Volcano Research https://scienceblogs.com/ en Friday Flotsam: Galeras settles, Krakatau anniversary, what is under Yellowstone and more. https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/27/sorry-about-the-lack-of <span>Friday Flotsam: Galeras settles, Krakatau anniversary, what is under Yellowstone and more.</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sorry about the lack of posts - I've been not only frantically prepping for class and my Eyja talk, but also I'm somewhat under the weather with an ill-timed sickness, so even though there is stuff to talk about, I haven't really had time/wherewithal to deal with it.</p> <p>However, expect big things from<em> Eruptions</em> next week!</p> <p><img src="http://knowledgenews.net/moxie/moxiepix/a1517.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Drawing of a ship washed inland by the tsunami generated by the August 27, 1883 eruption of Krakatau.</em></p> <p>I'll throw a few quick links:</p> <ul><li>The alert status at Galeras has been <a href="http://www.poder360.com/dailynews_detail.php?blurbid=8798" target="_blank">dropped back down to "orange"</a> after the non-explosive eruption earlier this week. However, <a href="http://www.google.com/hostednews/epa/article/ALeqM5joDrbTCeiFfCg07iDUh-p-kU9rlg" target="_blank">INGEOMINAS warns us the threat is still there</a> (<em>spanish</em>) for an eruption (and more evacuations).</li> <li>Another volcano anniversary falls this week - this time the <a href="http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/on-this-day-krakatoas-massive-eruption.htm" target="_blank">1883 eruption of Krakatau in Indonesia</a>. You can even hear <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0098gdy" target="_blank">a witness to the actual eruption get interviewed</a> by author <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Krakatoa-World-Exploded-August-1883/dp/0066212855" target="_blank">Simon Winchester</a>.</li> <li>Curious about what is going on underneath Yellowstone - check out<a href="http://all-geo.org/highlyallochthonous/2010/08/yellowstone-what-lies-beneath/" target="_blank"> the great post on <em>Highly Allochthonous</em></a> that examines the source of the giant North American caldera system.</li> <li>Dr. Boris Behncke has kept us appraised on <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/etnaboris/" target="_blank">the currently activity at Etna on his photostream</a> - not a lot of coverage of this new activity at the Italian volcano in any other media source.</li> <li>And you can catch up on all the week's volcano news with the <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports/usgs/index.cfm?wvarweek=20100818" target="_blank">Global Volcanism Program's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report</a>!</li> </ul></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Fri, 08/27/2010 - 07:43</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/andes" hreflang="en">Andes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colombia" hreflang="en">colombia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/etna" hreflang="en">Etna</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/explosive-eruption" hreflang="en">explosive eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/galeras" hreflang="en">Galeras</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/global-volcanism-program" hreflang="en">Global Volcanism Program</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/historic-eruption" hreflang="en">historic eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/indonesia" hreflang="en">indonesia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/italy" hreflang="en">italy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/krakatau" hreflang="en">Krakatau</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-society" hreflang="en">volcanoes and society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/yellowstone" hreflang="en">yellowstone</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210592" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282933927"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Eruptions readers who recall our technical chitchat here on deep focal earthquakes, </p> <p>scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/07/climate_volcanism_and_the_ande.php</p> <p>you will very much want to go look at Chris Rowan's blog entry for today, mentioned in Erics opener above.</p> <p>Look closely at Fig 2B. What do we see?</p> <p>We see what looks very much like a critical folding unit dimension of 200 Km. </p> <p>The twisting corkscrew shape that Chris mentions is a massive torsional movement that is mirrored in the curving path of the hotspot, seen in the first blog figure.</p> <p>I am thinking that we are seeing an interesting phenomenon:</p> <p>The 'unpleating' of the folded subducted crust. </p> <p>Recent tomography evidence of PNW crust subduction through deep focus EQ modeling (discussed in papers I presented in July, linked above) suggests that diving crust remains intact - stretched and thinned, but with structural integrity in place, as it descends to just below 800 Km.</p> <p>So, I'm not what happens as it's mashed down into pleated folds, but it sure does look like it's a pleated and unfolding structure that is feeding upwards as the Yellowstone hot spot.</p> <p>Now, with this picture in mind, look at the last set of modeled tomographic data. See the cold subducting crust plunge downward at the coast, being pleated and stacked at some critical depth (S2), and then an ancient fragment rising by convection, to emerge below and along the path of the Yellowstone hotspot?</p> <p>Could be coincidence (the apparent pleated geometry), but if this is true, it's quite remarkable!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210592&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mLCJ56kRs-JA2zpXsHDsXExVv0a_nLxjNx_T0bOG9Wg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210592">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210593" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282934964"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Erik<br /> We cannot be too grateful for your relentless endeavor in keeping us updated with all kinds of geological information whatsoever. This your blog is an outstanding example of generosity in sharing knowledge and arousing curiosity as a mean of improving our understanding of the world and the relationships between man, science and Nature.<br /> And I also want to thank Boris, ECho and all the other collaborators, as well as our fellow bloggers who, with their valuable comments and posts contribute to keep this blog "rocking". It's been a thrilling experience to be around.<br /> I must confess I'm still far from grasping the whole picture in which concerns magma and volcanoes, but I'm fascinated and eager to learn more.<br /> I'm specially interested in understanding the mechanisms governing plate tectonics and hotspots. Although my expertise is yet insufficient to go deep into the matter, I daresay that, concerning the mantle plume theory, there must be some kind of gap between what is being explained and what is really taking place underneath. Except for Hawaii, where mantle plume provides a very plausible explanation for volcanism, there must be a link between sinking of old plates and hotspots elsewhere. We've seen that kind of connection in Iceland and Yellowstone and recent EQ activity in ancient subduction zones appear as good examples of weird behaviors of magma formation.<br /> It has been said recently in this blog that the mantleplume.org would be a questionable source, though the article in Highly Allochthonous points to the site.<br /> Maybe you could give us some opinion about this as well as some other reliable sources in the net (or books) where a layman like me could get a good perspective in the actual course of debate.<br /> Many thanks in advance.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210593&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="91l_p6POsbzRphJ5B4qWbUBd32pd2V402VFEy_hq7Os"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210593">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210594" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282935564"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby<br /> As soon as I have sent my last post I saw your comment on Chris Rowan's blog. I must give you a special thank for getting me into this debate and for the whole lot of fascinating homeworking you have been charging me with. I can already feel the good results, so I hope. :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210594&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SQfu25jNBpfcfmIjk6wCpsQ4SKplIrN5b0kWDvQBk9o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210594">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210595" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282936856"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renato, meet Dr. Foulger:<br /> foulgerconsulting.com/Bio_GRF.html</p> <p>I used her consulting cv, as it's more up-to-date than her faculty 'vita. She's certainly legit and so is her website.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210595&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="sAkvFQN59niZSlTWM6VEkng3gFNU5hrhWropwFcGKn4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210595">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210596" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282936911"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ah, the dreaded late-summer ick. Hope it clears your system soon!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210596&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jTvuqC7diFj_eV87iV6_43Crk7No_XTPlntQcmZhCUE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://entequilaesverdad.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dana Hunter (not verified)</a> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210596">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210597" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282938992"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby<br /> I was thinking of buying the book, but I was afraid it would be too difficult to my present level, but since you recommend it, I'll give it a try. Many thanks.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210597&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="n8FP2zTnuSSGakH9tyHKIh1lBUWdMaMIJxh1mdH8HkA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210597">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210598" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282939957"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renato, I wasn't referring to her book, but to her website, in reply to your post query.</p> <p>If you are thinking about trying her book, you should write to Dr Foulger and ask if it's appropriate for the general public. At the very least, you should work through the material on her mantle.org website.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210598&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K86JUhtxmEcGjl1GW8Gi6UIBvL5Aoc7tUCfUuzO7kKc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210598">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210599" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282941232"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#7 @Passerby<br /> Yes, that is exactly what I needed when I addressed to Erik. I didn't notice the contents before I answered to your post. Cool! After going through the site I might as well be able to understand the book.<br /> Oh, dear, and all my daily errands waiting for me...<br /> Look what you've done to me! ;)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210599&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RFRB_47kFOkKG40lUD3kPkLM2gkWB7dJaq6UclBqRzA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210599">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210600" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282942392"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby<br /> Just found what I wanted here: The Mantle Plume Hypothesis Pro and Con: Evidence from Earth's Most Voluminous Large Igneous Provinces.<br /> "A common mechanism for the formation of LIPs is highly desirable, yet, at present, all existing hypotheses appear in some way deficient."<br /> Yes. That's exactly what I meant, but to go deeper in the matter I'll have to wait till I have enough time to grasp the basics on seismology and petrology.<br /> As they say in Italian: Piano, piano, si va lontano.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210600&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="X1Xo7IfiDzbR4nViJDl30VLaky00uxP0ZpGLZiknYek"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210600">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210601" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282942618"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Start at the simple level and then move into Gillian's website, with a range of factual complexity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.rasmussen.edu/student-life/blogs/main/beginners-guide-to-plate-tectonics/">www.rasmussen.edu/student-life/blogs/main/beginners-guide-to-plate-tect…</a> (NASA recommended)</p> <p>USGS, This Dynamic Earth - The Story of Plate Tectonics (online edition)<br /> pubs.usgs.gov/gip/dynamic/</p> <p>Introduction to Plate Tectonics<br /><a href="http://www.hartrao.ac.za/geodesy/tectonics.html">www.hartrao.ac.za/geodesy/tectonics.html</a></p> <p>Virtual Upper Mantle<br /><a href="http://www.virtualuppermantle.info/">www.virtualuppermantle.info/</a></p> <p>Geology.com earth internal structure<br /> geology.com/nsta/earth-internal-structure.shtml</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210601&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="n1K9jvu87U5ZRiRZaOeun2LV5MvADpHSrA-d6ZWMeJE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210601">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210602" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282942931"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As they say in Italian (musical direction): poco a poco.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210602&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="p8SE89FLuX-uP1NQQzQ0b5nv9Ob6of5Otw7rVjtREys"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210602">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210603" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282943443"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>More recent mantle plume theory and discussion, Episodes, March 2007 (several papers, start with Dr Xu's intro)</p> <p><a href="http://www.episodes.co.in/www/backissues/301/301.htm">www.episodes.co.in/www/backissues/301/301.htm</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210603&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PyGYpnpKQdbJu9kbfBI_wU8XRpvQyyUm3txpT1banDA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210603">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210604" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282943626"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Since the Episodes volume 30 March issue mentions the OneGeology concept, introduced in 2007, I'll throw in the link to this global geology website.</p> <p><a href="http://www.onegeology.org/home.html">www.onegeology.org/home.html</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210604&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="j7t01vfcDxk8mvxysB4AfoeEqczRw7_e-65Tn2HhIz8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210604">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210605" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282947284"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#13 Grazie infinite!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210605&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gUnhv3tjy-uTMS-Wl3AzxBfQ26IXIqmPT-WqR_-xDVQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210605">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210606" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282953654"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby<br /> What an invaluable material!<br /> All links are bookmarked and I'll take the weekend to start studying them "poco a poco" (actually, I've already started).<br /> Now I'd like to repost a link to this RUV article. Do you have any idea of what could they be? Cracks being found along the Icelandic rift system?<br /> "New cracks in Sprengisandur"<br /><a href="http://www.ruv.is/frettaskyringar/innlendar-frettir/nyjar-sprungur-a-sprengisandi">http://www.ruv.is/frettaskyringar/innlendar-frettir/nyjar-sprungur-a-sp…</a> (Icelandic)<br /> Thank you very much.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210606&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="c78hVVHxcU3KKJIs6wfVx2U0JsJDXyLaJqByemmiNTo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210606">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210607" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282963922"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@1:</p> <p>If I remember correctly you where the one *snorting* the most about my little brain-fast of the vorticing plumes/hotspots. I find it hilarious that you a few weeks later present the only "proof" of that idea so far. If I remember you even went to the trouble to suggest I should study fluid dynamics before saying anything... Haha!</p> <p>The world is a small thing after all:)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210607&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="uwquSctWOftZTKzCrPQrGXsn0zDqFpDvczAs6aCjp8o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl on Passerby (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210607">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210608" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282978003"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato: The geophysicist Páll Einarsson thinks these cracks, brand new as they are, are somehow related to the eruption in Vatnajökull glacier in 1996.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210608&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="HFK7Yg4hbJMbbRh8PYacgHUeLT3-WjtoQGNxuPgrgrQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reynir, NK, .is (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210608">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210609" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282990328"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renato, the cranks are in the Highlands between Hofsjökull and Vatnajökull icecaps. It's a dry volcanic and gravel flood deposit plain. They're associated with area rift systems, and their appearance in Spring and Summer suggests erosional exposure at the surface from glacier melt floods.</p> <p>If Pall Einarsson infers that they're related to the Gjalp 1996 eruption, he might be referring to crustal deformation effects of this event.</p> <p>Crustal deformation associated with the 1996 Gjálp subglacial eruption, Iceland: InSAR studies in affected areas adjacent to the Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland (2007).</p> <p>homepages.see.leeds.ac.uk/~earcpa/article.pdf</p> <p>See Figs 1, area 'T' (the rift system mentioned in the riv article), and 2 (interferograms, deformation maps). It's in the approximate area of the cracks reported a few days ago. </p> <p>Article in English, I found this while reading the Icelandic news on recently formed melt lake to the West on the Ok glacier remnant, posted by birdseye.</p> <p><a href="http://www.icelandreview.com/icelandreview/daily_news/?cat_id=16567&amp;ew_0_a_id=366771">www.icelandreview.com/icelandreview/daily_news/?cat_id=16567&amp;ew_0_a_id=…</a></p> <p>/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highlands_of_Iceland</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210609&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MflHy-_jJEWtvPPGn0oToC-BUpIqLol1JJGotnryqqs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210609">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210610" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282990718"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#16 @Carl<br /> I enjoyed very much all your talking about magma fluid behavior. Ever since then, I've been noticing that all plots and graphs concerning quakes distribution and lithosphere deformation, as well as rising magmas, exhibit a cork screw / semi helical pattern. Of course, there are many forces at stake here and we don't know exactly how the stuff in the mantle behaves, whether fluid-like or semi-solid, to state precisely if they go "by the book" in either way. But since we are no experts, we're entitled to do some speculation in this non academic forum and get ready for the criticism. I'm too far from giving my own opinion, but trying to gather some information on this.<br /> What I've read so far draws me back from mantle plume and convection currents theories as being the main responsible for plate movement and magma formation and that gravity is still very much to be blamed. But this is a mere intuition on my part and I'm ready to be slapped on my face to be saying such a sacrilege. Passerby is helping us a lot with all the material he has been providing and I hope someday I'll be able to discuss the subject in a less amateur way. So, let him snort at his leisure. He has already showed he's ready to respond to the good discussion, as you can see in the deep EQ debate.<br /> Love you guys!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210610&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Mk6wfo-VUEfLCgBOIpbsvSHU54hb67r6cERieh4HcPY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210610">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210611" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282991207"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#17 #18 @Reynir @Passerby<br /> Thanks for your posts and links. When I read about these cracks I thought they would cast some light in our Icelandic debates, and wanted you guys to examine the finding. I'll take a look at the articles.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210611&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="II6PQlu8GSfu31S8eIriljEPEmrV1dRwc5maguwbbEQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210611">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210612" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282994746"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#20 I read the article. The crevasses provide evidence supporting Einarsson's hypothesis of slip faulting at Tungnafellsjökull area due to a 5.6 EQ under Bardarbunga and the 96 Gjalp eruption. Wonder if recent EQ activity to the N of Bardarbunga is anyhow related to this and since activity in the area is somewhat "enigmatic", as they say, we don't know exactly what to expect. The ice sheet there is too thick to give us precise GPS measurements and even to surely state if an eruption has occurred.<br /> Fascinating.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210612&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Lto49XV8bQ8tuP_-PwPMtZE2yZSz4sj4yfnLe4DGQ6g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210612">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210613" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282997461"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The authors do a nice job of presenting possible explanations for deformation and then examining data in light of each case.</p> <p>You asked for an explanation of the crevasse formation at this location, and since you posted an article quoting Einarsson's comments point to the 1996 eruption, I did the best I could to point to published study connecting cause and effect.</p> <p>The authors noted deformation to the north as well as the NW. We have already discussed the potential for tectonic faulting absent of intrusions in some locations, and magmetic dike intrusions in others, to explain earthquakes covering a large area to the east of Askja, with many excellent plots provided by Lurking.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210613&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lcgyMFmzhxsFXWBDVCbZocp-F9SEXZQTmFE_GAfrWrY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210613">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210614" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282997485"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>so in summary, what goes down must come up?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210614&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="H4jku5jzc_6_UycuomYhEHTmV49b973hdQGehghHkro"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">doug mcl (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210614">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210615" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283003553"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby, Renato Rio, Reynir, NK</p> <p>I have no clue where "Goose Lake" or "New Valley" are at.</p> <p>Following along, the best I can come up with is the general region between Vatnajökull and Hofsjökull.</p> <p>So, in response to Renato Rio's musing:</p> <p>"Wonder if recent EQ activity to the N of Bardarbunga is anyhow related to this and since activity in the area is somewhat "enigmatic", as they say, we don't know exactly what to expect."</p> <p>A plot of this area and recent activity (since 8/1/2010)</p> <p>I won't be doing many of these plots, I had to layer the quakes in level by level to get them on the background image.</p> <p><a href="http://i33.tinypic.com/nd6a90.png">http://i33.tinypic.com/nd6a90.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210615&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="N46HSzPiNxnsKOE5Gc64FF2ca7GUz_JBuFDNJ1jmFRo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210615">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210616" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283003707"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><b>Provided that I got the extents of the background image right.<b></b></b></p> <p>(the lat and lon of the quakes are accurate)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210616&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oInyihuOoMoDsTxo5yueZ4R1-Cw94b2u6qTcOpuqelM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210616">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210617" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283004011"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><b>SCRAP THAT</b></p> <p>Corrected version.</p> <p><a href="http://i38.tinypic.com/eugbjc.png">http://i38.tinypic.com/eugbjc.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210617&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="u7I0XGoxXkYOuLLatTuAqnTxim4bK3Tcz68I0dM_XIQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210617">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210618" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283004900"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank-you, Lurking.</p> <p>If Renato will go to Fig. 1 of the 2007 paper cited above, he will see a reasonable match between recent seismic activity and that recorded between Sept 29 and Oct 13, 1996, predating the eruption.</p> <p>That should answer your last question, RR.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210618&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Y0C-oeMSOb2HpJUuOwgndu8p3zA4Giv0bViwEy_gwdU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210618">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210619" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283007097"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For those of you who think I'm an idiot. Well, your partially correct. But lacking a way of editing my hose ups... I am a fully exposed idiot. Can't zip the fly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210619&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="p2uvJhW0FLcxfHlygnWZCyjk6VAJD3QUF-vEfHlhBbs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210619">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210620" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283013215"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato Rio, etal. </p> <p>Speaking of Gillian Foulger and plumes, this link may be of interest. I site-searched the scienceblogs.com blog and didn't see it anywhere already.</p> <p><a href="http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/plumesdebate">http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/plumesdebate</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210620&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="a4Kf73VId89xe00LRALD2H_2cSrxZrc8lAeaM3OWYPQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">William M Boston (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210620">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210621" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283013901"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Gæsavötn (Goose Lakes): 64°46.7'N, 17°31'W.</p> <p>Nýidalur (New Valley): The mouth is at ca. 64°43'N,18°03'W. The valley was first found for certain ca. mid-19th century, hence the name.</p> <p>Both are popular rest spots after a day of bouncing and jouncing on a fourby trail.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210621&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="srANuhIpjAVGq-CoyaZ0j5TfTf_hfsLIJ3ACa-C7GE0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reynir, NK, .is (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210621">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210622" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283016664"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From the <a href="http://www.icelandreview.com">www.icelandreview.com</a> link in Passerby's post [18]</p> <p><i>"The crevasses are located a stoneâs throw away from the road between the Gaesavötn lakes and Nýidalur valley. "</i></p> <p>And thanks to Reynir, NK's coordinate set on Gæsavötn and Nýidalur, a replot (correctly oriented) with those locations and the background image constraints double checked.</p> <p><a href="http://i37.tinypic.com/hv5ftt.png">http://i37.tinypic.com/hv5ftt.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210622&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="E23dCpta5dX8rqZx_h9ACrpAtwTgMu5oIlIUZUn4w6A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurlking (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210622">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210623" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283017123"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato Rio, all</p> <p>Please read each of the following books before giving an opinion ...</p> <p><a href="http://www.dgf.uchile.cl/biblio/Libros_nuevos/mostrarioSismologia.htm">http://www.dgf.uchile.cl/biblio/Libros_nuevos/mostrarioSismologia.htm</a></p> <p>Haha, just joking. Saw the list and thought of your quest for deeper understanding. Seems like a lot of work.</p> <p>Famous Quantum Physicist Gerard 't Hooft says any dedicated person, young or old, can become a good PhD-level Quantum Physicist just from free material on the web. The following is a great read regarding acquiring scientific knowledge and expertise on one's on, and also the value of mentors to give guidance (eg passerby).</p> <p><a href="http://www.phys.uu.nl/~thooft/theorist.html#list">http://www.phys.uu.nl/~thooft/theorist.html#list</a></p> <p>So it would seem, hopefully, the same would be true of Volcanology.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210623&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DWjZOs6CTUgJqkXaKuYnPQ2Ujf1UIbCHYpvFla2yONQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">William M Boston (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210623">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210624" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283018949"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here's an animated gif timelapse of yesterday's (Friday) venting from Etna's volcano craters. It is a 4.4 MB file comprised of 95 images taken by CAM 4 8:10 AM to 12:40 PM UTC, </p> <p><a href="http://i33.tinypic.com/30uajxt.gif">http://i33.tinypic.com/30uajxt.gif</a></p> <p>A total of 4 1/2 hrs played back in just a couple of minutes. The images were separated by 2 minutes 40 seonds, which is a limitation given by Cam 3's rate of updating. In this version of the animation, each image is displayed for 200 ms.