Reiss (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365579">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365580" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505398443"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Jake:</p> <p>Too bad you don't understand what statistical significance actually means or how it differs from clinical significance. Quite simply, if one were to randomly sample from the same population an "infinite" number of times, based on known probability distributions, one can estimate the probabilities of various outcomes, e.g. only 5% of time will a certain outcome occur and, assuming that the sampling and, in the case of a case-control study, the matching, was well done, then one assumes that the outcome relates to the hypothesized variable(s); but 5% of the time the outcome could have been brought about by variables not controlled for/random chance, regardless of how well the study was done. However, it is an artificial cut-off point for decision making and in this case as the matching was poorly done, the sample size small, it was a post-hoc analysis subject to multiple comparison problems in deciding statistical significance, and there are numerous well-done studies that do not agree, it is meaningless. But, given your rigid bias, whatever even remotely fits your ideology becomes significant.</p> <p>I find it hard to believe that you were accepted in a doctoral program at the University of Texas School of Public Health; but, then again, over the years I've met people who managed to learn things and pass exams without really understanding them.</p> <p>I suggest, to start with, you read the following:</p> <p>Merwyn Susser (1973). Causal Thinking in the Health Sciences: Concepts and Strategies in Epidemiology.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365580&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gccpj8iADBnY3IhkuJGXTonTwE1cMBqnNII_082wY-w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH">Joel A. Harris… (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365580">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365581" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505399777"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Any bets on how long it will be until some random gibberish about original antigenic sin starts making the rounds?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365581&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KwHiKbwOge1Q5XvFKLtk4BSw9wYXq4uwK7tnPdKyoiM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365581">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365582" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505401325"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That's a sucker bet....</p> <p>The Gnat should go back to his self-copulatory Milo fantasies.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365582&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OVAbX5G8Ch93qZL3PrmnaamWbJOe-iiJErdu5nWA_io"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lawrence (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365582">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365583" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505406721"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congratulations on the birth of your daughter, Rich!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365583&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1sEaFvEZc7_mabTM-DH8vFDCfqNGhYNXX5KlCHrIFYY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365583">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365584" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505407136"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That one big finding wasn't even 17 cases and controls. It was 14 cases and 4 controls! Four! This is just an astoundingly weak study and I wonder why DeStefano keeps doing these kinds of post hoc subanalyses.</p> <p>I'm also not convinced they controlled adequately. Their matching was very poor. Age groups (+/- 30 years) are far too broad. Matching by region does not account for variation within regions. If cases are more likely to be African-American, they're more likely to be worse on SES measures. I'm in one of these regions and I can tell you that we are so segregated, a random sample of AAs and whites would not be remotely comparable.</p> <p>I'm glad someone posted the jelly bean comic. That's on the outside of my cubicle wall, which I put up there after the "whistleblower" brouhaha. So much irresponsible science.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365584&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mVMgVsG16AiSfgHKrY_PhhhAQWemhuMxqLdCLUCBNZk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">[Name Redacted], MPH (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365584">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365585" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505407454"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If you torture any dataset enough with post-hoc/subroup analyses, eventually it will give you an answer you want to hear.</p> <p>But like all other forms of torture, that answer is rarely correct.</p> <p>To those of us at the coalface, diagnosing, treating and attempting to prevent life-threatening vaccine-preventable diseases, studies such as this are never considered clinically applicable.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365585&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cywWm4Q8Sqyi1Ii8LheSxXvUVQwPavKXmob9Z7iOdU8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">DrRJ (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365585">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365586" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505409178"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Joel A Harrison, PhD, MPH:</p> <p>Thanks for attempting to educate Jake:<br /> Lord knows, I tried and got nowhere. But it showed his bent.