Henrietta Lacks https://scienceblogs.com/ en Detailed Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks FAQ Page Now Online https://scienceblogs.com/node/148258 <span>Detailed Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks FAQ Page Now Online</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/wp-content/blogs.dir/277/files/2012/04/i-6e9d9b9eca80e21c85ae51638f9b66d8-phpJjtjUQAM-1.jpg" alt="i-6e9d9b9eca80e21c85ae51638f9b66d8-phpJjtjUQAM-1.jpg" /></p><div>I've been <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/2010/03/skloot_launching_faq_blog_seri.php?utm_source=networkbanner&amp;utm_medium=link">working for a while</a> to develop a Frequently Asked Questions page to answers the most common reader questions about <i><a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a>.</i>  Well, it's now online, and it addresses questions ranging from why HeLa cells are immortal to how the Lacks family is benefiting from the book. It also includes answers to commonly asked publishing questions, like, <i>How do I break into science writing?  </i><a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/faq">You can read it online here</a>.  If you have burning questions not answered there, leave them in the comments section below -- I'll add to the FAQ as questions arise and time allows.<br />  </div> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a></span> <span>Fri, 07/02/2010 - 04:32</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-related" hreflang="en">Book Related</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela-faqs" hreflang="en">HeLa FAQs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/publication-news-and-followups" hreflang="en">Publication News and Followups</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/immortal-life-henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/faq" hreflang="en">FAQ</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/getting-published" hreflang="en">Getting Published</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela-cells" hreflang="en">HeLa Cells</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/how-do-i-get-published" hreflang="en">How do I get Published</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/publishing-0" hreflang="en">Publishing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-writing" hreflang="en">Science Writing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/skloot" hreflang="en">Skloot</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502030" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278199429"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I read the book today, and really enjoyed it. I woke up and finished <a href="http://www.amazon.com/MAN-WHO-LOVED-ONLY-NUMBERS/dp/0786884061/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;s=books&amp;qid=1278220278&amp;sr=1-1">The Man who Loved Only Numbers</a>. Went downstairs for coffee, breakfast and the paper. Finished those and settled down to read your book.</p> <p>And I did not stop until I finished it later in the afternoon.</p> <p>So cool that you started with a class in a community college. My younger son took his high school biology at the local community college because the high school program lacked substance (which changed for the better the next year!). My oldest son gets disability services at the community college. I also used the community college to get back to school (including taking the biology course I skipped in high school). Next year my daughter will take community college classes as a high school junior is a state program where motivated students get both high school and college credits (Washington State's Running Start program).</p> <p>You made Henrietta Lacks and her family real three-dimensional characters. Mrs. Lacks was a real person, a loving mother and someone who deserved so much better. I hope her descendants the best.</p> <p>I am also so grateful that my daughter has benefited from research by receiving the HPV vaccine series a couple of years ago. She and countless other will be spared the cancer that took Mrs. Lacks away from her young family.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502030&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="O0cbUA-R8v7qLx2ZuOnuU2c-GXTUvDigQUNIeqfoPuw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 03 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502030">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/node/148258%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 02 Jul 2010 08:32:44 +0000 rskloot 148258 at https://scienceblogs.com Gleaned - acupuncture, HeLa, linkage debates, psychos, and the FBI https://scienceblogs.com/neuronculture/2010/06/01/gleaned-acupuncture-hela-lin <span>Gleaned - acupuncture, HeLa, linkage debates, psychos, and the FBI</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><a href="http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2010/05/30/a-biological-basis-for-acupuncture-or-more-evidence-for-a-placebo-effect">A biological basis for acupuncture, or more evidence for a placebo effect?</a> Ed Yong ponders acupuncture, placebos, and context. This I like, and there's a nice meta dimension here as well: placebos being all about context.</span></p> <p><span>Abel Pharmboy reports on <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/05/henrietta_lacks_headstone_dedi.php">Marking the magnificient memory of Henrietta Lacks.</a> A nice account of what sounds like a lovely ceremony. Among other things, testifies to the potential <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Immortal-Life-Henrietta-Lacks/dp/1400052173/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;s=books&amp;qid=1275406651&amp;sr=8-1">power of the book</a>.</span></p> <p><span>Much ado about links and where they best belong. Starting points: <a href="http://www.roughtype.com/archives/2010/05/experiments_in.php">Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: Experiments in delinkification</a>, which gets examined by ReadWriteWeb in <a href="http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/links_in_text.php">The Case Against Links</a>, and more critically by Matthew Ingram, who ponders <a href="http://www.mathewingram.com/work/2010/05/31/nick-carrs-retreat-from-the-internet-continues">Nick Carrâs Retreat From the Internet</a>. I'm of two minds on this. it strikes me that in some types of posts, links are best used in-line while in others they might best serve both writer and reader if they're held till the end.</span></p> <p><span>As Vaughan Bell notes, a leading p<a href="http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2010/05/psychopath_researche.html">sychopath researcher is threatening to sue critics</a>. This adds to a disturbing trends in which researchers sue other researcher who differ with them, taking to court scientific matters that should be settled through research and discussion.</span></p> <p><span><span style="border-collapse: collapse;">And speaking of being careful about what you study: The splendid anthro blog </span><span style="border-collapse: collapse;"><a href="http://savageminds.org/">Savage Minds</a></span><span style="border-collapse: collapse;"> notes that "</span><span style="border-collapse: collapse;"><a style="color: #2244bb;" href="http://www.progressive.org/mc021010.html" target="_blank">A senior at Pomona College</a></span><span style="border-collapse: collapse;"> flying out of Philly was detained and handcuffed by the TSA and then questioned by the FBI ... for carrying Arabic flash cards in his pockets. So start putting your terrorist language materials in your checked luggage!"</span></span></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/neuronculture" lang="" about="/neuronculture" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ddobbs</a></span> <span>Tue, 06/01/2010 - 05:39</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/uncategorized" hreflang="en">Uncategorized</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/acupuncture" hreflang="en">acupuncture</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rebecca-skloot" hreflang="en">Rebecca Skloot</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/savage-minds" hreflang="en">Savage Minds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vaughan-bell" hreflang="en">Vaughan Bell</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/neuronculture/2010/06/01/gleaned-acupuncture-hela-lin%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Tue, 01 Jun 2010 09:39:21 +0000 ddobbs 143417 at https://scienceblogs.com More on Henrietta Lacks's New Grave Marker https://scienceblogs.com/node/148256 <span>More on Henrietta Lacks&#039;s New Grave Marker</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Anyone interested in Henrietta Lacks and the grave marker finally placed on her long unmarked grave this weekend should <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/05/henrietta_lacks_headstone_dedi.php">click here immediately</a> for a beautiful post by scientist David Kroll, who attended the unveiling ceremony.  It's filled with beautiful photos of the day, and a tribute to all Henrietta's cells did for science.  His photo below shows Henrietta's new headstone in much sharper detail than the one I posted yesterday with <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/2010/05/a_historic_day_henrietta_lacks.php">the text of the inscription</a>.  Visit his post for many more photos of the ceremony, the graveyard, and Henrietta's family. </p><div><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/wp-content/blogs.dir/277/files/2012/04/i-4f2b7e88c8d7d803a1a10b4f1630e3ab-Henrietta Lacks gravestone 05.30.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpeg" alt="i-4f2b7e88c8d7d803a1a10b4f1630e3ab-Henrietta Lacks gravestone 05.30.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpeg" /></div> <div></div> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a></span> <span>Mon, 05/31/2010 - 09:19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/publication-news-and-followups" hreflang="en">Publication News and Followups</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/immortal-life-henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-and-science" hreflang="en">Women and Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/david-kroll" hreflang="en">David Kroll</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/grave-marker" hreflang="en">Grave Marker</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/headstone" hreflang="en">Headstone</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/tombstone" hreflang="en">Tombstone</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="303" id="comment-2502015" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275339211"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wonderful work, Rebecca. You should be very, very proud.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502015&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DAqIi42okmeKoTX-xCSw4DZ8Yd7qyozVWd3vg7opglQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/isis-scientist" lang="" about="/author/isis-scientist" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">isis the scientist</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502015">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/isis-scientist"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/isis-scientist" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502016" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275389394"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If I remember correctly from your book, it was unclear exactly which grave was Henrietta's in the family plot. So has her grave been identified or is the marker placed in the general vicinity of her grave?</p> <p>Either way, this is a really a wonderful thing to have happened.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502016&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Xl7H5zTGaiUlLsXPEx0bOf8yZOToQsJglMySSLesaAk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mark F. (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502016">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502017" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1276875981"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi. I am in a bookclub and we are reading your book for the month of July. I loved the book and the history in the book. I can't wait to discuss the book with my fellow readers.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502017&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_Etvi1T074-grM3UrzomOCMUMDY4miQILIxHw7wIV8c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jewel S. (not verified)</span> on 18 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502017">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502018" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1277855646"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for this. I love that it's shaped like a book.</p> <p>Speaking of which: Your book knocked my socks off. Thanks for that too.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502018&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Kmrjj5AvRDB3YNsOQw64ww_wIsvqqIl2pZNxy5-y9PU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://toad.faultline.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ron Sullivan (not verified)</a> on 29 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502018">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/node/148256%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 31 May 2010 13:19:24 +0000 rskloot 148256 at https://scienceblogs.com Marking the magnificent memory of Henrietta Lacks https://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/05/31/henrietta-lacks-headstone-dedi <span>Marking the magnificent memory of Henrietta Lacks</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Henrietta%20Lacks%20gravestone%2005.30.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="center" img="" alt="Henrietta Lacks gravestone 05.30.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Henrietta Lacks gravestone 05.30.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-500x298-50104.jpg" width="500" height="298" /></a></p> <p><em>In addition to my own photos herein, Tom McLaughlin posted <a href="http://www.thenewsrecord.com/index.php/news/article/an_epitaph_at_last/"><strong>a nice slide show</strong></a> of the day at his South Boston <em>News &amp; Record</em>.</em></p> <p>Despite two trees that snapped and fell in my driveway within six feet of my car in an impressive thunderstorm Friday evening, I drove on Saturday morning to Clover, Virginia, for the dedication of a gravestone that finally marks the final resting place of Henrietta Lacks, a concrete honor, if you will, to recognize the source of one of the most valuable medical tools of the 20th century and today.</p> <p>For those who are not regular readers, Henrietta Lacks was a rural tobacco farmer, mother, wife, daughter, sister, and friend from southern Virginia who developed an unusually aggressive case of cervical cancer while living in Baltimore in 1951. While being treated at Johns Hopkins University, surgeons excised pieces of her tumor in an ongoing effort by the laboratory of Dr. George Gey to establish a continuously growing human tumor cell line in culture, a feat that had only been previously accomplished with mouse cells. Ms. Lacks's cells are today known by the name, HeLa (<em>hee</em>-luh), and have been used from the fifties in testing the effectiveness of the original Salk polio vaccine up through today providing the basis for the new cervical cancer vaccines. I would not be overstating the case to say that most biomedical scientists have at one time or another worked with HeLa cells.</p> <p><a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/"><img class="inset" img="" alt="Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 250px.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 250px-thumb-150x228-21808-thumb-100x152-42196-thumb-150x228-42198.jpg" width="160" height="249" /></a>However, the identity of Henrietta Lacks as the unknowing donor of the cells that gave rise to so many medical discoveries - a poor Black woman, mind you - as well as the story of her family and their travails at the hand of the medical establishment had largely gone untold until the 1980s, even among scientists themselves. </p> <p>But with the help of the family - especially Henrietta's late daughter, Deborah - scientists, historians, and her own tenacious investigative skills, journalist and author Rebecca Skloot spent the last ten years researching and gorgeously crafting a book on the HeLa story that has become this year's best-selling non-fiction gem, <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com"><strong>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</strong></a>. If you have not yet read the book, you are missing out on what <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/03/books/03book.html"><strong>Dwight Garner of <em>The New York Times</em></strong></a> called, "one of the most graceful and moving nonfiction books I've read in a very long time."</p> <p><strong>A black woman, a white boy, and a PhD</strong><br /> My own interest in the story extends beyond my general fascination with the history of science and medicine. It is far more personal. </p> <p>As I wrote in November on <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2009/11/a_black_woman_and_a_white_boys.php"><strong>the 20th anniversary of my PhD dissertation defense</strong></a>, HeLa cells were the primary experimental system for my study of the anticancer drug target, DNA topoisomerase IIα. Moreover, HeLa cells were also the source of genomic DNA I needed to understand the enzyme's regulation when I started my own laboratory in 1992. They ended up providing the topic of the first published paper from my independent group: me, my first PhD student, and first technician.</p> <p>So when I learned that from the South Boston (VA) <em>News &amp; Record</em> that the Lacks family had planned <a href="http://www.thenewsrecord.com/index.php/news/article/henrietta_lacks_headstone_planned/"><strong>a memorial dedication service</strong></a> for Ms. Lacks's headstone, I just had to attend. </p> <p>The headstone was provided by a Morehouse School of Medicine donation from Dr. Roland Pattillo and his wife, Pat. Dr. Pattillo is an ob/gyn physician-scientist at the <a href="http://www.msm.edu/about_us.aspx"><strong>Morehouse School of Medicine</strong></a> who has largely been the medical guardian of the Lacks family and who provided the entré to Ms. Skloot after she convinced him of her sincerity in telling the story of the family and their matriarch. Pattillo is also himself a notable scientist of historic stature and a living connection to Dr. George Gey. Among his own four decades of accomplishments, Dr. Pattillo worked at Hopkins with Gey in the sixties on the hormonal aspects of neuroendocrine tumors and, as detailed in <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/sci;159/3822/1467"><strong>a 1968 <em>Science</em> paper</strong></a>, established the <a href="http://www.atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-98&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line</strong></a>, the first immortalized line to produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). hCG is the hormone produced by the placenta that is detected in clinical and home pregnancy tests.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Kroll%20Pattillo%2005.29.10%20002%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="inset right" img="" alt="Kroll Pattillo 05.29.10 002 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Kroll Pattillo 05.29.10 002 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-275x412-50113.jpg" width="275" height="412" /></a>To the right is Dr. Pattillo at the gravesite with an unnamed science blogger showing off his 20-year-old dissertation. To the right are two Lacks family members sharing addresses on top of Skloot's book. You'll note that the gravestone is also in the shape of a book, representing the many stories that have come from the legacy of Henrietta Lacks.</p> <p>The service began at St. Matthew Baptist Church in Clover, the church where Henrietta had been a member since 1932. My intention had been just to drive up and quietly pay my respects, maybe even get a photo of my dissertation at Henrietta's gravesite. Such intentions were derailed by one of the nice usherette ambassadors at St Matthew who asked if I was a dignitary (no) but then insisted that I sit with the press and go have a word with the pastor, Reverend Alfred Chandler. Reverend Chandler then asked that I speak to the standing room-only congregation that included dozens of Lacks family members about how my personal and professional life had been touched by the woman from Clover. Time was set aside for friends and family to share such brief reflections.</p> <p>Just as an aside: I've now lived in the South for a third of my life. For the last ten years I've lived in a town with an equal 45% African-American and White population and am a prof at a historically-Black university. It never ceases to amaze me how warmly welcoming the Black community has been to me, everywhere from Virginia to Florida, and in a manner that belies the converse treatment of the community for centuries. In fact, if I could join a Black congregation, I'd probably still be going church.</p> <p>I was beaming when I learned that the first scripture reading was <a href="http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Ecclesiastes%203:1-8&amp;version=KJV"><strong>the famous Ecclesiastes passage (3:1-8)</strong></a> upon which Pete Seeger wrote Turn! Turn! Turn! (The song was made popular by The Byrds in 1965 and discussed on this blog, with a Byrds reunion performance, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/roger_mcguinn_john_coltrane_an.php"><strong>here</strong></a>.). In the context of the other speakers, it was clear that this day was one to heal, build up, laugh, dance, and, most certainly, a time to embrace - I haven't been hugged so much since my last visit with my large family from New Jersey.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Kimberley%20Lacks%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="inset" img="" alt="Kimberley Lacks 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Kimberley Lacks 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-275x366-50155.jpg" width="275" height="366" /></a>Opening words on behalf of the Lacks family were offered by Kimberley Lacks, daughter of Sonny Lacks, granddaughter of Henrietta Lacks. Kimberley stressed a major point that Skloot's book did so extraordinarily well: for us to remember that her grandmother was a real woman who worked in the fields, cooked, danced, and wanted the world for her children like any other parent.</p> <p>Kimberley then expressed the families gratitude for those who did just that, first and foremost thanking Rebecca Skloot for her ten-year journey with the family and scientists worldwide to bring the Henrietta Lacks story to the attention of all people, not just us in science and medicine.</p> <p>Then, Kimberley said something I want all writers to know:<br /><strong>"Thanks to the media for bringing the story of Henrietta Lacks to the world."</strong></p> <p>I joked with the writers and TV folks there as to when the last time was that they were expressly thanked for their work. But remember this, my journalism friends: you do make a difference. Because of this essential role you play in society, we just have to figure how to make the profession more financially viable for as many of you as possible in the new media landscape.</p> <p>I had the distinct pleasure of being seated next to Attorney William Bryant Claiborne and his wife. Attorney Claiborne is a proud graduate of <a href="http://www.vsu.edu/pages/1.asp"><strong>Virginia State University</strong></a>, a superb HBCU in Petersburg, and then earned a law degree at the University of Virginia. His colleagues thought he was out of his mind to come back to his rural home to practice but he reminded me that his home folk need legal services just as badly as those in Richmond and DC. Mr. Claiborne certainly walks that talk - also serving on the <a href="http://www.oldhalifax.com/county/"><strong>Halifax County</strong></a> Board of Supervisors. In this capacity, he presented the Lacks family (below) with a resolution honoring Henrietta Lacks, saying "we are so proud she lies in our county."</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Claiborne%20Halifax%20Co%20resolution%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img alt="Claiborne Halifax Co resolution 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Claiborne Halifax Co resolution 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-480x320-50157.jpg" width="480" height="320" class="mt-image-center" style="text-align: center; display: block; margin: 0 auto 20px;" /></a></p> <p><strong>A rare experience for a scientist</strong><br /> While anxiously reflecting on the comments I was about to give, I recalled the fact that I felt embarrassed that my dissertation included nothing more about HeLa cells than the paragraph <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2009/11/a_black_woman_and_a_white_boys.php"><strong>excerpted in this post</strong></a>, and certainly nothing about the woman from whom the cells were derived. Twenty years later, this is an even more glaring omission. So, I used the opportunity to thank the family for the gift of their matriarch. While I couldn't change the past treatment of the family, I can play a part in moving forward and was therefore honored to be asked by Rebecca Skloot to serve with Dr. Pattillo on the board of <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/book-special-features/henrietta-lacks-foundation/"><strong>The Henrietta Lacks Foundation</strong></a> to bring scholarship support to today's young descendants. (Rebecca is donating a portion of book proceeds to the Foundation.)