</p> <p>The action, like Thursday, started fairly sedated, but built in intensity over time.</p> <p>Some curious action happens on the edge of the right-most crater .. just barely discernable.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210624&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lAIlgt_HbzeNL2yTX_d7V9yitVD53YCFK-W_LwXHnLw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">William M Boston (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210624">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210625" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283019980"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Correction to above: 4 1/2 hours is played back in 20 seconds. So an hour goes by in approximately 4 1/2 seconds!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210625&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="dPRhn1R4kTl2w4FDYW7AFRYV6uLrUg0nDJdGfp7vl70"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">William M Boston (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210625">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210626" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283023263"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My dear mentors: I am a mess. I don't think I deserve to be the object of William's experiment on internet learning. Split between sciences and arts, I got stuck on a TV presentation of the last part of "Der Ring des Nibelungen" and missed my errands as well as my geological studies. I'll try to catch up on your recent posts and see what is behind Lurking's plots.<br /> @Passerby: Do you believe we could witness a revival of 1996 around Vatnajökull any soon? Just caught four more quakes over Herðubreið area.<br /> 28.08.201023:37:5065.137-16.3965.8 km1.690.014.7 km SSW of Herðubreið<br /> 28.08.201022:43:2965.090-16.2637.7 km0.535.065.5 km N of Upptyppingar<br /> Saturday<br /> 28.08.201021:58:0965.206-16.3005.2 km1.138.273.6 km WNW of Herðubreiðarlindir<br /> 28.08.201020:34:5264.674-16.5081.1 km1.274.46.7 km NE of Kverkfjöll<br /> 28.08.201020:17:1165.082-16.2687.8 km0.644.654.6 km N of Upptyppingar</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210626&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KklPD1LtLwqTFpurehTXvCQTjHJuQO-cCiR_Y7sYAkg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210626">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210627" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283025216"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#29 @William M Boston: Great link. I ask your permission to quote one paragraph:<br /> "Volcanism that appears to be anomalous (...) results from the inhomogeneity imparted to the mantle by plate tectonics and intraplate deformations that occur preferentially along pre-existing lines of weakness. The possibility of such a radical simplification alone is a strong hint that may something important may be going on here."<br /> That is exactly what we have been discussing isn't it Passerby?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210627&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="njDjtj5XdGNJpP-RS9EqU4GTJ_ieHeQehdUfRHsaPu8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210627">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210628" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283025368"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Make sure you understand where you're pointing, to, RR.</p> <p>en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herðubreið<br /> en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/vatnajokull/</p> <p>We were talking about the clustering under Vatnajokull, NW corner. You're now referring to a fracture zone to the north of the icecap.</p> <p>If an increase (above interannual average) in geothermal activity under the icecap results in a large lake forming, which is released as a sudden flood, it's possible that volcanic centers (probably Grimsvotn) will be destabilized at either crater or associated fissures and would then erupt. Whether the force of an eruption would be enough to break through 700-900 feet of ice and throw up a large volume of ash, is not known. IES can better address this question.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210628&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CSA53yEpk7_N3klKcofXR3BFuj0j9KeycT4MWzikj0M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210628">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210629" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283026447"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#37 @Passerby: Yes, I know Herðubreið is far to the North of Vatna, but I thought it could be somehow involved in the whole fracture system. But as I see, I am wrong at this.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210629&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="dsWEmCeflPdH_9WBJldIeCaC8YNSdW_oCrdEmi7HzZw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210629">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210630" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283027351"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>&gt;That is exactly what we have been discussing isn't it Passerby?</p> <p>We've discussed interplate EQs, faulting and rifting at sites like Reelfoot Lake/New Madrid fault in the south central US, and to a limited extent, faulting along the Wasatch Front and SW corner of Utah (wrt geothermal activity), but we haven't gone much into intraplate tectonics.</p> <p>This quote from the same source:<br /> The plume hypothesis as it is applied today requires that Earth dynamics is driven by two independent modes of convection - plate tectonics and plumes. The former is driven by forces at plate boundaries - ridge push and slab pull, and the other is driven by heat from the Earth's core. </p> <p>is a bit oversimplifed and outdated. That's why I posted a more recent paper written and published a few years ago.</p> <p>The latter (plumes), especially the mid-depth yellow dots on Courtillot's figure (plumes originating from the depths of the upper mantle) may be a case of intact, less dense folded crust rising with heating from pressure change and mixing chemistry, after passing under thickened continental boundary. </p> <p>The action of subduction and plume, at least in in the Yellowstone case, does not appear to be 'unrelated'.</p> <p>What Chris doesn't mention, at Highly Allochthanous, is that there is a physical and very long transverse fault system (with respect to the coast) that roughly parallels (to the south) the A-A' transect shown in Fig 2 of his Yellowstone plume blog post. That's a clue to the curving coastal plate subduction driving the curving torsion, shown in Fig 1.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210630&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tO_EWs3MrYE2-kd_KlN1y3gxwF8RHbW3t5IXhZ8Wmk8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210630">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210631" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283027893"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@38, we have more or less parallel track grouping of EQ activity, but having different mechanisms, as discussed in a couple of nifty papers with referenced figures described here, which Lurking then used to superimpose recent seismic activity for reference, and he also graphed their frequency over time.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210631&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ldf01WpZDgZQvyvZNZIsgoCNIy3xudlk1FbcJ-hdlBc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210631">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210632" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283029925"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#39 When we were discussing the Moro Golf deep focus quakes it was suggested that they have to do with "invisible" subducted plates and related faults, which I understood could be pretty much the same source of meltings under Yellowstone. I apologize for my skipping to conclusions too quickly, and maybe William is right when he tells me to read all those books before I post my opinion (even though he says he was joking). So please feel free to correct me and tell me when I should be quiet. I'm really happy to hear what you guys have to say, but so far I'm convinced that maybe other people could benefit from the wisdom with which you respond to my stupid remarks (yet I could be wrong on this too).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210632&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DNJ_1fG8_mCIB7WyMU8c8CQA5w1WDKmK4UNkL0W0Als"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210632">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210633" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283031062"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#40 Certainly missed this discussion. My fault.<br /> What intrigues me most is this repeated pattern of swarms (or isolated quakes) occurring almost simultaneously all across Iceland, like over this past 4 hours report from IMO: Reykjanes + Vatna + Herðubreið + Askja + Tjörnes. Difficult to think they are not somehow related (beyond MAR).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210633&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FBRK3eSPgTOXrTrCD79pdINqPYvn3V8xJxd2osf22iI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210633">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210634" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283033510"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Sinabung">Mount Sinabung</a> in Indonesia seems to have had a small eruption today.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210634&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Q08zKu09vfybKn-LtCeSvBa5SblG6DDiiGGPuvWm7SQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://peakvt.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">PeakVT (not verified)</a> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210634">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210635" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283033636"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If you go to Chris's blog, which started us looking at deep focus earthquakes and possible mechanisms, </p> <p>all-geo.org/highlyallochthonous/2010/07/fridayish-focal-mechanisms/</p> <p>He correctly describes the opening sequence of deep focus EQ, that continued for quite a while, as being related </p> <p>&gt;All four focal mechanisms indicate NW-SE extension. Like the Halmera earthquake, this sequence appears to be linked to the westward subduction of the Philippine plate beneath the Sunda plate, with the earthquakes taking place in a deeply subducted part of the Philippine slab. The extension is probably the result of down dip tension as the slab sinks into the mantle, with the first shock apparently triggering similar events above and below it. </p> <p>But that only whetted our appetite to know why they are occurring at such depth. While it could be stretching and elongation, the fact that they tend to cluster at specific depths was shown by Lurking in his graph and more obviously, in USGS and PHIVOLCs EQ data that we picked up from a secondary source and couple of related papers.</p> <p>That made us wonder about the potential for *structure*, because these same critical depths of clustering were found in other places, like near the Cocos plate.</p> <p>That led to set of references that have, for me, been exciting to read and ponder. For instance, Dr. Courtillot's plume and tectonics map</p> <p><a href="http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/webdav/site/GSL/shared/images/ourviews/plumes/CourtillotHotspots.bmp">http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/webdav/site/GSL/shared/images/ourviews/plumes…</a></p> <p>shows two shallow hot spots, to the east of the subducting Cocos plate, off the coast of Southern Mexico. That could be rising heated and unfolding subducted plate (pleated) that doesn't have the overriding thick continental edge to contend with, so buoyancy, heating convective forces drive it up from shallower depths. Maybe.</p> <p>Your questions and remarks are never stupid. </p> <p>Alternate theories - And then there was three.</p> <p>geology.about.com/od/platetectonics/a/nohotspots.htm</p> <p>What we are talking about here, and technical discussions of a few recent papers seem to be pointing to this conclusion, is a third theory: that thinned and subducted plate material sinks into the depths of the upper mantle, much deeper than 400 Km when it's very cold, water-laden ocean material, and is pushed deeply under continental crust, where it, amazingly, remains intact for some distance underneath the lithosphere.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210635&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5XbPlY1UgmOr4CkafVZWmj7c87PCYflg_7CMPOdem_E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210635">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210636" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283035737"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A volcano on Sumatra, named Mount Sinabung stared erupting today at 19:00 GMT (midnight local time). According to news, this is the first eruption in that volcano for 400 years.</p> <p>Here is the BBC News on this eruption.</p> <p><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11123169">www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11123169</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210636&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GAAYgEAg4jIQ9Se8cZFtIudz5o-WGssGiiAKvvfCXDo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210636">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210637" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283035861"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here is the volcano information. But that has last eruption listed as unknown.</p> <p><a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0601-08=">www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0601-08=</a></p> <p>Wiki article.</p> <p>en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinabung</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210637&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kGSu-iaYuvItLrkF1ETBFqIR22PJm6Gxao-7NDur9Ew"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210637">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210638" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283037240"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here's a link to the Jakarta Post</p> <p><a href="http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/28/agency-says-mt-sinabung-increased-activity-no-reason-worry.html">http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/28/agency-says-mt-sinabung-i…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210638&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K_zql-uoxW4EfdbM9nRIX7dIZrfGNuY3hgbFtEyFeZA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair, NoCal (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210638">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210639" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283037432"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Solfataric activity with incandescence 1912, no eruption. Last eruption listed by as 1600AD.</p> <p><a href="http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/29/volcanic-ash-clouds-blanket-medan.html">www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/29/volcanic-ash-clouds-blanket-meda…</a></p> <p>See other related articles, side bar.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210639&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bFNxWhPAjnsiTVk-HV6PHPBrMyWR5vyxwMY7dOKxpGw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210639">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210640" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283040102"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Etna popped again</p> <p><a href="http://i36.tinypic.com/301253n.jpg">http://i36.tinypic.com/301253n.jpg</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210640&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6AhGUDBbyQt8LtDAp1N___22P014ppmcfCS9ydZm5C0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Raving (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210640">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210641" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283041981"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#43 Your last flattering remarks will have me popping up again. Thank you for the incentive, Passerby.<br /> And now, lets learn what is going on in Sumatra.<br /> Thank you for the info, Jón.<br /> And thanks for the update on Etna, Raving.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210641&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6R1FYpxB3q7czRJCGtu_f8wm1x2ha0PXhfMEwUltEsg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210641">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210642" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283042344"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby</p> <p>The statement in nohotspots.htm:</p> <p><i>"Seismic imaging around some major, classic hotspots has not found clear evidence of magma conduits below the transition zone (400 to 660 km deep). At the Yellowstone hotspot, Humphreys' team found that the transition zone is cool, not hot."</i></p> <p>Seems to be contradicted by the "figure 2" image (right hand side) at all-geo.org/highlyallochthonous/2010/08/yellowstone-what-lies-beneath/</p> <p>But my real question, if you don't mind:</p> <p><i>"...That's a clue to the curving coastal plate subduction driving the curving torsion, shown in Fig 1." </i></p> <p>Then what causes the apparent curve? I would think that whatever feature that it cause would trend south ward since the southern edge would be leading the charge. That is unless it separated unevenly.</p> <p>(Note, I'm not sure where the figure 1 is at, I am assuming it's the image above the labeled "figure 2")</p> <p>Is it a shearing of the two sides of what once was a spreading center for the Farallon?</p> <p>You also mention</p> <p><i>physical and very long transverse fault system (with respect to the coast) that roughly parallels (to the south) the A-A' transect</i></p> <p>Is this a surface feature or a deeper item? If the latter, is it associated with the leftover part of was the spreading center?</p> <p>According to the 3D model on Wikipedia, the Farallon currently resides deep under the East Coast. You don't happen to think that what is under Yellowstone / Snake River is the left over western part of the Farallon? Sort of the left behind part, all folded up and shoved down into the muck.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210642&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fB5Tk9Iggw-jBV1DPZhR3v0RbDL9wwAtRCobFDy6s4E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210642">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210643" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283044947"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sinabung Simatra erupts after 400 years:<br /><a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE67S06O20100829">http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE67S06O20100829</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210643&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="YjRlZpBiHY3kXVT4vrRqItu2hOd0mczlMbvkIEHMATc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">R. de Haan (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210643">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210644" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283048072"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Reuters says 'first eruption in 400 years" -I'd guess they mean "First eruption in at least 400 years" since that's about the length of the historical record there. GVP profile says no confirmed dated eruptions (one uncertain in 1881)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210644&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kKaQiDvrtaGM7OsD37nzjxCdXqcT6NOsjMq7qrFPFwQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210644">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210645" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283053994"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Some of the very first pistures of the eruption on an Indonesian News Site: <a href="http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://www.detiknews.com/images/content/2010/08/27/10/gunung-sinabungdalam.jpg&amp;imgrefurl=http://www.detiknews.com/read/2010/08/27/203330/1429840/10/gunung-sinabung-keluarkan-asap-penduduk-kabupaten-karo-panik&amp;usg=___RDQO4ZrSEXZnOFmkuE4-X3PqYM=&amp;h=380&amp;w=285&amp;sz=14&amp;hl=de&amp;start=29&amp;zoom=0&amp;itbs=1&amp;tbnid=mVqALH2o7g-LwM:&amp;tbnh=123&amp;tbnw=92&amp;prev=/images%3Fq%3DSinabung%26start%3D21%26hl%3Dde%26sa%3DN%26gbv%3D2%26ndsp%3D21%26tbs%3Disch:1">http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://www.detiknews.com/images/cont…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210645&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ulRDWtf3OURMnQp9I09nSY6WoKyNSqzsst1dB-fXPkc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Wipf (not verified)</span> on 28 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210645">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210646" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283054503"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@42 (Renato Rio)):</p> <p>As you know I once sugested that there is a force running all those formations, and that those separate formations where taking there force from one central source of power.<br /> My theory might be glaringly wrong since I am not a geaologist, but mathematically the theory is sound and corroborates with at least some of the evidence witnessed in the simultaneus events we can all see.<br /> About my theory, the basis for my initial thought was to look for inital causes of that part of the world. Because I think we can all agree that something is lacking in the standard modell, my theory might be entirely wrong, but someone has to come up with a theory in the end to fill up the missing parts sooner or later.<br /> And let me remind you that almost all of todays theoris are just theoris. One should always challenge them now and then, even if it is done from someone who is wildly out of his field of expertise. In my case my knowledge of geology is to low (but I do have some and gaining more every day), but my knowledge in physics in general and fluid dynamics in particular is good. If I ever gain enough knowledge about geology I will probably sumarize it into a paper, mostly out of the math being really neat.</p> <p>What I really would like, is to see an original thought from Passerby on the subject.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210646&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Mqgpzu8GDYg45sWG3UDA8kTIh-3YeNcIate1W4glz0w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210646">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210647" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283054617"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sinabung in North Sumatra is quite close to Toba. It's located close to the town of Berastagi. There is an adjacent Volcano - Sibayak which overshadows the township itself. The two Volcanos maybe plumbing related. Berastagi is an important vegetable and fruit growing area. Its located on a plateau around 1000 metres above sea level - The temperature there is very pleasant.<br /> Here are some images.</p> <p>This is Sinabung. Note that there have been sulpheric emissions for hundreds of years.</p> <p><a href="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4936892099_f79266dfc5.jpg">http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4936892099_f79266dfc5.jpg</a></p> <p><a href="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4937478340_2a29d57077.jpg">http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4937478340_2a29d57077.jpg</a></p> <p>Here's its sister Sibayak</p> <p><a href="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4120/4937478424_6ceb00b489_b.jpg">http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4120/4937478424_6ceb00b489_b.jpg</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210647&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-el_1TnlLQhtJmNv-NfGaPQra2pDCrFexbtIAkBr0RU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Les Francis (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210647">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210648" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283058291"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>More about Sinabung.</p> <p><a href="http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-08/29/c_13467877.htm">http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-08/29/c_13467877.htm</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210648&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vkWSoJFEFjqo2KfNGJzbA29Y12nVl6GWqS19sijX-Lk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Perry (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210648">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210649" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283068920"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Good morning, evening, night. Here's more info on Mt. Sinabung. There are more links at the bottom of the story. If you go to the front page of the post, there's a dawn/dusk pic of the eruption that looks pretty impressive.</p> <p><a href="http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/29/a-safer-place.html">www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/29/a-safer-place.html</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210649&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1mWxna4tMtkh7-VqKNK88xqTq3BzWf0zxerk-p0Y430"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210649">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210650" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283069737"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Video of Mt. Sinabung</p> <p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jx_ZQ9848g&amp;feature=player_embedded#">www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jx_ZQ9848g&amp;feature=player_embedded#</a>!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210650&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yWLGnQ14SupVoY94QW0wliC-yQnKeyUkGh0Lzqd_Ojs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210650">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210651" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283071888"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#52 @Carl on Iceland:<br /> It's not only the swarms recurrence, but also tremor plots and GPS measurements that show parallel fluctuations, even though kept within standard levels. I can't tell what causes these fluctuations, but just speculate if there could be some sort of common source for them all. Looking forward to hear more from you.<br /> @everyone on Sinabung: Another next VE3 candidate? After 400 years you don't know what to expect. According to linked news there have already been two deaths. Worrisome.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210651&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5l7VAI_1-lDGUpAJ7Ls51b2IZpQO_Ayl-Nm9pR81W2U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210651">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="148" id="comment-2210652" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283073522"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Some news on Sinabung: </p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/new_eruption_at_sinabung_in_in.php">http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/new_eruption_at_sinabung_in_i…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210652&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XqVlcwqIGVofh7zx1qFMyG0FWSEbj6qMaBJJye-2JKU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210652">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/eklemetti"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/eklemetti" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210653" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283106513"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For anyone interested in the 1883 Krakatau eruption the fascinating Royal Society report from 1888 is downloadable (PDF 27.2 Mb):</p> <p><a href="http://ia311311.us.archive.org/1/items/eruptionkrakato00whipgoog/eruptionkrakato00whipgoog.pdf">http://ia311311.us.archive.org/1/items/eruptionkrakato00whipgoog/erupti…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210653&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GnRSpVrC9TzQrWhVVx9VoniNV1Xn4-UmyoXIcKd2O2I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210653">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210654" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290359774"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I love this game, this is a great article bring back some memory.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210654&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8nqwD_Y4K9qXDBphTDQiW7pA1xiMaFVXpGaJvaeIefc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://concernedseniors.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Georgie Guinto (not verified)</a> on 21 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210654">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210655" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290625228"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I saw something about this topic on TV last night. Nice post.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210655&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1JHedinD1IWigzlNcV4w6e3J2WxohUymQUBqts_dBKo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://igrice2besplatne.bravejournal.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Joseph Perry (not verified)</a> on 24 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210655">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210656" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292106843"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Amazing content. Will need a bit of time to think about your points=)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210656&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="JzDlPLa3M8K7699vyps3LfLrWTZcmSSXsU4UnKOlnis"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://srthjsryj.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnson Eardley (not verified)</a> on 11 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210656">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210657" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292463697"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In business, never each one that comes through your doorwill emerge as a buyer. It's a numbers amusement and quite a couple of individuals will say 'no'. Nonetheless, the more rejections you go after and obtain, the more money you earn. That concept is true to each and every step referred to as being successful in life--not just Community marketing.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210657&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Dq5xqH5WybfYTq9RLxwdbAmnxOWpFzV8sYKA51VACQQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://cindyjohnson9.livejournal.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leadnetpro (not verified)</a> on 15 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210657">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210658" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292534954"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for this type of statement. I particularly favored reading it and ought to share it with individuals.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210658&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9JcuAUIfNZwpYYXhJTI7efksgbn6Co4ZU36ptLVR_f4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ihbgcup.