</p> <p>Seriously, he should have got stat basics years ago and he didn't. Needless to say, he is clueless in other ways. As well as resistant to new info/ reality.</p> <p>I would hope that other minions would chime in too. Like when people do an intervention: many voices saying the same thing in diverse ways.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365586&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="G4dAAWSg3GfE2Hq23K32KoiAtzWvVsb7MsJqF6PMbI0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365586">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365587" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505412325"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>"I find it hard to believe that you were accepted in a doctoral program at the University of Texas School of Public Health; but, then again, over the years I’ve met people who managed to learn things and pass exams without really understanding them." </p></blockquote> <p>Well, he's not there anymore. According to Jake's "About" page on the White Rose and Hans Litten blog: <i>"He was dismissed from the Ph.D. Epidemiology program of the University of Texas School of Public Health, due to academic misconduct by the school’s administration."</i></p> <p>But I digress...</p> <p>Yes, one of the things that academic epidemiologists keep getting wrong is translating their findings into meaningful action/practice/policy. The first thing you ask when presented with any finding is, "So what?" Then you tease it apart.</p> <p>In the case of this study, I'd ask, "So what? Actual influenza causes way more death and disability, and miscarriages, in pregnant women than the vaccine would <b>if</b> this study were valid." Even the authors of this study, the editors of the journal, and everyone worth their salt (<b>and not kicked out of a doctoral program in epidemiology</b>) have pointed out that this is not a finding on which flu vaccine policy/recommendations in women should be changed. I'd take it a step further and ask why, oh why did they publish this?</p> <p>As Orac pointed out, a matched case-control study would have been stronger. One-to-one like this, and if you draw them from a similar population, you might control so much that you stratify on a collider and get a whole new bias in there. (We saw this when they drew cases and controls from the same medical setting for the coffee-pancreatic cancer study back in the day.)</p> <p>These are very complicated issues to understand in epidemiology, so you really can't blame the public for now getting confused over this. Now, we are going to have to go get a more robust study done to explain the association seen in this one, which is a waste of time and resources. And you're going to have women who will choose to forgo the influenza vaccine in what promises to be a very active flu season if the "as Australia goes, we go" rule kicks in this winter.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365587&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Q9I3hEUSea7Tg-KLVoMNfbJpreXD-N78DYuMJKN_lq4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ren (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365587">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365588" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505413984"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Ren:</p> <p>Wow, thanks for the info on Jake being kicked out of doctoral program. After I finished my PhD at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, I received a post-doctoral fellowship from the National Institutes of Health in a program at the University of Houston, applying social psychology to preventing cardiovascular disease. As part of my training, I took at MPH and then an MS in biostatistics and epidemiology at the UT School of Public Health in Houston. I still have friends there 35 years later; but, Jake was at the UT Austin campus. Still, it's a good school and hard to believe he ever even got into the program.</p> <p>And I do remember the coffee-pancreatic cancer study, published in the top journal, New England Journal of Medicine if I recall. </p> <p>By the way, even if there was a rare chance of the flu vaccine contributing to a miscarriage, though there isn't, full blown flu in the first trimester would affect far more with devastating consequences. As I mentioned above, antivaccinationists, thanks to vaccines and never having seen the results of the vaccine preventable diseases, downplay the risks from them. I remember kids with iron braces and one in an iron lung. Not memories I cherish and I was in first cohort to get the Salk vaccine in 1955.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365588&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aBqGpexiLyAAwQ8GxLy67tY3G28eZCwp7DUcP-gttM0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH">Joel A. Harris… (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365588">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365589" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505414378"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I believe MI Dawn may have touched on this and I am probably veering horribly outside my lane, but wouldn't women with a prior history of problem pregnancies (including miscarriages) be more likely to also be getting flu vaccines? I would think their physicians would strongly recommend it as part of a regimen of risk reduction.</p> <p>I'll return to betting whether I can persuade the niece and nephew to eat bell peppers stuffed with sauteed garlic chicken livers, black beans with feta. My guess is not. There's a reason for that bag of chicken nuggets in the freezer.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365589&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0c2cQkJ4ZY_dmTesAoQAALD4ilRNaqFiYZgV7e8H388"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sirhcton (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365589">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365590" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505414413"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>due to academic misconduct by the school’s administration.