</p> <p>And I didn't even think about this until I was standing before the congregation - I told the family that I would be honored for them to sign my dissertation because this PhD work was as much theirs as mine.</p> <p>I also had a few other things to say regarding the impact of HeLa cells on me personally and professionally and on other scientists and physicians around the world and how literally world-famous Henrietta Lacks is now. This gift of their matriarch, through her own suffering, has facilitated our efforts to relieve the suffering of literally millions of other people. The use of HeLa cells (and other cell lines overtaken by HeLa cells) led to the development of some drugs that treated my own mother who was stricken with a lymph node-positive breast cancer when I was a junior in college, stimulating me to become a cancer researcher and allowing her to now be a 26-year breast cancer survivor.</p> <p>I was also sure to address the young people in the audience, family and otherwise, to encourage them in science and medicine and offered our them an open invitation to visit with us in our laboratories and classrooms in the Research Triangle area.</p> <p>These words got some applause and a few Amens and "Praise Jesus!" - affirmations and feedback that we rarely get in the context of university auditoriums and seminar programs. Knowing more about the Black church since moving to the South makes these affirmations even more meaningful.</p> <p>I do not yet have the writing skills to adequately express how moving this experience was for me to have the opportunity to face the family and express my gratitude that the life I have today - the wife, daughter, house, guitars - stems from a story of injustice across the decades. Because of today's clinical guidelines for anonymizing human tissue specimens, we most often have no idea as to who exactly provided the biological research tools we use in the laboratory. But to be hugged by Sonny Lacks and literally and philosophically embraced by so many of the family is an experience I will never forget.</p> <p>And now that several dozen members of the Lacks family have autographed and inscribed my dissertation, it somehow seems more complete.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Veronica%20Spencer%20inscription%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="center" img="" alt="Veronica Spencer inscription 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Veronica Spencer inscription 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-500x357-50184.jpg" width="500" height="357" /></a></p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Jackson%20inscription%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="center" img="" alt="Jackson inscription 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Jackson inscription 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-500x666-50188.jpg" width="500" height="666" /></a></p> <p>Many of the family also put in their telephone numbers, quite ironic knowing how difficult it was for Rebecca to even get family members to return her phone calls for the first couple of years of her writing.</p> <p>The guest speakers that followed were uniformly outstanding beginning with Rev. Kevin Chandler, president of the Halifax NAACP chapter. Rev. Ronnie Womack, mediator of the Banister Missionary Baptist Association, gave us some of the most motivating old-time preaching, stressing that the day was one for unification - implying, to me at least, that we were there to recognize that the gift of a Black woman has impacted the lives of all racial and ethnic groups - and "that when CNN rolls across the bottom of the screen that a cure for cancer has been found," that Henrietta Lacks will be part of that story.</p> <p>The highlight for many of us was when Dr. Roland Pattillo took the pulpit to humbly note his role in the day and the generosity of he and his wife in providing the gravestone for Henrietta Lacks together with the Morehouse School of Medicine. In noting that over 60,000 peer-reviewed publications have made use of HeLa cells, Pattillo told us that even today, another such paper is published at a rate of one every two hours. Dr. Pattillo is deserving of his own blog post and I look forward to telling more of his story.</p> <p>At the other end of the spectrum was the next speaker, a remarkable young man, freshman congressman <a href="http://perriello.house.gov/"><strong>Rep. Tom Perriello</strong></a> (I can say that because he's about a decade my junior). An undergrad and law graduate of Yale University, this native of Virginia's 5th district reflected on his work in West Africa where polio continues to afflict millions despite the millions saved in Western nations thanks to the role HeLa cells played early in vaccine development. Perriello excerpted a resolution he read into the Congressional Record last Friday honoring Henrietta Lacks ("Honoring Henrietta Pleasant-Lacks" <a href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CREC-2010-05-28/html/CREC-2010-05-28-pt1-PgE1008-3.htm"><strong>full text</strong></a>).</p> <p>As a side note, I drove past many advertisements for his Republican opponent, Robert Hurt, that read, "HURT U.S. Congress." </p> <p>My immediate thoughts were, no thank you - you've hurt it enough already. </p> <p>Perriello is an energetic politician who causes Republicans to froth because of his dedication to the military, international relations, workforce development, and establishment of faith-based aid groups while also putting forth such heresy and tyranny as affordable health care and asking his campaign workers to also "tithe" hours on community service projects unrelated to the election. His district runs from the North Carolina border to north of Charlottesville, home of the University of Virginia, where his support is quite strong. I took it as a compliment that Rep. Perriello stopped me afterward to say I'd make a good politician - if it meant being like him, I would.</p> <p>Reverend Alfred Chandler then closed with words that I think we can all do well to remember - that when we see someone in our community and feel an urge to pass judgment, bear in mind that we have no idea as to that person's story.</p> <p><strong>Gravestone dedication</strong><br /> We were then off to the Lacks family cemetery on the property of the old home-house down Lacks Town Road, an absolutely beautiful stretch of rolling farmland. The photo below was taken looking south from the intersection of Mt. Laurel and Lacks Town Rd.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Mt%20Laurel%20and%20Lacks%20Town%20Rd%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img alt="Mt Laurel and Lacks Town Rd 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Mt Laurel and Lacks Town Rd 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-455x215-50173.jpg" width="455" height="215" class="mt-image-center" style="text-align: center; display: block; margin: 0 auto 20px;" /></a></p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Elsie%20Lacks%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="inset right" img="" alt="Elsie Lacks 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Elsie Lacks 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-250x183-50175.jpg" width="250" height="183" /></a>About 100 people remained from the church service to dedicate the Henrietta Lacks gravestone just to the left of that of her mother, Eliza Pleasant. Another gravestone also being dedicated was that for Elsie Lacks, Henrietta's daughter who died at age 15 at the Crownsville State Hospital, known then as The Hospital for the Negro Insane of Maryland. The story of Elsie and the visit there by Rebecca and Deborah Lacks has been cited by many as one of the most emotional parts of Skloot's book.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/Sonny%20and%20PRM%20Forester%2005.29.10%20copyright%20David%20J%20Kroll.jpg"><img class="inset" img="" alt="Sonny and PRM Forester 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/05/Sonny and PRM Forester 05.29.10 copyright David J Kroll-thumb-250x375-50178.jpg" width="250" height="375" /></a>With all of the press attention, Sonny Lacks made it a point to introduce to all NPR "Butch" Forester, the groundskeeper who maintains the previously overgrown Lacks family cemetery in its now peaceful and reverent state.</p> <p>I also had the chance to walk over to the home-house where Henrietta, her husband David, and children lived. It's tougher to see now than in the winter due to the trees and undergrowth but you can get a better glimpse of it from the <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/book-special-features/photos/"><strong>photos then at Rebecca Skloot's website</strong></a>.</p> <p>And before heading back on the road, the church and family had a nice repast dinner with fried chicken, green beans, potato salad, macaroni salad, meatballs, rice, and - nom! - chocolate cake.</p> <p>Put simply, this was the single most moving day in my life as a scientist.</p> <p><strong>A roundup of press cover of the Henrietta Lacks headstone memorial dedication:</strong><strong></strong></p> <p>Lauren Compton and her videographer from WSET-TV in Lynchburg wrote <a href="http://www.wset.com/news/stories/0510/741005.html"><strong>this article and filed a segment</strong></a> from the station having only an hour to get back to the studio, thereby missing the repast. Beyond being a superb reporter, Ms. Compton did not have to refer to the songsheet to sing the words to the hymns.</p> <p>I had a lovely time chatting with <strong>Denise Watson Batts of the Hampton Roads <em>Virginian-Pilot</em></strong> who wrote <a href="http://hamptonroads.com/2010/05/after-60-years-anonymity-henrietta-lacks-has-headstone"><strong>"After 60 years of anonymity, Henrietta Lacks has a headstone."</strong></a> Denise also had <a href="http://hamptonroads.com/2010/05/cancer-cells-killed-henrietta-lacks-then-made-her-immortal"><strong>an excellent interview earlier this month</strong></a> in Baltimore with Sonny Lacks, eldest brother, Lawrence, and cousin Sadie Grinnan.</p> <p>A superb writer, editor, and a fine gentleman, <strong>Tom McLaughlin</strong>, wrote <a href="http://www.thenewsrecord.com/index.php/news/article/an_epitaph_at_last/"><strong>this nicely detailed article</strong></a> for his South Boston <em>News &amp; Record</em>. Although the press took numerous photographs at the services, only Tom put up a slideshow of 49 photos within that story. Tom and his mother, Sylvia O. McLaughlin, editor of the <em>News &amp; Record</em>, are extremely proud of their newspaper and readers know that I am a huge fan of local news. The level of detail that local writers and publishers puts into such stories (or should) reminds us of the importance of sustained local reporting. I'm grateful to Tom and his Mom for sending me home with a few issues of their paper that covered Skloot's book and the Lacks family stories. Tom's own <a href="http://www.thenewsrecord.com/index.php/opinion/article/emotional_rescue/"><strong>review of the book</strong></a> speaks from the viewpoint of a Southside Virginia native.</p> <p><strong>Tim Saunders from WDBJ-TV in Roanoke, Virginia</strong>, birthplace of Henrietta Lacks <a href="http://www.wdbj7.com/Global/story.asp?S=12571061"><strong>filed this article and video</strong></a>, "Halifax County community pays tribute to world famous native," today.</p> <p>A brief note appeared on June 1 on <a href="http://www.essence.com/news/hot_topics_4/henrietta_lacks_headstone.php"><strong>the website of <em>Essence</em> magazine</strong></a>.</p> <p>Many thanks also go to Melissa Bell from <em>The Washington Post</em> and graduate of Northwestern University School of Journalism who patiently listened to my stories and whose work I look forward to reading.</p> <p>I also want to publicly thank my lovely wife, PharmGirl, MD, and the illustrious PharmKid for understanding how much being away for this event meant to me. As always, I was on science time and a quick "couple of hours" trip took all of Saturday, a holiday weekend day we really needed to spend together after I've been out of town and away for other university events.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a></span> <span>Mon, 05/31/2010 - 08:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bioethics" hreflang="en">Bioethics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cancer" hreflang="en">cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/journalists-awesome" hreflang="en">Journalists, Awesome</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/personal" hreflang="en">personal</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/race-science-and-society" hreflang="en">Race in Science and Society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/american-south" hreflang="en">The American South</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-science-and-medicine" hreflang="en">Women in science and medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rebecca-skloot" hreflang="en">Rebecca Skloot</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bioethics" hreflang="en">Bioethics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cancer" hreflang="en">cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/social-sciences" hreflang="en">Social Sciences</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338738" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275311580"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you very much for giving us this wonderful post.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338738&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qz0SIcm0NPPtoi16iD9J6TD2Z8p2TQPXpykqjR7wi_M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blogs.nature.com/mfenner" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Martin Fenner (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338738">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338739" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275313175"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What a beautiful story and an amazing post. You do all of us a proud by speaking with such feeling and authenticity. Thank you.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338739&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AJXvY1PDwVu51bj6R2B0OWqWabd96x-p2FgwGk88cjI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://Www.orthoonc.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Felasfa Wodajo (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338739">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338740" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275315215"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you for telling this story, and describing the impact of Henrietta's life on your career as a scientist.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338740&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ZPBg1M4YH6qeXJ2a4lFPHgHwOvvTDQS02eOLDoPP6RI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.freethinkersasylum.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Geknitics (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338740">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338741" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275316609"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for sharing your wonderful photos, and this continuation of the Henrietta Lacks story, Abel. After hearing interviews with Rebecca Skloot on the radio several times, it's been in the back of my head that Lacks was quite young when she died of cervical cancer - but seeing that gravestone makes it especially poignant, somehow.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338741&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bnq9YqPcEsGvmrwF_I7KATd5M7MivEZi8MQL28OMpBI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Barn Owl (not verified)</span> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338741">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338742" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275321042"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you for this wonderful post. I have printed it and put with my Rebecca Skloot book about Henrietta.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338742&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="olXtAadJD1a2WH1mIeOdQfhI5iFnQZ8Gx9AE5AM23XM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.rascofromrif.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rasco from RIF (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338742">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338743" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275325228"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Awesome that you were able to be a part of this, Abel. I read the book, and just loved it. The headstone is beautiful.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338743&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AxKKLOm_YjyCNz1AqCFWQEp5wzU3ORgK-5yLriBbKbA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://candidengineer.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Candid Engineer (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338743">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338744" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275330908"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What a pleasure it was to read your entire post and see the photos from this long overdue and wonderful event. One thing you got wrong -- you DO have the skill to express in words how moving this was for you, because it comes through in your every sentence. So glad you go to have this experience, and thanks for sharing it with others.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338744&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="t8qGrKKpJQpQ0RnQkxJp65cdHmbMYRY33RhZgAGt-Zc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://lisaromeo.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lisa Romeo (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338744">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338745" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275330979"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Nice post! Just told Mr. Bill to read it!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338745&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OWbG6HXWEwQrSg5Y53G-kseGZAkJnBLNrt8khKsoWfY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anjou (not verified)</span> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338745">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338746" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275334210"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Glad you were able to attend this event, Abel. I've lent my copy of Skloot's book to several colleagues and all of them said they had absolutely no idea where HeLa cells originated, why the cells were so named, and that they were reduced to tears at the unjustices done to the Lacks' family.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338746&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5tHkvJz_H2m-M-j_rZNOT6YAF30XHxn6JvobLIs8gjs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://trainingprofessor.blogspot.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Professor in Training">Professor in T… (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338746">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338747" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275335611"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What a wonderful post about the memorial and dedication. My family is from Clover, and we had no idea about this wonderful woman until we saw in the paper about her tombstone placement. Next time I go back to Clover I want to head to Lackstown and place flowers.</p> <p>I can't help but comment on your glowing review of our "Congressman" though. He is not from the district, he is a Yankee who came down and ran a smear campaign against our longstanding Congressman and managed to get elected because of the Presidential election. He is not well liked except in Charlottesville. Don't believe everything you hear.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338747&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mL2x46vbb9Z5K4T8Z_tTPHocXyUPxHnHxCtH0zT2GBs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rose (not verified)</span> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338747">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338748" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275339471"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great post Dr.Kroll. Very moving!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338748&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Qb5whnhFmaWjTuJTKx0xiClkdy3OTGQphbsPK0kE5KY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://arvindsays.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">arvind (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338748">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338749" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275340957"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you for sharing your experience so vividly in this post!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338749&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="U8K3S4FClxGEeVfqXaknPBi0bXP-N_IsmyNOCT3nuhw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">fog (not verified)</span> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338749">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338750" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275348953"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Very, very nice, DM. A fine account of a splendid day.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338750&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jKL5Vsq_vRhtnKJkmjDe3HE6znmQRl-86Q1suNMG-Nw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/neuronculture" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Dobbs (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338750">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338751" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275353733"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Greetings, Dr. Kroll, it was such a pleasure to meet and talk with you at the Memorial Dedication for our grandmother. Our thanks and gratitude go out to people like you who took the time to attend this event. It was so memorable and I for one will not forget the many people that I had the opportunity to meet. I was thinking about a comment my uncle Lawrence made, "That GOD had a plan in his mother's passing". AND if you think about all of the lives that she has touched, from the cures of diseases to people like you. Who took an interest in her cells and became a successful doctor and still to this day, lives are being affected. Our family, would like to THANK YOU for such a beautiful post, and we will keep in touch. Please thank your family as well for allowing us to have you in attendance for this event. Best Regards</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338751&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="50HD2iaBUIqOZzFNjBYGP6m16L3YL9iyRO49lu7jPNs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kimberley Lacks (not verified)</span> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338751">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338752" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275384430"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Abel, this is quite simply one of the most beautiful and well written posts I've ever read. On so many levels. Bravo, sir, and bravo to the family and spirit of Henrietta Lacks!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338752&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="or7Mv6qU45FKsd5djIa1kyLC2vyPdKEmMe9XTYnA2fc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://behindthestick.wordpress.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">scribbler50 (not verified)</a> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338752">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338753" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275391738"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Once again, this story has brought me to tears. Thank you for sharing your day with those of us who could only be there in spirit.<br /> And thanks to the Lacks clan for Henrietta's gift to humanity and their patience with the world's failure to acknowledge it...until now.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338753&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="p9taH6fqc04oWHDAOA3Ff4H_vY6mRww2Rw6F6aV1xS0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://pascalesthoughts.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Pascale (not verified)</a> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338753">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338754" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275401545"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wow...What a re-cap of the dedication! We drove down from Harrisburg Pennsylvania to attend and would not have missed it for the world.</p> <p>Thank you for such a complete article. </p> <p>Earl</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338754&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tT6JZeY6EjGIjihnIUt-0ClFqZrBFys-Vn_msbYKNx4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Earl W. Wilbourn Sr. (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338754">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338755" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275408224"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Many thanks to all of my friends, old and new. I still don't feel that I completely conveyed just how remarkable this day was for me - certainly one that I will never forget for the rest of my life. (But thank you, Lisa Romeo @7, for your vote of confidence!).