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Coralee Addo (not verified)</a> on 16 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210658">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210659" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292892594"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>been following your blog for some days now and i should say i am starting to like your post. and now how do i subscribe to your blog?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210659&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0XARis2KjYK_yM4pchFr9f8k1Y7x_YI5svifZMYTiww"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://topfashiongirl123.homepage.ph/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Geralyn Scelzo (not verified)</a> on 20 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210659">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/27/sorry-about-the-lack-of%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 27 Aug 2010 11:43:41 +0000 eklemetti 104361 at https://scienceblogs.com Tuesday Tidbits: Eyjafjallajökull, Yasur, mud on Mars and more https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/24/tuesday-tidbits-2 <span>Tuesday Tidbits: Eyjafjallajökull, Yasur, mud on Mars and more</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Finally, a chance to catch up a bit ... !</p> <p><img src="http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/en/fileadmin/photos/vanuatu/yasur_0410/yasur_i29801.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Yasur erupting in May of 2010.</em></p> <p>Some news from the world of volcanoes:</p> <ul><li>The <em>BBC</em> has a series of videos one the fallout from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption - including <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11038232" target="_blank">a look at the area around the volcano</a> and <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11050737" target="_blank">how the economy has been affected</a> by the eruption. However, things seem pretty quiet at the summit of the Eyjafjallajökull summit where snow can begun to settle without melting - and the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/17/world/europe/17briefs-Volcano.html" target="_blank">Icelandic Met Office appears to think</a> that the <a href="http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/travel/2012635499_webicelandvolcano16.html" target="_blank">eruption is more or less (but not officially) over</a>. And take this press release as you will, but a recent study by a UK moving company (UniBaggage.com) claims that parents moving their children off to university each fall <a href="http://www.prlog.org/10879379-uk-uni-parents-emit-twice-as-much-co2-as-ash-cloud-volcano.html" target="_blank">release twice as much CO<sub>2</sub></a> than the Eyjafjallajökull eruption.</li> <li>Most people think of <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE67H36I20100818" target="_blank">volcanoes being bad for the economy</a>, but in places like Vanuatu, volcanoes are vital to the local economy, thanks to a consistently active volcano. <a href="http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jq_pVXqCUOOGcJLHjmxdank_TzFQ" target="_blank">Yasur on Tanna Island</a> is visited by tourists regularly - along with providing a source for fertile soil. The description of the visits are a bit, well, harrowing, but those are the risks if you're going to <a href="http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100821/TRAVEL/708209885/1259/LIFE" target="_blank">visit an erupting volcano</a>.</li> <li>There were some great new shots from space from the <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/" target="_blank">NASA Earth Observatory</a> of two active volcanoes. The first is<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=45388" target="_blank"> an image of the intensified activity at Sakurajima</a> in Japan - complete with an impressive ash plume and <strike>a pyroclastic flow heading to the south</strike> steam-and-ash plume from a lower vent on the south flank. The second is an image of the <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=45265" target="_blank">new dome complex on Chaiten</a> in Chile - and it looks pretty calm compared to when it started back in 2008 (when this blog got its start too). However, this is still a lot of the area covered with what looks like fresh ash, so the domes continue to intermittently coat the area with ash.</li> <li>There was also <a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38775996/ns/technology_and_science-space/" target="_blank">an article on <em>MSNBC</em></a> that wasn't about magmatic volcanoes, but rather <a href="http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/bcmudvol.html" target="_blank">mud volcanoes</a> ... on Mars no less. The region on the northern hemisphere called Acidalia Planitia appears to have a high concentration of features that look like terrestrial mud volcanoes. <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&amp;_udi=B6WGF-4YRPDX5-3&amp;_user=10&amp;_coverDate=08%2F31%2F2010&amp;_rdoc=13&amp;_fmt=high&amp;_orig=browse&amp;_srch=doc-info(%23toc%236821%232010%23997919997%232206762%23FLA%23display%23Volume)&amp;_cdi=6821&amp;_sort=d&amp;_docanchor=&amp;_ct=38&amp;_acct=C000050221&amp;_version=1&amp;_urlVersion=0&amp;_userid=10&amp;md5=4fe69161414c9c9ab3e4582fd1b37ea9" target="_blank">The article in <em>Icarus</em></a> suggests that there are potentially 40,000 mud volcanoes in the area that likely formed in <a href="http://pweb.jps.net/~tgangale/mars/mst/GeologicTimeScales.htm" target="_blank">early Amazonian times</a> on Mars (over 1 billion years ago).</li> </ul></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Mon, 08/23/2010 - 22:12</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chaiten" hreflang="en">Chaiten</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chile" hreflang="en">Chile</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/extraterrestial-volcanism" hreflang="en">extraterrestial volcanism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eyjafjallajapkull" hreflang="en">Eyjafjallajökull</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/iceland" hreflang="en">Iceland</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/japan-1" hreflang="en">japan</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mars-0" hreflang="en">Mars</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mud-volcano" hreflang="en">mud volcano</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa-earth-observatory" hreflang="en">NASA Earth Observatory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/remote-sensing" hreflang="en">remote sensing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sakurajima" hreflang="en">Sakurajima</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-images" hreflang="en">Satellite images</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vanuatu" hreflang="en">Vanuatu</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-society" hreflang="en">volcanoes and society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/yasur" hreflang="en">Yasur</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/earth-observatory" hreflang="en">earth observatory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pyroclastic-flow" hreflang="en">pyroclastic flow</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rhyolite" hreflang="en">rhyolite</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-image" hreflang="en">satellite image</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-tourism" hreflang="en">volcano tourism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/remote-sensing" hreflang="en">remote sensing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-society" hreflang="en">volcanoes and society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210419" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282629393"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The pic of Sakurajima may be mislabeled. The ash plume looks like it is emerging from the main crater while the so-called "pyroclastic flow" looks to me like steam emerging from the smaller Showa crater. That is my impression anyway.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210419&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hMkdWFGuGP8uLmLGELGlNrfcw_um47t7xwAegBK_9LE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike lyvers (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210419">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210420" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282685813"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It's interesting the fact that Chaitén is covered by snow, indicating a cooling of the dome. In the OVDAS site, Caldera camera (frozen for a long time), you can see the base of the dome with snow.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210420&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GqtUwsm2WPUGhcolpZbcsycSSNVZrnsqy5zBhi4ooXA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Guillermo (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210420">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210421" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282687563"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Guillermo<br /> Before the eruption, did Chaitén show a perennial icecap, or it just forms in winter (when not erupting)? Could melting mean an eruption at sight?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210421&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cSYTPmw_PFLVifZ86q1Yakepe1ERPQWcGjd7e1JJzNw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210421">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210422" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282688010"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MÃla's cams showing a significant steam plume for the first time in days. Could that be related to recent EQ activity?<br /> Wednesday<br /> 25.08.201003:32:2163.694-19.5581.1 km2.190.014.2 km WNW of Básar<br /> Wednesday<br /> 25.08.201003:32:2063.639-19.3661.1 km1.690.025.7 km W of Goðabunga</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210422&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gRqW8GD8BGr8MD_4Fqhz5816rYJ8OSROtcmz-dHu6lw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210422">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210423" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282690086"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>just checked the Ãórólfsfelli cams. FLIR is back in action, and yes there is a steam plume again.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210423&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BFQMj3Kou9kK6sLjR7pu5M45VLrXdyxdUWBAzWOnPGw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alastair (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210423">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210424" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282690461"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Alastair:<br /> FLIR is back, I forgot to mention. Have you tried the cam from Ãorvaldseyri? Contrast is now too sharp, but earlier you could neatly see the rising plume. Maybe the crater lake is boiling now.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210424&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xUI7hJBXtp-WxdSWKMhOCbr0_EAnPLxLlLaRIpEQUFU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210424">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210425" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282700419"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>All this recurring steaming would suggest (to me anyway) that water is not just sitting in the crater bowl but penetrates deeper and deeper into the mountain. Her next eruption could prove to be, erm..., "interesting".</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210425&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="omIkeUvUvh39l7lxmh-BdXzrvMoYybKDKsdKAp8UJqk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Henrik, Swe (not verified)</span> on 24 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210425">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210426" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282713203"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello </p> <p>After the strong earthquakes in recent days, the Galeras volcano erupted this morning in Columbia.</p> <p><a href="http://intranet.ingeominas.gov.co/pasto/P%C3%A1gina_Principal">http://intranet.ingeominas.gov.co/pasto/P%C3%A1gina_Principal</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210426&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RLX-R3qQsXSwccUbrEZLge4qVnyU-Gt4lj6vq1btfAw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sherine, France (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210426">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210427" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282714359"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks, @Sherine:<br /> I got this from El tiempo, Colombia:<br /> "The eruptive event occurred in the early hours of Wednesday, after which the alert level was raised from orange to red indicating that another eruption could be recorded in minutes, therefore she reiterated the call for residents to attend to shelters. According to Dr. Martha Calvache, deputy director of Ingeominas, the incident happened around 4:00 am and the organization and the state is monitoring the volcano.<br /> The signal of the Galeras has lasted for nearly an hour, one of the largest that have occurred in the area, as added Calvache."<br /><a href="http://www.eltiempo.com">www.eltiempo.com</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210427&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="__WQlbUIt_oYg8a_nAZFE3sTIzX0wWI-SJOmhQAxIoM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210427">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210428" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282714874"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>They say that although weather conditions at the site are good, yet they don't know the kind of material extruded from the volcano.<br /><a href="http://www.elespectador.com">www.elespectador.com</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210428&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="g-fRYjsPD9_KE1xcpxGKSNkbCgSNpV9jyBHaEKWpSr4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210428">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210429" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282715384"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#8 Link for the Galeras web cam:<br /><a href="http://intranet.ingeominas.gov.co/pasto/Imagen_en_l%C3%ADnea">http://intranet.ingeominas.gov.co/pasto/Imagen_en_l%C3%ADnea</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210429&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lbsBJXkfUy5OMo7gFsPPFAxcR4WddRVhK3QnZsBWuFE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210429">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210430" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282717319"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks, @Renato for the link</p> <p>I found another interesting link</p> <p><a href="http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/galeras-e.html">http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/galeras-e.html</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/galeras-e.html">http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/galeras-e.html</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210430&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tSM1knRjZdcAMNsXqvPrKIY41IOFk-EsyfeLWkVJHOA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sherine, France (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210430">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210431" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282718782"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I get the feeling that Galeras could turn nasty since the residents flat out refuse to go to shelters with the words "nothing will ever happen"...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210431&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RS12Z4WT9eE53H_qWYKPxTk2r4IY5HWMr0hqE8DO0CA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210431">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210432" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282719404"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik just opened a thread for Galeras. I'll paste your comments over there.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210432&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MxH1ao3atG1UmurImvLFwj6AvHJO3eGN7ZQ4gd0Bdsc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210432">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210433" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282756493"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Light from the moon makes the steam plume visible during the night tonight.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210433&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="TPKQiI1nrlI1Pt5CidaEXvnubsCy91pX2hdWbolGl-4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 25 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210433">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210434" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282816230"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>April 18 photos of Eyja. I found while looking for photos of glacier Ok. The photographer just happened to be on the spot, shooting clothing company ads. Is the second photo (looking down into the snow-coated cone) a photo of Eyja.?<br /><a href="http://www.partytow.com/e/?p=7922">http://www.partytow.com/e/?p=7922</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210434&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yVrb5I4Rf22A277sQF_2kVpoTu-kK4h4U8bmeyDEOLs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jane (not verified)</span> on 26 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210434">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210435" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282818553"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello<br /> Last news from Galeras, but I do not see this report on the site Ingeominas :<br /> August 26th, 2010<br /> This morning the alert-level was reduced to ORANGE.<br /> Seismic activity went on for about 12 hours after the eruptive at 4 AM local time, but intensity<br /> was redused during the day. However, another seismic event happended again late afternoon, similar<br /> to the one at 4 AM. Ashfall is reported within 30 km from the crater, and there are possiblilities<br /> that a new crater has opened up. Up to 3.000 tonns sulfur dioxide up to 400m above the top was partly<br /> visible duringthe day. Of the 8.000 inhabitants to be evacuated, most of them refuse to live their homes<br /> so far. Magma is still floating near the opening, and therefore reason to be prepared for new intensity.<br /> Source : <a href="http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/galeras-e.html">http://www.vulkaner.no/v/volcan/galeras-e.html</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210435&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="VrVsJGwkWJSh0nz-0f_WgCPh3ax4NxF6BuewK_jXsQM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sherine, France (not verified)</span> on 26 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210435">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210436" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282865148"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I read this at RÃV News, but not quite sure of what it means:<br /> "New cracks were found in some of Sprengisandur up, but they are believed to have formed in the spring. Páll Einarsson, mineral physicists believe cracked delayed by attacks by the eruption under Vatnajökull Gjálp in 1996. " (Google translated)<br /><a href="http://www.ruv.is/frettaskyringar/innlendar-frettir/nyjar-sprungur-a-sprengisandi">http://www.ruv.is/frettaskyringar/innlendar-frettir/nyjar-sprungur-a-sp…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210436&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RXd7DeSOSoFGy7ixRwGAko6_LL9fRLIFhA9i-8I89lE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 26 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210436">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210437" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282902592"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Two of the Mila cams are down now, so I went exploring and found that Weather Underground has a satellite view that might be useful, if Eyja. becomes active again. I had to zoom and drag the map to find the glacier with Eyja.<br /><a href="http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=64.12999725&amp;lon=-21.89999962&amp;zoom=10&amp;pin=Reykjavik%2c%20Iceland">http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=64.12999725&amp;lon=-21.89999962…</a></p> <p>Below the map is a slider that will give you animation if moved to the right, for more frames. Unfortunately, I didn't think of using this site during the eruption, and I'm not sure how useful it would be. I do use the radar images when a storm is predicted for my location, to see how fast it's approaching. The image refreshes perhaps twice an hour.</p> <p>Looking at Wunderground for Catania Italy, I can see many small craters after zooming and dragging to Mt. Etna. Some craters have black around them (ash?).<br /><a href="http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=37.47000122&amp;lon=15.05000019&amp;zoom=10&amp;pin=Catania%2c%20Italy">http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=37.47000122&amp;lon=15.05000019&amp;…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210437&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AjJBCOdySmosFFZ2RTk6luLBetZCp7E-QIlwxjj1XiY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jane (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210437">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210438" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282909941"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik: Just saw the Nasa image of Chaiten, too bad the Chilean webcam has been inoperative since 6/20. I started reading about volcanoes when your blog started (and Chaiten erupted). Congrats on the great work.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210438&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Nt5tMdFjxCuP5pAqxmH1hhppSyzMyhGUMhurDlIGFRM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Orlando (not verified)</span> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210438">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210439" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291196248"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I love your site lol</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210439&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nvUzplSALGoToMiN8DJFakLcVcZSNi5a9YicgK6D6F0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lauren (not verified)</span> on 01 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210439">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/24/tuesday-tidbits-2%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Tue, 24 Aug 2010 02:12:24 +0000 eklemetti 104357 at https://scienceblogs.com Etna Week (Part 3) - Etna's Volcanic Hazards https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/20/etna-week-part-3-etnas-volca <span>Etna Week (Part 3) - Etna&#039;s Volcanic Hazards</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The final part of Etna Week, brought to us by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/mount_etna_-_brief_anatomy_of.php">Part 1</a> and <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/mt_etna_-_the_current_dynamics.php">Part 2</a> as well!</p> <p><strong>Etna Volcanic hazards</strong><br /> By guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke.</p> <p>Etna is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth, and a population of nearly one million people dwell on its flanks, many in areas that have been repeatedly invaded by lava flows during the historical period. A few villages have been constructed very close to the vents of eruptions only a few hundred years old. </p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-db0e5663b08d95dfc8e01c80ce464948-EtnaP3-1.jpg" alt="i-db0e5663b08d95dfc8e01c80ce464948-EtnaP3-1.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-1623739add892d1db0c885cf5cd6f076-EtnaP3-1b.jpg" alt="i-1623739add892d1db0c885cf5cd6f076-EtnaP3-1b.jpg" /><br /><em>Top: Residential areas surrounding numerous pyroclastic cones on the lower southeast flank of Etna, seen from Monte Arso, a cone that erupted in the late Middle Ages looking toward the metropolitan areas of Acireale and Catania. The cones seen in this image are all prehistoric but just outside the field of view are a few cones that erupted during the past 2000 years. Photo taken in 2000 by Boris Behncke. Bottom: A volcanologist's dream and nightmare - one day, a new crater will open and grow into a new cone in our backyard, like shown in this apocalyptic photomontage (the big cone formed during the 2001 south flank eruption projected onto a photograph of my hometown Trecastagni on the southeast flank of Etna). Both original photos by Boris Behncke</em></p> <p>As mentioned before, few people are known to have lost their lives due to eruptions of Etna. During the last century, three deadly incidents are known, in 1929 (two deaths), 1979 (nine deaths), and 1987 (two deaths); in all cases the victims were visitors to the summit crater who were surprised by sudden steam-blast (phreatic) explosions. Amazingly, many people have escaped unscathed during a number of much more violent explosive magmatic eruptions, which, however, always showed a conspicuous buildup for some time before culminating. In contrast, phreatic explosions occur virtually without warning, as has been tragically demonstrated at <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1501-08=" target="_blank">Galeras</a> volcano (Colombia) in 1993, when nine people, including six volcanologists, were surprised and killed by a relatively small explosion - they happened to be near the very crater (some were even within the crater taking gas samples). [For further detail on the Galeras incident, there are two rather gripping and contrasting stories, <a href="http://books.google.it/books?id=mnNR3eqgHQkC&amp;dq=surviving+galeras&amp;source=bn&amp;hl=it&amp;ei=QMNaTOewNtaksQbdyL2oAQ&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=book-thumbnail&amp;resnum=4&amp;ved=0CDEQ6wEwAw" target="_blank">"Surviving Galeras</a>" written by one of the survivors, Stan Williams (in collaboration with Fen Montaigne), and "<a href="http://books.google.it/books?id=VqCbGwAACAAJ&amp;dq=no+apparent+danger&amp;hl=it&amp;ei=KMpaTOGZFMuFsAaW2sGZAQ&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=book-thumbnail&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CC0Q6wEwAA" target="_blank">No Apparent Danger</a>" by former-geologist-turned-into-reporter Victoria Bruce'. I recommend to read Williams first and then Bruce, after which you may be having some sort of a balanced view of things.]</p> <p>Volcanic hazards at Etna are: (1) lava flows, (2) tephra falls (and volcanic ash plumes endangering air traffic), (3) earthquakes related to eruptive activity and magma movement, (4) volcanic sector collapse, (5) tsunami, (6) pyroclastic flows.</p> <p>Lava flows are by far the most common hazard at Etna. About half of Etna's historically recorded eruptions have caused damage to human property due to lava flow invasion. In most cases the losses have been cultivated land, but on a number of occasions buildings have been destroyed. More rarely have population centers been impacted and partly or completely destroyed - during the past 400 years this has happened only three times, in 1651-1653, 1669, and 1928. </p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-3fc8cec960f0c79b632ab0df15a1298f-EtnaP3-2a.jpg" alt="i-3fc8cec960f0c79b632ab0df15a1298f-EtnaP3-2a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-7a76c79344b855d18bae22d06d2746c6-EtnaP3-2b.jpg" alt="i-7a76c79344b855d18bae22d06d2746c6-EtnaP3-2b.jpg" /><br /><em>Etna eating towns and villages - luckily this happens quite rarely. Top image is a reproduction of a fresco exposed in the sacristy of the cathedral of Catania, which neatly shows the erupting vent (Monti Rossi) low on the south flank of Etna and the lava flow being diverted around the city of Catania by its city walls; people can furthermore be seen fleeing on boats, others holding processions, and a few housewives hanging their laundry next to the hot lava to make it dry faster.</em></p> <p>In a recent study, Behncke et al. (2005) for the first time tried to quantify the risk posed by lava flows, diving the Etnean area into six different zones of increasing hazard, from the coastal areas to Etna's summit. This work revealed a moderately high risk of lava flow invasion in a densely populated area on the southeast flank of Etna, including Trecastagni where I and my family are living. However, such hazard zonation is of relatively limited use for land use planners and civil defense, since the boundaries of different hazard zones are relatively vague and do not reflect the morphological variations of the terrain on a scale of a few tens to a few hundreds of meters.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-8a4b7a59b47dce33aa838e01689a11ce-EtnaP3-3a.jpg" alt="i-8a4b7a59b47dce33aa838e01689a11ce-EtnaP3-3a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-1bd69dbb55e7f5ee90b0e0c1b1766cdf-EtnaP3-3b.jpg" alt="i-1bd69dbb55e7f5ee90b0e0c1b1766cdf-EtnaP3-3b.jpg" /><br /><em>Mapping the lava flow hazard at Etna. Top image shows the rough subdivision by Behncke et al. (2005) into six hazard zones, bottom image renders a much refined impression of the vulnerability to lava flow invasion based on the SCIARA lava flow simulation model (Crisci et al., 2010).</em></p> <p>A much more sophisticated effort was thus launched in recent years, which involved several groups of scientists from various universities in Italy and abroad, and the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. I participated in some of this work, and the results are encouraging. The main means of defining the hazard from lava flow invasion, and fine-tuning the hazard zonation and the vulnerability of the Etnean area at very high resolution, is computer simulation of lava flows. Different models have been applied at Etna for the simulation of lava flows, which are described in much detail in publications by Crisci et al. (2010), Favalli et al. (2009), and Herault et al. (2009).</p> <p>It is now possible to recognize those areas that would be impacted first - obviously those lying in morphologically low areas - and where to concentrate rescue efforts and salvage operations once the location of an imminent or starting eruption is known. The tens of thousands of computer simulations carried out during the project have not only served to produce very detailed hazard maps for Etna, they also produced virtually all possible eruption (lava flow) scenarios for any location on this volcano. These scenarios can be extracted with a few mouse clicks on demand, so that simulating new scenarios causing loss of precious time will not be necessary.</p> <p>The risk of damage and disruptions caused by tephra fall has been seriously underestimated at Etna until recently, mainly due to the (false) notion of Etna being a non-explosive volcano. During the about 150 episodes of lava fountaining during the 1995-2001 "Millennium Fireworks" at the summit craters, heavy showers of ash and scoria (very porous, black, centimeter-sized fragments of lava) occurred frequently on the flanks of Etna, causing damage to crops, and sometimes breaking car windshields and disrupting road traffic. During one of these episodes, on 26 April 2000, a passenger airplane starting from Catania airport with more than 100 passengers on board encountered the tephra plume and falling scoria cracked its windshield, whereupon the airplane had to return for an emergency landing in Catania. Since that incident, air traffic is severely restricted during explosive eruptions at Etna.