</i></p> <p>Roughly translated: "Failure to recognise my genius and originality".</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365590&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cyU6SYxYJdagEu2BTOzu12FAVYMLXCGZDphCYPPk-yY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365590">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365591" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505423109"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Where do you get garlic chickens?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365591&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="X3EoWnbFwBilXelbUcekNzJLLQoo0oijl_3yzBjBqiM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365591">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365592" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505424245"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>I’ll return to betting whether I can persuade the niece and nephew to eat bell peppers stuffed with sauteed garlic chicken livers, black beans with feta. My guess is not.</p></blockquote> <p>Oh man, that sounds good. My host granny in Russia used to make chicken livers with some kind of garlic sour cream sauce and serve it over buckwheat. I <i>love</i> that.</p> <p>I have a few things planned: chana masala, fattoush with homemade Arabic bread, a spicy Palestinian shrimp recipe. Jambalaya for company at some point after this part of hunting season is over (my brother has been requesting it.) Plus I'm sure typical stuff like pizza and some sort of meat-and-potatoes. </p> <p>I hear you on the nephews. I made a bunch of Palestinian food a while back and, well, at least they liked the bread and the rice-and-vermicelli pilaf.</p> <p>Honestly, my brother can be almost as much of a challenge sometimes.</p> <p>I mean, if we're going to devolve to talking about food... :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365592&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BClYEt1fnVbie61o_8iwI3tSqYhp_ncHIcqmuQlMVtI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365592">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365593" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505427071"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>I hear you on the nephews. I made a bunch of Palestinian food a while back and, well, at least they liked the bread and the rice-and-vermicelli pilaf.</p></blockquote> <p>M'judra/mujaddara is a pretty popular comfort food; the Palestinian fellow at the Cornell Dollar says his kids love it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365593&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8zWuw7zN_b2pFe1COnD3DGi2Ee2rldeMzzl37cJiMSc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365593">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365594" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505427756"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ JP #52</p> <p>Like most kids, they sometimes have a limited view of what foods they will even try. Unfortunately, at ages of about seven and six for the niece and nephew, we and their parents made a few mistakes on a vacation - raw oysters, fresh lobster, mussels, and softshell crab. Do not, I say again, do not give children the chance to acquire expensive tastes. We thought the texture of the oysters would put them off and the others would be too strong a flavor. We were very wrong and they could both pack those items in like harvest hands, given the chance, even at those few years. Do you have any idea how embarrassing and unseemly it was to squabble with a seven-year-old for my fair share those things at my age?</p> <p>/thread hijack mode off</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365594&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="k96QavIYVk2uKwBaCCtvuRVkvCAfJnVgweb4D04mOVw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sirhcton (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365594">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365595" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505428134"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>M’judra/mujaddara is a pretty popular comfort food; the Palestinian fellow at the Cornell Dollar says his kids love it.<br /></p><blockquote> <p>The baby/toddler actually ate a little of everything, including the fish and the fattoush; it's the four year old who is impossibly picky. (He definitely gets it from his dad.)</p> <p>@sirhcton:</p> <p>I can empathise with the kids when it comes to seafood; I'm a big fan of shellfish. Probably picked it up from when we used to go to the coast when I was a kid and harvest tons of them and cook and eat them outdoors. (With butter and garlic or course.)</p> <p>I haven't had oysters since the last time I was at the coast a year ago. Dang it, now I will be thinking of them!</p></blockquote> </blockquote> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365595&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KQle91VbTrY9CMwdvlsbZv1HPqi-cOXqCLJjccfDREw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365595">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365596" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505429391"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>I guess Mike Adams and the gaggle of morons at Age of Autism missed this part.</p></blockquote> <p>This did at least elicit a Gerg classic, in which he apparently accidentally <a href="http://www.ageofautism.com/2017/09/flu-vaccine-and-miscarriage.html?cid=6a00d8357f3f2969e201b8d2aa57db970c#comment-6a00d8357f3f2969e201b8d2aa57db970c">throws Thompson under the bus</a>.