</p> <p>First and foremost, Ms. Lacks @14 - Thank you again for being so welcoming of me on such a special day of celebration for your family. I consider it an honor and am ever so glad to be able to tell this story in this post and in others I've written on the blog over the last year.</p> <p>Ms. Lacks @14 and Mr. Wilbourn @17 - I do have to say it was overwhelming to meet everyone at one time - the Clover, Baltimore, and Harrisburg Lackses. I could have easily spent hours talking with any one of you. I know that there will be other events and I very much look forward to participating and spending more time with you wherever and whenever I can. But please be sure to take me up on my promise to help the young folks in the family with their career plans, regardless of whether they include science or medicine.</p> <p>anjou @8 - It is your Bill who has served for me as an example of how to hold in reverence all of those who came before us in the field of oncology therapeutics.</p> <p>Professor in Training @9 - Your comment is exactly the reason I started my <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/what-professors-are-saying-about-the-immortal-life-of-henrietta-lacks/">academic endorsement</a> of the book with the statement, "No student or biomedical scientist should be permitted to broach the barrier of a cell culture hood without reading Rebecca Sklootâs, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks."</p> <p>Rasco from RIF @5 - Now *that* is an honor - thank you!</p> <p>Barn Owl @4 - I was also reminded of just how young and vibrant Henrietta must have been when she died by looking at her granddaughters who are around 31 with their little ones.</p> <p>Pascale @16 - What a perfect way to express to the Lacks family what so many of us feel: <i>"And thanks to the Lacks clan for Henrietta's gift to humanity and their patience with the world's failure to acknowledge it...until now."</i></p> <p>David Dobbs @13 and scribbler50 @15 - Your comments make me blush coming from two people whose writing I admire and aspire to (and fine gentlemen as well!)</p> <p>Rose @10 - I'm so glad that you came to learn about the story here at our blog. What a wonderful honor and place in history for your hometown. But, goodness me, I hesitate to get much into politics more than my admiration for Congressman Perriello the man. He really is from Ivy, Virginia, and went to Yale for undergrad and law school, well, because he was smart enough to get into Yale. In fact, the smearing actually came instead from the campaign of Perriello's opponent, Rep. Virgil Goode, who <a href="http://www.c-ville.com/index.php?cat=1991704080566501&amp;act=post&amp;pid=12032909081163812">depicted the challenger as a "swarthy New York liberal."</a> (btw, Yale is in New Haven, Connecticut.) </p> <p>Of course, I'm wary of any politician from any party but I was very impressed by his work to introduce the congressional resolution and in the depth of knowledge and sincerity of his comments on Saturday.</p> <p>But, yes, please do go to the Lacks Town gravesite and lay flowers next time you are home. It is a beautiful site and a fitting resting place for a most noteworthy woman and her family.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338755&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="j2u3QBCdquj76hb04_-mztFFZKDMDgnchgMLqICxQCU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338755">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338756" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275429771"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Tremendous, David. Thank you for this moving post about your trip. Both are fitting tributes, and I feel privileged to share in this story.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338756&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="HmkrW4wAqNt4kg4KqmlBT2sNti2ILM7VSOeB_PSASNQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.marsosudiro.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Phil Marsosudiro (not verified)</a> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338756">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338757" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275506397"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dear Dr. Pharmboy:<br /> This is a remarkable story and thank you for bringing your link into the narrative. This was a wonderful gesture on your part. The messages left witnin your thesis are quite moving, best to you and your work!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338757&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="04ReKTPRzcERMRon0fHJAgZD4rTOYDnEycBbwapqSbg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Twopackjack (not verified)</span> on 02 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338757">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338758" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275555619"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you for a wonderful coverage story. I have just finished "The Immortal Henriette Lacks" and find greta satisfaction that there has been recognitation of her life and contribution.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338758&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BX4R69WcR9PXUMw6myS9hgycFzI0WeYPZIcm7yJFfrc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jim Cahill (not verified)</span> on 03 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338758">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338759" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275582732"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How can we say thankyou to a great man who did not care to just write a thesis but cared to reach out and give his thanks and graditude. Once again on the behalf of my family the Lacks, we like to thankyou for coming to our memorial. Just you acknowleding HeLa as not just a cell or thesis but a mother, wife,grandmother, great grand, friend and most important a person means alot.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338759&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qqv8BdnHoh0gml5ET17t5GL22sKIKuBjFHZQcdKp8Nc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Veronica A. Spencer (not verified)</span> on 03 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338759">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338760" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275584215"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I see orher family members was just as excited like myself to say how great you are and give you thanks. Within the Lacks family we are forever thankful,we do hope to see you and your family again at our black tie affair as well as your family. You can contact my daughter at <a href="mailto:www.spencerveronica50@gmail.com">www.spencerveronica50@gmail.com</a> for more info. thanks again!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338760&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FYbWLH7DbZl6xtzd6ubg27cy0wH2218gQ98YOMlzy44"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="toni (lawrence lacks daughter)">toni (lawrence… (not verified)</span> on 03 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338760">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338761" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275593321"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I think your writing skills are just fine, Abel. You brought a tear to my eye and a lump to my throat. Thanks.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338761&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xw-0APMCtB5_1_BDpXlubWmVJFIJYV9rpcyCycjkm9w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://skeptivet.blogspot.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">DVMKurmes (not verified)</a> on 03 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338761">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338762" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275876972"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Its important to give Henrietta Lacks her due important as a donor.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338762&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yfIRyLE0FgnwVTgX7w5o35yADO-gX5a-pXAT0Pz4P1E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://helacells.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Om Singh (not verified)</a> on 06 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338762">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338763" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1276620567"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi... I didn't read all that you wrote. I stopped when you said, "In fact, if I could join a Black congregation, I'd probably still be going church." Why can't you? I am a European American woman, and I have been blessed twice in my life to serve on the staff of African American congregations. I also found them very welcoming places, and places where my spirit was nourished and inspired. I think you should do it!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338763&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_vJZ_3_o4Fcl-2eUls9Zj1LxItwTH27j9I01bFQfpa0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Susan Hunnicutt (not verified)</span> on 15 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338763">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/terrasig/2010/05/31/henrietta-lacks-headstone-dedi%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 31 May 2010 12:02:09 +0000 terrasig 119688 at https://scienceblogs.com A Historic Day: Henrietta Lacks's Long Unmarked Grave Finally Gets a Headstone https://scienceblogs.com/node/148255 <span>A Historic Day: Henrietta Lacks&#039;s Long Unmarked Grave Finally Gets a Headstone</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Today is a very exciting day:  Henrietta Lacks (aka HeLa) has been lying in an unmarked grave since her death in 1951. Today, thanks to Dr. Roland Pattillo at Morehouse School of Medicine, who donated a headstone after reading <i><a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a></i>, her grave is finally marked.  Below, a snapshot of some members of the Lacks family beside the new marker for Henrietta, and the marker for her daughter, Elsie, which was also unveiled today.  Dr. Roland Pattillo is pictured at the far left: </p><div><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/assets_c/2010/05/Henrietta Lacks funeral-50054.php" onclick="window.open('http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/assets_c/2010/05/Henrietta Lacks funeral-50054.php','popup','width=1600,height=1200,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0'); return false"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/assets_c/2010/05/Henrietta Lacks funeral-thumb-600x450-50054.jpg" width="600" height="450" alt="Henrietta Lacks funeral.jpg" class="mt-image-center" style="text-align: center; display: block; margin: 0 auto 20px;" /></a> <div>Her stone, in case you can't tell from the picture, is shaped like a book. The text was written by members of the Lacks family. It reads:</div> <div>  </div> <div style="text-align: center;">Henrietta Lacks, August 01, 1920-October 04, 1951.  </div> <div style="text-align: center;">In loving memory of a phenomenal woman, wife and mother who touched the lives of many. </div> <div style="text-align: center;">Here lies Henrietta Lacks (HeLa).  Her immortal cells will continue to help mankind forever.</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Eternal Love and Admiration, From Your Family </div> <div style="text-align: center;"></div> <div></div> <div></div> <div>Many thanks to <a href="http://twitter.com/melissabell">Melissa Bell</a> for the photo.</div> <div></div> </div> <div></div> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a></span> <span>Sat, 05/29/2010 - 10:39</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bioethics" hreflang="en">Bioethics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/publication-news-and-followups" hreflang="en">Publication News and Followups</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/immortal-life-henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-and-science" hreflang="en">Women and Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/roland-pattillo" hreflang="en">Roland Pattillo</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502000" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275146538"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That's really great, Rebecca.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502000&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UxbmbriXQYMAxmaIoJwGKJBRZ2PZFlPiRqzhOkvGmO0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lila (not verified)</span> on 29 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502000">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502001" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275158327"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Nice work and thanks to everyone involved in correcting this deficit for Henrietta, Elsie, Deborah, and the rest of the Lacks family.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502001&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="uvimxW0meCscAx0Egg7nIOx9-qrZmDdztdDrUNhm-sU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.twitter.com/hclemenceau" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Heather Clemenceau (not verified)</a> on 29 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502001">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502002" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275165150"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Beautiful tombstones and a lovely picture. I've just started reading the book and am already enthralled.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502002&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xj4gFLAm4-4Hoc_H9f6ZFneZEAidc6DNtsKIaglWO88"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.findingjosephine.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dionne Ford (not verified)</a> on 29 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502002">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502003" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275165757"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sklooty, that is so awesome! And you should be really proud for writing such a fucking great book!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502003&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Lu130oqWIDc5LnkSzXNtR6EMnjSTuTMauhROt0sTcwA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://physioprof.wordpress.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Comrade PhysioProf (not verified)</a> on 29 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502003">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502004" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275170183"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I feel like I bonded with the family after reading the book. I am thrilled that Henrietta Lacks has a memorial to her life.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502004&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="c_KTyEudwsBC7a7g9UNx7_WzLHgzOz0339nCPE8JVag"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Warren Daniel (not verified)</span> on 29 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502004">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502005" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275192902"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Got a bit choked up on seeing Henrietta's headstone and the family. Nice to see that recognition is finally coming to that poor woman and her long suffering family.<br /> Congratulations to you, Rebecca, for seeing this through. Restores my faith in humanity :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502005&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gD5c5znM3wPj6LyadIELNCSM7DcD88GiMOcIJ2bF98E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Chris Smyth, Dublin, Ireland">Chris Smyth, D… (not verified)</span> on 30 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502005">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502006" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275224154"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ms. Skloot, if you're not already, you should be proud for the part you've done in giving Lacks and her surviving family the recognition they deserve.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502006&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NNxwrNsE12Mv2NkqcTlt4YU24BAD8c9FbGtSAmHhjI8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Tybo (not verified)</span> on 30 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502006">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502007" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275245523"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Good.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502007&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PabahqSqhvWbjQ5RSO1CyRNHUk3pTlpKw566Eab-Bts"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Christopher Gwyn (not verified)</span> on 30 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502007">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502008" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275245902"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm weeping as I write this comment. Truly a historic occasion! The sentiment on Henrietta's marker is so fitting and beautiful. Thank you, Rebecca, for helping the Lacks family honour the memories of Henrietta and Elsie at long last -- and for helping the rest of us appreciate the woman behind HeLa. Now, if only Johns Hopkins would give the surviving family members free or low-cost health care...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502008&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eWpYbKM6s4R499Kf0UB8ztr33ip9RPcdRt_ZWCvpaXA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carmen (not verified)</span> on 30 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502008">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502009" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275315550"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sklooty, that is so awesome! And you should be really proud for writing such a fucking great book!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502009&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="HN_QPg3UmMBK5rcBL0OQn3CbyyUwM8j6_HL8MdbY6bw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.redpepper.gen.tr" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">red pepper (not verified)</a> on 31 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502009">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502010" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275366210"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rebecca...you've written a great book! I've just finished and I'm so pleased to see the above pictures. It's criminal that it wasn't done sooner.<br /> Congratulations on a job well done.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502010&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AkxayC2MlMiMHXSeQiZedB8DjZRdq3ysv0_cDsTskOg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">taryn (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502010">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502011" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275412669"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>An amazing story so well told - thank you for the telling. Its just right and fitting that this story be told to the world as haven't we all had the benefit from Henrietta cells. So pleased that this lady and her family now have the recognition that is deserved</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502011&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vYUhjSzPbD2SuEvZ7cKv07TI2J_MJVuqjCToAI_YHqo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">maureen (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502011">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502012" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1276270168"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am thrilled that Henrietta Lacks has a memorial to her life.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502012&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UTTUg4WxsxIo1pXa5cWmCchzLpqWgb1myqgfGZy0geI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.redpepper.gen.tr" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">red pepper (not verified)</a> on 11 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502012">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502013" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1277436221"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Learned about this incredible book thru my Book Club "Brothers and Sisters BC". Her living was not in vain. What a wonderful tribute for her families for generations to come.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502013&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="iPMln8IKVDdiSbTE1lMzFaj_Phb-PP1Lc2kPO19fvm4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Marsetta Lee (not verified)</span> on 24 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502013">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2502014" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1277530878"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>very nices article.An amazing story so well told - thank you for the telling. Its just right and fitting that this story be told to the world as haven't we all had the benefit from Henrietta cells. So pleased that this lady and her family now have the recognition that is deserved</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2502014&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qF4JaPoxojcc53S6MfxokaoyRDbLZIimmjF9dpLCsiY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.sacekim-merkezi.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">saç ekimi merkezi (not verified)</a> on 26 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2502014">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/node/148255%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sat, 29 May 2010 14:39:08 +0000 rskloot 148255 at https://scienceblogs.com Skloot Launches FAQ Blog Series Answering Reader Questions About The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks https://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/2010/03/21/skloot-launching-faq-blog-seri <span>Skloot Launches FAQ Blog Series Answering Reader Questions About The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/wp-content/blogs.dir/277/files/2012/04/i-6e9d9b9eca80e21c85ae51638f9b66d8-phpJjtjUQAM-1.jpg" alt="i-6e9d9b9eca80e21c85ae51638f9b66d8-phpJjtjUQAM-1.jpg" />As some of you may have noticed, things have been a weeeeeeee bit quiet here at Culture Dish.  This is what happens when a person embarks on <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/book-tour/">a totally insane book tour</a>.  I've been on the road for two months straight since the publication of <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a>, giving talks, signing books, meeting readers, and doing <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/press/">lots and lots and lots</a> of interviews for TV and radio (talking to folks like <a href="http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/267542/march-16-2010/rebecca-skloot">Stephen Colbert</a>, <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/03/15/sunday/main6300824.shtml?tag=contentMain;contentBody">Jim Axelrod of CBS Sunday Morning</a>, <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123232331">Terry Gross</a>, and many others).  This has been a wonderful experience, which I will be posting about soon (complete with videos and photos), but it has, amazingly, left little time for blogging.  I hope to change that, though I will be on the road until June talking about the book around the country (full schedule is <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/events">online here</a>, so check it to see if I'm going to be in your area).</p> <p>I'm starting a series of posts responding to frequently asked questions about the book. I've been getting a flood of email with questions that I haven't been able to respond to individually, so I thought I would start addressing them here, and link to them as a way to fill my <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/faq/">now empty FAQ page</a>.  </p> <p>So ... if you have any questions you'd like me to address related to the book, please post them here in the comments section, or <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/about/contact/">email them to me. </a>Obviously it will take a while to respond to them all, but I plan to answer as many as I can.</p> <!--more--><p>Photo credit <a href="http://allencentre.wikispaces.com/file/view/question-mark.jpg/34233941/question-mark.jpg">here</a>.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a></span> <span>Sun, 03/21/2010 - 06:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-related" hreflang="en">Book Related</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela-faqs" hreflang="en">HeLa FAQs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/immortal-book-tour" hreflang="en">The Immortal Book Tour</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/immortal-life-henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/faq" hreflang="en">FAQ</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501914" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269174162"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Are there any plans of creating a children appropriate adaptation of this novel? I teach 8th graders, many who are very interested in the book, but cannot comprehend the content.