</p> <p>This became a particularly biting issue during the prolonged ash falls from the 2001 and 2002-2003 flank eruptions, and again during the 2006 summit eruption. For periods of days to weeks, the airport of Catania remained closed, sometimes even the airport of Reggio Calabria, on the Italian mainland about 70 km northeast of Etna, had to be closed as well. For this reason, people in Sicily were not particularly shocked when Iceland's Eyjafjalljökull brought all air traffic in Europe to a grinding halt in the spring of 2010 for a few days, including northern Italy.</p> <p>The revelation that ash-producing flank eruptions are far more common at Etna than previously thought indicates that the population around Etna and people travelling from and to Sicily in airplanes will experience further disruptions due to ash falls about once every 10-20 years. Obviously, tephra falls will be locally devastating if a flank eruption occurs close to the populated areas, as in 1669. A similar event would bury the villages to the east and southeast - including Pedara, my home town Trecastagni, Mascalucia, Tremestieri, and a few more - under up to several meters of tephra. In this moment, I know of no preparations for such a case, and educating the public (administrators and inhabitants) to create an awareness of this and other hazards is overdue.</p> <p>Earthquakes accompanying the movement of magma or caused by magma-induced flank displacement are frequent on the eastern, southeastern, and southern flanks of Etna, and often cause significant material damage and occasionally kill people. Such events cannot be predicted, and prevention such as earthquake-resistant construction is essential. Building codes are applied for new constructions since the 1980s, but an amazing quantity of residential buildings as well as hospitals and school buildings were constructed during the 1960s to 1980s without applying any codes, so that a tremendous number of such buildings are vulnerable. This is an issue of unimaginable proportions, and extends far beyond Etna's magma-related seismic activity, because all of eastern Sicily is a high-risk seismic zone due to the presence of several major regional tectonic fault systems, and a number of large population centers such as Catania and Messina lie in this area, having a building stock of which maybe 20 per cent would resist (not collapse) during a major earthquake.</p> <p>Volcanic sector collapse is known to have occurred at least once during the history of Etna, about 9000 years ago, forming the Valle del Bove. This event is believed by some researchers to have caused a massive tsunami, which ravaged the coasts around the eastern Mediterranean (Pareschi et al., 2006). Although the flanks of Etna continue to be severely affected by instability, the risk of a major sector collapse and related tsunami is currently considered low.</p> <p>Pyroclastic flows are a fairly new discovery at Etna, although this volcano has proved more inventive in different mechanisms to generate such flows than any other volcano. I have had the doubtful privilege to witness small pyroclastic flows in the summit area of Etna on two occasions, in 1999 and 2006, and at very close range (less than 1 km), and a few colleagues have made similar experiences. These flows were showing nearly all the characteristics of pyroclastic flows on other, generally more explosive volcanoes, but were - luckily - very small and some apparently were much cooler than their more common counterparts.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-5f0e3f29032fac83fbf13c9f0bd374bd-EtnaP3-34.jpg" alt="i-5f0e3f29032fac83fbf13c9f0bd374bd-EtnaP3-34.jpg" /><br /><em>Pyroclastic flow caused by the collapse of an oblique eruption column from the Southeast Crater, on 16 April 2000. Note the numerous people near the building in the left foreground, immediately after this photo was taken they fled downslope, and no one was touched by the flow. Note the large pyroclastic fragments in the air above the pyroclastic flow. Building is Torre del Filosofo, which was buried under tephra during the flank eruption of 2002-2003. Photo courtesy of Jean-Claude Tanguy, published in Behncke (2009).</em></p> <p>During the past 25 years, small pyroclastic flows have occurred on at least 10 occasions in the summit area and on the upper flanks of Etna. A few were caused by collapse of eruption columns, which is one of the most common mechanisms of pyroclastic flows worldwide. A fine example of this type occurred on 16 April 2000 at the Southeast Crater, when a heavily charged pyroclastic jet shot out obliquely from an opening flank vent, the heavy downpour of gas-charged fragments developing into a pyroclastic flow that passed a few hundred meters from dozens of spectators, luckily without reaching any of them. Similar events occurred in 1986 at the Northeast Crater, repeatedly during the numerous lava fountaining episodes from the Southeast Crater in 2000 (and possibly also during similar events in early 1999), and more recently, on 10 May 2008 and on 8 April 2010.</p> <p>A very different scenario was the one we encountered on 25 October 1999, during the one-month-long eruption that filled the Bocca Nuova to overflowing (Behncke et al., 2003). On that day, magma pushing through hot, though largely solid material filling the crater, uplifted a portion of that material, raising it like a lava dome and thrust it over the crater rim onto the steep outer flank of the central summit cone. The flank of this dome-like mass steepened, becoming unstable and collapsing like the flanks of a growing silicic lava dome, much the same way as the lava domes of Soufrière Hills on Montserrat or Merapi in Indonesia. The collapsing masses of hot, gas-charged rock transformed into small pyroclastic flows that traveled at a speed of about 70 km per hour, and some of us were just a few hundred meters away from these flows.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-828a64389505a4143e3926342121137d-EtnaP3-5a.jpg" alt="i-828a64389505a4143e3926342121137d-EtnaP3-5a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-cda62c319cd3e7d3440ce4a07e4a7ee7-EtnaP3-5b.jpg" alt="i-cda62c319cd3e7d3440ce4a07e4a7ee7-EtnaP3-5b.jpg" /><br /><em>Ground and aerial views of the small pyroclastic flows that formed during the Bocca Nuova eruption on 25 October 1999. These flows were generated by the collapse of a mass of hot lava, which was pushed from inside the crater over its western rim. Note the vigorous Hawaiian-style lava fountains in both images. Photos by Marco Fulle (top) and Marco Neri (bottom)</em></p> <p>The most impressive pyroclastic flows seen in recent years at Etna were those of November 2006, and they were also the most enigmatic in terms of the mechanisms which generated them. On 16 November, during one of many eruptive episodes at the Southeast Crater between July and December 2006, lava issuing from the summit of the cone interacted explosively with wet, hydrothermally altered rocks into which it was eroding, causing numerous small and two larger (up to 1.5 km long) pyroclastic flows (Behncke et al., 2008). Different interpretations of the causes of the larger flows were proposed by Norini et al. (2009) and Ferlito et al. (2010), the earlier proposing a purely gravitationally induced collapse of the cone (the pyroclastic flow was in fact described as a debris avalanche by Norini et al., 2009), the latter envisaging a sudden decompression of shallow magma when the cone's flank collapsed. These scenarios fail to take into account that removal of a significant portion of the cone was not an instantaneous event but occurred over more than 6 hours at a rather slow speed, a process that I and numerous colleagues had observed since early on that day. But whatever the details of the causes, the pyroclastic flows were large enough to engulf people had they travelled southward rather than southeastward. The temperature was probably low, because plastic-coated wooden signs placed along a tourist path had not suffered any heat effects, but the mechanical impact might have been deadly for any living being in the path of the pyroclastic flows.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-fb6ecefc562d9f1f662ea3212c5e576c-EtnaP3-6.jpg" alt="i-fb6ecefc562d9f1f662ea3212c5e576c-EtnaP3-6.jpg" /><br /><em>Dramatic sequence of photos showing development of a large pyroclastic flow from the southeastern base of the Southeast Crater cone on 16 November 2006, photographed from about 1.5 km to the south. The first photo (upper left) shows the initial explosive jets that generated the flow, consisting entirely of ash, blocks, and water vapor, but little incandescent material. The abundance of water vapor indicates involvement of a large volume of wet, hydrothermal-fluid-soaked rock, which mixed and interacted explosively with hot lava flows. Building visible in the first three frames is what remains of Torre del Filosofo, largely buried under 2002-2003 tephra. Photos courtesy of M. La Rosa</em></p> <p>Similar pyroclastic flows occurred on 24 November and were again observed at close range by a geologist (Robin Campion from Belgium), but no study of the deposits and on the triggering mechanisms was carried out in this case.</p> <p>Finally, a fourth mechanism producing pyroclastic flows was discovered during an episode of lava fountaining and emission of voluminous, fast-moving lava flows from the Southeast Crater on 29 March 2007. In this case, a large lava flow encountered deep snow on a steep slope, and apparently disintegrated as snow melted and failed under the moving lava; this caused powerful explosions which in turn produced pyroclastic flows and mudflows that advanced for about 1 km downslope into uninhabited areas.</p> <p>As far as can be understood from current knowledge, pyroclastic flows as those observed in the past few decades are a severe hazard for visitors to the summit area, but do not threaten the lives and property of the people living on the slopes of Etna. However, larger pyroclastic flows were generated during the cataclysmic eruptions at the end of the Ellittico stage about 15,000 years ago, and during the 122 B.C. Plinian eruption. Chances of an Ellittico-style event are extremely remote, because the magma composition is different today, but an event like in 122 B.C. cannot be fully excluded to occur even in the short term.</p> <p>Much, much more could be told about Etna - such as the relationship of the volcano with the people who live next to it, and the various monitoring techniques now being applied by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia of Catania, as well as a number of groundbreaking research efforts. It would be well worth to indicate how Etna can be discovered by volcano and nature lovers without beating the common tourist paths. All this may come in a future guest blog - and, obviously, one day there will be a new eruption to inform you of. We are all waiting for it - hoping that we will still have a peaceful summer and maybe a peaceful Christmas, and a peaceful next year. One day time will run out, and be certain that you'll receive the news firsthand here on this blog.</p> <p><strong>References</strong><br /> Acocella, V., Behncke, B., Neri, M., D'Amico, S. (2003) Link between major flank slip and 2002-2003 eruption at Mt. Etna (Italy). Geophysical Research Letters, 30, 2286, doi: 10.1029/2003GL018642</p> <p>Allard, P., Behncke, B., D'Amico, S., Neri, M., Gambino, S. (2006) Mount Etna 1993-2005: Anatomy of an evolving eruptive cycle. Earth Science Reviews, 78: 85-114, doi: 10.1016/j.earscirev.2006.04.002</p> <p>Andronico, D., Branca, S., Calvari, S., Burton, M., Caltabiano, T., Corsaro, R.A., Del Carlo, P., Garfì, G., Lodato, L., Miraglia, L., Murè, F., Neri, M., Pecora, E., Pompilio, M., Salerno, G., Spampinato, L. (2004) A multi-disciplinary study of the 200203 Etna eruption: insights into a complex plumbing system. Bulletin of Volcanology, 67: 314-330, doi: 10.1007/s00445-004-0372-8</p> <p>Armienti, P., Tonarini, S., D'Orazio, M., Innocenti, F. (2004) Genesis and evolution of Mt. Etna alkaline lavas: petrological and Sr-Nd-B isotope constraints. Periodico di Mineralogia, 73: 29-52, <a href="http://tetide.geo.uniroma1.it/riviste/permin/testi/V73/2.pdf">http://tetide.geo.uniroma1.it/riviste/permin/testi/V73/2.pdf</a></p> <p>Behncke, B. (1998) Il vulcanesimo del Plateau Ibleo (Sicilia sud-orientale) negli ultimi 230 Ma. Bollettino dell'Accademia Gioenia Catania, 31 (N. 355): 39-50</p> <p>Behncke, B. (2009) Hazards from pyroclastic density currents at Mt. Etna (Italy). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 180: 148-160, doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2008.09.021</p> <p>Behncke, B., Neri, M. (2003a) Cycles and trends in the recent eruptive behaviour of Mt. Etna (Italy). Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 40: 1405-1411, doi: 10.1139/E03-052.</p> <p>Behncke, B., Neri, M. (2003b) The July-August 2001 eruption of Mt. Etna (Sicily). Bulletin of Volcanology, 65: 461-476, doi: 10.1007/s00445-003-0274-1</p> <p>Behncke, B., Neri, M., Carniel, R. (2003) An exceptional case of endogenous lava dome growth spawning pyroclastic avalanches at Mt. Etna (Italy): the 1999 Bocca Nuova eruption. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 124: 115-128, doi: 10.1016/S0377-0273(03)00072-6</p> <p>Behncke, B., Neri, M., Nagay, A. (2005) Lava flow hazard at Mount Etna (Italy): new data from a GIS-based study. In: Manga, M., Ventura, G. (Eds), Kinematics and Dynamics of Lava Flows. Geological Society of America Special Paper, 396: 189-209, doi: 10.1130/2005.2396(13)</p> <p>Behncke, B., Neri, M., Pecora, E., Zanon, V. (2006) The exceptional activity and growth of the Southeast Crater, Mount Etna (Italy), between 1996 and 2001. Bulletin of Volcanology, 69: 149-173, doi: 10.1007/s00445-006-0061-x</p> <p>Behncke, B., Calvari, S., Giammanco, S., Neri, M., Pinkerton, H. (2008) Pyroclastic density currents resulting from the interaction of basaltic magma with hydrothermally altered rock: an example from the 2006 summit eruptions of Mount Etna, Italy. Bulletin of Volcanology, 70: 1249-1268, doi: 10.1007/s00445-008-0200-7.</p> <p>Bonforte, A., Bonaccorso, A., Guglielmino, F., Palano, M., Puglisi, G. (2008) Feeding system and magma storage beneath Mt. Etna as revealed by recent inflation/deflation cycles. Journal of Geophysical Research 113, B05406. doi: 10.1029/2007JB005334</p> <p>Bonforte, A., Gambino, S., Neri, M. (2009) Intrusion of eccentric dikes: The case of the 2001 eruption and its role in the dynamics of Mt. Etna volcano. Tectonophysics, 471: 78-86, doi: 10.1016/j.tecto.2008.09.028</p> <p>Borgia, A., Ferrari, L., Pasquarè, G. (1992) Importance of gravitational spreading in the tectonic and volcanic evolution of Mt. Etna. Nature, 357, 231-235, doi: 10.1038/357231a0</p> <p>Bousquet, J.-C., Lanzafame, G. (2001) Nouvelle interprétation des fractures des éruptions latérales de l'Etna: Conséquences pour son cadre tectonique. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 172: 455-467, doi: 10.2113/172.4.455</p> <p>Branca S. (2003) Geological and geomorphologic evolution of the Etna volcano NE flank and relationships between lava flow invasions and erosional processes in the Alcantara Valley (Italy). Geomorphology, 53, 247-261, doi: 10.1016/S0169-555X(02)00315-X</p> <p>Branca, S., Del Carlo, P. (2005) Types of eruptions of Etna volcano AD 1670-2003: implications for short-term eruptive behaviour. Bulletin of Volcanology, 67: 732-742, doi: 10.1007/s00445-005-0412-z</p> <p>Branca S., Coltelli M., Groppelli G. (2004) Geological evolution of Etna volcano. In: Bonaccorso, S., Calvari, S., Coltelli, M., Del Negro, C., Falsaperla, S. (Eds) "Etna Volcano Laboratory", American Geophysical Union Geophysical Monograph, 143: 49-63.</p> <p>Calvari, S., Tanner, L.H., Groppelli, G., Norini, G. (2004) A comprehensive model for the opening of the Valle del Bove depression and hazard evaluation for the eastern flank of Etna volcano. In: Bonaccorso, S., Calvari, S., Coltelli, M., Del Negro, C., Falsaperla, S. (Eds) "Etna Volcano Laboratory", American Geophysical Union Geophysical Monograph, 143: 65-75.</p> <p>Chester, D.K., Duncan, A.M., Guest, J.E., and Kilburn, C.R.J. (1985) Mount Etna, the Anatomy of a Volcano. London, Chapman and Hall, 404 p, <a href="http://books.google.it/books?id=qS6sAAAAIAAJ&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=Mount+Etna,+the+Anatomy+of+a+Volcano&amp;hl=it&amp;ei=EK5aTIT8F-imsQbls_lq&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=result&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA">http://books.google.it/books?id=qS6sAAAAIAAJ&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=Mou…</a></p> <p>Coltelli, M., Del Carlo, P., Vezzoli, L. (1998) The discovery of a Plinian basaltic eruption of Roman age at Etna volcano, Italy. Geology, 26: 1095-1098, doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1998)0262.3.CO;2</p> <p>Coltelli, M., Del Carlo, P., Vezzoli, L. (2000) Stratigraphic constraints for explosive activity in the last 100 ka at Etna volcano, Italy. International Journal of Earth Sciences, 89: 665-677, doi: 10.1007/s005310000117</p> <p>Coltelli, M., Carlo, P., Pompilio, M., Vezzoli, L. (2005) Explosive eruption of a picrite: The 3930 BP subplinian eruption of Etna volcano (Italy). Geophysical Research Letters, 32, L23307, doi: 10.1029/2005GL024271</p> <p>Corsaro, R.A., Cristofolini, R., and Patanè, L. (1996) The 1669 eruption at Mount Etna: Chronology, petrology, and geochemistry, with inferences on the magma sources and ascent mechanisms. Bulletin of Volcanology, 58: 348-358, doi: 10.1007/s004450050144</p> <p>Corsaro, R.A., Métrich, N., Allard, P., Andronico, D., Miraglia, L., Fourmentraux, C. (2009) The 1974 flank eruption of Mount Etna: An archetype for deep dike-fed eruptions at basaltic volcanoes and a milestone in Etna's recent history. Journal of Geophysical Research 114, B07204, doi: 10.1029/2008JB006013</p> <p>Crisci, G.M., Avolio, M.V., Behncke, B., D'Ambrosio, D., Di Gregorio, S., Lupiano, V., Neri, M., Rongo, R., Spataro, W. (2010) Predicting the impact of lava flows at Mount Etna, Italy. Journal of Geophysical Research, 115, B04203, doi: 10.1029/2009JB006431</p> <p>Del Carlo, P., Pompilio, M. (2004) The relationship between volatile content and the eruptive style of basaltic magma: the Etna case. Annals of Geophysics, 47: 1423-1432, <a href="http://www.annalsofgeophysics.eu/index.php/annals/article/view/4402">http://www.annalsofgeophysics.eu/index.php/annals/article/view/4402</a></p> <p>Doglioni, C., Innocenti, F., Mariotti, G. (2001) Why Mt Etna? Terra Nova, 13: 25-31, doi: 10.1046/j.1365-3121.2001.00301.x</p> <p>Favalli, M., Tarquini, S., Fornaciai, A., Boschi, E. (2009) A new approach to risk assessment of lava flow at Mount Etna. Geology, 37: 1111-1114, doi: 10.1130/G30187A.1</p> <p>Ferlito, C., Viccaro, M., Nicotra, E., Cristofolini, R. (2010) Relationship between the flank sliding of the South East Crater (Mt. Etna, Italy) and the paroxysmal event of November 16, 2006. Bulletin of Volcanology, in press, doi: 10.1007/s00445-010-0384-5</p> <p>Gvirtzman, Z., Nur, A. (1999) The formation of Mount Etna as the consequence of slab rollback. Nature 401: 782-785, doi: 10.1038/44555</p> <p>Herault, A., Vicari, A., Ciraudo, A., Del Negro, C. (2008) Forecasting lava flow hazards during the 2006 Etna eruption: Using the MAGFLOW cellular automata model. Computers &amp; Geosciences, 35: 1050-1060, doi: 10.1016/j.cageo.2007.10.008</p> <p>Kamenetsky, V.S., Pompilio, M., Métrich, N., Sobolev, A.V., Kuzmin, D.V., Thomas, R. (2007) Arrival of extremely volatile-rich high-Mg magmas changes explosivity of Mount Etna. Geology, 35: 255-258, doi: 10.1130/G23163A.1</p> <p>Lo Giudice, E., Rasà, R. (1992) Very shallow earthquakes and brittle deformation in active volcanic areas: The etnean region as an example, Tectonophysics, 202: 257- 268, doi: 10.1016/0040-1951(92)90111-I</p> <p>Mazzarini, F., Armienti, P. (2001) Flank cones at Mount Etna volcano: Do they have a power-law distribution? Bulletin of Volcanology, 62: 420-430, doi: 10.1007/s004450000109</p> <p>Neri, M., Acocella, V., Behncke, B. (2004) The role of the Pernicana Fault System in the spreading of Mt. Etna (Italy) during the 2002-2003 eruption. Bulletin of Volcanology, 66: 417-430, doi: 10.1007/s00445-003-0322-x</p> <p>Neri, M., Acocella, V., Behncke, B., Maiolino, V., Ursino, A., Velardita, R. (2005) Contrasting triggering mechanisms of the 2001 and 2002-2003 eruptions of Mount Etna (Italy). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 144: 235- 255, doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2004.11.025</p> <p>Neri, M., Guglielmino, F., Rust, D. (2007) Flank instability on Mount Etna: Radon, radar interferometry, and geodetic data from the southwestern boundary of the unstable sector. Journal of Geophysical Research, 112, B04410, doi: 10.1029/2006JB004756</p> <p>Neri, M., Mazzarini, F., Tarquini, S., Bisson, M., Isola, I., Behncke, B., Pareschi, M.T. (2008) The changing face of Mount Etna's summit area documented with Lidar technology. Geophysical Research Letters, 35, L09305, doi: 10.1029/2008GL033740</p> <p>Norini, G., De Beni, E., Andronico, D., Polacci, M., Burton, M., Zucca, F. (2009) The 16 November 2006 flank collapse of the south-east crater at Mount Etna, Italy: Study of the deposit and hazard assessment. Journal of Geophysical Research, 114, B02204, doi: 10.1029/2008JB005779</p> <p>Pareschi, M.T., Boschi, E., Favalli, M. (2006) Lost tsunami. Geophysical Research Letters, 33, L22608, doi: 10.1029/2006GL027790</p> <p>Puglisi, G., Bonforte, A., Ferretti, A., Guglielmino, F., Palano, M., Prati, C. (2008) Dynamics of Mount Etna before, during, and after the July-August 2001 eruption inferred from GPS and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry data. Journal of Geophysical Research, 113, B06405, doi: 10.1029/2006JB004811</p> <p>Rittmann, A. (1964) Vulkanismus und Tektonik des Ãtna. Geologische Rundschau (now International Journal of Earth Sciences), 53: 788- 800, doi: 10.1007/BF02054564</p> <p>Rust, D., Neri, M. (1996) The boundaries of large-scale collapse on the flanks of Mount Etna, Sicily. In: McGuire,W.C., Jones, A.P., Neuberg, J. (Eds) "Volcano Instability on the Earth and Other Planets", Geological Society of London Special Publications, 110: 193-208, doi: 10.1144/GSL.SP.1996.110.01.15</p> <p>Rust, D., Behncke, B., Neri, M., Ciocanel, A. (2005) Nested zones of instability in the Mount Etna volcanic edifice, Sicily. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 155: 137-153, doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2004.11.021</p> <p>Schellart, W.P. (2010) Mount Etna-Iblean volcanism caused by rollback-induced upper mantle upwelling around the Ionian slab edge: An alternative to the plume model. Geology, 38: 691-694, doi: 10.1130/G31037.1</p> <p>Schiano, P., Clocchiatti, R., Ottolini, L., Busà, L. (2001) Transition of Mount Etna lavas from from a mantle-plume to an island-arc magmatic source. Nature, 412: 900-904, doi: 10.1038/35091056</p> <p>Schmincke, H.-U., Behncke, B., Grasso, M., Raffi, S. (1997) Evolution of the northwestern Iblean Mountains, Sicily: uplift, Plicocene/Pleistocene sea-level changes, paleoenvironment, and volcanism. Geologische Rundschau (now International Journal of Earth Sciences), 86: 637-669, doi: 10.1007/s005310050169</p> <p>Spilliaert, N., Allard, P., Métrich, N., Sobolev, A. (2006. Conditions of ascent, degassing and eruption of primitive alkali basalt during the powerful 2002 flank eruption of Mount Etna. Journal of Geophysical Reserarch, B04203, doi:10.1029/2005JB003934</p> <p>Tanguy, J.-C., Condomines, M., Kieffer, G. (1997) Evolution of the Mount Etna magma: Constraints on the present feeding system and eruptive mechanism. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 75: 221-250, doi: 10.1016/S0377-0273(96)00065-0</p> <p>Tommasini, S., Heumann, A., Avanzinelli, R., Francalanci, L. (1997) The fate of high-angle dipping slabs in the subduction factory: an integrated trace element and radiogenic isotope (U, Th, Sr, Nd, Pb) study of Stromboli Volcano, Aeolian Arc, Italy. Journal of Petrology, 48: 2407-2430, doi:10.1093/petrology/egm066</p> <p>Walter, T., Acocella, V., Neri, M., Amelung, F. (2005) Feedback processes between magmatic events and flank movement at Mount Etna (Italy) during the 2002-2003 eruption. Journal of Geophysical Research, 110, B10205, doi: 10.1029/2005JB003688</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Thu, 08/19/2010 - 22:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/etna" hreflang="en">Etna</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/galeras" hreflang="en">Galeras</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/guest-blogger" hreflang="en">guest blogger</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/italy" hreflang="en">italy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lava-flows" hreflang="en">lava flows</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pyroclastic-flow" hreflang="en">pyroclastic flow</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/physical-sciences" hreflang="en">Physical Sciences</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210295" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282273911"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What use is science if its results cannot be communicated? If the people over at the Smithsonian have any sense, they'll ask your permission to "cut-and-paste" your article into the GVP pages and ask other vulcanologists to write similar briefs using your pattern. Thank you for a wonderfully illuminative brief on Etna, Dr Behncke!</p> <p>Some months ago, we had a discussion about what constitutes *the* volcano - the visible volcanic edifice, the sub-surface plumbing or the deep source of magma. After the Eyjafjallajökull experience and your Etna brief, my current understanding is that it is all three: The deep source of magma is the generator, the sub-surface plumbing has a great influence on the final composition (hence type and violence of eruption) whereas the mountain itself - the volcanic topsoil if you will - has the final say in where and when as well as some influence on the style of eruption.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210295&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1_uX3jdA6NQ6n8_z7xl_LeT4_hBBVWrJ9RU0w8uPugw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Henrik, Swe (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210295">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210296" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282273958"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dr. Behncke, thank you for these very informative articles, especially so to a layman. They are very easy to read, with complex things explained in a way easy to understand, and give a good basic knowledge of a very complex and multi-faceted volcano.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210296&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pmpz83KacAaIAae2VRcmBjqJcWeWcASz_uemyKRIuQ0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210296">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210297" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282280216"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Tank you Boris.<br /> Now I have my weekend entertainment: reading carefully your article. (and then come the questions...) :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210297&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ypgSCOwOpo8V4oq5zeSebF4_ac1LdsuCr1k50BWNdpA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210297">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210298" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282284285"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris Behncke, well done, thank you so much. This is a classic series; at some future time, would be interested in the relationship you mentioned between the neighbors and their mountain.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210298&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eP0SKeu6yiIqnKBNwB93NDkMHbFbPNmQN-sT9-evxT4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210298">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210299" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282285561"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>too cool. Is it legal/do you mind if I copy/paste this into a single document for the local high school science teachers?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210299&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="EggP0X-pjqBuTR4DFbBxo6E4v5flCObpFeeqyJHHsik"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dave (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210299">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210300" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282288412"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Mr. Behncke. This has been a lovely and educational series.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210300&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yceFKY2Ujg7KuNMbrrr2XFPq7MUurIjCHst_ayG-wNA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Maria (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210300">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210301" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282295106"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Lurking, "master of charts" could you do one on the activity at Vatnajökull?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210301&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="HT8T9AC4J2h0ecW6Y3ZKhwg-qzpkz2GIk8yiiVgroio"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gina ct (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210301">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210302" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282296359"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#7 @gina ct:<br /> He has already done. Just take a look at the "Summer Open thread #2".</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210302&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6GTox0seX_KM9Z1oZ04ij5Q9bLWzlPmc8jRA3LJYQlE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210302">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210303" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282305753"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wow. Wow. Boris, thank you so much for these papers on Etna. I've always loved Pele, but now I'm in a triangle with Etna. It has it all-- plate tectonics, rifting, subduction volcanos, earthquake from all the above. Magma from the mantle, subduction melting and decompression! As my sweetie put it "It's a well-rounded volcano". My questions have been answered by the questions in the previous comments.</p> <p>I've some notes: </p> <p>How about calling those steamy, cooler pyroclastic flow phreatoclastic flows?</p> <p>I was fascinated by the picture in the cathedral at Catania showing the lava flow being diverted around the city walls. Perhaps city shield wall might be a good defense against lava flows. (And giant umbrellas over the city to protect from ashfall ;-D )</p> <p>Besides the BIG thank you to Boris, thanks to </p> <p>@27 passerby Part 1 for the link-- it answered my question about potential mantle/subduction melt magma mix.</p> <p>@lurking for all the fabulous charts and maps. I've got them bookmarked and ready to go for the future.</p> <p>Happy mind.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210303&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BGv3LdqigRIlVQCkb639bFidghJeHcr3SdhN1JlQyug"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair NoCal (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210303">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210304" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282310741"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ps. Could Etna be described as partially allochthonous? I keep thinking about the Trinity Alps in California, a very allochthonous eddy in the subduction process....</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210304&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="d6VLQHzQVML-VAFF1PdHogdvDqyLLyy3CESZeR8Hyrs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair NoCal (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210304">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210305" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282320032"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This has been a really long stressful week here, but it's now Friday night. I have a glass of single malt whisky in my hand and some fantastic writing by Boris in front of me to keep me informed and entertained. Cheers!