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365596&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="EcrJ3S5iaV1La8D8MtWtnU9cHBwfUkUVWX81BNz1L40"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 14 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365596">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365597" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505455481"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Rich Bly,<br /> Congrats and hope the mom &amp; baby are doing well.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365597&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nYCCfL20Fg5Gb4T1yaUIDXeEn1DApW8hf2IL2TaVerw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MikeMa (not verified)</span> on 15 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365597">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365598" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505467258"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>More on Mike ( Natural News, yesterday):</p> <p>Not only do vaccines cause miscarriages but they complement a covert depopulation plan involving spiked foods as well as other vaccines' dire effects, Planned Parenthood's focus on aborting non-whites and other monstrous atrocities. </p> <p>He read it in the NYT ( 1969 article quoted)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365598&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nc11QU03LDnMTq29B_AP0XnbVQkA7ocXWi6SZKc4oi4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span> on 15 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365598">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365599" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505491407"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I couldn't find a copy of the entire paper (for free), so I've just read the abstract. It's not clear from reading the abstract whether the authors adjusted for procedures known to increase SAB, such as amniocentesis. Additionally, given the short interval of follow-up, it seems like a cohort study would have been a much stronger study design.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365599&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="j1XhtDeNTBtA0M6BbaoJL-xRcQhAqr6DnwckBs_DGzY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Devbani Raha (not verified)</span> on 15 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365599">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365600" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505591561"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So Jake is right for once, and, as you would expect, he handles it with all the grace and composure you would expect.</p> <p><a href="http://www.autisminvestigated.com/david-gorski-vaccine-miscarriage/">http://www.autisminvestigated.com/david-gorski-vaccine-miscarriage/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365600&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DiyufojylgU0MCvIS4lKJ67DN_7VqpJifAPFdZ52IJA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 16 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365600">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365601" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505592315"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I've a comment in moderation, and I expect that y'all will say there is too much expectation for such a simple post. Don't expect me to disagree. </p> <p>Can a brother get a preview button up in this place? Or am I expected to just scroll back and re-read what I type to see if it meets my own expectations? I expect I know the answer.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365601&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Ia8rS5lX3JV1bXrnZwEEqqwdcn1LUI68_RyEBy0MUMU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 16 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365601">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365602" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505595164"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I don't know if it does cause flu vaccines, but all I know is that all the good chemistry jokes argon. ?</p> <p><a href="https://m.facebook.com/pg/3MPhilippines/posts/?ref=page_internal&amp;mt_nav=1#!/3MPhilippines/photos/a.244423475654213.53293.141670465929515/1412626802167202/?type=3&amp;source=48">https://m.facebook.com/pg/3MPhilippines/posts/?ref=page_internal&amp;mt_nav…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365602&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PFZzCO8U1POxdicbiSR7Y8UmgZRXG7RtdEq2TBeuSL8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Curious Scientist (not verified)</span> on 16 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365602">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365603" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505595403"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>Can a brother get a preview button up in this place?</p></blockquote> <p>I suspect that, in your heart of hearts, you already know the answer to that question.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365603&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AQlXTXZJ3_uNNXP_lHHh3OuSAhWhMGLKCVR3fie5X7o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 16 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365603">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365604" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505644095"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Johnny:</p> <p>Thanks for that link.</p> <p>I think Jake is attempting to rescue his self esteem after being booted... I mean DISMISSED from UT:</p> <p>-Notice that he himself found an error which Orac, PhD MD and two epis ( PhD Joel and PhD C Ren) missed.<br /> - he includes a video of his triumphant ( heh) debate with Orac.