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501914&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rvRM7_qrqYco6FSrSY0hrp4XilolxJVj3OdFKyMxOPU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jessica Oliver (not verified)</span> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501914">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501915" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269175474"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Since your book release has the foundation you created for the Lacks family had a lot of outside donations? I would love to know how one could donate to the family if they wanted to</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501915&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="809yUBkhAC8lCf0zgRX7UWQ5ieijrdR_WFbM3DzSd7Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephanie Higgins (not verified)</span> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501915">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501916" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269184994"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rebecca -- As a fellow science-writer-historian type, I have a technique question. I'd like to know more about how you gathered info for recreated scenes. Clearly in some cases you had your recorder or computer or notebook with you for notes. But in others -- particularly when you first drive into a place or someone bursts into your presence, for instance -- it seems more likely that you're working from memory. So do tell -- what's your working technique for gathering the sort of detailed dialogue that appears throughout the book?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501916&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="wtx5FDQJJWxT-kM_fl1XO6wh287l-pk_03OpOphzhCM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.thomashager.net" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Hager (not verified)</a> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501916">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501917" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269185389"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm almost finished reading your book, and find it difficult to put down. A great, tragic story wonderfully told. It would be fabulous, as someone already suggested, to have this as a children's book. Perhaps one in the "Scientists in the Field" series?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501917&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PwdSR_m7ajcWZViodjKVkwvN-VPKfkY3JK7bnMygrlw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Severinghaus (not verified)</span> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501917">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501918" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269188221"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So, my professor said that I should change my topic on my research paper, because he said it's too new of a topic(as said before when I was asking questions a couple of weeks ago) but for some reason, I can not stray from this topic. I absolutely love it! I hope to see you at Memphis this fall!!!! This book is wonderful :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501918&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jZT-ySxtiuyXVrolzokcjXzE5K4moZ4NZ5uewG1FsT4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Heather Graves (not verified)</span> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501918">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501919" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269198990"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>great idea.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501919&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SMHg-5mlvraZNqknWjE64kR5aZmvGMVfzquvn3HAHqY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://urban-science.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">DNLee (not verified)</a> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501919">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="323" id="comment-2501920" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269212110"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great questions -- I'll address them in my FAQs. </p> <p>Jessica: Your question is an easy one: Yes. I'm working on that this very minute, in fact. Also a HeLa book for younger children. Thanks for asking!</p> <p>Stephanie: I'll address your question more in detail in my FAQs, but for now, you can find out more about the Foundation <a href="http://www.henriettalacksfoundation.org">on its website</a>, where you'll also find a <a href="http://www.lacksfamily.com">link to the Lacks Family's site,"</a> where people can donate directly to them.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501920&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hMqYs0VNimwdi8DUX9LBAVJZcVnPBpIEaK5-jaqM7Dc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501920">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/culturedish"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/culturedish" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/rebecca%20skloot.jpg?itok=6INInKYA" width="95" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user rskloot" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501921" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269458566"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rebecca,</p> <p>Two questions, one more improbable than the other, that I wanted to ask you before I post a short article on your book on my blog.</p> <p>1) Is it even remotely possible that HeLa cells used in testing polio vaccines somehow contaminated the vaccines themselves with a mutant cancer gene? I was born in central New York in the 50's. Of my family: 3 of four children have had cancer. Am finding more and more my age from the area who were diagnosed in their 40's. Just ran through my head while reading....stranger things have happened!</p> <p>2) Just confirming: scientists can no explain how/why HeLa cancer cells are still living, correct?</p> <p>3) Is it possible to pinpoint what chemotherapy agents for breast cancer were HeLa was used in their development? Taxol? Taxotere? Xeloda? Or are/were HeLa cells and other cell lines used in testing various cancer treatments?</p> <p>Thanks so much Rebecca. Your journey following this story and the resulting book: extraordinary.</p> <p>Jody Schoger</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501921&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="x76gndWW6TY6V86QSslkg7B_Dtwd4sKDfUojOkJ7TWA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://womenwcancer.blogspot.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jody Schoger (not verified)</a> on 24 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501921">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501922" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269546659"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am a Journalist of China Youth Daily, which is one of the most famous newspapers in China with readers all around the country. I read a news report introducing your book about HeLa cells recently and I was totally attracted. It is such a great book that I would like to introduce it to our audience as quickly as possible.<br /> Since now in China people can not get this book yet, would you please to answer some questions by E-mail to share more details about the story?<br /> I am looking forward to hearing from you. My Email:<a href="mailto:fuyannan1@hotmail.com">fuyannan1@hotmail.com</a><br /> Best regards.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501922&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="YQh_u94v7xaT32VdcgZS1t3wIaBNUQyPcomB1NF0IGU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Fu Yannan (not verified)</span> on 25 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501922">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501923" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269568351"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am one of the people who won your book through the draw here on scienceblogs. I am very excited to read it and have been looking forward to its arrive for a while now.</p> <p>I guess I should try to write some questions down as I read it and post them here. Too bad you are not coming to Ottawa on this book tour. Good luck though, it looks rather nutty.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501923&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="g-zUImCnG6ax7li25OqK3bsRDbSLgG6ZUaC6qYSm_Js"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://pretendbiologist.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Travis (not verified)</a> on 25 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501923">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501924" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269694380"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On page 2 of your Prologue you give some estimates about the numbers of HeLa cells that have been produced. In particular you give a figure of 50,000,000 metric tons. You also say that if placed end to end these cells would span 350,000,000 feet. Some simple math seems to show that these figures canât both be correct. A metric ton is 1000 kilograms or 2,204.6 pounds. Using the given values leads to one linear foot of cells weighing nearly 314 pounds which is not possible</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501924&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="b_xFyrewvY1lkU_mAuiE6fLiFQeM6wnzhzE9BjkWquY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bob (not verified)</span> on 27 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501924">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501925" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269711883"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rebecca--I attended the seminar at the VA Festival of the Book in which you were one of the panelists. I was much impressed by your determination. On my blog, I have mentioned your struggles to publish and posted a link to your book at Amazon.com. Best wishes to you. Vonnie</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501925&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9HswycHWwdAeUPOq56cBLHuHAHxoxIo2uhm0lXNiK18"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.vintagevonnie.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Vonnie Davis (not verified)</a> on 27 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501925">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501926" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269790958"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ms. Skloot--<br /> I read lot of books. Rarely has a book grabbed me like this one. I was absolutely fascinated-- especially by your very caring descriptions of the Lacks family. I was absolutely thrilled when I got on the Foundation's website and discovered you were actually coming to my smaller community in Grinnell, Iowa, in October.<br /> Doug</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501926&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FS1N6WmFVYVfPuZYcPY1nuAegKBsNr1fS0a9UrPzj70"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Doug Cameron (not verified)</span> on 28 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501926">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501927" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269797602"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rebecca,<br /> I too was completely captivated by your book. I would like to applaud your efforts in telling this very poignant story of the Lacks family. It seems unbelievable that even today we do not have control over our tissues once taken from us. As in the case of HeLa, it is wonderful if they are used for curing diseases and the science of DNA but leaves the ethical question of where does one draw the line. The damage of HeLa to the Lacks family was and is profound. You did a fantastc job of making that anguish real for the reader. Thanks for telling this compelling and profound story.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501927&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="JJoVA8T478rjdayAESfBOU2bkUfIR664y2CNSV4DP14"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Catheen Brenner (not verified)</span> on 28 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501927">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501928" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269870319"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I completely agree with you, Noah. What you say explains the current lack of demand for access to the literature. I wonder if science journalism of tomorrow will still be that way? If the current trend of slashing university jobs continues in the face of rising numbers of students, there will be ever increasing competition for the few remaining jobs. In this not very unlikely not-too-distant future scenario of overwhelming pressure to hype any small advance, will journalists still be the willing enablers of hype?<br /> Of course, that scenario doesn't have to materialize, but right now you don't need to be an Einstein to extrapolate the figures...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501928&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5g4YlgG_GGV78COy9Mu-uNsWIudG3UjskjY4Y__q5dc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.pornositeleri.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sikiÅ (not verified)</a> on 29 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501928">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501929" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269961929"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am so taken with this story. I heard you on NPR and immediately put my name on the waiting list! I just got it over the weekend and can barely stop reading it. I so hope that it has opened "the doors of health care" to this family - has Johns Hopkins (or any other health care provider), at the very least, offered free health care and medication to Henrietta's survivors? (I'm nearly finished with the book and just finished the piece about Deborah's medications). It only seems humane that Johns Hopkins acknowledge the family, and if not monetarily, at least with health care and medication.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501929&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="INTmgd7RyA3rC1WGqBoMKFJIrqIOJzo0dLtGaGU7D6o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lois Plantefaber (not verified)</span> on 30 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501929">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501930" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1270153067"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What happened to Deborah's daughter, LaTonya?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501930&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="erR18JOicwuvVr7802cXpPjDOVio9LG47PGY_KjrKQc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Elizabeth (not verified)</span> on 01 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501930">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501931" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1270640935"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>HPV-18 is sexually transmitted. Since Henrietta's husband obviously gave her syphilis and gonorrhea, it seems likely that he also gave her the virus that caused her cervical cancer. Much as I loved your book, I couldn't help but wonder about David's pivotal role in Henrietta's illness and death, something you implied but did not overtly address. Was this too sensitive and difficult an issue to deal with, especially for the surviving members of the Lacks family?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501931&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BUlmLw3gtcS8ksJhYt87ATTu-kG1Tpo1QJEzapoMn7w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carmen (not verified)</span> on 07 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501931">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501932" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1271245237"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This story was waiting to be told for so many years. Thank you for bringing it to us. Has the success of this book allowed you to help the family financially?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501932&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-cPA-xb9YxNztUybgAx5eptgSiKu6nI78STNl5oHAq8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Debbie (not verified)</span> on 14 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501932">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501933" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1271946007"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In the Afterword in The Book, Ms. Skloot refers to a pending lawsuit by the Havasupais against Arizona State University for using blood samples for tests that had not been revealed to the donors. The following announcement was in the on-line edition of the NY Times. Imagine what just a fraction of this settlement could do for the Lacks family.</p> <p>A protion of the announcement:<br /> Acknowledging a desire to âremedy the wrong that was done,â the universityâs Board of Regents on Tuesday agreed to pay $700,000 to 41 of the tribeâs members, return the blood samples and provide other forms of assistance to the impoverished Havasupai â a settlement that legal experts said was significant because it implied that the rights of research subjects can be violated when they are not fully informed about how their DNA might be used.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501933&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rTG8zYb1kuIgc4G59uSG0hWA8Y6-FZqzEhrQrBVRbjg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary K (not verified)</span> on 22 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501933">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501934" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1272057118"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It was great meeting you today, Rebecca! I have one question: the claim about 50 million metric tons of HeLa cells being produced to date seems quite exaggerated. Can you quote your source? It seems like this bit of information caught attention of many people, but I feel it's better to stick to more accurate (even if only estimated) numbers. Thank you for writing this book!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501934&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mNRoJwyDaTubv3swkLUTkssOmqF8M0n21y0B0hdKHG0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">KaKo (not verified)</span> on 23 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501934">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501935" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1272345495"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It was great meeting you today, Rebecca! I have one question: the claim about 50 million metric tons of HeLa cells being produced to date seems quite exaggerated. Can you quote your source?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501935&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OLlTrJv9JPTNGuezMsuV2INIyrkoF9L0rbAXyZhouSQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.redpepper.gen.tr" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">red pepper (not verified)</a> on 27 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501935">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501936" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1274069285"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello there, what an exceptional book, exceptional family and story.</p> <p>Question: Looking at the photos on the Flickr stream on your website, I was hoping to see the one of Elsie age 6, that you reference in the book, Chapter 30, when you first walk into Zacariyyah's apartment. Is there a photo of that one we can see? thank you.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501936&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OZ5Vz7lo9uFHEbPmO8EHdL2X4KcipC6u1pZ6yZEivpw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Jennifer K in South Carolina">Jennifer K in … (not verified)</span> on 17 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501936">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501937" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1274268202"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am wondering why the incorporation papers for the Henrietta Lacks Foundation do not specifically mention the Lacks family, other than in the name of the foundation. I understand that you want to keep your options open as to how the funds will be used, but it looks like it is theoretically possible that none of the funds would be used for the education of Henrietta's descendants. I wish you luck with the administration of the foundation; it has the potential to do a lot of good.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501937&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-hqxQ0NCEjRDRYbfxHn8axhnuYl_I4b4_itYdSvhe2U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lisa C (not verified)</span> on 19 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501937">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501938" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1275032540"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rebecca my concern is similar to the one above - the book is highly acclaimed, you are on a whirlwind book tour - how do you see your responsibility towards the Lacks family now that you are becoming famous yourself? - how do you ensure that they are not objectified? The foundation has no Lack listed on the board and you do not specify what portion of profits go to the foundation?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501938&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IRXrhidxoXS6JowXVAilBL9M-SBEj66s7ZNzbIaAGew"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Tessa (not verified)</span> on 28 May 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501938">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501939" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1277791836"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am puzzled as to which is correct, your estimate of the weight of HeLa cells produced to date:</p> <p> "... theyâd weigh more than 50 million metric tons"</p> <p>or Wikipedia's:</p> <p> "Scientists have grown some 20 tons of her cells"?</p> <p>Those are two really wildly differing estimates!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501939&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LPY1R1NACLB5rWIndVrW9oqjvIE7Hm4ro6HVIWH6KG0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Nicholas Penney (not verified)</span> on 29 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501939">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501940" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1277835951"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Small world note. Rebecca Skloot's father is the tremendously talented writer Floyd Skloot. His book, In the Shadow of Memory, is a moving memoir of his heartrending battle with the neuroimmune disease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) which his medical tests showed was caused by a viral infection. (Many of the viruses that have been associated with CFS are neurotropic are neurotropic in nature and the brain damage he describes has been well documented by clinicians and neuroscientists such as Ben Natelson and Frank Duffy) His case is tragic, but not an unusual one. He also wrote: The Night-Side: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome &amp; The Illness Experience</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501940&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tQI-yLRU-qUhV40Kaouc8IlfxQfAj-92xhG3NM1msCY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.pornositen.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">porno (not verified)</a> on 29 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501940">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501941" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1277868353"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>1. Congrats on a masterpiece of research, writing, &amp; absolutely amazing commitment to your subject.<br /> 2. However, one issue that I felt was not fully addressed was why, after Henrietta's death, her children were handed over to "that hateful woman," Ethel. Prior to her death, I felt you had painted a very positive portrait of Henrietta, her sister, Gladys, and cousins Sadie &amp; Margaret - as a group of VERY close-knit women who supported each other completely in life (&amp; knew what an awful choice Ethel would have been). Do you know why one or more of these relatives didn't step in and save those poor children from true torture?<br /> 3. A small point, but to all of your fact-checkers (pp. 332 - 333) Ambien is NOT a narcotic. It is sometimes classified as sedative or, more correctly, as a hypnotic.<br /> 4. Did your scientific research help you better understand your father's CFS (which I share)?</p> <p>Thanks again for devoting so many years of your life to this amazing story.