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210305&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qqtN_iLXu8SZvisbKNqooCaV3ir41KqQNeeBqfZey70"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gordon (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210305">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210306" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282320654"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@gina ct [7]</p> <p>I sort of did... over in the OpenThread #2 Post 128, 145, and 150. I was trying not to pollute the Etna articles with the other stuff.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/summer_open_thread_2.php#c2740298">http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/summer_open_thread_2.php#c274…</a></p> <p>I plan on doing an update of the data a bit later after I unwind from the erroneous parts shipments, user errors and the normal weekly weirdness. </p> <p><i>As for that "master of charts" moniker... a "master" level chart slinger won't transpose lat-lon labels. It's not like I don't know the difference, I dealt with Nav Charts for 20+ years. It just proves that anyone can have a brain-fart.</i></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210306&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fuO7u1b_ackd6k3382elBrUVAFjW_twijvhCJEoBlz0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210306">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210307" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282330375"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great work. I have learned so much.</p> <p>Thank you</p> <p>P.S. Great references.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210307&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="A2hA3ODzB7VSb4Ra96qCs-ak3v5iRtcO5aHrgVcJZ1o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dasnowskier (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210307">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210308" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282330925"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris,</p> <p>Thank you so much for these articles on Etna. I understand the mountain much better and I can see why you wanted to be there to watch, learn, and write about such a unique place. I wish I could be there when Etna erupts again or even to just take a look around and see the cones on the flanks, the SE crater that I have watched for so long and the island of Sicily itself.</p> <p>I will definitely look forward to any info you will be able to post the next time Etna goes off. Yeah, you will be veeerrrryyy busy then, but I know you will let us know what you are seeing and what kind of eruption it will be. I bet it will get going in the next few months or so, or maybe not. We will see.</p> <p>Thanks again for a great write-up on such an interesting mountain.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210308&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ye-fDeHT3m6RqdN6FbgZNOWtbvkDOUp45l05iBE5zSA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane N CA (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210308">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210309" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282452041"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/etnaboris/520372570/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/etnaboris/520372570/</a></p> <p>Some months ago, Dr B put up this link (fresco in the Cathedral of Catania depicting the 1669 eruption). Well worth a second look!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210309&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WFGJzD41m-IrEipfdugJeKNEyyRh2_jxy6kJCmTpM9A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Henrik, Swe (not verified)</span> on 22 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210309">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210310" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282482373"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris, many thanks again for a wonderful exposition of what must be one of the world's most fascinatingly complex volcanoes. I intend to print the articles out to keep in my "library" ..otherwise they'll slip down the page at Eruptions and fade from memory.</p> <p>Keep us posted, please, next time Etna starts cooking: but be careful, don't follow the example of old Empedocles :o)</p> <p>(and yes I know that some spoilsports say he died in his bed at a ripe old age)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210310&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="c6sZIrLzeLQf6BHAusJaCW3uHE5bFE5TsE30iZftKHg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 22 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210310">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210311" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282506216"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris, thanks to you again for these three great threads - and like Mike Don, I'll be adding them to my paper pile for more detailed future reference, like during snow storms when I am in extra need of a good read and have time to think more than I do now! Keep in touch with us, yes?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210311&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6z4ktjl3aQqs4ojBVIZNHQqO1m_suPKiOWasllGaWU4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 22 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210311">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210312" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282610254"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Keep us posted, please, next time Etna starts cooking: but be careful, don't follow the example of old Empedocles :o)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210312&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xf0rgO9xHypjNYv10fNkjLG3_gt0vXB4DHYXtaezNiw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.elinkslondon.org/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">link of london (not verified)</a> on 23 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210312">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210313" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282610573"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>See the pattern? A direct snip of a previous post and then a link.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210313&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7UL4ykhasNg_CNzKBWKcRLx5_xTm9Zq9SO96pmHX89Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 23 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210313">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210314" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282617363"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Yep. The cure is easy though - disable the "URL:" in the "Post a Comment" meny. All it will be able do then, if it's a bot, is copy other posts, an irritating nuisance at worst. If a he or a she, the links will have to be posted "in the nude" so to speak, instantly revealing the purpose as well as lessening the chance of anyone following them.</p> <p>Just be glad we're not struck by the "Age gap sex site"-bot...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210314&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IA4awY_PHmDWJqIuIgJdVduy32dVS9dyc0m04JQRbRo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Henrik on drawbacks of the www">Henrik on draw… (not verified)</span> on 23 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210314">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210315" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283124942"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great article. I was on Etna in May 2002, and walked around the areas detroyed during the 2001 eruption (ski lifts, buildings, etc.). The area was still very hot, and the places where we could go obviously limited, but the views not something I will easily forget.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210315&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gusjNvAARoR4nJkEduvCP528A17iL607HPdGnt202gA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Willem (not verified)</span> on 29 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210315">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210316" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1287525360"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Redundantly sleepyheaded and apologizing for web analytics</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210316&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GTnYoEoquQe3bGrArnWSyVQLPt02N_nuD3R4clC9oUI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.townsville-travel.info/townsville-accommodation.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">motel townsville (not verified)</a> on 19 Oct 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210316">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210317" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292513162"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You are a very smart individual!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210317&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="avFEp1g1X57fiNQvFsvyb46o65hHjMdz1E-omBo17z8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://trtrtrukfteftgvcsdfgv.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Murray Uutela (not verified)</a> on 16 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210317">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/20/etna-week-part-3-etnas-volca%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 20 Aug 2010 02:05:36 +0000 eklemetti 104353 at https://scienceblogs.com Etna Week (Part 2) - The current dynamics and activity of Etna https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/18/mt-etna-the-current-dynamics <span>Etna Week (Part 2) - The current dynamics and activity of Etna</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is Part 2 of 3 from guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out Part 1 here.</p> <p><strong>The current dynamics and activity of Etna</strong><br /> by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke</p> <p>The recent behavior of Etna is characterized by nearly continuous eruptive activity from the summit craters and eruptions from new vents on the flanks at intervals of a few years to decades. Summit eruptions vary from quiet lava emission to mild Strombolian explosions to high-discharge-rate Hawaiian to sub-Plinian style lava and fire fountaining accompanied by the emplacement of fast-moving lava flows; usually the strongest activity concentrates in episodes lasting from a few tens of minutes to a few hours. Most flank eruptions are predominantly effusive - that is, characterized by the emission of lava flows, and explosive activity during these events is often limited to Strombolian explosions or mild spattering. This leads to the emplacement of extensive lava flow-fields and only minor cones are built at the eruptive vents, including the smallest constructive volcanic features, called hornitos (Spanish: "small furnaces"). </p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-d0862a258b68cccad1450eab5db308b9-EtnaP2-1a.jpg" alt="i-d0862a258b68cccad1450eab5db308b9-EtnaP2-1a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-b58d4ccb9c1221c731b9b7390a7993ed-EtnaP2-1b.jpg" alt="i-b58d4ccb9c1221c731b9b7390a7993ed-EtnaP2-1b.jpg" /><br /><em>Pyroclastic constructs on Etna come in all forms and sizes. The photograph at top shows a cluster of steep, narrow spires a few meters tall built up around small vents by the ejection of liquid blobs of lava (spattering activity), seen against the backdrop of the huge composite cone of the Southeast Crater, one of the summit craters of Etna. The conspicuous yellow hue is from sulfur deposits. The bottom photograph shows the largest pyroclastic flank cone formed during the historical period, Monti Rossi at about 700 m elevation near the village of Nicolosi, on the south flank of Etna. The name, literally, means "the red mountains" - the plural stands for the two summit peaks, the crater actually lying between them; but the original name - Monte della Ruina, "mountain of devastation" - more accurately refers to the catastrophic impact of this eruption. The cone is approximately 250 m tall from base to top. Photos taken in 1999 and 2000 by Boris Behncke</em></p> <p>Some flank eruptions, however, show much more intense explosive activity, like the 2001 and 2002-2003 eruptions, and a number of previous eruptions as in 1852-1853, 1879, 1886, and 1892. Conspicuous pyroclastic cones (also called cinder cones or scoria cones) are formed during such explosive activity, which can be up to a few hundred meters tall, like the prominent double-peaked Monti Rossi cone formed during the unusually voluminous and explosive 1669 eruption on the south flank of Etna. A typical feature of the flank vents is that each erupts only once, like the eruptive centers in monogenetic cone fields worldwide (e.g., the famous "new volcano" ParÃcutin in Mexico, 1943-1952). As a matter of fact, the numerous pyroclastic cones of Etna could be considered a monogenetic cone field, were it not for the huge central volcano on whose flanks they are sitting.</p> <p>Flank eruptions represent a considerable hazard for the populated areas on the lower flanks of the mountain, which are home to approximately one million people. During the historical period, new flank vents have occasionally opened within those areas that are now densely urbanized, especially on the southern and southeastern flanks, most recently in 1669 near the village of Nicolosi. During the past 1000 years, lava flows have reached the coast of the Ionian sea on three occasions, in ~1030, 1224, and 1669. The map below shows the extent of historical lava flows, distinguishing those of flank eruptions (in different shades of pink, yellow and red) from those emitted during summit eruptions (in green). It is evident that summit lava flows have never come anywhere close to the populated areas and therefore summit activity poses no immediate threat to those areas.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/EtnaP2-2.jpg"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-115fa72f28b5cedd5edae67a9c41ad49-EtnaP2-2-thumb-500x486-54289.jpg" alt="i-115fa72f28b5cedd5edae67a9c41ad49-EtnaP2-2-thumb-500x486-54289.jpg" /></a><br /><em>Map of historical lava flows of Etna, distinguishing summit from flank eruptions. Modified from Crisci et al. (2010)</em></p> <p><em>Evolution of the summit area</em><br /> The summit area of Etna has undergone profound changes in the past century. Until 1911, there was a single large crater at the summit, about half a kilometer wide, and truncating a broad cone about 300 m tall, which had grown since a major summit collapse accompanying the large 1669 flank eruption. This crater was known as the Central Crater. At the beginning of the 20th century, it was a funnel-shaped pit about 200 m deep, but intermittent eruptive activity on its floor led to its gradual filling, and in the mid-1950s, lava flows for the first time overflowed from the Central Crater onto the upper flanks of the volcano. Vigorous activity from several vents within the crater in the early 1960s led to the complete filling and obliteration of the Central Crater, and two large cones built up around the two main vents, the Voragine ("Big Mouth") that had been present since 1945, and a smaller vent known as "the 1964 crater". In 1968, a third vent opened, which became known as Bocca Nuova ("New Mouth"), and which progressively enlarged in diameter mostly due to the caving in of its unstable rims.</p> <p>For much of the 1970s to 1990s, the evolution of the Voragine and the Bocca Nuova was characterized by periodic intracrater activity and rim collapse, leading to their growth in diameter, until the two pits began to coalesce with only a thin septum remaining between the two, known as the "diaframma" (diaphragm). During a period of exceptionally intense summit eruptions in 1997-1999, both craters were filled to overflowing before subsidence of magma in their conduits led to the formation of new collapse pits, which gradually enlarged and coalesced into a single large depression, Etna's new Central Crater.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-39cb95cdc92c68e96bd476e06e3242ee-EtnaP2-3.jpg" alt="i-39cb95cdc92c68e96bd476e06e3242ee-EtnaP2-3.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-c7a4459dcfa66fe65d1ae2c25b5a3a90-EtnaP2-3b.jpg" alt="i-c7a4459dcfa66fe65d1ae2c25b5a3a90-EtnaP2-3b.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-2d3d9d3c561abda943c5c4fb31e1868d-EtnaP2-3c.jpg" alt="i-2d3d9d3c561abda943c5c4fb31e1868d-EtnaP2-3c.jpg" /><br /><em>Aerial views of Etna's summit area showing the evolution from the single Central Crater in the early 20th century to the currently four summit craters. Top photograph was taken in the 1920s, when the Northeast Crater was already present (but is barely discernible in this view); the size and depth of the Central Crater is well recognizable here. The view is from the west. Center photo is of 1961 and shows the Central Crater filled-to-overflow with pyroclastic cones and lava; the much smaller Northeast Crater is seen behind the Central Crater to the left. The view is from the south. Photograph at bottom was taken in May 2008, the Bocca Nuova and Voragine are in the upper center, nearly coalescing into a new Central Crater, whereas the Northeast Crater is emitting a dense white vapor plume at right, and the Southeast Crater is at center left, showing conspicuous light-colored sulfur deposits lining its rim. The view is from the east. Photographers for top and center photographs unknown, bottom photo by Stefano Branca (INGV-Catania)</em></p> <p>In the spring of 1911, a collapse pit opened at the northeastern base of the central summit cone, from which issued a vapor plume but which showed no eruptive activity until 1917. This pit became known as "the Northeast subterminal Crater" (the term subterminal is applied to eruptive vents lying close to Etna's summit craters and showing a eruptive behavior different from the vents of flank eruptions); it is now called Northeast Crater. The new crater remained a pit until 1923, when a small cone grew within and filled the pit, leading to the first lava overflows from the Northeast Crater. In the 1950s, cone growth intensified, as the crater became the site of virtually continuous, mild Strombolian activity accompanied by slow lava emission; this type of activity was termed "persistent" and for a long time was believed to represent the most common type of Etnean eruptive manifestation. In 1977, however, the Northeast Crater switched to a more dramatic form of volcanism, which proved highly efficient in making it become the highest point on Etna - brief but violent episodes of high lava fountaining with voluminous, fast-moving lava flows and tall tephra columns.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-06072d21443d4c0bf20f0c3c3bfd6396-EtnaP2-4a.jpg" alt="i-06072d21443d4c0bf20f0c3c3bfd6396-EtnaP2-4a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-e1ddbfc232bdd77090f4b81c9dbb1f65-EtnaP2-4b.jpg" alt="i-e1ddbfc232bdd77090f4b81c9dbb1f65-EtnaP2-4b.jpg" /><br /><em>The Northeast Crater showing different types of eruptive activity. Top photo, taken in 1969, shows the cone of the Northeast Crater nearly as tall as the rim of the former Central Crater (in the foreground), and displaying weak Strombolian activity from its summit, while lava quietly issues from a small crack on the left side of the cone. This activity lasted with few interruptions from 1955 until 1971, and again from 1974 until 1977. Photographer T. Micek (?). The bottom photograph shows one of about twenty episodes of violent fire fountaining and tall tephra plumes that occurred between July 1977 and March 1978; this was one of the latest episodes of that series. View is from the village of Monterosso on the southeast flank of Etna, photo by Carmelo Sturiale.</em></p> <p>By 1978, the Northeast Crater had grown to about 3340 m elevation and thus become the highest point ever measured on Etna. It produced a few more episodes of lava fountaining in late-1980 and early-1981, which brought its height to 3350 m. On 24 September 1986, an unprecedentedly violent eruptive episode caused a reduction in height by 10 m of its cone, and further collapse occurred throughout the following decade. Although the Northeast Crater went through another phase of intense activity in 1995-1996, its height continued to decrease, and in 2007 was 3329.6 m (Neri et al., 2008).</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-f9b26bce29bdc6b57bcde7991256ef05-EtnaP2-5a.jpg" alt="i-f9b26bce29bdc6b57bcde7991256ef05-EtnaP2-5a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-ad01fa561026ec9daa73a08d1d62a787-EtnaP2-5b.jpg" alt="i-ad01fa561026ec9daa73a08d1d62a787-EtnaP2-5b.jpg" /><br /><em>The Southeast Crater seen from the air immediately after its formation in spring 1971 (top) and in May 2008 (bottom). Note that the field of view in the latter photo is much wider than in the earlier. Photos taken by Carmelo Sturiale and Boris Behncke</em></p> <p>The latest addition to Etna's summit crater family is the Southeast Crater, which formed during a flank eruption in May 1971 at the southeastern base of the central summit cone as a sort of pressure valve - while lava was emitted a few kilometers further downslope to the northeast, it emitted vapor-rich ash clouds for a couple of weeks. It then remained quiet until spring 1978 and then sprang to life with high lava fountains accompanying a series of flank eruptions in rapid succession - April-June, August, and November 1978, and August 1979. Since then, it has been the most persistently active vent on Etna, and its appearance on the stage was accompanied by a marked change in the eruptive behavior of the volcano. As a matter of fact, since the birth of the Southeast Crater, Etna has practically doubled its average output rate (Behncke and Neri, 2003a).</p> <p>The Southeast Crater has grown much more rapidly than the Northeast Crater, and nearly 40 years after its birth its cone stands approximately 300 m above the site where it came to life in 1971, reaching a height of 3290 m as of 2007. This rapid growth is the result of numerous periods of frantic eruptive activity which are unparalleled in the documented history not only of Etna but of all volcanoes on Earth. The culmination was a series of 64 episodes of violent lava or fire fountaining between January and June 2000, followed by two more in August and 16 more in May-July 2001 (Behncke et al., 2006). The Southeast Crater has erupted more recently in 2006 and 2007-2008, again producing numerous episodes of strong Strombolian activity and lava fountaining, the latest - and possibly most violent - on 10 May 2008, when lava flows advanced 6.4 km in 4 hours, an unprecedented value for Etnean summit eruptions.</p> <p>What are the reasons for such variable and, for a basaltic volcano, often unusually violent explosive behavior?</p> <p><em>Eruption types and styles</em><br /> It seems that much of the explosivity of Etna is driven by magmatic gases, foremost water vapor (H<sub>2</sub>O) and carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>). Etna is emitting significant quantities of these gas species, up to 200,000 metric tons of water vapor and about 20,000 tons of carbon dioxide per day. Eruptions tend to be more explosive when magma rises fast, which is the case when batches of new primitive magma enter into the plumbing system of the volcano, so that the most explosive eruptions of Etna in the past few thousand years have also produced the most mafic magmas (Coltelli et al., 2005; Kamenetsky et al., 2007). In particular, a powerful sub-Plinian eruption about 3930 years before present produced picritic magma, which was also extremely enriched in CO<sub>2</sub>. In contrast, the Plinian eruption of 122 BC was apparently triggered by the sudden decompression of the magmatic system, which led to the catastrophic exsolution of gas although the pre-eruptive water content of the magma was found to be only about 1 weight-% (Del Carlo and Pompilio, 2004).</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-33afed797611f05586bcec86636ac15e-EtnaP2-6.jpg" alt="i-33afed797611f05586bcec86636ac15e-EtnaP2-6.jpg" /><br /><em>Hypothetical and simplified scheme of the magmatic plumbing system of Etna, illustrating magma transport feeding summit activity and the two different types (lateral vs. eccentric) flank eruptions, from Behncke and Neri (2003b)</em></p> <p>Most magma ascends to the surface through the central conduit system of Etna, which leads to the frequent summit activity. Unless magma ascent is very rapid, much gas is lost from the magma during its ascent to the surface, and significant volumes of relatively gas-poor magma are stored in the shallow plumbing system of the volcano. During many flank eruptions of Etna, such gas-poor magma exits laterally from the central conduits, resulting in relatively weak or almost no explosive activity but copious lava outflow. Most flank eruptions during the 20th century were of this type; they are commonly called "lateral" flank eruptions. Typically such eruptions are accompanied by the cessation of summit activity and some collapse at the summit craters, as the central conduit system is drained of magma.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-70867c0d3c37c78bcd18525c769fa7c9-EtnaP2-7a.jpg" alt="i-70867c0d3c37c78bcd18525c769fa7c9-EtnaP2-7a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-8c28a6de8d03f24e06c74a545d631399-EtnaP2-7b.jpg" alt="i-8c28a6de8d03f24e06c74a545d631399-EtnaP2-7b.jpg" /><br /><em>Extremes in eruptive styles at Etna: totally non-explosive extrusion of gas-poor lava near the Southeast Crater in 1999 (top), and the 10-km-high eruption column formed during a sub-Plinian eruption from the Voragine on 22 July 1998 as seen from Catania. Photos taken by Boris Behncke and Sandro Privitera</em></p> <p>Another type of Etnean flank eruption is characterized by much more pronounced explosive activity, resulting in the emission of significant volumes of ash even for prolonged periods of up to several months, as in 1892, 2001, and 2002-2003. These eruptions occur when magma, rather than rising through the central conduits, pushes its way forcefully through the flank of the volcano to form new conduits called "eccentric" or "peripheral" (Rittmann, 1964; Neri et al., 2005). Being in a closed system until eruption, the magma does not lose significant amounts of its gas during ascent, and therefore the ensuing activity is considerably more explosive. The 1974 and 2002-2003 eccentric eruptions did in fact produce more tephra than lava (Andronico et al., 2004; Corsaro et al., 2009), belying the widespread notion of Etna being a rather non-explosive volcano!</p> <p><em>Eruptions and flank instability</em><br /> The question why Etna makes flank eruptions at all is not easy to answer. Certainly the fact that the volcano lies above the intersection of several main regional fault systems helps in rendering its flanks unstable and subject to fracturing. Mazzarini and Armienti (2001) demonstrated that the distribution of Etna's flank cones is largely controlled by intersections between tectonic lines of weakness. It has also been suggested (e.g., Chester et al., 1985) that the hydrostatic (or rather "magmastatic") pressure exerted on the conduit walls by the rising magma column within the conduit might lead to the opening of lateral cracks through which the magma could escape to feed flank eruptions. Bousquet and Lanzafame (2001) specified that magma transfer from the central conduits into the flank occurred in a more or less horizontal manner, rather than rising upward vertically. All of these scenarios concerned exclusively lateral flank eruptions, not eccentric ones, which had effectively been nearly forgotten prior to the 2001 and 2002-2003 eruptions.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-8520b909657a70dac4cf5ca1f08a8184-EtnaP2-8.jpg" alt="i-8520b909657a70dac4cf5ca1f08a8184-EtnaP2-8.jpg" /><br /><em>The Pernicana fault cuts through the northeastern flank of Etna, from an elevation of about 2000 m at the Northeast Rift, down to sea level near the village of Fondachello. From Neri et al. (2004)</em></p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-32d1954ac8ead6afdd4c601f8538537b-EtnaP2-9a.jpg" alt="i-32d1954ac8ead6afdd4c601f8538537b-EtnaP2-9a.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-ce68b6bda4cde0ad13b46483e85ad1fb-EtnaP2-9b.jpg" alt="i-ce68b6bda4cde0ad13b46483e85ad1fb-EtnaP2-9b.jpg" /><br /><em>Displacement along the Pernicana fault during the massive flank movement of 2002, along the Fornazzo-Linguaglossa road (top) and the Catania-Messina highway (bottom). From Neri et al. (2004)</em></p> <p>Since the early 1990s scientists (Borgia et al, 1992; Lo Giudice and Rasà, 1992; Rust and Neri, 1996; Bousquet and Lanzafame, 2001) proposed that a large portion of the volcano, encompassing its eastern and southern flank sectors, was subject to lateral sliding, much in the same manner as the southern flank of KÄ«lauea on Hawai'i. There was some debate as for the cause of the sliding - was it caused by gravitational pull, the push of accumulating magma below the volcano, or by more shallow intrusion of magma into the flanks? Also the extent of the mobile sector was not unanimously defined; whereas there was agreement that the northern boundary of this sector was defined by the transcurrent (mostly horizontally moving) Pernicana fault, the southern or southwestern boundary was variously attributed to different fault systems cutting the southeastern and southwestern flanks of Etna. It is now known that the extreme southwestern boundary is the Ragalna fault system (Rust and Neri, 1996; Rust et al., 2005; Neri et al., 2007).</p> <p>Speculation became truth in the fall of 2002, when a large sector of the eastern and southeastern flank of Etna underwent a massive move toward the Ionian Sea. During a powerful and complex flank eruption in the summer of 2001, the southern flank and summit area of the volcano were violently ripped open, and the eastern flank started to move away from the remainder of the mountain at accelerating speed. Though this was recognized only in hindsight (Bonforte et al., 2008, 2009; Puglisi et al., 2008), many of us were convinced that the 2001 eruption had significantly destabilized the volcanic edifice, and that further flank eruptions would occur from now on in rapid succession.</p> <p>On 24 September 2002, a shallow earthquake occurred on the northeast flank of Etna, along the upper portion of the Pernicana fault system, which had been very active during the 1980s but had not shown any seismic activity or significant displacement since 1988. The earthquake was accompanied by conspicuous ground rupturing along the fault, similar to numerous events between 1980 and 1988. A few weeks later, on 27 October 2002, a more pronounced movement along the fault heralded the onset of a new flank eruption, which affected both the south and northeast sides of Etna and destroyed numerous tourist facilities as well as forested areas. During a few days, a part of the northeastern flank moved by more than 2 m eastward; then the movement extended over an ever larger area to the southeast side of Etna, where earthquakes accompanying the displacement caused severe damage in several villages, such as Santa Venerina and Milo.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-380f79c897165d7edc7b4128a936f2c2-EtnaP2-10.jpg" alt="i-380f79c897165d7edc7b4128a936f2c2-EtnaP2-10.jpg" /><br /><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-fb94d0a1af28b586956ec79f1cbb7cbb-EtnaP2-10b.jpg" alt="i-fb94d0a1af28b586956ec79f1cbb7cbb-EtnaP2-10b.jpg" /><br /><em>Top: The sector of Etna's eastern to southern flanks affected by flank instability and displacement is shown in pink. PFS = Pernicana fault system; VB = Valle del Bove; RN = Ripe della Naca; ZE = Zafferana Etnea; SV = Santa Venerina; TFS = Timpe fault system; AC = Acireale; TF = Trecastagni fault; R = Ragalna fault system. From Neri et al. (2004). Bottom: Distribution of earthquake epicenters accompanying the 2002 eruption and flank movement helped to distinguish several blocks (Blocks 1, 2 and 3) within the unstable sector, moving at different times and speeds. From Neri et al. (2005)</em></p> <p>This immense mass movement, which was later revealed to have involved about 2000 cubic kilometers of rock (Walter et al., 2005), both of the volcanic pile and of the underlying sedimentary basement, was documented in extreme detail, thanks to improved monitoring equipment placed on the volcano a few years before. It could thus be established that the movement started at the Pernicana fault in the northwestern portion of the moving sector, and then extended both eastward - to the Ionian coast - and southward, affecting numerous fault systems cutting through the eastern and southeastern portions of the volcano. In the entire area, earthquakes were strongly felt and often caused damage, and cracks ripped through buildings and other constructions as well as roads.