<br /> - he introduces Orac in Mike Adamsian fashion<br /> - he grandiosely refers to himself in the third person as editor<br /> - and didn't get the point of what Orac and commenters wrote</p> <p>A few years ago, just prior to his study at GW, I warned him that his web activities and woo positions might doom his chances at a career in SB professions. </p> <p>So I suppose I was right: </p> <p>he won't ever work legitimately and has to be content editing/ writing a childish web project whilst pretending to be both a journalist and a scientist. </p> <p>His family has enough money that he may eventually become a film maker *a la* AJW or Gary Null or even hit the big time with a web scandal sheet like dear old Mikey or Bolen .Maybe he'll write an expose tome published at Skyhorse.</p> <p>BUT like Kim and Mark and others at AoA, their 'careers" don't exist outside a very narrow internet niche of partisans.</p> <p>Do any of them teach anywhere? Or work as reporters? Or have clients/ patients**? I don't think so.</p> <p>** Unfortunately, some real woo-meisters do have clients who pay for quackery. Not a goal anyone should aspire to.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365604&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="l9clppaLu08oLSYRYaVaZsKb-ut8dpz3hCon5SpszBs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365604">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <div class="indented"> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365605" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505646349"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I didn't bother to look at The Gnat's little tirade; so thanks for the summary. (Why waste time and brain cells, after all?) I used to feel sorry for The Gnat because he's just so damned pathetic, but over the last couple of years, his complete embrace of the alt right (including its racism and misogyny) along with his continued embrace of antivaccine pseudoscience (not to mention his general nastiness) has led me to cease to have any sympathy or empathy for him. He's just not worth it. He's an adult; he's made his choices; and those choices are, by and large, despicable.</p> <p>I'm sure The Gnat's little rant will soon find its way to Natural News; that's how low The Gnat has fallen.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365605&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OJf2GsJfyDT4m8-OoEQL5DqJBhKIaTuwzDx-VA0ROlw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365605">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/1365604#comment-1365604" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"></a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span></p> </footer> </article> </div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365606" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505648919"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This sentence is also wrong: "Basically, the study found zero (that’s right: zero, nada, zilch) association between miscarriage and flu vaccination—with one exception: if the woman had consecutively received a flu vaccine containing the 2009 H1N1 virus."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365606&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="dEuYyvzblAuML-PAkBZVyybQvyYVt3YXYE64WXAxyX4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jake Crosby (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365606">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="28" id="comment-1365607" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505649719"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hmm. I hear The Gnat buzzing again. Amazing how he focuses in on one single sentence. It's certainly because he can't deconstruct the whole post or otherwise show why this study's result is not a statistical fluke when even the authors of the study admit that it almost certainly is, even as they ask for more funding to do a followup study. To humor The Gnat, I deleted that sentence, which was a holdover that I forgot to delete the first mistake.</p> <p>That's because, unlike The Gnat, I am intellectually honest.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365607&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OYdPT7ZPkupGxQlHvKgqCGV40byZ_-RytO-N_Ow-wHM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365607">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/oracknows"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/oracknows" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/orac2-150x150-120x120.jpg?itok=N6Y56E-P" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user oracknows" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365608" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505652259"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Orac talks about how JC "focuses in on one single sentence" and " can't deconstruct the whole" :<br /> believe me there's a name for that but I'm not allowed to say that / too much like a diagnosis.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365608&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="a0Db9snwUpM4v1rRE73BwqXM-yzCRHa6jUiKFaZVbVI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Denice Walter (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365608">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365609" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505656194"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Now that Jacob Crosby, MPH, has been expunged from the Ph.D. program at the University of Texas I suppose that he, as an advocate of accuracy in media, will have many hours available to correct the misstatements that he has promulgated. </p> <p>Indeed, as Narad suggested, it might be time for Toxic Boy to update his readers on the expected publication date of the <i>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</i> article in which, Crosby claimed, William Thompson would (in May 2016!) repudiate his statements that MMR was associated with an increased risk of ASD in a subset of African-American boys because Thompson was bribed with a “huge bonus” and the promise of “his own autism research foundation.” Etc.