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501941&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IGayfIGWCQrYUgwU9WpfjRJw4pZli4LiycNfBffD9MQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">T. Morrison (not verified)</span> on 29 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501941">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="323" id="comment-2501942" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278060794"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for the questions. I've now answered many of them on the <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/faq">FAQ Page</a> of my site. A few not answered there:</p> <p>Bob: Both of the figures are correct, it's just that they're from different time periods. The figure saying they'd wrap more than 3-times-around-the-world was calculated long ago, and with no follow up. It would be far more than that now, so best we can say on that one is that they'd wrap around more than 3 times. The 50 million metric tons figure was calculating how many cells could have ever grown, so it was a forward looking figure when it was calculated. The details of how that worked are in the notes section of the book.</p> <p>KaKa: See the answer above. The 50 million metric tons figure is not exaggerated, and the method for calculating it is in the notes section of the book.</p> <p>Nicholas: The figure on Wikipedia is incorrect, it's 50 million metric tons.</p> <p>Jennifer: That photo is actually in the photo insert of the book.</p> <p>Tessa, Lisa, Gotkin: Only a few of the documents for the foundation are online at this point. The documents laying out the mission of the foundation very clearly include the Lacks family. Once the foundation is approved for its 501c3 status, the papers related to that will go online as well. For now, we're waiting, which can take more than a year. The key thing is that the Lacks family is intimately aware of how the Foundation is doing, they are pleased with it, and they do not feel I've exploited them in any way. The Henrietta Lacks Foundation is already helping one Lacks descendant get the tutoring necessary to pass college entrance exams, and it will be helping several Lacks descendants go to school starting this fall. I will post updates on the foundation with details of all of that when the information is public.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501942&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hNmVju1ooc7IlAZA8_BPAPrYqMejpgqYwxpmrOcb0Rs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a> on 02 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501942">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/culturedish"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/culturedish" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/rebecca%20skloot.jpg?itok=6INInKYA" width="95" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user rskloot" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501943" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278085659"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How can one become involved with this cause and the foundation? I would love help the foundation, or wear a t-shirt or a bumper sticker or a poster to bring this plight to the attention of everyone I come in contact with. I just want to do SOMETHING to help!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501943&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="TtBDWY9jA1e-oUpyhwEg-Zoay_Onv7bm_3BOocZzYEg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mahnia (not verified)</span> on 02 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501943">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501944" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278097002"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I think I found a typo. I think you inadvertently reversed the last two words in the following sentence in your FAQ:</p> <p>"Many of the difficulties Henriettaâs family faced came down to issues class:..."</p> <p>Also, please note that Johns Hopkins had specifically provided that the hospital that was to bear his name should treat persons of color as well as whites. That was unusual for its time.</p> <p>Sam Hopkins</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501944&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BUc4UPDBzOSXnd6J5iN2FPnxKwRunkLQoqXRX4-GL-8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sam B Hopkins (not verified)</span> on 02 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501944">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="323" id="comment-2501945" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278159365"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for catching that typo, Sam. Fixed it. And yes, the history of Hopkins and its relationship to race is all in the book.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501945&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kFEfuiJesaYOd-CwQTuG5PtpvYwP2CAUe6Ftf_3hH14"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a> on 03 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501945">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/culturedish"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/culturedish" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/rebecca%20skloot.jpg?itok=6INInKYA" width="95" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user rskloot" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501946" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278559035"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi Rebecca, what a great book. I'm learning more about cells than I did in high school over 30 years ago! Or maybe I'm re-learning. I was hoping that someone has stepped up and given the Lacks family some sort of medical insurance/plan. Please tell me they have? Will you be on Oprah soon?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501946&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gAaFegY8QGlnzQjs7_tI4oAYtkUmoYsptelBjTti2sA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ruth (not verified)</span> on 07 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501946">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501947" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1278571571"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How can one become involved with this cause and the foundation? I would love help the foundation, or wear a t-shirt or a bumper sticker or a poster to bring this plight to the attention of everyone I come in contact with. I just want to do SOMETHING to help!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501947&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K-pP9ivk5JXj_pUAnSsA2UYrqxjI77Rl3U7RkKEDZI0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.sikisizlet.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">travesti (not verified)</a> on 08 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501947">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/culturedish/2010/03/21/skloot-launching-faq-blog-seri%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sun, 21 Mar 2010 10:45:09 +0000 rskloot 148250 at https://scienceblogs.com What's the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3 cells? Part III: Theodore "Ted" Puck, PhD, and the first clonal isolation of human tumor cells https://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/16/hela-s3-part-3 <span>What&#039;s the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3 cells? Part III: Theodore &quot;Ted&quot; Puck, PhD, and the first clonal isolation of human tumor cells</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span style="float: left; padding: 5px;"><a href="http://www.researchblogging.org"><img alt="ResearchBlogging.org" src="http://www.researchblogging.org/public/citation_icons/rb2_large_gray.png" style="border:0;" /></a></span><br /> This post is the third in a series on the origin and history of HeLa S3 cells. The <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/hela_s3_part_1.php"><strong>first post</strong></a> details how I came about to ask this question when launching my independent research laboratory. The <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/hela_s3_part_2.php"><strong>second post</strong></a> details the life and careers of the legendary physician-scientist pioneer, Dr. Florence Rena Sabin.</p> <p>Today, we take up a discussion where we will finally learn the origin of HeLa S3 cells, complete with original literature citations.</p> <p><strong>A recap</strong><br /> We left our <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/hela_s3_part_2.php"><strong>previous discussion</strong></a> with the final and still-productive years of Dr. Florence Rena Sabin. After graduating from Johns Hopkins Medical School in 1900, Dr. Sabin embarked on a nearly 40-year career at Hopkins and now-Rockefeller University, elucidating the developmental origin of the lymphatics and antibody responses to tuberculosis and training a generation of physician-scientists. She was truly a pioneer, becoming the first woman to be appointed to faculty at Johns Hopkins, their first female full professor, the first female full member (full prof-equivalent) at Rockefeller, and the first woman invited to join the National Academy of Sciences.</p> <p>Upon her retirement in 1938, she returned to her native Colorado to join her sister, Mary. Near the end of World War II, she was tapped by the Colorado governor to lead a committee that would address existing public health issues in the state that would have to be solved while absorbing a large number of men and women returning from the war to civilian life. Although in her 70s, Sabin was highly effective and shared the 1950 Lasker Award for Public Service. In 1951, the University of Colorado School of Medicine honored her with the dedication of the Florence R. Sabin Research Building for Cellular Biology.</p> <p>That same fall was a sharp contrast for the Virginia-born tobacco farmer, Henrietta Lacks. She, too, was spending time at Johns Hopkins. But in this case, it was because her life was being cut short at age 31 from an aggressive case of cervical cancer. </p> <p>In the months before her death on October 4, 1951, cells derived from her tumor had been successfully cultured in the Hopkins laboratory of Dr. George Gey. These cells were called HeLa, so named for the first two letters of Henrietta Lacks's names, and took a place in history as the first human cell line to be continually propagated in culture. They would live on in laboratories not only at Hopkins but around the world, including that of Colorado geneticist, Dr. Theodore "Ted" Puck.</p> <p><strong>From bacteria and bacteriophage to human genetics</strong><br /><img class="inset right" img="" alt="Puck from Rowley obit.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/Puck from Rowley obit-thumb-200x235-42845.jpg" width="200" height="235" />Ted Puck came to Colorado a few years earlier. His 1994 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7856664"><strong>autobiography</strong></a> in the <em>American Journal of Medical Genetics</em> tells you far more than I can here. Here he shares his situation before the Sabin Building became available:</p> <blockquote><p>On my arrival in Denver in 1948, I first became aware of the magnitude of the responsibility which I had undertaken. The total contribution of the medical school to the budget of the Department of Biophysics was $5,000 per year. All the rest was to come from grant funds. I was the only faculty member in the newly formed department which was required to present a major course to the medical students, to institute graduate training leading to the Ph.D. degree in biophysics, to conduct a post-doctoral training program for<br /> M.D.'s and Ph.D's, to conduct a significant research program in biophysical science, and to raise the necessary grant funds for those activities. An old unused lumber room in the basement of the medical school was cleaned out, painted, and transformed into offices and a laboratory for the department. </p></blockquote> <!--more--><p>A native of Chicago, Dr. Puck did both his undergraduate (1937) and graduate training (1940) at the University of Chicago. His doctoral mentor in Physical Chemistry was Dr. James Franck, a physicist who had shared the <a href="http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1925/press.html"><strong>1925 Nobel Prize in Physics</strong></a>. Puck's PhD work focused on the atomic transitions in chlorophyll necessary for photosynthesis. </p> <p>At the end of his PhD, World War II had begun and Puck remained at Chicago as a research associate to work with Dr. O.H. Robertson on the potential of polyethylene vapor to kill airborne microorganisms for the Commission on Airborne Infections of the Office of the Surgeon General of the Army. The relevance of this project during wartime was exemplified by Puck publishing five papers in <em>Science</em> and six papers in <em>J Exp Med</em> on this work. While on this project, he worked with Phil Marcus, a master's student who would later join him in Colorado. </p> <p>After the war, Puck did formal postdoctoral work on the genetics and kinetics of bacteriophage interactions with bacteria at the California Institute of Technology with Max Delbrück, who later shared the 1969 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Alfred Hershey and Salvador Luria (yes, Luria broth). Delbrück was originally a physicist and obviously contributed to Puck's early enthusiasm for "applying physicochemical approaches to problems of biology."</p> <p><strong>Clonal populations of mammalian cells</strong><br /> Puck's work with phage impressed upon him that studying human genetics would require that similar techniques be developed to manipulate human cells. Because HeLa cells were taken from the tumor of Henrietta Lacks, they contained several populations of cancer cells. Puck and his then-graduate student Phil Marcus and Steven Cieciura were trying to figure out how to grow clonal populations from single cells.</p> <p>Establishing "clones," or colonies that grew from a single cell, was first accomplished with mouse L929 cells in 1948 by Katherine Sanford and Gwendolyn Likely in the laboratory of Wilton Earle at the National Cancer Institute (<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18105872"><em>JNCI</em> 1948; 9:229</a>). Earle is credited with the isolation and propagation of the first continuously cultured cell line, mouse L cells. This heterogeneous population was originally isolated in October 1940 as an outgrowth of subcutaneous connective tissue from mammary fat pads excised from a 100-day-old C3H/An mouse (JNCI 1943: 4:165). The cells acquired a malignant phenotype in culture and could produce sarcomas when injected back into mice. </p> <p>Just as an aside, Earle's group acknowledged the cell culture work of Lewis (<a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/citation/81/2110/545"><em>Science</em> 1935; 81:545</a>) and Fischer and Davidsohn (<a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v143/n3619/abs/143436b0.html"><em>Nature </em>1939; 143:436</a>). The 1935 paper from Warren H. Lewis was his presidential address to the American Association of Anatomists where he reported the continuous culture of rat sarcoma cells for 2-4 years, although no photographs or formal data were shown. Albert Fischer and Fanja Davidsohn reported carrying mouse adenocarcinoma cells for up to 12 years. But while both Lewis and Fischer had lengthy careers, I'm unable to find any follow-up literature on these respective cell lines. Hence, the most continually documented work of Earle's group is most deserving of the "first" designation.</p> <p>Recognizing that L cells came from a heterogeneous cell population, the Earle group worked on isolating single cells and propagating clonal cultures from those cells. At the time, the composition of cell culture medium was not fully refined and attempts at growing out cells from small populations were unsuccessful. Earle's group recognized that using medium "conditioned" by growing cells produced diffusible factors that encouraged growth of small cell populations. To produce single clones, Earle's group painstakingly transferred single L cells to small capillary tubes together with a small amount of conditioned medium, producing the first clonal cultures of immortalized mammalian cells. The most widely studied of these is clone 929, known more properly as NCTC L-929 cells, the first immortal mammalian cell line offered by ATCC, appropriately as <a href="http://www.atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-1&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>CCL-1</strong></a>.</p> <p>The capillary approach to cloning seemed too cumbersome to Puck and he wanted to develop a method that was more analogous to isolating clonal bacteria cultures from distinct colonies that had grown from individual cells. Moreover, quantitative assessment of cellular sensitivity to drugs or radiation would not be possible using the capillary method. Because he was interested in human genetics, he decided to work with HeLa cells. As cited below in references 1 and 2, he obtained his original HeLa culture from the George Washington Carver Foundation of historically black institution, Tuskegee University in Alabama, rather than from George Gey at Hopkins who had originally isolated the cells. </p> <p><strong>From Hopkins to Minnesota to Alabama to Colorado</strong><br /> The role of Tuskegee in the polio treatment and vaccination effort is an engaging story in its own right that is told by Rebecca Skloot in her book and worthy of expanding into its own separate post. The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP), known today as the March of Dimes, had funded a HeLa mass production laboratory at Tuskegee to provide a uniform source of cells in tests of the Salk polio vaccine after having had established a hospital there in the late 1930s to care for black polio victims. </p> <p>William Scherer and Jerome Syverton at the University of Minnesota (together with Gey) had shown that HeLa cells could be infected with all three strains of the poliomyelitis virus circulating at the time which could then be neutralized by incubation with antibodies to the virus (<a href="http://jem.rupress.org/cgi/content/abstract/97/5/695"><em>J Exp Med</em> 1953; 97:695</a>). To test the efficacy of the vaccine, 23 sites around the country were charged with taking post-vaccine blood samples from over 2 million children to test the ability of their serum to neutralize the virus in culture as an indication of antibody titer. The Carver Foundation at Tuskegee supplied these cells, but also provided samples to researchers such as Puck. When starting the production facility, Tuskegee scientists Russell W. Brown and James H.M. Henderson traveled to the laboratory Scherer and Syverton at Minnesota to learn HeLa culturing techniques. Scherer was one of the first recipients of HeLa cells from George Gey and in fact had maintained an original culture, something Gey himself had not. So, when ATCC later asked Gey to submit a culture for the repository, Gey had to solicit Scherer. When you look up the original HeLa culture (<a href="http://atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-2&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>CCL-2</strong></a>) at ATCC, you will see that Scherer, not Gey, was the submitter.</p> <p><strong>Clonal isolation of HeLa S3</strong><br /> Puck hypothesized that a highly conditioned medium could be produced by a monolayer of cells that had been rendered incapable to dividing by irradiation. By providing conditioned medium in a large vessel capable of supporting colony growth, it would be easier to quantify the efficiency with which clones were produced while optimizing media composition. He defined such replication-incompetent cells as "feeder layers." In initial experiments with postdoctoral fellow Dr. Roshan Christensen, they attempted UV radiation but it was insufficient to damage the cellular DNA. They were about to move on to X-rays when Christensen became pregnant. She and Puck made the decision that use of X-rays was not in the best interest of her baby and she moved on to other projects until the next person joined the lab.</p> <p>That next person was Phil Marcus, the MS research associate Puck had known from the University of Chicago. Marcus was recruited by Puck with the intention of having him join the new PhD program at Colorado once he met the course requirements. Around the same time, famed atomic physicist Leó Szilárd was visiting Puck's lab to learn about molecular biology. This is the same Szilárd whose work with Enrico Fermi on the Manhattan Project led to the atomic bomb. As Puck noted in his <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7856664"><strong>autobiography</strong></a>, Szilárd began involving himself in the project without advance discussion, instead talking privately with Marcus.</p> <p>Initially, Puck had wanted the feeder layer to be irradiated and new HeLa cells plated on top of them to grow into colonies in empty spaces on the Petri dish. Szilárd appears to have understood that the feeder layer was necessary but had not known of the idea to irradiate the cells. Therefore, he suggested privately to Marcus that he construct a glass slide platform above a freely growing feeder layer on which single HeLa cells would be plated. Over the course of time, hard feelings developed between the young professor and the senior scientist. The ultimate outcome, however, was the combination of the two ideas: Szilárd's platform above Puck's irradiated HeLa feeder layer.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/1955%20PNAS%20Puck%20and%20Marcus%20feeder%20layer%20schematic.jpg"><img alt="1955 PNAS Puck and Marcus feeder layer schematic.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/1955 PNAS Puck and Marcus feeder layer schematic-thumb-500x222-42836.jpg" width="500" height="222" class="mt-image-center" style="text-align: center; display: block; margin: 0 auto 20px;" /></a></p> <p>The drawing above comes from a 1955 PNAS paper by Puck and Marcus (1) where Szilárd's contribution is noted in the acknowledgments. The irradiated feeder layer of cells is at the bottom. The microscope slide showing the colonies generated was originally prepared by plating a dilute suspension of HeLa cells containing only 5 to 100. The cells were allowed to attach to the slide for 5 hours, then placed in the media with the irradiated feeder layer. After 8-10 days of incubation, colonies of 800-2,000 cells grew out from the original plated cells.</p> <p>But how to harvest the clones? In a subsequent 1956 paper in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (2) Puck, Marcus, and Steven Cieciura describe the use of trypsin to harvest the colonies using what we today call cloning rings. Here is the original text:</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/1956%20HeLa%20S3%20cloning%20passage.jpg"><img alt="1956 HeLa S3 cloning passage.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/1956 HeLa S3 cloning passage-thumb-515x453-42838.jpg" width="515" height="453" class="mt-image-center" style="text-align: center; display: block; margin: 0 auto 20px;" /></a></p> <p>This single passage is notable in that it describes not only clonal isolation and propagation of cells but establishes the basis for clonogenic assays of cancer cells (a measure of a given cell's ability to replicate into colonies) and also the more stringent soft-agar assay which measures a cell's ability to form three-dimensional colonies.</p> <p>And finally after three blogposts, we learn what HeLa S3 cells are: they were the third clone isolated and propagated from the heterogeneous HeLa culture with the letter S in honor of Dr. Florence Rena Sabin, for whom the building housing Puck's new laboratory was named in December, 1951.</p> <p><strong>Why S3 and not S1 or S238?</strong><br /> But I couldn't stop there. I wanted to know why Puck continued working with the S3 clone and why that is the one deposited with ATCC and sold as <a href="http://www.atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-2.2&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>CCL-2.2</strong></a>.</p> <p>Puck's laboratory continued this work in an attempt to better define media components necessary for growing these cells at high clonogenic or "plating" efficiency. First Puck and Harold Fisher followed the observation that HeLa S1 cells formed smaller colonies that HeLa S3 cells grown for the same number of days. In their 1956 <em>J Exp Med</em> paper (3), they demonstrated below that in the absence of a feeder layer, the S3 clone could still form colonies at very low concentrations of human serum used in the growth medium. (By the way, the human serum was also provided by the Carver Foundation at Tuskegee from who paid local donors with funds from the NFIP contract - we know today that HeLa cells can be grown with fetal calf serum instead).</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/1956%20Puck%20and%20Fisher%20JExpMed%20S1%20vs%20S3.jpg"><img alt="1956 Puck and Fisher JExpMed S1 vs S3.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/1956 Puck and Fisher JExpMed S1 vs S3-thumb-515x443-42840.jpg" width="515" height="443" class="mt-image-center" style="text-align: center; display: block; margin: 0 auto 20px;" /></a></p> <p>We know today that the feeder layer "conditioned" the media with peptide growth factors but there were also some important biochemicals they provided that were missing from the media used at the time. In their 1957 <em>Science</em> paper (4), Gordon Sato, Fisher, and Puck showed that HeLa S3 cells required inositol to form colonies in the absence of a feeder layer but were inositol-independent when a feeder layer was present. In other experiments, they showed that the HeLa S3 cells also required cholesterol. </p> <p>But when they analyzed the series of S clones for their requirements across the board, the S3 clone was the most hardy and grew with the highest plating efficiency under optimized condition. The authors also noted that the S3 phenotype seemed to be the most predominant in the original heterogeneous HeLa cell population.