</p> <p>Since the fall of 2002, the movement of Etna's eastern flank has continued, most of the time at somewhat reduced speed, but often with new accelerations accompanied by shallow earthquakes. Since 2004, the southern block in the unstable sector has started moving slowly southward. At the Pernicana fault, dramatic slip accompanied by earthquakes and rupturing of the ground surface has occurred several times in 2003 and 2004, and again in early April 2010. This all indicates that the volcano has not yet returned to a state of relative stability and equilibrium as before 2002 (or 2001, if we consider the eruption of that year a significant factor in destabilizing the volcano). As a matter of fact, the behavior of Etna has changed profoundly since 2001.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-441d9cc0067389c765130700a0219de2-EtnaP2-11.jpg" alt="i-441d9cc0067389c765130700a0219de2-EtnaP2-11.jpg" /><br /><em>Fluctuations in Etna's eruptive behavior since 1600 AD, with marked variations in the frequency, style, and size (volume) of eruptions. The output rate was exceptionally high from about 1607 until 1669, when ten - most of them very large - flank eruptions occurred (see black vertical bars in the graph at the bottom of the figure) and up to 3 cubic kilometers of magma was erupted. Very low output and few flank eruptions are seen during the following ~100 years, until the 1760s when flank eruptions pick up in frequency and size. A marked acceleration in the activity of Etna is evident starting in the second half of the 20th century. Unpublished figure by Boris Behncke and Marco Ner</em>i</p> <p><em>Eruptive cycles</em><br /> If one looks at the historical record of Etna's eruptions, it becomes evident that the intervals between these events, as well as their characteristics (duration, location, volume, eruptive style) vary strongly. Unfortunately the record is complete only since the beginning of the 17th century, yet these past little more than 400 years show remarkable fluctuations in Etna's activity. The first 70 years of the 17th century showed unusually high levels of activity, with frequent summit activity and ten flank eruptions. Some of these flank eruptions lasted for years - the one of 1614-1624 being the longest flank eruption in the historical record of Etna - and produced large volumes of lava (1614-1624: about 1 km3, 1634-1638: about 200 million m3, 1646-1647: about 160 million m3, 1651-1653: about 450 million m3, 1669: about 650 million m3). A few of the flank eruptions were quite explosive and built large pyroclastic cones, like Monte Nero during the 1646-1647 eruption and Monti Rossi in 1669.</p> <p>The last eruption in this series, in 1669, apparently emptied a shallow magma reservoir that had existed throughout the previous decades - evidence for such a reservoir lies in the presence of abundant up to centimeter-sized <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plagioclase" target="_blank">plagioclase feldspar</a> crystals in the lavas of all eruptions from 1600 until 1669. The rounded shape and pale yellow color of these crystals has led the locals to call the lavas of this period "cicirara", which means something like "chickpea lava", because the crystals resemble chick peas! Due to a prolonged presence in a reservoir relatively close to the surface, the magma could cool and crystallize to the degree that plagioclase grew to the "chick pea" size crystals seen in the 17th century lavas. Further evidence for wholesale magma extraction from a shallow reservoir and a dramatic withdrawal of the magma column in the central conduit is the collapse of Etna's summit cone during the 1669 eruption (Corsaro et al., 1996). </p> <p>After the 1669 eruption, Etna has never again produced "cicirara". Furthermore, the frequency and size of flank eruptions dropped sharply for about 100 years, with only three minor flank eruptions being recorded in 1689, 1702, and 1755. It seems that the magma reservoir that had fed the intense activity of the 17th century had disappeared, the feeding system of the volcano had been disrupted, and the mountain had become structurally stable. Much of the time, all magma that made it to the surface rose to the summit, where a new cone was constructed. Flank eruptions became frequent again from 1763 on, and for the next 100 years occurred about once per decade, with volumes of a few tens to rarely more than 100 million cubic meters per eruption.</p> <p>Interestingly, throughout the 18th and the first half of the 19th centuries, there are no records of significant earthquakes in the unstable eastern sector of Etna as those of the 1980s and of 2002 and the following years. A powerful and destructive earthquake in 1818 near Acireale was probably caused by movement along a regional tectonic fault, not by movement of Etna's unstable flank.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-af6a875669c378624dcb89e704864929-EtnaP2-12.jpg" alt="i-af6a875669c378624dcb89e704864929-EtnaP2-12.jpg" /><br /><em>Etna's unstable eastern to southern flank sector, and a selection of earthquakes presumably caused by movement of this unstable sector. Note that there have been many more earthquakes in this area during the period since 1865, when the first of these events took place. Unpublished figure by Boris Behncke</em></p> <p>Then came the year 1865, which brought a large eruption on the northeast flank - the Monti Sartorius eruption - and soon after its end, a very localized, extremely shallow (close to the surface) earthquake on Etna's eastern flank, which devastated the village of Macchia di Giarre and killed about 70 people. Similar earthquakes have since then occurred at a recurrence rate of a few years, luckily rarely resulting in as many fatalities, but often causing significant damage and a few human deaths. Most, if not all, of these earthquakes are now known to be related to slippage, or movement, of Etna's unstable eastern to southern flank sectors.</p> <p>At the same time, the intervals between flank eruptions have become systematically clustered into determined sequences, or parts of cycles. The first cycle started after the large 1865 flank eruption (and the first earthquake in modern time that can be with confidence attributed to flank displacement), initially with quiet emission of gas from the Central Crater and a few years later, mild activity within the Central Crater. From 1874 until 1892 there were five flank eruptions, which showed an overall increase in emitted volume in time, the latest - in 1892 - being the most voluminous (besides 120 million m3 this eruption also produced a significant amount of pyroclastics). This increase in the volume of flank eruptions was apparently the result of increasing structural instability of the volcano. Apparently the emission of a large volume of magma brought this cycle to a close, the volcano returned to relatively stable conditions, and a new cycle started, like the previous one, with a period of quiescence, followed by summit activity, which in turn was followed by a further series of flank eruptions. Four cycles of this type occurred between 1865 and 1993. The latest of these was longer than its predecessors - 42 years - and culminated in a series of no less than 13 flank eruptions, many of which were among the largest of the past 300 years. This cycle ended with the 472-days-long eruption that lasted from December 1991 until March 1993 and produced the greatest lava volume - about 250 million cubic meters - of any Etnean eruption since 1669.</p> <p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-ef00f890f62f2f9f3141780a6f3384e1-EtnaP2-13.jpg" alt="i-ef00f890f62f2f9f3141780a6f3384e1-EtnaP2-13.jpg" /><br /><em>Evolution of the 1952-1993 eruptive cycle at Etna, showing three main phases (Eruptive quiescence -&gt; summit activity -&gt; flank eruptions, ending with a particularly voluminous flank eruption). Unpublished figure by Boris Behncke and Marco Neri</em></p> <p>Interestingly, there was very little seismic activity in Etna's unstable sector during the first two phases of this cycle, whereas they became more and more frequent during the third phase. Many episodes of accelerated flank displacement preceded flank eruptions by days to months, as in 1981, 1983, 1985, and 1989.</p> <p>Etna's latest and ongoing cycle started after the end of the large 1991-1993 flank eruption. For two years, no eruptive activity occurred anywhere on the mountain. Then, in summer 1995, eruptive activity returned to the summit craters - first at the Bocca Nuova and then at the Northeast Crater; in 1996 and 1997 also the Southeast Crater and the Voragine joined the party (Allard et al., 2006). This period of summit eruptions continued until July 2001 and consisted of several long-lasting lava overflows and more than 150 episodes of violent Strombolian to sub-Plinian explosive activity, nearly always with copious lava emission. We called this exceptional period of activity "The Millennium Fireworks". Still more exciting fireworks came with the flank eruptions of <a href="http://boris.vulcanoetna.it/ETNA_2001.html">2001</a> and <a href="http://boris.vulcanoetna.it/ETNA_2002.html">2002-2003</a>, and two more flank eruptions have occurred in 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, separated by a period of spectacular eruptions from the Southeast Crater in 2006-2008. These events are described in detail in the <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0101-06=&amp;volpage=var#bgvn_2909">Bulletins of the Global Volcanism Network</a> (scroll down the page to get to the more recent reports).</p> <p>What should be noted is that since flank eruptions kicked in again in 2001, the unstable flank sector of Etna has moved at sometimes astonishing rates (up to several tens of centimeters in a few days in spring 2009), and seismic activity in this sector has been intense, including a series of rupturing events at the Pernicana fault as recently as April 2010. The volcano seems to be currently in the middle of an eruptive cycle, and it is likely that this will come to an end (and bring back the volcano to a state of temporary stability) only with a very large, voluminous flank eruption (Behncke and Neri, 2003a; Allard et al., 2006). From a scientific point of view this is rather exciting. From a human (and civil defense) point of view, these prospects are rather disconcerting and challenging.</p> <p>So why does the flank of Etna move? It is now believed that much of the movement is caused by the pressure of magma accumulating within the volcano. As a matter of fact, much more magma enters into Etna's plumbing system than exits during eruptions. The quantity of this unerupted "excess" magma can be approximately calculated from the amounts of gas emitted from the volcano, in particular sulfur dioxide. It has thus been revealed (Spilliaert et al., 2005; Allard et al., 2006) that at least three-quarters of the magma that enter into the Etnean feeder system stay there, which leads to a constant volume increase. Where does all this magma go? There are certainly no empty spaces that can host this magma, so space must be created, and this is best done in pushing the volcano, both upwards (so that the volcano swells, or inflates), and sidewards, in whatever direction the side of the mountain gives way most easily. At Etna this is on the eastern, southeastern, and to a lesser degree, southern flanks, which are not buttressed by surrounding mountains as the northern and western flanks. It can be speculated that the more magma accumulates below the volcano, the more unstable it becomes, and this in turn facilitates the opening of fractures on the flanks, allowing magma to escape in flank eruptions. Possibly the presence of a large, relatively shallow magma reservoir during the 17th century led to a strong destabilization of the volcano, which thus had magma leaking through its open flanks on any given occasion, and in large volumes. A similar situation seems to be on the way to become established in recent decades - so no one would be really surprised to see Etna behave again like it did between 1600 and 1669, but once more, these are anything else than comforting prospects.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Wed, 08/18/2010 - 00:14</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/etna" hreflang="en">Etna</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/guest-blogger" hreflang="en">guest blogger</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/italy" hreflang="en">italy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210257" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282110061"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Very interesting.</p> <p>I was just wondering, is a catastrophic flank failure at all likely?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210257&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8NetuK2EY1DyEMOH2IFC1gmyOA02_mpde1CiJECXV4Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.science20.com/blog/3277" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gareth (not verified)</a> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210257">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210258" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282113378"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Outstanding work Dr. Behncke! Thank you so much for publishing this to the impressed hobby-volcanologists!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210258&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SI8Pv6pgDY_iJq0Be6h7xfjRv6SbPVjG1O-p4iOJMCc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Wipf (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210258">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210259" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282116214"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"...much more magma enters into Etna's plumbing system than exits during eruptions."<br /> This is, to me, a stunning revelation.<br /> 1. Do you believe that a massive failure of the southeastern slopes could take place, in a similar way as it did in Mt. St. Helen's?<br /> 2. Is ice accumulation, in winter, heavy enough to affect the stability of big fat Mamma Etna?<br /> 3. If you pick Etna and covers it with a huge Icecap (like in Vatnajökull, in Iceland) what would happen? Could we compare processes in Badarbunga system with Etna's?<br /> It's getting more and more interesting and enlightening.<br /> Thank you Boris.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210259&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ALt-e9iYYGzydf1_aP13AXCD-dAB6QfM1wnGSRSvf5s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210259">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210260" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282118422"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Gareth #1 and Renato Rio #3 - currently a catastrophic flank failure seems unlikely, because the stress on the eastern flank sector is released in numerous small slip episodes and nearly continuous, slow, aseismic creep. This is similar to the flank slip at Kilauea, and some publication (I admit I don't remember which one) recently proposed that basaltic volcanoes such as Kilauea, Etna, and Piton de la Fournaise are capable of accomodating their flank instability in numerous and frequent minor episodes rather than collapsing catastrophically. Obviously, catastrophic collapse does occur (it is well documented for the Hawaiian volcanoes and the Valle del Bove collapse at Etna seems pretty much ascertained by now) but more rarely.</p> <p>Ice and snow accumulation are currently relatively minor at Etna - virtually all snow melts during the summer - but minor quantities of ice can be preserved under tephra if this is deposited on snow during the winter as in early 2000 and late 2002. The quantities of ice do not appear to be significant in affecting the volcano stability. However, a few thousand years ago this might have been different - a group of British scientists (Deeming, McGuire and Harrop) recently proposed that the Valle del Bove collapse was triggered by magma intrusion into water-saturated flanks during cooler and wetter weather conditions.</p> <p>We know that Etna was covered with glaciers before the cataclysmic "Ellittico" eruptions 15,000 years ago. The presence of the glaciers certainly led to much more explosive volcanism than has occurred since then. However, this is an area of ongoing studies and much more needs to be revealed.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210260&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OT7dKA3YpKAcgFxj6nFyLpiUaiyHDZHjzGOrEbqrBRM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Boris Behncke, Catania, Italyb">Boris Behncke,… (not verified)</a> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210260">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210261" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282120379"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris,</p> <p> I lived on Etna (in Nicolosi) from 1993 to 1996. I was able to witness it "re-awaken" from its slumber following the huge 1989-1993 lava eruptions. I used to go up to the fractures produced by the initial 1989 intrusions which cut the roadway to the ski area (as I remember!). At times, while I was at the fractures, the guardrails would abruptly begin to creak and pop, I believe due to further intrusion and spreading going-on beeath that area. so i had my own makeshift strainmeters! Upon returning to my home, following one particularly noisy/active visit to the fractures, the Northeat Crater erupted!<br /> By the way,...another outstanding presentation of your knowledge of Etna volcanology!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210261&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jqhImoijJpQgSmp_Q1fSVtjcIWOYRSZ561vEoLjqxdw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rodger Wilson (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210261">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210262" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282126710"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you Boris,especially for the information about flank stability. It never even crossed my mind that Catania on the sea may be in a fault/slip zone.</p> <p>What an amazing volcano.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210262&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="chPPwj1jMDCj9D9HeSTqKasX_icexJJ1wrpoi2mbNwk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dasnowskier (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210262">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210263" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282128077"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Stupendous.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210263&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1GFvOwRFwo_N2k5BbdQfOeMO4V1WoF3wbb2q9eM5AmA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">WIll (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210263">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210264" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282131243"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris, </p> <p>that was a fantastic presentation! I was watching some of what was going on, too, and that made it all the more interesting for me to read. I can hardly wait for the next installment! I can see why you chose to study Etna because it is a facinating mountain with some interesting seizmic zones along with the volcanic mechanisms. </p> <p>From the illustration of Behncke and Neri (2003b) it looks like some fault blocks on the north-east area and I am wondering if it is part of the flank collapse or fault blocking. </p> <p>I remember the quake that offset the roads and did so much damage and watched as the Piano de Lago disapeared. That was such a beautiful area before the eruption that covered so much of it. But there is beauty even in the lava flows just like the area around Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Lassen. It is amazing how things can recover so quickly and something else that I have found interesting is the fact that around Mt. St. Helens, there has been fossilization found already! I think that has blown the scientific world's mind. I will look forward to the day when some recovery will be evident in the Piano de Lago area. It will take a while, but I bet it will come back faster than we ever thought possible. Of course, it depends on Etna's activity. It could send more lava down that way.</p> <p>Has there been any indication of an eruption taking place any time soon? Maybe you will be talking about that in your next post.</p> <p>Thanks so much for taking the time to teach us about Etna and the complexities of the inner workings of a volcano not fully understood. Interesting stuff.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210264&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fNdtisA-DRKnK6Gcf-X3XOujGX_8-gJ1l3hWjpPyxjs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane N CA (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210264">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210265" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282135345"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>just a random thought ...</p> <p>a large active sill type magma chamber extension in the E / SE would have a very high "lubricating" effect on the movement ? no ??</p> <p>sort of like trying to walk on a sea of ball-bearings ???</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210265&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0PYRSKzh8H4ozwZYqUUB_wMoOD_HbTSptQZMPAY02jg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210265">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210266" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282139312"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am in awe..I feel like saying "we are not worthy". Almost reluctant to ask what are probably rather silly questions, but:</p> <p>Re the 'chick-pea' lavas: surely basalt magma held "in storage" for some time would first crystallise olivine? Are there olivine phenocrysts? Or did this mineral sink under gravity, so that somewhere in Etna's guts there are olivine cumulate lenses? (left after the bulk of that magma body had erupted)</p> <p>Second: I read a while back (in a press story, so a dubious source) that recent Etna lavas had been found to contain amphibole, for the first time in many years. Is this so, and is it related to the recent changes in behaviour?</p> <p>Third (more relevant to part 1, sorry); how does the historically active Campi Flegrei del Mar Sicilia (sp?) SW of Sicily fit into the plate-tectonic scheme for the Etna/Sicily area?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210266&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="F_qGBHGarRzMizV9OCz9Q_RtQoef_S-2Kdhf6DjplV0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210266">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210267" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282145359"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#10 @Mike Don<br /> Your third question also came to my mind. I was curious to understand the tectonics under both Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia and Pantelleria. The latter is explained as being "continental rifting" (!?)(SMI Global Volcanism Program)but they don't mention any correlation between the two volcanoes. Could Campi be a continuation of Calabric Arc? Could there be another segment of subducting oceanic lithosphere underneath? Or another "slab rollback" to the W? I have been doing some research over the web, but all I could find was this abstract from an article concerning the Lipari-Vulcano Volcanic System (LVVC):</p> <p>"...the LVVC crustal structure and the evolution of the volcanism are consistent with those recognized in zones of transition from arc-related to rift volcanism. In addition, results of a preliminary mechanical analysis based on the available structural data indicate low values of the ratio between magmatic overpressure and tectonic stress. This suggests a passive mechanism of mantle upwelling. The mantle upwelling is due the post-collisional normal strikeâslip tectonics affecting the Aeolian Arc."</p> <p><a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com">http://www.sciencedirect.com</a> (link to big to be pasted)</p> <p>Since the LVVC is further NE I don't know if has any relation to Campi and Pantelleria, both only 70 km apart.<br /> When Boris said "the geodynamic setting of Etna is a bit complicated" he really meant it.<br /> Any clues, Boris?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210267&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nCcaRCOFGutGeUvobLrznEgm30A8lY7phHyylSnW-WY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210267">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210268" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282149602"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Mike: I also found a very interesting book on the subject through Google Books:<br /> "Postcollisional tectonics and magmatism in Mediterranean region and Asia, by Yildirim Dilek,Spyros Pavlides (you can read parts of it):<br /> Here's a transcript:<br /> "These features collectively suggest that the fault pattern observed in the Sicily channel may result from coexistent deformation regimes, with NE-SW-directed extension superimposed on the subduction-related NW-SE-directed compression in the Maghrebides (?), Sicily and the Apenines. The case history of the Sicily channel indicates that continental and extensional processes can overlap in the same area. Moreover, the coexistence in this central Mediterranean area of two deformational settings suggests that plate boundaries are passive features rather than the driving mechanisms of plate tectonics."<br /> Isn't that awesome?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210268&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cTcmvt-mk8v3VJr8L3iKyJgohq4XpRHkifaZa8c84QI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210268">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210269" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282155882"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm still trying to get my head around just how big this volcano is.</p> <p><a href="http://i34.tinypic.com/2n9jl34.png">http://i34.tinypic.com/2n9jl34.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210269&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aHQ8CcJ95ZPb7fryNcBsusQz8ZsGeLoHitTrkTQNAeo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210269">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210270" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282156694"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Lurking<br /> Fantastic plot! You can almost see the magma pushing up through the "slab-rollback-created-window". And yes. It is huge. Good job!<br /> I suggest that everyone tried some Google-earthing over Sicily. And also over Pantelleria. Don't miss the pictures attached - you can see the most extraordinary rock formations near the southern edge of the island.<br /> And then you all understand why Boris is so happy in this geological paradise.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210270&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3YpUn5VOFcMaIDHW5I6fOrqNfqURzXYY6mbOTVbdETo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210270">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210271" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282158495"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Okay... I have more faith in these profile quake plots.</p> <p>View North</p> <p><a href="http://i33.tinypic.com/8ys4dz.png">http://i33.tinypic.com/8ys4dz.png</a></p> <p>View East</p> <p><a href="http://i38.tinypic.com/2mq0pow.png">http://i38.tinypic.com/2mq0pow.png</a></p> <p>Note how the quakes tend to veer off to the East as they get shallower. (compare the two views) </p> <p> View North is one degree across, View East is 0.5 degrees across.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210271&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pNcxpTglqDXmgthCfBJaYZJ2tLZbfPFHvUhpJyYLW-M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210271">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210272" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282158984"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#15 You mean, like in an ascending helical? Interesting...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210272&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="sbBH1fsYuxoDTa-QCAscePIAASoCS5ZvzUTYn5-_ISU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210272">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210273" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282159035"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Fantastic article, Boris, thanks! When will you write the definitive book on Etna?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210273&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="M1AIVia75NaAe4Em0Gv_uYgaMrjn9-Yl7AetJOZoX2k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike lyvers (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210273">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210274" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282159204"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Lucky #13: what strikes you as odd about the topology?</p> <p>Other Etna data graphs of interest:</p> <p>1. Using the Volume vs Time chart, if one goes to the Wikipedia Little Ice Age entry and captures the past portion of the temperature plot (1600-2004) and superimposes a semi-transparent image over the TvV chart, very nice correlation may be found in the rate change over time.</p> <p>2. Using the 'example of a cycle' chart, and superimposing upon it a portion of the 'Global Temperature Record' (also a wikipedia graphic), again, we see an interesting correlation between phases and temperature.</p> <p>So what is going on here? We got a hint, in Boris' comment above, that one of the phases of activity *may* be correlated to Ice Age recession of Etna glaciers at existed during the Dryas period of icecap recession.</p> <p>We think temperature glacier rebound, centered just below Switzerland where large icecap fragments once existed and glacier recession is much in evidence, and change in Mediterranean sea level during recent hemispheric cooling (LIA, within the last 400 years) might be factors at work in 'loading' aesthnosphere window flow to the magma chamber, with corresponding flank fissure periods during record warm periods.</p> <p>If the window aperture were relatively narrow, the adjacent plate flexure may explain sensitivity to continental isotactic shift and through changes in sea floor pressure.</p> <p>Conjecture of course, but interesting correlations nonetheless. If this were true, it might provide a basis for modeling past events and predicting activity cycles as a function of climate and sea-level change.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210274&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xtXdHyCpWmCdmHmNxeDn187oP5piF6_ZmOIlJlEBpHc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210274">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210275" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282159947"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I wouldn't exactly call that helical. A bend, yes... but I don't think a helix from that small amount of data. (2009 to like... two days ago)</p> <p>I did see a helix pattern in some of the Eyjafjallajökull quakes, but I can't tell you what it means... other than being an interesting fracture pattern.