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365609&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="z9PuiEm99T9ukrvg9BVZbVorCbulaxawfVFt_RIQg78"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">brian (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365609">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365610" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505657971"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Orac (#67) writes,</p> <p>I am intellectually honest.</p> <p>MJD says,</p> <p>And intellectually adaptive. </p> <p>I really appreciate the picture you used at the beginning of this post.</p> <p>You could have used this dreadful image from Naturalnews.com</p> <p><a href="http://www.naturalnews.com/gallery/640/Medical/Background-Vaccine-Latex-Glove-Syringe-Flu-Shot.jpg">http://www.naturalnews.com/gallery/640/Medical/Background-Vaccine-Latex…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365610&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4EyYtbtJOJ3B0TobOx5AvDWOO7qigO2iIsr9o7uLxy8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Michael J. Dochniak (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365610">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365611" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505658994"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"That’s because, unlike The Gnat, I am intellectually honest."</p> <p>There is that. There is also the fact that you have an understanding of statistics, which he does not.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365611&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="w3jaD8Poy5YWsPN-1kaKxhgu9o0ij5XP1uFppDw9vIw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dean (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365611">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365612" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505659183"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p> I think Jake is attempting to rescue his self esteem after being booted… </p></blockquote> <p>Jake has always had delusions of adequacy, stretching back to his AoA days. Sure, the rise of Orange Thinskin brought out a bit of a darker side in the lad. But I haven't noticed any changes in his posts after his departure from UT to suggest that it had that big of an effect on him.</p> <blockquote><p> A few years ago, just prior to his study at GW, I warned him that his web activities and woo positions might doom his chances at a career in SB professions. </p></blockquote> <p>DW, I love you like a sister, and you're right, you did warn him. But that's like predicting that the sun will come up in the morning - it didn't take any real skill. Everybody knew he was torpedoing his chances for any real job in the science or health industry, and his current on line activities, much like Captain Sockpuppet, will limit his employment in about any other job. </p> <p>Of course, while everyone knew it, you did try to honestly warn him, and that counts for something. I also remember that he dismissed your warnings. </p> <p>Some people learn from others. Some people have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.</p> <blockquote><p> His family has enough money... </p></blockquote> <p>The question is, will mommy ever get tired of giving him handouts? Will he ever realize that he's never earned a thing for himself? Will he ever think that (after what? 30 years?) 'maybe I should be able to live on my own'? Mommy and daddy have bought him a fine education (fine credentials, anyway), and he should be at least filing his own income taxes, not being carried as a dependent. But other than maybe earning a few hundred cross posting his 'work' at Epoch, he's never mentioned having a job.</p> <p>Someday, that might bother him. Or not. He might be happy being a sponge.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365612&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ah2pOkJZfCmEBd-I2hhcGElFukVCSOPVYIJm5d9acxA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365612">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365613" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505678357"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>"Notice that he himself found an error which Orac, PhD MD and two epis ( PhD Joel and PhD C Ren) missed."</p></blockquote> <p>That would be DrPH C Ren. Unlike the PhD types -- with all due respect -- I'm not too interested in academic research. I'm more about taking that research and putting it into practice... If I finish. The thesis has taken a life of its own.</p> <p>Maybe I should keep it simple?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365613&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="45_oaorWvch0g9kerrj1ESifQ6SCvfZNq1Cdj8Nzh7M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ren (not verified)</span> on 17 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365613">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1365614" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1505903047"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I note that Jake has let a post by the lovely and talented Rebecca Fisher appear under her own name. I believe it's the first in quite a while that he hasn't edited to change her name to 'Brian Deer'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.autisminvestigated.com/david-gorski-vaccine-miscarriage/#comment-287188">http://www.autisminvestigated.com/david-gorski-vaccine-miscarriage/#com…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1365614&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="f8q3pZqJnukkp9mGX0S7cfZgMLtnYRzu13WyEyzJ7rA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 20 Sep 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/channel/medicine/feed#comment-1365614">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/insolence/2017/09/14/does-the-flu-vaccine-cause-miscarriages%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 14 Sep 2017 06:50:50 +0000 oracknows 22623 at https://scienceblogs.com