</p> <p>Today, as we have gone away from the use of high concentrations of human serum toward low(er) concentrations of fetal calf serum, I wonder if mixed HeLa cultures still contain the less robust S1 cells. As I said in an earlier post, the HeLa S3 cells look more compact and uniform than most HeLa cultures I have worked with. But these have been carried separately under varied conditions over the course of decades. So, your choice of HeLa or HeLa S3 cells for your work may be one more of semantics than practicality.</p> <p>I welcome comments from others who may have personal lab experience with either cell population.</p> <p><strong>What was so special about HeLa cells?</strong><br /> I know that Rebecca Skloot has gotten this question <em>ad nauseum</em> while on her book tour. It is the obvious question: what about HeLa cells made them the first continuously culturable human cell line out of the hundreds of tumor specimens that came from Johns Hopkins surgical wards and into the laboratory of George Gey?</p> <p>I thought more about this while reading this old papers. We know today that HeLa cell DNA contains portions of a human papillomavirus genome and it overexpresses telomerase, both mechanisms by which normal cells can be transformed. But many cells are virally-transformed and many more overexpress telomerase. And even though HeLa cells are billed as growing rapidly, their 24 hr doubling time is shared by a great many tumor cell lines.</p> <p>Instead, I think that the tumor cells from Ms. Henrietta Lacks were somehow capable of tolerating the incomplete nutritional conditions of the cell culture media used in the early 1950s. We know from Puck's work that the cells grow optimally in the presence of inositol and cholesterol but other cell lines have much more stringent requirements for non-essential amino acids, substrates for oxidative phosphorylation, and only tolerate very narrow ranges of pH. I've not conducted any formal comparative investigations but I think that Henrietta Lacks's tumor cells were so aberrant that they had minimal nutritional requirements relative to cells from other tumors that made it to the Gey laboratory.</p> <p>This, I suspect, is also why Ms. Lacks's cancer was so unique and voracious as described by the pathologist at that time. It grew at metastatic sites that may have been suboptimal in terms of availability of biochemicals and maybe even tolerated hypoxia and/or acidic pH better than other cervical cancers. I know that many labs have new students first try their hand at culturing HeLa cells because they are hardy and forgiving of bad technique.</p> <p>Perhaps what makes HeLa cells so easy to culture are the same reasons that made them so deadly to Ms. Lacks.</p> <p>I have more to say about Dr. Ted Puck because he was truly a remarkable scientist and gentleman. He made many other contributions in his 50+ year career and I'd like to share that with you in another post.</p> <p>But now you know the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3.</p> <p><strong>References:</strong><br /><span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=Proceedings+of+the+National+Academy+of+Sciences&amp;rft_id=info%3Adoi%2F10.1073%2Fpnas.41.7.432&amp;rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fresearchblogging.org&amp;rft.atitle=A+rapid+method+for+viable+cell+titration+and+clone+production+with+HeLa+cells+in+tissue+culture%3A+the+use+of+X-irradiated+cells+to+supply+conditioning+factors&amp;rft.issn=0027-8424&amp;rft.date=1955&amp;rft.volume=41&amp;rft.issue=7&amp;rft.spage=432&amp;rft.epage=437&amp;rft.artnum=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pnas.org%2Fcgi%2Fdoi%2F10.1073%2Fpnas.41.7.432&amp;rft.au=Puck+TT+and+Marcus+PI&amp;rfe_dat=bpr3.included=1;bpr3.tags=Biology">(1) Puck TT and Marcus PI (1955). A rapid method for viable cell titration and clone production with HeLa cells in tissue culture: the use of X-irradiated cells to supply conditioning factors <span style="font-style: italic;">Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 41</span> (7), 432-437 DOI: <a rev="review" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.41.7.432">10.1073/pnas.41.7.432</a></span></p> <p><span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=Journal+of+Experimental+Medicine&amp;rft_id=info%3Adoi%2F10.1084%2Fjem.103.2.273&amp;rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fresearchblogging.org&amp;rft.atitle=Clonal+growth+of+mammalian+cells+in+vitro%3A+growth+characteristics+of+colonies+from+single+HeLa+cells+with+and+without+a+%22feeder%22+layer&amp;rft.issn=0022-1007&amp;rft.date=1956&amp;rft.volume=103&amp;rft.issue=2&amp;rft.spage=273&amp;rft.epage=284&amp;rft.artnum=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jem.org%2Fcgi%2Fdoi%2F10.1084%2Fjem.103.2.273&amp;rft.au=Puck+TT%2C+Marcus+PI%2C+and+Cieciura+SJ&amp;rfe_dat=bpr3.included=1;bpr3.tags=Biology">(2) Puck TT, Marcus PI, and Cieciura SJ (1956). Clonal growth of mammalian cells in vitro: growth characteristics of colonies from single HeLa cells with and without a "feeder" layer <span style="font-style: italic;">Journal of Experimental Medicine, 103</span> (2), 273-284 DOI: <a rev="review" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.103.2.273">10.1084/jem.103.2.273</a></span></p> <p><span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=Journal+of+Experimental+Medicine&amp;rft_id=info%3Apmid%2F19867118&amp;rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fresearchblogging.org&amp;rft.atitle=Genetics+of+somatic+mammalian+cells%3A+I.+Demonstration+of+the+existence+of+mutants+with+different+growth+requirements+in+a+human+cancer+cell+strain+HeLa&amp;rft.issn=0022-1007&amp;rft.date=1956&amp;rft.volume=104&amp;rft.issue=3&amp;rft.spage=427&amp;rft.epage=434&amp;rft.artnum=&amp;rft.au=Puck+TT&amp;rft.au=Fisher+HW&amp;rfe_dat=bpr3.included=1;bpr3.tags=Biology">(3) Puck TT and Fisher HW (1956). Genetics of somatic mammalian cells: I. Demonstration of the existence of mutants with different growth requirements in a human cancer cell strain HeLa <span style="font-style: italic;">Journal of Experimental Medicine, 104</span> (3), 427-434 DOI: <a rev="review" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.104.3.427">10.1084/jem.104.3.427</a></span></p> <p><span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=Science&amp;rft_id=info%3Adoi%2F10.1126%2Fscience.126.3280.961&amp;rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fresearchblogging.org&amp;rft.atitle=Molecular+growth+requirements+of+single+mammalian+cells&amp;rft.issn=0036-8075&amp;rft.date=1957&amp;rft.volume=126&amp;rft.issue=3280&amp;rft.spage=961&amp;rft.epage=964&amp;rft.artnum=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sciencemag.org%2Fcgi%2Fdoi%2F10.1126%2Fscience.126.3280.961&amp;rft.au=Sato+G%2C+Fisher+HW%2C+and+Puck+TT&amp;rfe_dat=bpr3.included=1;bpr3.tags=Biology">(4) Sato G, Fisher HW, and Puck TT (1957). Molecular growth requirements of single mammalian cells <span style="font-style: italic;">Science, 126</span> (3280), 961-964 DOI: <a rev="review" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.126.3280.961">10.1126/science.126.3280.961</a></span></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a></span> <span>Tue, 03/16/2010 - 17:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/history" hreflang="en">History</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/race-science-and-society" hreflang="en">Race in Science and Society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/working-scientist" hreflang="en">The Working Scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-science-and-medicine" hreflang="en">Women in science and medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ted-puck" hreflang="en">ted puck</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/physical-sciences" hreflang="en">Physical Sciences</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338487" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268778266"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>please consider submitting your post(s) about Dr Sabin to the Diversity in Science carnival for March, celebrating women's history month.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338487&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vhMRwaMXF08cczPRqC1EZHx6S5xrE_so24WB-Uy6vP4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://urban-science.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">DNLee (not verified)</a> on 16 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338487">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338488" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268825880"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hela cells were not the first to be immortalized in culture. Read hayflicks letter to science for details(latest issue).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338488&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6lSWYsPX45Is3Jv0i5P_-wEVPOnLEFmvkUtae5sJWwg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Canada (not verified)</span> on 17 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338488">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338489" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268838371"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Should the title say Ted Puck, PhD?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338489&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FNc854gOK8obiGQwEGl0vq7lXaNddAk7UXH-nVW_oW4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MitoScientist (not verified)</span> on 17 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338489">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338490" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268844649"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@DNLee - Hello and congratulations to the newly-minted Dr. Lee!!! Yes, indeed, I'll submit the previous post to the Diversity in Science Carnival for Women's History Month.</p> <p>@Canada - I believe that you are referring to a <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v464/n7285/full/464030d.html">letter from Dr. Hayflick to <i>Nature</i></a> about Steve Silberman's review of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Mr. Silberman simply left out the word "human" from his description of HeLa as the first immortal line. </p> <p>As Dr. Hayflick pointed out, and as I wrote about extensively above, the first immortal cell line was the mouse L cell line isolated by Wilton Earle in late 1940, published in 1943.</p> <p>@MitoScientist - Yes, you are correct. I will make the change to PhD in the title. Thanks for catching that.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338490&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bIARY8lq9xXsmlmjhbP8zlwMNqZriWcBC1PPHGObO3g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 17 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338490">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338491" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268943958"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Many, many thanks for reminding me of the origin of the cells which I have worked with daily for over 30 years. Very well done.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338491&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Zmc6RbxV4Cow86iya_8Tmy7wqKSaWDFdyctsNhyarvg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.virology.ws" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Vincent Racaniello (not verified)</a> on 18 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338491">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338492" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269106723"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For the record, I didn't leave anything out of my Nature review of Skloot's wonderful book. The Nature editors left the word "human" out of the subhead, that's all.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338492&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eMnWeeVHP8kj-8Z3l4TPAmJ-2bMVvy9sagT2C5xzkL8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.stevesilberman.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Steve Silberman (not verified)</a> on 20 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338492">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338493" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269166303"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you Professor Racaniello for your kind words. Your work on books, podcasts, and other outreach is an inspiration to me - I've learned a great deal of virology from you and use some of your materials in my classes. It was a delight to go back and read some of these old papers and think what it was like to do this work at the time.</p> <p>Steve, that's a very good point, one that all readers should note. While I have the luxury of titling my posts whatever I want, print writers are generally at the mercy of editors when titles are selected for their articles.</p> <p>So, I stand corrected on my comment above - Mr. Silberman did not leave out "human." The editor did. I hope that information makes its way back to Dr. Hayflick.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338493&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jQnyeFujup-mzjTvGMWsDfG36i9zp58nrftmMZgr68o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 21 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338493">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338494" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269872312"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I thoroughly enjoyed this series and am glad that others are speaking out for the researchers who developed cell culturing. I was thrilled to <a href="http://xrl.in/4xcu">hear </a>that Howard Jones is still with us. His wife and he were legends when I arrived in Baltimore in the early seventies. </p> <p>I believe that the biography of Henrietta Lacks painted some of the same generation poorly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338494&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lwX5QO5wfI5DAKt3HoAf9RcLeItJCHW8Gk66oB1lV7s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://foxyurl.com/7Bh" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Pietr Hitzig (not verified)</a> on 29 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338494">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338495" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1269974918"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm not a scientist, working in IT myself. Stumbled upon a display of HeLa cells in the Exploratorium in San Francisco couple of months ago. Was interviewed on site by a lady researcher about the effectiveness and usefulness of the display, too.</p> <p>I vaguely remembered reading something about these cells years ago, and that display kindled my interest again. So have been following these articles with much interest.</p> <p>Amazing details, and lots of new names for me to explore and read about.</p> <p>Well done.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338495&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="dRJIoGkPTKYlFL1N_aUCX0Sky6bYyB1NidvpTG_LFBE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">RMu (not verified)</span> on 30 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338495">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/terrasig/2010/03/16/hela-s3-part-3%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Tue, 16 Mar 2010 21:02:43 +0000 terrasig 119659 at https://scienceblogs.com What's the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3 cells? Part II: The life and careers of Florence Rena Sabin, MD https://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/07/hela-s3-part-2 <span>What&#039;s the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3 cells? Part II: The life and careers of Florence Rena Sabin, MD</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This post is the second in a series on the origin and history of HeLa S3 cells. The first post can be found <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/hela_s3_part_1.php"><strong>here</strong></a>. In this post, we discuss the life and careers (yes, career<u>s</u>) of the remarkable physician-scientist, Florence Rena Sabin.</p> <p><strong>"Too bad you're not a boy, you would have made a good doctor." </strong></p> <p><img class="inset right" img="" alt="Sabin birthplace home Central City Smith College collection.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/Sabin birthplace home Central City Smith College collection-thumb-200x250-42212.jpg" width="200" height="250" />Florence Rena Sabin was born in the mining town of Central City, Colorado, on November 9, 1871, two years after her sister and lifelong companion, Mary. Florence's father. George Sabin, had moved from Vermont to Colorado in the midst of the Colorado gold rush and a notable 1859 gold strike between the towns of Central City and Black Hawk. Her mother, Serena (Rena) Miner (yes, Miner), was a Vermont school teacher in Savannah, Georgia who moved sight unseen to Black Hawk to respond to an ad for a schoolteacher. (This photograph of their home, like many in this post, are derived from <a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/Views/Exhibit/narrative/biographical.html"><strong>The Florence R. Sabin Papers</strong></a>, freely available from the National Library of Medicine's Profiles in Science Collection.)</p> <p>If you've driven I-70 from Denver International Airport to any number of Colorado ski areas, you have passed a highway specifically built to bring you to these two former mining towns for a different kind of gold: limited stakes <a href="http://www.visitbhcc.com/index.cgi?CONTENT_ID=5"><strong>casino gambling</strong></a>.</p> <p>Tough, hardscrabble living in the mountains led the family to move to Denver while Mr. Sabin continued to work in the mining business. Sadly, the girls' mother died in childbirth in 1878 and George Sabin enrolled his daughters in a boarding school called Wolfe Hall, where both would later teach. Mr. Sabin recognized how deeply the girls were devastated by the loss of their mother and his long absences didn't help matters. The girls were sent to live with their uncle Albert in Chicago - though not the Albert Sabin of poliovirus vaccine fame. He brought them to visit and then ultimately live with their paternal grandparents in Saxtons River, Vermont.</p> <p>I belabor this issue because it was then that Florence's grandmother remarked that one of their ancestors, Levi Sabin, had been a doctor and her father had attended medical school for two years before moving to seek his fortune in gold. Observing Florence's love of nature and biology, her grandmother remarked, "Too bad you're not a boy, you would have made a good doctor." </p> <p>Florence apparently took this statement as a challenge, vowing to become a doctor anyway. She finished school in Vermont and attended Smith College where she was befriended by the school physician, Dr. Grace Preston. Preston took an interest in Florence, cultivating her interest in biology and chemistry and advising her about a new university in Baltimore whose medical school would be accepting women owing in part to an unusual turn of events.</p> <p><strong>Money talks: how wise women influenced a new medical school</strong><br /> Founder of that eponymous university, philanthropist Johns Hopkins, had counted on income from B&amp;O Railroad stock to establish the medical school and recruit faculty. (N.B., the peculiar extra S was because his first name was actually a family surname - <a href="http://webapps.jhu.edu/JHUniverse/information_about_hopkins/about_jhu/who_was_johns_hopkins/"><strong>source</strong></a>.) However, the 1890s were economically volatile times and Hopkins only had funds to open the hospital but not the medical school. As documented in <a href="http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/about/history/history6.html"><strong>the history of the university</strong></a>, four daughters of the university's original trustees offered to help, with conditions:</p> <blockquote><p>Martha Carey Thomas, <a href="http://www.medicalarchives.jhmi.edu/garrett/mededucation.htm"><strong>Mary Elizabeth Garrett</strong></a>, Elizabeth King and Mary Gwinn, all unmarried, wealthy, well-educated and devoted to the new feminist movement - offered a deal. They would raise the $500,000 needed to open the school and pay for a medical school building, but only if the school would open its doors to qualified women. Arguments ensued, the pragmatists won out, and the women were given the go-ahead to try.</p> <p>When the money was in hand by Christmas Eve, 1892, the Women's Fund Committee added a strategic twist, making new demands that even the staunchest opponents of a coeducational school could not reasonably refuse. Garrett - who as daughter of the head of the B&amp;O was able to donate about $350,000 to the effort herself - presented a list of stiff entrance requirements that would have to be met by any Hopkins applicant, male or female: proof of a bachelor's degree, proficiency in French, German and Latin, and a strong background in physics, chemistry and biology. Hopkins' leaders were taken aback; most of the demands appeared to have been lifted directly from an early letter by [first professor and dean, William Henry] Welch to University President Gilman - suggestions that even Welch, after he hired on, admitted he thought were impossible goals.</p></blockquote> <p>Yes, medical school standards varied widely at the time and these "impossible goals" pushed forward by the women established the new institution as one of the best in the United States.</p> <p>To understand the prevailing attitude toward women in higher education, the following were the 1874 <a href="http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/about/history/history6.html"><strong>comments</strong></a> of Gilman's colleague Charles Eliot, president of Harvard University, who called coeducation "a thoroughly wrong idea which is rapidly disappearing," Hopkins trustees had Gilman call upon Eliot as a consultant on this issue:</p> <blockquote><p>"[S]tudents might fall in love, which could produce disastrous, socially unequal marriages; women would have trouble keeping up with the academic pace and hold up instruction for the men; the stress could prove so severe that the women might fall ill and destroy their chances of good marriages; and finally, a woman's future was so different from a man's that there was no point in educating them together."</p></blockquote> <p><img class="inset" img="" alt="Thumbnail image for Sabin Smith College graduation.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/Sabin Smith College graduation-thumb-200x214-42220-thumb-200x214-42221.jpg" width="200" height="214" />Unfortunately, George Sabin's mining company in Denver was also suffering financially for many of the same reasons that the Hopkins railroad investments delayed opening of the medical school. The 1890s were volatile economic times not to be matched until The Great Depression. As such, Florence could not afford to attend medical school after graduating from Smith College in 1893 (her senior picture is shown to the left) and would have to assume financial responsibility for any future education.</p> <p>As a result, Sabin came back to Denver to teach at Wolfe Hall, where her sister Mary was already working since her own graduation from Smith two years earlier. In 1895, Florence returned to Smith to teach and then received a fellowship during the summer of 1896 to work at the renowned Marine Biological Laboratories at Woods Hole on Cape Cod. </p> <p>With these experiences and now-sufficient savings, Sabin was able to apply and be accepted to Johns Hopkins Medical School for the 1896-97 academic year. Exemplifying the commitment of Hopkins to training female physicians, Florence was one of 14 women in a class of 45.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/wp-content/blogs.dir/400/files/2012/04/i-4c23c17f87a8eb2df648ea421c3a8e3d-Sabin book American Women of Achievement.jpg" alt="i-4c23c17f87a8eb2df648ea421c3a8e3d-Sabin book American Women of Achievement.jpg" />What follows from her remarkable career is detailed at numerous sites on the web including a 1960 <a href="http://www.nap.edu/readingroom.php?book=biomems&amp;page=fsabin.html"><strong>National Academies Press</strong></a> biography, the <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/changingthefaceofmedicine/physicians/biography_283.html"><strong>National Library of Medicine</strong></a>, and the <a href="http://www.rockarch.org/exhibits/women/women_05.php"><strong>Rockefeller Archive Center</strong></a>. But I detail these early life influences here because they are not widely accessible outside of archives at Smith College and the Colorado Historical Society and are covered only briefly in the 1960 National Academies biography. I learned most of the preceding story from a remarkable <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Florence-Sabin-Women-Achievement-Kronstadt/dp/1555466761"><strong>out-of-print 1990 book</strong></a> from a 50-book series entitled, American Women of Achievement. Written by New York freelance writer, Janet Kronstadt, this 101-page volume on Sabin can be purchased used on Amazon for only a few dollars, roughly the same cost as shipping.</p> <p>The book and websites above chronicle the rest of Sabin's remarkable life of medical achievement and public service but I'll provide some of the highlights as follows. </p> <!--more--><p><strong>A career of "firsts"</strong><br /> At Johns Hopkins, Sabin worked with anatomist Franklin Paine Mall and published in 1901, the year after her graduation, <em>An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain</em>, that served as an neuroanatomy text for the next three decades (see <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=v4eUFRBzP1wC&amp;dq=cu+florence+rena+sabin+award&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;source=in&amp;hl=en&amp;ei=J_KSS72ZHMS0tgejwJHVCg&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=result&amp;resnum=12&amp;ved=0CDcQ6AEwCw#v=onepage&amp;q=&amp;f=false"><strong>here</strong></a> at Google Books). Her 1900-01 internship with famed physician Sir William Osler <a href="http://jmb.rsmjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/13/3/162"><strong>is credited</strong></a> with planting the seed of her interest in tuberculosis that came back to serve her in the laboratory in the 20s and 30s and in public health in the 40s.