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210275&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="A-LLE2Ei2hdICXbdcAhUjk7lcJfz4gBx-k8P4z5mvoY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210275">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210276" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282162339"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#19 Yes, I recall having seen that pattern elsewhere too, that's why I mentioned it. Maybe there isn't enough length for a full helix to develop, or maybe magma isn't fluid enough to let it go, but it looks like, for my amateur eyes, after so many plots of crust and mantle features, that there's always this twisted shape in most instances, whatever they be, faults, quakes or rising magma. Comes to my mind another discussion upon its vortex-like behavior. (??!!!)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210276&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6yNl3MQaapQ6qxXcfk5r9Y3HRiSF7kdrhKOi71V12HY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210276">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210277" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282163728"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That's the idea of the blog!<br /> Learning more and more. I hope in the future an article of the different types of volcanic quakes (VT, LP, HB, etc.) to know what they mean, not only the abreviations, but the physical interpretation.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210277&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="H4xiZl5ahezNw3J7c8YPIM19v2T2BD_Sk7cHOWqUFyw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Guillermo (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210277">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210278" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282186377"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris,</p> <p>Thanks Boris, I'm looking forward to part 3. I was on Etna in october 2009 and returned in july this year, I never realized that Etna is such a huge volcano. The pit at the foot of South-East crater was intermittently steaming vigorously. <a href="http://picasaweb.google.nl/ptibben/EtnaSicily#5507022110941199874">http://picasaweb.google.nl/ptibben/EtnaSicily#5507022110941199874</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210278&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="V_UAbLkOHJ9aqQ7uQuVzAunemoWxQiAGIvX0U7FnEHg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Peter Tibben (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210278">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210279" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282201917"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato Rio, I did my master's project on Pantelleria last year. It is in an extensional setting despite the overall tectonics being compressional, which surprised me to begin with. GPS studies show that the western tip of Sicily is moving slightly more eastwards than Tunisia, leading to E-W stretching in the Sicily Channel. Paleomag also shows Sicily has rotated clockwise. Why this should be happening, though, I never did find out; I was measuring CO2 output so it wasn't really relevant. Boris may know more, he did write a paper on it, after all...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210279&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lo6xmG35PUwxVeGZwjaGOUzd-_0Dcrocd774dA6kXPE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.science20.com/blog/3277" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gareth (not verified)</a> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210279">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210280" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282209674"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>After the past week of non-stop earthquakes around the world this quiet trend that has been going on for the past few days almost feels like the calm before the storm.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210280&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qsBFfpr0uNsEtOXfOG8LPUxlM_6F1kqBMCrc9M_4POg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">R.Hurst (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210280">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210281" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282212177"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks again, Boris. You've given us such an amazing resource. Non-scientists almost never have access to graphics like these, with descriptions and analyses written in non-scientific English. I'll come back to this again and again.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210281&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ElLUbJJ85qOUxMsn6aeWYA1YT_JOeVYYr3XPgNHJLlg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Susan/Tx (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210281">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210282" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282212907"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@24 Haven't really noticed a quiet trend, then again haven't really paid attention. However I have noticed the sun's activity has quietened down from what is was the last few months. I'm not making any connections here just an observation.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210282&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DWLDDuvEQihg0QndvZaJvZBIZweHIIA8LkJjl5YRp-4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210282">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210283" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282213595"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@26 Chris, Did you see the solar eruption yesterday that happened on the far side of the sun, it was a blast which produced a C4-class solar flare and hurled a bright coronal mass ejection (CME) over the sun's western limb?</p> <p><a href="http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2010/18aug10/cme_c2_512.gif?PHPSESSID=mlg4454chi9gdqcjd9890ptp15">http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2010/18aug10/cme_c2_512.gif?PHPSESSID=…</a></p> <p>I look at the solar weather site too, it is possible that the magnetic storms could effect more that we think.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210283&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MSROZoi0s-tSJzbrXlycItfyPw96afGRwp-fNG2sizA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">R.Hurst (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210283">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210284" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282227690"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you, Boris! My knowledge is by far not good enough to understand everything but I still very much enjoy reading your great texts! Keep it coming, please :-).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210284&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RQT0QqSDQYcH9WYVFTiaGDdk9nlDgLC3Ad-Y89LaFfI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.stromboli.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Stefan, stromboli.org">Stefan, stromb… (not verified)</a> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210284">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210285" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282229217"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renato 11/12: Thanks for these references. it looks like the western end of Sicily is as complicated as the east (and thanks for that to Gareth too) I wonder if the CFdMS activity has some relation to that curious kink in the plate margin down the west of Sicily (diagram from Boris' link to Highly Allocthonous) We really need Boris on this one. </p> <p>An ability to visualise in three dimensions is vital for geologists..it's something I'll have to re-learn :o(</p> <p>Gareth: more please sometime on Pantelleria, it's one of those forgotten volcanoes that no-one ever mentions</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210285&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MUHFIiaVvPC5rVc6HaBFlCNKzJBDN0nvk1CmuTjzZEM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210285">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210286" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282230022"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Gareth:<br /> Thank you for the update. It is becoming clearer now.<br /> @Mike don:<br /> Thanks for bringing up the question. It was a fascinating piece of research.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210286&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ky1pYDcmfkokWFoauQWtngJGS9ouXBN53jLvqSlCXVE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210286">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210287" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282232769"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@23, Gareth: this citation answers your question on the clockwise rotation you mentioned in your comment.</p> <p>Structural evidence for Neogene rotations in the eastern Sicilian fold and thrust belt. Monaco and DiGuidi (2006)<br /> J Struct. Geol. 28(4):561-574.</p> <p>&gt;From a geodynamic point of view, the Neogene clockwise rotation in the eastern Sicily fold and thrust belt is related to the regional framework of the AfricaâEurope convergence.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210287&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="n_Pb5PCf0OAEBsdx4H4-EiOKmvrzXi9U1vrxEp1ezjU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210287">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210288" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282236116"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Historical Etna flow diagram from Dr. Behncke's post draped on Google Earth (3D) with roadways enabled. 3 x vertical exaggeration.</p> <p><a href="http://i37.tinypic.com/8ygcvq.png">http://i37.tinypic.com/8ygcvq.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210288&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Fa5p8NRhB-qZUOqwaBOv1IbxPOJhhc13Xgqo-QKLwEg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210288">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210289" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282279329"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@27 R.Hurst Yes I saw that. Pretty cool stuff. Seeing the sun build up to some high activity for the last few months and now showing some low activity again is a bit of a let down, almost anticlimatic. I was hyped up over all the sun activity then I read about 3 X-class solar flares that were directed at earth in 2005, I think it was, and really had no adverse effects besides some nice aurora's further south. Also I'm waiting to see if we get more swarms at yellowstone in the dec/jan time frame.... sorry to diverge from the Etna topic at hand.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210289&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hg21EJTptvLEoJzCskpCAqaisZB-eXi7Lzp9HYZbg2k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210289">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210290" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282281003"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@33Chris, A great site to see a dozen pics of the real-time sun each with a different filter is </p> <p><a href="http://www.solarmonitor.org/index.php">http://www.solarmonitor.org/index.php</a></p> <p>I made a mistake posting the sun comment on the Etna topic, I was aiming for the summer thread #2, sorry everyone.</p> <p>I really enjoy reading about Etna Boris, I brought up this page at home and my 14 year old son saw your write-up. On Discovery channel last month we watched a show on the most dangerous volcanoes in the world and Mt.Etna was featured, lets just say that he was very impressed, you are a great writer Boris.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210290&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OC639DsIL2VxM59RGDsUuHLx-MSi9ZKDjacIUm6z784"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">R.Hurst (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210290">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210291" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282294854"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Lurking, master of charts could you do on on the activity at Vatnajökull?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210291&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Ic60uUSnos4nUfbV8L-tngZRr5O91JGi2SQm6qOpQgk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gina ct (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210291">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210292" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291747014"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello.This post was really motivating, particularly because I was investigating for thoughts on this subject last week.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210292&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="V05JU63lsAho7_RmPB4wZq-CJfVW6b-XXIPgLFTMebU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.wwwwwwwwgggtffsdfhzujzhdgfghj.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Juliana Pride (not verified)</a> on 07 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210292">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210293" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291847156"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Amazing points. Going to want a bit of time to ponder the info=D</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210293&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4tcwvg8Da38Cf70KFqPFQELjdZ8FAg-Y8X04GUdVG1M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://srftjrsyj.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Clarisa Mosakowski (not verified)</a> on 08 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210293">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210294" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292666059"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I image this could be diverse upon the written content? even so I nonetheless believe that it is usually suitable for nearly any form of topic subject matter, because it might continuously be fulfilling to determine a warm and delightful face or possibly listen a voice whilst initial landing.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210294&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xb0CL3xcBDy74PX4w587zWlSguvkodNIQeD1nO_qv9U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.thebleeder.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ebooks online (not verified)</a> on 18 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210294">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/18/mt-etna-the-current-dynamics%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 18 Aug 2010 04:14:53 +0000 eklemetti 104352 at https://scienceblogs.com Welcome to Etna Week! https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/16/welcome-to-etna-week <span>Welcome to Etna Week!</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://www.decadevolcano.net/photos/etna/1106/etna_e4312.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Italy's Mt. Etna erupting in November 2006.</em></p> <p>Well, I am currently off in the wilderness, but that doesn't mean that things aren't still hopping here at <em>Eruptions</em>. We are lucky to have <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/qa_dr_boris_behncke_answers_yo.php" target="_blank">Dr. Boris Behncke</a> of the <a href="http://www.ct.ingv.it/" target="_blank">INGV Catania</a> as that blogger and he brings us a three-part series on Mt. Etna on the island of Silicy. That means this week is <strong>Etna Week</strong> here on <em>Eruptions</em>, so for all of you chomping at the bit for more information on the Italian volcano, you are going to get it (and then some).</p> <p><a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0101-06=" target="_blank:&gt;Etna&lt;/a&gt; is one of the most active volcanoes in the world, producing a spectacular show on the island of Sicily - and sometimes becoming a real threat to the people of the region. It has captivated people for thousands of years, starting in 729 B.C. from the Greeks and Romans who would peer into the volcano and wonder about how the inner workings of the world worked to &lt;a href=" http:="">modern-day satellites who can watch that same summit from space</a>. </p> <p>I think you're all going to love this series, so I'll thank Boris now for his great work. Enjoy!</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/etna" hreflang="en">Etna</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/guest-blogger" hreflang="en">guest blogger</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/italy" hreflang="en">italy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210318" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281956848"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Erik @Boris<br /> This blog is similar to soap operas in Brazil: once you see the first chapter you get addicted. You guys should be in the entertainment business.<br /> Just coming back from work to my daily checking of volcanic news (all quiet over Iceland) and you give us Etna! And introducing it with the most fantastic picture.<br /> Good grief!<br /> I have papers to write, but I'll just get a snack and read through the main page.<br /> Amazing blog! I'm so happy to be here.<br /> Thank you!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210318&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4WMVghdLShW4rO5earHHwLM68FNobgGQ_jgGmxynJ1Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 16 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210318">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210319" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281991611"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Heh, better than Shark Week! on the Discovery Channel.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210319&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="powrMjUsaYEYeobQdaIxCbTsSlxEcALOPjjRx5bI26g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 16 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210319">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210320" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282010340"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Boris:<br /> Congratulations for the beautiful family you have.<br /> I saw the picture of your daughter (<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/etnaboris/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/etnaboris/</a>) playing with sulfur on Etna's slope and I remember that when I was a kid my mom used an old Portuguese formula ("talco Granado") to sooth our skin rashes. It consists of a mix of talc and sulfur and happens to be an excellent antiseptic and deodorant, specially for parts of the body exposed to heavy sweating. The patent was bought by Johnson &amp; Johnson, and I don't know if it is commercialized elsewhere. Still today I use it as a dry deodorant (it has a slight sulfur smell but it proves to be excellent for feet and armpits).<br /> I must say I was happy to find out that Etna has a low lethality history (only 84 in historical registers), otherwise I would be worried for your family safety. But the landscape and the volcano itself are stunning , so I assume you people must have a a wonderful time living in the shade of Mama Etna.<br /> Looking forward to more information on this amazing volcano.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210320&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PEKJ0KOY6Rq0kDB_i6HOooSF4OiFA_CdDKwCD5_zsFI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 16 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210320">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/16/welcome-to-etna-week%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 16 Aug 2010 03:57:12 +0000 eklemetti 104354 at https://scienceblogs.com GVP's Sally Kuhn Sennert answers your questions! https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/13/gvps-sally-kuhn-sennert-answer <span>GVP&#039;s Sally Kuhn Sennert answers your questions!</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Earlier this summer, we had a chance to ask Sally Kuhn Sennert of the Smithsonian Institution/USGS Global Volcanism Program questions about her job as the main writer of the well-loved Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. Well, now here are the answers!</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/Sally_MtRainier.JPG"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-ae6b3b31bbf1b689e253720c56a80737-Sally_MtRainier-thumb-400x300-53995.jpg" alt="i-ae6b3b31bbf1b689e253720c56a80737-Sally_MtRainier-thumb-400x300-53995.jpg" /></a><br /><em>Sally Kuhn Sennert of the Global Volcanism Program in front of Mt. Rainier, Washington.</em></p> <p><strong>Q&amp;A Sally Kuhn Sennert:</strong></p> <p><em>Q: Could you describe how you go about putting together the weekly update?</em><br /><em>A</em>: If time permits, I would start to gather information on Friday when particular sources post their weekly summaries. The majority of the information gathering, however, actually happens on Monday mornings, when I visit about 40 websites. I also rely on reports coming to me via email either directly from the source (like from Rabaul Volcano Observatory) or indirectly through news feeds. I read the source information and write reports for most of Monday and Tuesday, often revisiting sites for updated information in the process. On Wednesday morning, I check a few more sites and then pass the "finished" Weekly Report to colleagues. The Report then goes through two rounds of editing by two of three regular Weekly Report editors in the Global Volcanism Program. In the meantime, I prepare the website files, such as the interactive map. If everything goes smoothly, the Report should be posted around 4 PM on any given Wednesday! Whew!</p> <p><em>Q: How do you differentiate between reliable and unreliable sources?</em><br /><em>A</em>: I consider THE authority to be the folks at individual observatories and therefore the reports they produce. I also utilize the notices from the multiple Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACS). News reports are also important, especially when there are no other sources. With the media, I try to only use major sources, such as Reuters or Associated Press, and I use them carefully! Once in a while, one of the sources gets something wrong (analysts initially thought plume seen in satellite imagery was from volcano- later discovered it was from forest fire) or I misinterpret a translation, and a correction has to be posted in the report. That is the nature of the "rapid reporting" of the Weekly.</p> <p><em>Q: Do you get a lot of "tips" from people about volcanic activity that is happening?</em><br /><em>A</em>: Funny thing about that- on a few occasions now, I have learned about eruptions I had no clue about from my grandma or mom!! In my defense, they are events that happened on weekends, when I am tuned out. Yeah, that's my story.</p> <p><em>Q: What would make your job easier in terms of getting a complete picture of activity?</em><br /><em>A</em>: Definitely visiting more volcanoes!! It is so much easier getting the big picture of an event if you have been there and know the layout of the land or have seen the previous eruption products first hand. I would also love to meet more volcanologists (esp. folks at the observatories) around the world. Familiarity with people you communicate with is so important.</p> <p><em>Q: How do you see the reports changing in the future? What about the GVP in general?</em><br /><em>A</em>: As the world becomes more digital, GVP has lost some of the personal connections with contacts that have really strengthened the monthly Bulletin, the database of activity, and to some degree the Weekly in the past. People used to call in or fax information, but now, observers can just post reports on their own blogs or websites! We are in the process of really reconnecting with people and fostering better information exchange. We are also continuing to improve our website and how we communicate to reach as many people as possible. For the Weekly specifically, I would love to see better maps available for each volcano- perhaps something 3-D and interactive.</p> <p><em>Q: Have any new social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter made your job easier or harder?</em><br /><em>A</em>: Both! It is important to keep up with the current communication technology and methods; if you want to get your information out there, you have to do it in the way your audience prefers. The downside is that I can't keep up! My grandma and I share this complaint.</p> <p><em>Q: What sort of questions do you get at the GVP from the general public? How about the media?</em><br /><em>A</em>: Public questions vary depending on the interests of the individual asking the question. GVP recently participated in the Smithsonian's Folk Life festival and showcased what we did. Questions from the public varied from why the "African Plate" is named the Nubia Plate to what was the magnitude of an earthquake that happened in the questioner's hometown on the day they were born. Questions like these, and seeing the wonder on people's faces when you talk about volcanoes or geology in any form, make it all worth it. Most of the questions from the media come during an eruption and center on trying to get us to predict when it will stop. Enthusiastic reporters are always fun to talk to, no matter what they try to make you say!</p> <p><em>Q: Is there any way the general public can get involved with helping the GVP, the weekly reports or the website?</em><br /><em>A</em>: YES! GVP hosts several volunteers that work on the Bulletin reports, if you're interested drop me an email. We also welcome reports of volcanic activity from anyone that will send them, either volcanologists doing fieldwork or the casual vacationing observer. We do need specific information to incorporate the information into a report, such as date of observation or where the observer was. The more info the better! Many of our reports of volcanic activity "in the middle of nowhere" come from a recreational sailor passing by or a hiker on an adventure. I often ask, if a volcano in the ocean erupts and no one is there to see it happen, did it? A later random floating pumice raft may have the answer. </p> <p><em>Q: What volcanic event of the last few years was the most interesting to follow?</em><br /><em>A</em>: The eruptions that stand out in my mind are from Jebel at Tair (2007), Nevado del Huila (2007), Kelut's dome growth (2007), Chaitén (2008), Sarychev Peak (2009), and finally the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. All of these events were new, exciting, important, and fun to follow.</p> <p><em>Q: What else do you do for the Global Volcanism Program and/or the Smithsonian Institute/USGS?</em><br /><em>A</em>: My current high-priority "other project" is to write film scripts. I am helping my Global Volcanism Program colleagues create short educational films based on our historic film footage archive that we are currently digitizing. Several will be available on-line very soon, and in multiple languages.</p> <p><em>Q: What is your favorite volcano?</em><br /><em>A</em>: I have to pick only one? That is tough! My default favorite (from grad school days) is Popocatépetl, specifically because of the fabulous existence of "Popo Cam", but when I really think about it, I have to say Kilauea. It is such an interesting and accessible volcano! People from all walks of life, all ages, all backgrounds and interests can go there, hopefully at the right time, and have an experience of a lifetime. I lucked out when I participated in a field school and got to stand on cooled lava flows while watching (and feeling the heat of) new Earth being born right in front of me. I will never forget my time there, and probably never again eat a burrito as good as the one I cooked on an incandescent crack. </p> <p><em>Q: How do you determine which volcanoes are listed in the active category versus the ongoing category (each week)? (From Diane; Stephen in the UK)</em><br /><em>A</em>: There is a page called "Criteria and Disclaimers" that discusses the topic of your question (<a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports/usgs/index.cfm?content=disclaimers">http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports/usgs/index.cfm?content=disclaimers</a>). Even though the reasoning behind the category assignment seems straight-forward, there are some volcanoes or some eruptions that don't quite fit the mold. So I sometimes consider the assignment on a case-by-case basis. For instance, I reported seismic swarms (no eruption) at Melimoyu in mid-June 2010. That volcano has never been reported on in the Weekly or the Bulletin, as it has only two documented eruptions in the Holocene. I assigned it to the "New Activity/Unrest" section to draw attention to it simply because it has not been reported on before. There are other volcanoes that have periodic or "typical" seismic swarms that I don't include in the weekly at all.</p> <p><em>Q: Why are there sometimes unfinished or outdated information on the Global Volcanism Program website? (from Jon Friman)</em><br /><em>A</em>: The only area that may seem "unfinished" that I can think of is the Geologic Summaries written for each volcano. They are occasionally written in a way that does not accommodate new activity, and need to be re-worded. They, along with some other areas of the website, get updated yearly. As far as "outdated," one of the main goals of GVP is to database and archive information about volcanic activity over the last 10,000 years. We are currently archiving data from volcanoes active in the Miocene as well. So, by design the archived information is "outdated!"<br /> Seriously, if you see something on the website that seems incorrect, unfinished, or just leaves you scratching your head, please email me and I will certainly look into it.</p> <p><em>Q: Why was the recent large eruption at Redoubt 2008-2009 removed from the list of larger Holocene eruptions? (from Riggs)</em><br /><em>A</em>: I am not aware that it was there and removed. The list of large Holocene eruptions consists of volcanoes with VEI eruptions classified as 4 or higher. Perhaps the Redoubt eruption in question was thought to have been a 4 or higher at first and then changed to a 3 once the activity and products were better understood. </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Thu, 08/12/2010 - 22:49</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/global-volcanism-program" hreflang="en">Global Volcanism Program</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/qa" hreflang="en">Q&amp;A</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/smithsonian-institution" hreflang="en">Smithsonian Institution</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/usgs" hreflang="en">USGS</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/redoubt" hreflang="en">Redoubt</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/smithsonian" hreflang="en">Smithsonian</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vaac" hreflang="en">VAAC</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210202" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281674222"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Erik Klementti:<br /> We are most honored to have Sally Kuhn Sennert answering to our questions. Hope she will continue doing her wonderful job and that we may someday be able to provide some contribution from here. And hope she comes back again.<br /> Looking forward to see the new improvements to the GVP site. It will be great to have 3d maps and footages to illuminate our volcanic discussions.<br /> Thank you Sally and Erik!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210202&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="q5Uz3WNaSTTr0O3cHgSxzlbxcdu8brvaqdDPguLzsWI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 13 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210202">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210203" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281688348"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I've obviously missed the opportunity to forward a question and I would like to make up to that.