</p> <p>In 1903, Sabin became the first woman faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and was noted for her work on the origin and development of the lymphatic system. Her 1913 book arguing that lymphatics derive from the venous system and not tissues spaces is probably the most complete compilation of the nine critical publications documenting her early work, also accessible <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=gWP6Q3lO6fcC&amp;dq=cu%20florence%20rena%20sabin%20award&amp;pg=PP1#v=onepage&amp;q=&amp;f=false"><strong>here</strong></a> at Google Books. In 1917, she was appointed Professor of Histology, the first woman full professor at Johns Hopkins and in 1924 became the first woman president of the American Association of Anatomists.</p> <p>But when Mall died in 1917, Sabin was passed over as head of the anatomy department in favor of her own former student, Dr. Lewis Weed. She continued in her work but, not surprisingly, was ripe for recruitment to Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research by Dr. Simon Flexner, the original director of Rockefeller and elder brother of Alexander Flexner. (Discussed <a href="http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/355/13/1339"><strong>here</strong></a> in a 2006 NEJM review, Alexander Flexner's 1910 report defined the standards of American and Canadian medical schools for the rest of the 20th century.)</p> <p>In <a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/Views/Exhibit/narrative/rockefeller.html"><strong>joining Rockefeller</strong></a> as a full member, a full professor equivalent, Sabin was the first woman to hold such a position at that institution as well. Her work had turned to the immune system's response to the bacillus that causes tuberculosis, monocytes in particular, and how fibrotic "tubercles" develop and contribute to the destruction of surrounding tissue. In April, 1925, Sabin became the first woman elected to the National Academy of Sciences. <a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/B/B/K/V/_/rrbbkv.pdf"><strong>This link</strong></a> will take you to a PDF of her notification letter from The Florence Rena Sabin Papers.</p> <p>Accounts of her time at Rockefeller indicate that she was a tireless mentor of young investigators, men and women, and life in New York City fed her diverse interests in theatre and music. This 1941 version of <a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/B/B/M/G/"><strong>her personal bookplate</strong></a> reflects her literary interests, work ethic, and love for science. Her National Academy biography notes this comment from a co-worker at the time:</p> <blockquote><p>"The great joy and pleasure which she derived from her work were like a contagion among those around her so that all were stimulated in much the same manner that she was. I have never known any other person to be quite so buoyed up by intellectual stimuli as she was. Dr. Sabin was one of those people who, however strenuous the previous day might have been, waked at the crack of dawn with great enthusiasm for what the day was to hold. She was nearly always the first one at the laboratory, and greeted every one with a <em>joie de vivre</em> which started the day pleasantly for all of us. . . . Despite the fact that she was the first to arrive in the morning, she was often the last to leave in the evening."</p></blockquote> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/wp-content/blogs.dir/400/files/2012/04/i-66a2b12f62e5b692faa0bacf14917825-Sabin and Rockefeller lab 1930.jpg" alt="i-66a2b12f62e5b692faa0bacf14917825-Sabin and Rockefeller lab 1930.jpg" /><em>Photos: Above: Dr. Sabin with her Rockefeller laboratory group in 1930; Below: At her scope, The Rockefeller Archives</em></p> <p><img alt="Sabin at microscope Rockefeller smaller.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/Sabin at microscope Rockefeller smaller-thumb-515x410-42215.jpg" width="515" height="410" /></p> <p><strong>"Retirement" on the Health Committee of Colorado's Post-War Planning Committee</strong><br /> When she retired from Rockefeller in 1938, the signature book for her retirement reception (<a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/B/B/C/P/"><strong>here</strong></a>) reflected the deep admiration her students and colleagues felt for her, including a pre-World War II version of a smiley emoticon from Thomas Rivlin and the inscription, "All blood cells love you and wish you many more happy years." Other inscriptions include, "with ten years of memories that are with each succeeding year more deeply significant, " and another that noted her work in the women's suffrage movement: "with appreciation and admiration of the National Women's Party."</p> <p><img class="inset" img="" alt="Sabin Florence and Mary.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/Sabin Florence and Mary-thumb-200x313-42217.jpg" width="200" height="313" />At age 67, Dr. Sabin returned to Denver to live with her sister, Mary, living <a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/Views/Exhibit/narrative/colorado.html"><strong>another career</strong></a> in "retirement." This photo with Mary on the left was taken in 1939, shortly after Florence returned to Denver. (For those of you who know Denver, Florence and Mary lived in the Stanley Arms apartments at 1321-1333 E 10th Ave, just west of Cheesman Park and the Denver Botanic Gardens)</p> <p>After living in Baltimore and New York City and working at the nation's top medical centers, Sabin was appalled at the state of public health in her native Colorado. As World War II drew to a close, she was tapped by Gov. John Vivian (and then under the next governor) to lead a group examining health services in anticipation of the needs of returning soldiers. A PDF of the letter of invitation can be viewed <a href="http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/RR/B/B/D/Y/_/rrbbdy.pdf"><strong>here</strong></a>. </p> <p>She traveled to all 63 Colorado counties and lobbied politicians to gain passage in 1947 of four of six proposed "Sabin Bills" to improve preventative health and facilities for existing tuberculosis patients, general sanitation, and an overhaul of the state's Board of Health. She then served on the board of what is now Denver General Hospital and then the Denver Department of Health.</p> <p>As an example of her impact, Sabin's encouragement of chest X-ray screening resulted in a 50% reduction in the death rate from tuberculosis in Denver within two years. The incidence of syphilis dropped by 90% during the same time period (from 700 to 60 cases per 100,000). In 1951, Sabin received a Lasker Award, not for her laboratory career but instead for her work in public health.</p> <p>Sabin turned 80 on November 9, 1951, just one month after a woman named Henrietta Lacks had died of cervical cancer at the hospital where she had been a professor. On December 1, the University of Colorado School of Medicine honored Dr. Sabin on this milestone with the formal dedication of the Florence R. Sabin Building for Research in Cellular Biology, the site where the black tobacco farmer and medical research would become intertwined.</p> <p>On October 3, 1953, Sabin died of a heart attack while recovering from pneumonia at her Denver apartment. Her biography <a href="http://www.nap.edu/readingroom.php?book=biomems&amp;page=fsabin.html"><strong>notes</strong></a> that she died while watching her beloved Brooklyn Dodgers on television in the World Series. I find it noteworthy that today <a href="http://www.stowevintage.com/gpage19.html"><strong>a handwritten letter</strong></a> from Dr. Sabin goes for $1,800 whereas <a href="http://www.legendsofthefield.com/Shop/Control/Product/fp/SFV/32553/vpid/7984020/vpcsid/0/rid/129354"><strong>a photo</strong></a> signed by 11 members of the 1953 Dodgers can be had for $375.</p> <p>The story of Florence Rena Sabin is still recognized and examined in pockets of the academy as evidenced by <a href="http://www.genderforum.org/index.php?id=143"><strong>this 2009 article</strong></a> in <em>Gender Forum</em>, an internet journal for gender studies. Entitled. <a href="http://www.genderforum.org/no_cache/issues/apparatus-xy/the-quiet-feminism-of-dr-florence-sabin/"><strong>"The Quiet Feminism of Dr. Florence Sabin: Helping Women Achieve in Science and Medicine,"</strong></a> by Dr. Patricia J.F. Rosof of St. Francis College, this detailed and painstakingly referenced historical perspective documents Sabin's semi-stealth activism in women's rights extending back to her 1900 graduation from Johns Hopkins Medical School.</p> <p>A statue of <a href="http://www.aoc.gov/cc/art/nsh/sabin.cfm"><strong>Sabin at her microscope</strong></a> was presented in 1959 as the first of Colorado's representatives in <a href="http://www.aoc.gov/cc/art/nsh/nsh_coll_origin.cfm"><strong>The National Statuary Hall Collection</strong></a> at the U.S. Capitol. Each state is granted only two statues to honor the persons most notable in their history. The other Colorado statuary representative is that of the Apollo 13 astronaut, John L. "Jack" Swigert, Jr., the Denver native who was portrayed by Kevin Bacon in the movie, <em>Apollo 13</em>.</p> <p><strong>Back to the story of HeLa S3</strong><br /> At the time of Dr. Sabin's death, a physician-scientist named Theodore "Ted" Puck was working on cellular genetics in his University of Colorado School of Medicine laboratory in the building carrying Sabin's name. Recruited to Colorado in 1948 as the founding chair of the Department of Biophysics, Puck played a major role in the application of bacterial culture methodologies to assessing the growth requirements of human cells in culture.</p> <p>On page 100 of Rebecca Skloot's book, <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/"><strong>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</strong></a>, she makes a very brief reference to the role of Colorado scientists in isolating and expanding the first clonal populations of human tumor cells. In the research building named in honor of Dr. Sabin, Ted Puck and his graduate students selected these clones from the mixed culture of HeLa cells. These are the cells that had been circulating amongst researchers for five or six years since first expanded from Mrs. Lacks's tumor in 1951 by technician Mary Kubicek in the laboratory of Dr. George Gey at Johns Hopkins.</p> <p>In the next post of this series, we'll discuss how Puck and his graduate students provided this immortal link between Dr. Sabin and Henrietta Lacks.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a></span> <span>Sun, 03/07/2010 - 06:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/history" hreflang="en">History</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/working-scientist" hreflang="en">The Working Scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-science-and-medicine" hreflang="en">Women in science and medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/florence-rena-sabin" hreflang="en">florence rena sabin</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/education" hreflang="en">Education</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338479" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267965976"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Awesome post, holmes! BTW, the Flexner Report was written by Abraham Flexner, not Alexander.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338479&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="a8Khl7y_m2mON9mJZU0X14onvZzGFUczTeF4CFX3vZ0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://physioprof.wordpress.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Comrade PhysioProf (not verified)</a> on 07 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338479">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338480" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267969743"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks, brudda, for the compliment and the correction. I can't tell you how many similar mistakes I caught before I hit "publish." I knew it was Abraham, read the NEJM review and saw Abraham, and still wrote Alexander. </p> <p>Old age, dude. I'm getting old.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338480&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="wg33RCR40jv2yZd4Ieb4D4GMbn--AEWY_cvZgCZLI4I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 07 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338480">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338481" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267985025"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you for this.</p> <p>I'm ashamed to say, I'm from Colorado, and yet I never knew who Dr. Sabin was, or any of this story. This enlightenment is late, but I'm glad of it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338481&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bXieIcAfS7GPez2S3mTDewIHGTGZv9CTr3xzkExjfYk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Luna_the_cat (not verified)</span> on 07 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338481">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338482" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268122095"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great, great post, Abel. Makes ya' think about all the potential talent that went untapped because of this ignorance. Yeesh!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338482&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="HRlbHUQ3SEInDIK3rYwuZFThyRrYvaxbxQrI-2SmjFA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://behindthestick.wordpress.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">scribbler50 (not verified)</a> on 09 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338482">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338483" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268130458"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wonderful history. Can't wait for the next installment.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338483&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9zWu3Cm1uTPvBTz1Z_wnFVvL2arx-vfhVxakD4Ii0Ew"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://pascalesthoughts.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Pascale (not verified)</a> on 09 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338483">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338484" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268170713"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Luna - no worries, I didn't know the whole story until I started looking at the original papers on these cells and then read up on Dr. Sabin. I think it's because it was more than one generation before us and people who knew her weren't around when we came up.</p> <p>@scribbler50 - always great to hear from you, good sir! At least there were some forward-thinking women with the financial wherewithal to make a difference for some.</p> <p>@Pascale - thanks, doc! I hope to get the rest of this up on Wednesday.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338484&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="24564BwgFi0NqT9vO6hCXkNvMgG2YYa7nzgvDEZExVE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 09 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338484">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338485" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268934912"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As a Baltimorian, it is very strange to me to read about the actions of people like Gilman and Garret, who I knew only as people for whom private schools and buildings at private schools were named. (Gilman is one of the major boy's private schools, and Garret is a founder of the Bryn Mawr School for girls, where they still take Latin.)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338485&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="S9LaaKUgZ6PwHUG4js65XAtrl3Dz4Ef5lmyFziMd5eg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 18 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338485">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/terrasig/2010/03/07/hela-s3-part-2%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sun, 07 Mar 2010 11:02:34 +0000 terrasig 119657 at https://scienceblogs.com What's the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3 cells? Part I: Launching the lab https://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/06/hela-s3-part-1 <span>What&#039;s the difference between HeLa and HeLa S3 cells? Part I: Launching the lab</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.rockarch.org/exhibits/women/women_05.php"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/wp-content/blogs.dir/400/files/2012/04/i-11a0e806e84d60ddab1811abaea71126-Sabin Rockefeller portrait cropped.jpg" alt="i-11a0e806e84d60ddab1811abaea71126-Sabin Rockefeller portrait cropped.jpg" /></a>When I first started my independent academic laboratory in 1992, it was in a brand new facility across the parking lot from a then 40-year-old building named in honor of the woman to the right. I took on a big teaching load from day one and while I had some cash left from the $50,000 start-up package, I didn't hire a technician immediately. So it fell upon me to do all the ordering of the basic supplies to get the operation rolling. No problem, right? I ordered much of my own stuff as a postdoc so it should be no problem to get everything I need to start the lab from scratch. </p> <p>One of the most common buffers used in molecular and cell biology labs is "Tris," short for a base called tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane. By adding different amounts of hydrochloric acid to it, you can create buffers from pH 6.8 to pH 9 so it's pretty versatile.</p> <p>So, I opened the old Sigma catalog (this was when companies were only just starting to get their catalogs online). There were five varieties of Tris and nine varieties of Trizma<sup>®</sup>, Sigma's brand of Tris base (there are now six and 15, respectively). </p> <p>So which do I order? The ACS reagent grade &gt;99.8%, the JIS special grade &gt;99% or do I go for the BioUltra Trizma? </p> <p>But the BioUltra Trizma comes in two forms, one for molecular biology and another for luminescence. I definitely needed a molecular biology grade tested RNase-free that I could also use for cell culture. </p> <p>Hmmm, how 'bout the "Biotechnology Performance Certified, meets EP, USP testing specifications, cell culture tested, â¥99.9% (titration)."</p> <p>And so, for each chemical I needed to start the lab I had to go through and evaluate why I needed one form over another, and what the difference was between all of the terminology.</p> <p>When it came time to bring in the cultured cell lines for my work, I decided that I was going to start all of my cultures from an original, traceable stock obtained directly from a cell repository instead of the more common practice of soliciting colleagues around campus for hand-me-downs of their established lines. You never know where someone's cells have been, how long they might have been passaged, whether they have been cross contaminated, or if they have latent mycoplasma infections.</p> <p><a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/"><img class="inset" img="" alt="Thumbnail image for The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 250px.jpg" src="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/assets_c/2010/03/The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 250px-thumb-150x228-21808-thumb-125x190-42196.jpg" width="125" height="190" /></a>So I knew I needed HeLa cells - those ones we're hearing all about these days from Rebecca Skloot's <em>New York Times</em>-bestselling book, <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/"><strong>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</strong></a>, about the 31-year-old rural black woman whose cervical carcinoma gave rise to the first immortalized human cell line.</p> <p>The two most common vendors for original cell culture stock are the <a href="http://atcc.org"><strong>American Type Culture Collection (ATCC)</strong></a> and the<a href="http://www.dsmz.de/"><strong> Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ)</strong></a>, or German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures. There are others, including major national research institutes, and dozens of other vendors have modified cells for a variety of specialized uses. </p> <p>ATCC is a private, non-profit organization that <a href="http://www.atcc.org/About/WhoWeAre/tabid/139/Default.aspx"><strong>traces its roots</strong></a> back to 1925 when scientists realized a need for a central laboratory that distributed certified strains of microorganisms. If you isolate your own cell line that you wish to make available to the scientific community, you can deposit it with ATCC and they will handle requests for it from other investigators, using sales fees to support their operation. </p> <p>Not only does ATCC serve as a central repository but it also contributes to the continuity of the biomedical research enterprise. I had a physician-scientist colleague a few years back who was closing his research lab and moving to private oncology practice. But he had developed a series of drug-resistant clonal populations of two, common human leukemia lines. These are very useful cells for investigating why cancer cells develop tolerance to drug therapy but since there would be no one left to distribute them, he deposited them with ATCC (<a href="http://atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CRL-2264&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>example</strong></a>).</p> <p>OK, so back to 1992: I open the ATCC catalog (again, before it was online) and, hmm, you've got HeLa cells (catalog designation <a href="http://atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-2&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>CCL-2</strong></a>). Great. Let's order 'em up.</p> <p>But then there are also HeLa 229 (<a href="http://atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-2.1&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>CCL-2.1</strong></a>), and HeLa S3 (<a href="http://atcc.org/ATCCAdvancedCatalogSearch/ProductDetails/tabid/452/Default.aspx?ATCCNum=CCL-2.2&amp;Template=cellBiology"><strong>CCL-2.2</strong></a>).</p> <p>Hrumph. I just want some freakin' HeLa cells - what's up with these other ones? They all kind of look the same, all from the same woman, all grown in the same medium. </p> <p>So what the difference?</p> <p>In her <em>Los Angeles Times</em> <a href="http://articles.latimes.com/2010/feb/08/entertainment/la-et-rebecca-skloot8-2010feb08"><strong>interview</strong></a> last month, Skloot remarked that the Lacks book began with a manuscript she was planning to meet the requirements of her MFA at the University of Pittsburgh:</p> <blockquote><p>"I was in class, and I got out a piece of paper and I wrote at the top 'Forgotten Women in Science,' " she remembers. She planned to do 12 essays. "Number 1, I wrote Henrietta Lacks, and then I was like, hmmm."</p></blockquote> <p>So over a series of posts this weekend, I wish to tell you about a woman in science indirectly related to HeLa cells. She may not necessarily qualify as a "forgotten woman of science" but her story is perhaps not well-appreciated today because her contributions occurred so long ago. </p> <p><strong>Florence Rena Sabin, MD (1871 - 1953)</strong>, a daughter of a Colorado coal mining family, became a female pioneer in medicine and public health. With the simple notation of "S3" she is forever linked to the first clonal population of these cervical cancer cells from the poor Virginia tobacco farmer.</p> <p><em>Image credit:</em> Sabin color portrait from <a href="http://www.rockarch.org/exhibits/women/women_05.php">Women in the Rockefeller Archive Center</a> </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a></span> <span>Sat, 03/06/2010 - 05:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/history" hreflang="en">History</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/working-scientist" hreflang="en">The Working Scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-science-and-medicine" hreflang="en">Women in science and medicine</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/florence-rena-sabin" hreflang="en">florence rena sabin</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/technology" hreflang="en">Technology</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338468" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267874221"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great hook. I'll be back for the complete story.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338468&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ybmqJ0HPOR_jS35Hp0vnkCcKEST0zq-LnXWXDwWGMQo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://twitter.com/JLVernonPhD" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jamie Vernon (not verified)</a> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338468">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338469" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267876818"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I look forward to the next installment!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338469&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="91pN4rkSd51SpbGGoMJFtXWAKxrgq5rB4aQkvOnGUxc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carpus (not verified)</span> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338469">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338470" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267877679"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You fucker! How can you leave us hanging like that?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338470&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="POLoh8sJQ3p7GzpGPnyVNfjx3kXAfGQl5NZGRhKP5bI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://physioprof.wordpress.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Comrade PhysioProf (not verified)</a> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338470">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338471" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267880299"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Don't worry, CPP, you won't have to go looking up 1950s papers yourself. I've just been working on this post in fits and starts throughout LungMutiny2010 and it got too long even when I tried to abbreviate it.</p> <p>Thanks Carpus and Jaime. Hope the rest hold your interest.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338471&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MRvS44MYKmn0uGk-rXfR5AlnXF50PLt0IN-f4vtD7tQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338471">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338472" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267889315"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'll be waiting with impatience, myself....</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338472&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-z8EDxZBw02Yh_DNjO0Zu-W-l0AtondWxiwVujZ-cr0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Luna_the_cat (not verified)</span> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338472">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338473" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267893107"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>more! more!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338473&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1AMdA2wRQNNsGBQ9Z_GJ_XITjmLCLjtkg18r273V9Po"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.scienceblogs.com/bioephemera" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bioephemera (not verified)</a> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338473">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338474" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267897322"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Just cruel. I'm with PP.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338474&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5X-0tpPk0nNHoalXIfnSqbG9M-OJ-JN6ye-GUNgx-Wc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://pascalesthoughts.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Pascale (not verified)</a> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338474">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338475" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267903980"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Nice intro. I'll be watching for the rest of this story. I've always loved narratives that combine the history with the science.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338475&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="v-7rfXr1BOO-ZAIwOndp_-aRcyAPl9mDwGwDjvchrgQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">chezjake (not verified)</span> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338475">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338476" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267920003"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You may be interested in the following article:<br /> Capes-Davis A et al. (2010): Check your cultures! A list of cross-contaminated or misidentified cell lines. <i>Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 8 [Epub ahead of print]</i><br /></p><blockquote>[...], we have compiled a list of known cross-contaminated cell lines. The list currently contains 360 cell lines, drawn from 68 references. <b>Most contaminants arise within the same species, with HeLa still the most frequently encountered (29%, 106/360) among human cell lines</b></blockquote> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338476&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XYF5UMTa3yYFueEBAMG4uqR4_clbtc060Hwl8vobGFk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sparc (not verified)</span> on 06 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338476">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2338477" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267952929"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Fabulous post -- I hope you continue. And, please, if the rest is as good, turn it into a book. Immortal Life might be a well-written book, and Henrietta Lacks may have been a good &amp; worthy person, but a person of science she was not. All the attention on the person whose cells have been studied only shows the confusion of our society about what's important. It's the Florence Sabins who we need to know more about. A delightful intro for that subject here if you ask me.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338477&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9LFha4oYZ62eBVUPj7VIj2INsjqOODXjGNKcGoWsIT8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Albion Tourgee (not verified)</span> on 07 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338477">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="188" id="comment-2338478" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267999162"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Luna, BioE, Pascale, chezjake - thank you and I hope you'll now move on to Part II <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig/2010/03/hela_s3_part_2.php">here</a>. I'm just realizing it's a rather long post that I could have broken up even more. Part III will go up Monday and will describe the clonal isolation of HeLa S3. It's actually been a lot of fun putting this together.</p> <p>@sparc - Yes, HeLa contamination is everywhere, still. Thanks so much for the heads-up on this latest paper.</p> <p>@Albion - I'm glad you enjoy the post but please do take the time to read the Immortal Life. The author interspersed the family stories with some quite detailed chapters on the science and the stories behind the scientists. These chapters are well-annotated with the original literature as well, something you don't see in many books.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2338478&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ugx3phGhpKparnxkqc0HPv_CqbPq7ny00EQiuGJaFdU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/terrasig" lang="" about="/author/terrasig" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">terrasig</a> on 07 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2338478">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/terrasig"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/terrasig" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/terrasig/2010/03/06/hela-s3-part-1%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sat, 06 Mar 2010 10:40:44 +0000 terrasig 119656 at https://scienceblogs.com Immortal Cells; Moral Issues https://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/2010/02/12/immortal-cells-moral-issues <span>Immortal Cells; Moral Issues</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Today's Baltimore Sun features <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.lacks0212,0,2368591.story">a great OpEd</a> by Ruth Faden, director of the bioethics institute at Johns Hopkins, exploring the ethical and moral issues raised by <a href="http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a>, and its relevance to the current debate over health care reform.  In it she says, among other things:</p> <p> </p> <!--more--><p> </p><blockquote>... Henrietta Lacks story touches the very heart of the<br /> current debate over health care reform, and the need for universal<br /> coverage and access to care. Her tale, like health care reform and the<br /> ethics of biomedical science, is tied up in how the least of us live. <p>We need a national conversation about more than health care costs and<br /> cost shifting. We need one about the ethical foundations of access to<br /> care and their relationship to biomedical science -- and what is the<br /> right thing to do. It is to be hoped that the newly appointed<br /> Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues will get<br /> that conversation going.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the saga of Henrietta Lacks tells us that without genuine<br /> health care reform, her scientific legacy will forever overshadow her<br /> human one. </p></blockquote> <p> <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.lacks0212,0,2368591.story">Click here</a> for full OpEd.  </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/culturedish" lang="" about="/culturedish" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rskloot</a></span> <span>Fri, 02/12/2010 - 03:49</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bioethics" hreflang="en">Bioethics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hela" hreflang="en">HeLa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-money-0" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Money</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/immortal-life-henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/henrietta-lacks" hreflang="en">Henrietta Lacks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-and-money" hreflang="en">Science and Money</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501900" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1266976727"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>While I appreciate you talking about all the reviews. I would much rather see more posts about your ideas and your opinions. Longer posts with good content would be wonderful.</p> <p>This post is kind of bland... =\</p> <p>I hope to be back soon to visit!<br /> =)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501900&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0HH4uLCKq9zQyFkeOCdVIouILhyliRTqgfuqoXZknf0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://gundamwing4132.wordpress.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jeff Tong (not verified)</a> on 23 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501900">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501901" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267115197"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I saw your book about a week ago. I can't wait to buy it. It looks like a interesting read. I am in the medical field particularly, nursing. When I first read the cover, I thought amazing. How sad. After thinking about it today and reading online about it, which I do have some medical background. I hate to say this must go on all the time without our knowledge. This is terriblly fantastic, but I am sure there is lots of stuff that goes on, with stem cells, research etc that goes on. It is terrible that when things get into man's hands without any kind of regulation, not just scientists but anyone thinks they can do what ever they want. It's too bad this happened to her, and her family. I can't wait to read your book. But I just wanted to let you know that what you started probably opened a can of worms. I hope it makes every one about what men with power and government can get away. I hope the book sales help the family. Good luck with your book and great success.<br /> Susan Curtis<br /> Myrtle Beach, SC.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501901&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jMcZaqyRzvNK7_eiFS4Q-yGWDoSelemUFqtruPSInWw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://susansliterarycafe.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Susan (not verified)</a> on 25 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501901">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501902" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267205058"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Just a note to say how much I enjoyed your book -- it was incredibly well written and an important story. I've written a review on my site from a lay-person's perspective. I hope you'll write more in the future, your style is excellent.<br /> Anne</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501902&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SkAgN_VNjdjv_pSOo9Tp7n5Tm1-XxeoKA4CeVKy1RU0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://books.brooklyanne.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anne Wilson (not verified)</a> on 26 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501902">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501903" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267205998"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is an absolutely wonderful book that I only received yesterday in the post from Amazon.ca. I couldn't put it down &amp; have just finished it. It is a very moving personal story of what seems to be an abstruse scientific issue -- the writing is masterful, the scholarship superb.An incredible story. Bravo and a tip of the tam-o'-shanter to you! As chair of a large Research Ethics Board I shall make your book recommended reading for its members. (PS You may be happy to know your book is at the top of the list for medical ethics books in Canada at amazon.ca - one ahead of my book! :) </p> <p>Philip Hebert MD PhD</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501903&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7YR0AmdfuLJ_vD0wZKD10n_B6h8VP51ZDk4C5hDJbqI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Philip Hebert (not verified)</span> on 26 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501903">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501904" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267261000"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am so loving your book--about 70% finished with it. The parts about your time with Deborah make me laugh out loud at times. What a great and difficult time you must have had writing this book!<br /> Thanks, JO</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501904&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PGp_OfT28Onkvxgmlv6lG5eXAEsPotQqVpcEdYn9CvQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jo (not verified)</span> on 27 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501904">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501905" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267302541"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I applaud the strength and determination it took to bring forward the story of Henrietta Lacks and the difficulties her family has faced throughout the years. As a health care professional I find ethics one of the hardest parts of my job. I can only hope that bringing this story to life will humanize research efforts and offer real consent to many of the ongoing and future research projects. We are forever indebted to the cells of Henrietta Lacks and the medical advances she has offered the international medical community. I look to share this story in hopes of championing for the medically underserved and those at risk of being taken advantage of for the sake of research. Thank you for such a quality text - I hope the story inspires ethical research practice and the respect for Ms. Lacks she deserves.</p> <p>C. Meyer, RN, MSN, CEN</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501905&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3Gy6QVEEZGV0J_ZNTaCWXZv1zvmwp9GlJ_nUgJgoKXY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="C. Meyer, RN, MSN, CEN">C. Meyer, RN, … (not verified)</span> on 27 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501905">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501906" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267336676"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I enjoyed reading your book and it has given me much pause for thought. Strangely, I only found your blog when I was looking up "Patient Narratives" on PubMed and I came upon a recent article about your father, Floyd. That led me to his web page and on that a link to yours. "There are no accidents, there are only appointments."<br /> Your book would be perfect for the kinds of programs that many colleges have where the entire community reads one book and discusses it over a month or so. Are any doing that now? I will see if there is interest here at Williams. I teach a course in Medical Humanities occasionally here (I am a local physician).<br /> The Op-Ed author rightly says, "As the new book 'The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks' reminds us, behind every biological sample is a human being." Osler is famously, but erroneously quoted as saying, "It is more important to treat the patient who has the disease, than the disease the patient has." (It was probably Maimonides, but may go back even further). Similarly, exploring Henrietta Lacks's life and the fates of her relatives turns out to be more important than just focusing on the science (to me at least). Beyond health care, there are unnatural causes for illness which are rooted in societal inequities. These determine how we are sick and how we are well. These are difficult to escape and your moving narrative of HeLa's children exemplifies that. "Dale" would be alive and well today had she not been poor and black and second class in the Baltimore of her youth. This so-called "health care" we are all debating will not reverse the forces that make us ill or allow us to be "well."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501906&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="01uhizCT3UhcJ4gF-ZIXKsFGzQ5yxJS_cVo-81_PlwA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www,cell2soul.typepad.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Elpern (not verified)</a> on 28 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501906">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501907" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267336837"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I enjoyed reading your book and it has given me much pause for thought. Strangely, I only found your blog when I was looking up "Patient Narratives" on PubMed and I came upon a recent article about your father, Floyd. That led me to his web page and on that a link to yours. "There are no accidents, there are only appointments."<br /> Your book would be perfect for the kinds of programs that many colleges have where the entire community reads one book and discusses it over a month or so. Are any doing that now? I will see if there is interest here at Williams. I teach a course in Medical Humanities occasionally here (I am a local physician).<br /> The Op-Ed author rightly says, "As the new book 'The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks' reminds us, behind every biological sample is a human being." Osler is famously, but erroneously quoted as saying, "It is more important to treat the patient who has the disease, than the disease the patient has." (It was probably Maimonides, but may go back even further). Similarly, exploring Henrietta Lacks life and the fates of her relatives turns out to be more important than just focusing on the science (to me at least). Beyond health care, there are unnatural causes for illness which are rooted in societal inequities. These determine how we are sick and how we are well. These are difficult to escape and your moving narrative of HeLa's children exemplifies that. "Dale" would be alive and well today had she not been poor and black and second class in the Baltimore of her youth. This so-called "health care" we are all debating will not reverse the forces that make us ill or allow us to be "well."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501907&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LVuIW4Yok3AGp50RlN8OgO6s0-ZC_-oRdhgvptU-dm4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www,cell2soul.typepad.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Elpern (not verified)</a> on 28 Feb 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501907">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501908" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267452590"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I saw you speak at Politics and Prose Bookstore in Washington, DC recently. You have really done something here. You opened a door to a dialogue that's long overdue. You have told a very important story. You have touched a family and in the process many, many people. I wish you well and will not be surprised when you to win the Pulitzer Prize. I just know it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501908&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xAuXUZb1FApVEim6C52rX1TxM0-ihBMvVl7CIc5G_DQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecilia Saad (not verified)</span> on 01 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501908">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501909" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1267959926"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I heard your interview with Terry Gross on WHYY's "Fresh Air" a short time ago and I was fascinated by the subject. Ordered the book up from the local library and waited for my turn to read it. Sat down this weekend and devoured it like it was a thriller. It is. Thank you for your balanced treatment of these complicated relationship, social-political, educational, ethical, and scientific issues. What a wonderful piece of work.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501909&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="n-dF-eCAgiXDvlcjgxRX1wa_AN-ZfmyB8rasjBowHsE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.CenterforCreativeGrowth.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Susan Boyes (not verified)</a> on 07 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501909">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501910" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268543854"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I too came across previews for this book while researching Pubmed and NIH articles in the hopes of researching a rare and aggressive cancer that took my own mother and the potential links to my own illness. I am a passionate advocate of tolerance and hold a BA in Math and Science.<br /> I knew I must have this book. After two weeks of searching<br /> (all the local book stores were sold out), a dear friend at a publishing company got a hold of one for me.<br /> When I received it, I literally devoured the contents in less than 24 hours. Brilliantly written with compassion, honesty and an understanding of not just science but the human soul. As someone who understands, intimately, the complex world of medicine and research studies and how a lack of educational exposure and understanding leaves an individual powerless, I applaud efforts for setting up an educational fund to the family members who remain. A final thank you to Henrietta who continues to save lives.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501910&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="27eslbdDQN8f-TLcJu7hzlMg0GRYt-CuSuKYMxq86ms"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">A.Kager (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501910">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501911" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268828481"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Nice job on Stephen Colbert last night. Loved the Centipede cells. Also I enjoyed the audiobook version of your book very much. A well done production.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501911&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WHCF9b6GHoXbAlz3YfrHwW7FeAWRyeiSryuCQ-rFGpA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mark F. (not verified)</span> on 17 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501911">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501912" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1268906426"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Things have not changed at Johns Hopkins: <a href="http://adventuresincardiology.com">http://adventuresincardiology.com</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501912&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hk99uzJLJyGjw9_eO5G_AnNwHSptrZAq97hxqY58TPo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://adventuresincardiology.com/chapter-next/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dan Walter (not verified)</a> on 18 Mar 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501912">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2501913" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1270414567"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The Balt Sun link provided does not get you to the Op-Ed piece mentioned. Here is a better link.<br /><a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.lacks12feb12,0,7465550.story">http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.lacks12feb12,0,746…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2501913&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-kQQ2O7EeSls1nlv1Vur9hVPw_DPtqEnTplwP7qn35Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.facebook.com/photoboothe" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boothe Davis (not verified)</a> on 04 Apr 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/20817/feed#comment-2501913">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/culturedish/2010/02/12/immortal-cells-moral-issues%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 12 Feb 2010 08:49:26 +0000 rskloot 148249 at https://scienceblogs.com