</p> <p>I would like to know why a continuous red status volcano like Chaitën is left out of the report.</p> <p>Thanks in advance for answering my question and the opportunity to ask questions in the first place.</p> <p>Great opportunity, continue the good work.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210203&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0K-E0lrIJAUh74FIc7d2j1p3CW0nMAsmHfp4P24Q6Bo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">R. de Haan (not verified)</span> on 13 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210203">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210204" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281701671"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>And maybe we should thank her for another recent improvement to the GVP site: a vastly increased photo archive for many of the world's volcanoes</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210204&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5ky2orPXb6qNs7iPN1hS99vYmthEvXnADftfYFZeTis"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 13 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210204">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210205" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281713102"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'd like to thank Sally and everyone at the GVP for the weekly report. I always look forward to Wednesday afternoons!</p> <p>Also, to echo mike @ #3, the GVP recently added thousands of volcano photos to the site. </p> <p>Keep up the good work!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210205&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="iyBKkcUleBve_2RMy6GHgS1iW457g1pW0CKS6NdI4iw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.kccu.org/doug.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Doug C (not verified)</a> on 13 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210205">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210206" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281733544"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OT: For everyone that could answer. A volcano classified as a 'caldera' could be a 'stratovolcano' at the same time?<br /> Because I think there are stratovolcanoes that have a caldera only as a morphologic feature caused by an individual eruption.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210206&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="X7_reOWmy2W2oTT35-5MStZnAm01sdYvjyUA8eGESx0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Guillermo (not verified)</span> on 13 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210206">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210207" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281755684"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For stratovolcanoes that have calderas as well look no further than two of the largest eruptions of the last two centuries: Tambora and Pinatubo. Both volcanoes now have a substantial caldera but both also retain enough of a peak to still be a stratovolcano as well.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210207&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="x_uedRN5dBqOOoNs9fGP7Hs_UAatPM-mtw05wUHXv1I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Newton (not verified)</span> on 13 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210207">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210208" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281780302"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OT, a new episodic tremore slip (ETS) initiated in the northwest a few days ago. These events happen every 14 months or so and it was only a few years ago that seismologists figured out how to tease the tremor signals out of the background noise. The tremor seems to be associated with non ductile shearing and/or hydaulic movements in or near the accreationary wedge above the subducting plate. To me this sounds like part of the story of the ongoing uplift of the eastern Olympic mountains, but I haven't yet found a report that identifies if there is a vertical component to the tremor.</p> <p>Here are two site that track the episode:<br /> the blog, with near daily comments and links to previous events: <a href="http://www.pnsn.org/WEBICORDER/DEEPTREM/summer2010.html">http://www.pnsn.org/WEBICORDER/DEEPTREM/summer2010.html</a></p> <p>the data map, updated daily with tremor location: <a href="http://www.pnsn.org/tremor/">http://www.pnsn.org/tremor/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210208&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mhGMOGkTqqrGEK_fIaHA4shgZhnprTwn_zdaPkSz4eg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Doug McL (not verified)</span> on 14 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210208">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210209" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281807652"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you ,Sally for answering our questions. I check the info periodically and I plan to check it more regularly again as I used to. Thank you for the work you do.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210209&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Ue8od2f1mPrbuCK7x3TJnMp5kCCXzKmaJMDq6eKFKaU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane N CA (not verified)</span> on 14 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210209">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210210" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281817899"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@R. de Haan: The Chaitén status was lowered to yellow a few months ago, although is still moderately active.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210210&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4lq89CTn_6QuFWlUOFAAanyPDhVeOzqXVjfB_XiPOjQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Guillermo (not verified)</span> on 14 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210210">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210211" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281827911"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you, Sally Kuhn Sennert, for answering our questions. Come back and see us! </p> <p>Riggs is actually the name of my beagle, as is Sassy, I used them in my email addy.</p> <p>CHAITEN Southern Chile 2008  May 2  4<br /> OKMOK Aleutian Islands 2008  Jul 12  4?<br /> KASATOCHI Aleutian Islands 2008  Aug 7  4<br /> REDOUBT Southwestern Alaska 2009  Mar 22  4<br /> SARYCHEV PEAK Kuril Islands 2009  Jun 11  4</p> <p><a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/largeeruptions.cfm">http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/largeeruptions.cfm</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210211&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IT5C1Pcx4anNZgFxcSUD9qVifVgDYausKN6cjJ5QXW4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.lifestylesconsulting.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ed Murphy (not verified)</a> on 14 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210211">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210212" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282265075"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I read your post very impressed seen this kind of important informationâs. Really am interested to back to your blog again to gather some more informationâs.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210212&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7Gt1gAjv-2g83NVkEe8Dblbt3qyeRsjGkULyXaA1fLM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://echografilm.com/echographie-3D-4D-questions.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="centre d&#039; echographie 3d  ">centre d&#039; echo… (not verified)</a> on 19 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210212">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210213" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282830204"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm Sally's grandma, and LOVED the article she wrote ! Talk about a proud grandma ! Way to go , Sally Sue ! You are special , and much loved !</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210213&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kJE3n83C3AfKlCWKEUUsrCrNT3x-iCC6DteAkRgy4KY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Esther Norris (not verified)</span> on 26 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210213">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210214" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282916573"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi Sally,<br /> What a wonderful article. I had no idea I had such a smart, talented great niece! Your field has to be very exciting and interesting. Keep up the good work!<br /> Virginia Norris, Fla.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210214&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cSqvEmwT5lJMjSuYqr3tSVKNzFycqBy486ZeFRYPzBw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://vn34695" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Virginia Norris (not verified)</a> on 27 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210214">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210215" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283158976"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wow, Sally, I am impressed with all you do. Of course, I don't understand much of it, but I'm impressed nonetheless.<br /> I have such a smart niece!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210215&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8gmPCkTk_SdnFwZithLaDJH8Eacxu37EvUPH1oB5x84"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Aunt Lynne (not verified)</span> on 30 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210215">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210216" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1283335103"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What a great article and interesting career you have! I am ERUPTING with envy!!!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210216&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KnHShFiqtfm6Hx2lEQndLve91mUaPQtHQkLPREAVC2w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bill Norris (not verified)</span> on 01 Sep 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210216">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210217" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1289221369"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I have been here before but this is among the best blogposts yet. continue the good work!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210217&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Zrcmh7Rkbz3Zofzvt8APnb1T5xRELmddhrVImvFsfVM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.culturadigital.cl/wp/?p=1011" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">webkinz (not verified)</a> on 08 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210217">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/13/gvps-sally-kuhn-sennert-answer%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 13 Aug 2010 02:49:04 +0000 eklemetti 104350 at https://scienceblogs.com Odd volcano news: Volcano stadium, wheat from Eyjafjallajökull and volcanoes as ads https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/10/odd-volcano-news-volcano-stadi <span>Odd volcano news: Volcano stadium, wheat from Eyjafjallajökull and volcanoes as ads</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>August has been rather quiet for real volcano news, but I did find some more, well, odd news to mention. It is all volcano-related - to an extent - so here we go:</p> <p><img src="http://dvice.com/assets_c/2010/08/Chivas-stadium-by-Massaud-thumb-550xauto-44681.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>The new volcano-inspired Chivas stadium in Guadalajara, Mexico.</em></p> <ul><li>Last year we had the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/living_around_and_in_volcanoes.php" target="_blank">volcano mall</a> in Italy, this year we have the <a href="http://dvice.com/archives/2010/08/wild-stadium-lo.php" target="_blank">volcano football (that is soccer for us Americans) stadium</a> in Mexico (see above). The stadium in Guadalajara has green, sloping sides that that open to the "crater" that is filled with the pitch and the stands - seems fitting for a city in the middle of the <a href="http://www.nationalatlas.gov/articles/geology/features/mexvolcan.html" target="_blank">Trans-Mexico Volcanic Belt</a>. No word on what happens when the home team scores.</li> <li>Over in Iceland, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/eyjafjallajokull/" target="_blank">Eyjafjallajökull</a> is being thanked for bringing a <a href="http://www.icenews.is/index.php/2010/08/10/iceland-volcano-thanked-for-bumper-wheat-harvest/" target="_blank">bumper crop of wheat</a> to the southern part of the island. One of the wheat farmers, Olafur Eggertsson from Thorvaldseyri, says that he thinks the ash from the eruption helped by adding nutrients to the soil - although the especially warm summer for Iceland this year likely played an important role as well.</li> <li>And some of you might have seen the news (or the ad) for a new <em>Guitar Hero</em>-like game called <em>Power Gig 2</em> where <a href="http://www.thesixthaxis.com/2010/08/10/developer-drops-5000-guitars-in-volcano/comment-page-2/#comments" target="_blank">the developer supposedly dropped 5,000 <em>Guitar Hero</em> controllers</a> into the crater of Eyjafjallajökull from an airplane. I've watched <a href="http://e4g.info/news/411/powergig-destroys-guitar-hero-guitars-in-a-volcano/" target="_blank">the video</a> and I'm 99% sure it is a fake - I mean, it is supposed to be July 2010 when they make the drop, but the "crater" at Eyjafjallajökull is filled with a partially crusted-over lava lake - which, of course, never existed. So, yeah, I think they spliced in CGI or other video from a lava lake because dropping the controllers into a relatively cool crater lake (of water) wouldn't have the <a href="http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2010/08/power-gig-2/" target="_blank">"extreme" edge that the developers were hoping</a>. However, that means that somewhere in Iceland lie the shattered remains of 5,000 fake guitars ... !</li> <li>And in a less odd and more head-scratching moment - or at least an example of how the media can get things wrong - there is <a href="http://gulfnews.com/news/world/philippines/quakes-due-to-undersea-volcano-expert-claims-1.666092" target="_blank">news that Jim Holden of the University of Massachusetts</a> (<em>UPDATE: here is the <a href="www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100712_underwatervolcano.html" target="_blank">original NOAA press release</a>, thanks to Passerby</em>) was misquoted as saying he thinks the deep earthquakes underneath Moro Gulf in the Philippines in late July were related to an <a href="http://www.aolnews.com/surge-desk/article/another-gigantic-undersea-volcano-found-off-coast-of-indonesia/19551321" target="_blank">recently-discovered undersea volcano named Kawio Barat</a>. Now, the article I found doesn't go into details, but the USGS solutions for the earthquakes show focal depths of over 500 km (very, very deep), so for earthquakes like that to be related to an eruption of an undersea volcano would be, to say the least, very surprising. I have a feeling that somehow something go lost-in-translation - <a href="http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20100809-285705/RP-quakes-near-undersea-volcano" target="_blank">the original article in the <em>Inquirer</em> or the NOAA press release</a> doesn't seem to say the same thing.</li> </ul></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Tue, 08/10/2010 - 05:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eyjafjallajapkull" hreflang="en">Eyjafjallajökull</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/iceland" hreflang="en">Iceland</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kawio-barat" hreflang="en">Kawio Barat</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mexico" hreflang="en">Mexico</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/philippines" hreflang="en">Philippines</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-society" hreflang="en">volcanoes and society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/crater-lakes" hreflang="en">crater lakes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-society" hreflang="en">volcanoes and society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210169" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281435178"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik, I agree about the Philippine quake stories.The first one, from Gulf News, obviously leaps to a conclusion never made by the science crew. Looking at the speculative trash that passes as top news stories on several sites today, this doesn't surprise me.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210169&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ZR5zon_HyrZI0MVZ61xuyK30TEQJgbRKlgY-mHeRz-U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">EKoh (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210169">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210170" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281435501"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here's a news report (in icelandic) on the guitar drop:<br /><a href="http://visir.is/fleygdu-fimmhundrud-plastgitorum-yfir-heklu/article/2010827897827">http://visir.is/fleygdu-fimmhundrud-plastgitorum-yfir-heklu/article/201…</a></p> <p>In short:<br /> They had planned to drop over Eyjafjallajökull but it was decided to do it over Hekla instead.<br /> The shot of the crater is CG "enhanced".<br /> Two drops of 250 guitars each were performed by firemen from ReykjavÃk.<br /> A rescue service crew on the ground was tasked with picking up the guitars after the drop as a prerequisite for permission.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210170&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="y4dmnhE_TOE7QtVFRMbu-9IDl59_0hDWU3NOsZRILZo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Bjarni, Hafnarfjordur, Iceland">Bjarni, Hafnar… (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210170">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="148" id="comment-2210171" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281436017"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Bjarni - that makes a little more sense, but by "digitally enhanced" they mean "changed completely to have lava in it. The current Hekla crater is quiet. Nothing like "truth in advertising".</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210171&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Wvf-kwqS4SMK2EidV5lbdm0yxAIUz9yJ-ybubmOtJOY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210171">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/eklemetti"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/eklemetti" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210172" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281436158"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The volcano in the video definitely wasn't Eyjafjallajökull; the shape was all wrong, for one; there was no glacier, and it should have been spewing steam. The one in the video had fumes rising.</p> <p>It was an Icelandic plane (DC3?), though, and there might have been 50 "guitars" that they dumped.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210172&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MGnbjtQqkFg7B0nhgcAnPm5ev0R3qlVFHwM5ya2J3Tk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210172">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210173" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281437047"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The bumper crops were also mentioned in the St. Helens stories a while back...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210173&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7z67-xizYnqoPuWeDDw1L8A9I70d0UG0uUjDwqZQcSE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210173">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210174" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281437443"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The NOAA research expedition public website info and a press release got garbled by a reporter who sought to connect the deep-focus EQ activity (many more than 3) in the Moro Gulf with the discovery of the new volcano, by proximity.</p> <p>Jim Holden is quoted in this NOAA Jul 13 press release, describing the discovery of the new volcano<br /><a href="http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100712_underwatervolcano.html">www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100712_underwatervolcano.html</a></p> <p>The Okeanos Explorer US-Indonesia Deep Sea Project Expedition specifics and daily log (with cool graphics, photos and explanations) can be found at:</p> <p><a href="http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/10index/welcome.html">http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/10index/welcome.html</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210174&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="YbYedXDByjqELJF1xl9VTJn2Ol2J1MhpC9S8l9l-CHM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210174">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210175" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281440822"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Really restless today. I expect another EQ to pop up on the map soon.</p> <p><a href="http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/stodvaplott.html">http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/stodvaplott.html</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210175&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0yVX9FTvaoF5W4s9UP4h4FFH7qeWkZPFOsdvKde-gRc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210175">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210176" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281441243"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sorry for spam posting but can someone explain to me why the 2-4Hz bands has been acting like an equalizer today? </p> <p>GOD and MID station has been all over the place and these sit on either side of Lady E. MID on west and GOD on east side.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210176&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SbVKrCtPjz_EUDx_c3u66GtHzQEN4LMIbLvMg5JCPQM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210176">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210177" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281449249"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>First of all, the item in The Inquirer was not a 'press release'. Both it, and the one in the Gulf News, were "news" reports from obviously science-impaired journalists, who wanted to goose their stories by dragging the recent earthquakes into them. There was no 'garbling' involved. It was out-and-out falsification, since Jim Holden apparently never said one word about the earthquakes in an actual NOAA press release.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210177&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ErJeqJmau1fe131hUu7h8iTsj7Ck4twMw-PjDG5-ygE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mjkbk (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210177">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210178" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281451109"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Just a comment on the stadium story (haven't had a chance to digest the rest of the post yet). Latin America seems to have a strange link between football/soccer and volcanoes. There is a football pitch in the crater of Guatemala's Agua (according to GVP), and before it resumed activity in the 1980s there was a pitch -of sorts- on the caldera floor of Colombia's Galeras. Can't imagine that the playing surface was much good, probably worse than Wembley (in joke for the Brits on here) Wonder if there are/have been any others?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210178&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9IJ4kA3gKy3IE-emdBJ8VnMnEuxkJHjXyoCzyWU6sIY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210178">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210179" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281451338"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik, you didn't pursue this link //top-10-list.org/2010/01/01/largest-underwater-volcanoes/ in the Kawio Barat-article? Amongst other things, this list informs us that "Heimaey, Iceland" is the world's fifth largest underwater volcano. Funny, at height of some 9,100m (29,855 ft), you'd think that the world's tallest mountain as measured from base to summit, Mauna Kea, would at least get a mention...</p> <p>*grin*</p> <p>PS. The summit of Mount Everest is only about 3,650 to 4,650 m (11,980 to 15,260 ft) above the plateaus on either side.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210179&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LNowbuKoUdNj6O04D8p110oMdl_lhKfKeyreA87P4zY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Henrik, Swe (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210179">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="148" id="comment-2210180" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281453194"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@9 - Yeah, maybe I was hoping that it was just a mistake/mistranslation, but yes, you're probably right that it was a media grab.<br /> @10 - Wow, I'd love to see any info about the pitch on Galeras!<br /> @Passerby - Thanks for the links to the original press releases. I think I'll elevate them to the main text.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210180&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oGSjHylWvDlLfBKYsEFUUrwh736ONZR6A6LJvgborIQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210180">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/eklemetti"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/eklemetti" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210181" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281467018"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>'Science' in hindsight</p> <blockquote><p>A previously unmapped fault was responsible for the magnitude-7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on Jan. 12, not the fault originally blamed for the temblor, scientists announced Tuesday.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/haiti-quake-new-fault-0434/">http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/haiti-quake-new-fault-0434/</a></p></blockquote> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210181&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MPHJJ9thaLazf8lCGedhI5OU0lKTy0DPM_Tn-PMERCY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Raving (not verified)</span> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210181">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210182" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281499856"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Yesterday there was some odd signals in the tremorcharts at <a href="http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/stodvaplott.html">http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/stodvaplott.html</a></p> <p>They seem to be in some sort of a pattern. I mean MID and GOD charts. This would suggest some sort of manmade noise. Can this be confirmed?</p> <p>It was mainly the 2-4Hz curves which were affected.</p> <p>Today it started again and this time it is both 2-4Hz and 1-2Hz.</p> <p>I am really curious as to what may cause this. Any suggestions?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210182&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ANa9GB-5gFa3z6CbXENlXXW-gCuMBQwuSUuue3z57x0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 11 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210182">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210183" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281502380"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@14 -<br /> Much more pronounced on MID: starting at 0900 or a bit earlier, break at about noon, another break at 1500, stops around 2000.</p> <p>I used these plots: <a href="http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/oroi_mid.html">http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/oroi_mid.html</a> and <a href="http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/oroi_god.html">http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/oroi_god.html</a> too.</p> <p>Road works on the road to the boonies just south of Markarfljót?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210183&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XbSGb5vaiv9h_da02WQ-5-CzsCfZ7RoBgAEP_RjBdu0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 11 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210183">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210184" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281534443"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik (12): the Galeras reference came from Stan Williams book of the 1993 eruption, 'Surviving Galeras', page 28: "an old wooden soccer goal sits in pieces on the amphitheater floor, placed there by police and soldiers who once played on what was undoubtedly the world's most dangerous soccer field"</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210184&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PH-gPkS4afjSsxZdJCOPLGaBTBDRfR431LfueN5ncqs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 11 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210184">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210185" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281540077"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Kultsi #4 - To be exacting, "Páll Sveinsson", TF-NPK, is an ex-USAF C-47.</p> <p>@Raving #13 - Finally we know it wasn't our fault.</p> <p>@Kultsi #14 - Markarfljót flooded today.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210185&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="t2GwvCnusACjjc2Z1V7THpxbbR0KQRPN_7q5tJNnSCQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reynir, NK, .is (not verified)</span> on 11 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210185">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210186" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281560913"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, that's assuming that anything was ever dropped. Otherwise whoever pulled the stunt should get a huge fine for dumping without a license and they can pay for the mess to be cleaned up as well.</p> <p>As far as dropping things go, I'm always reminded of Lockheed-Martin dropping a satellite in the integration bay ...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210186&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KVxJcAclYXhOvq-djepErxy_T_jUURKVDchz1Y3Y8WQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MadScientist (not verified)</span> on 11 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210186">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210187" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282179725"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I don't believe there is a lava-lake in ANY icelandic volcano? </p> <p>And by the way, Guys/Girls - I'm going up there again - leaving from Copenhagen tomorrow morning. After being there for the Fimmvorduhals-eruption at easter this year - I feel an urge to go back and trek across the new lava. Will send you all a thought when standing up there. </p> <p>Best wishes<br /> Heidi</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210187&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-lBey6nNP4Sv5Y8qyDq1-p9PkjrvIYJw33Z9BCRXm74"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Heidi Ritterbusch (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210187">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210188" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282186658"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#19 @Heidi<br /> I don't think there is any lava lake, no.<br /> Wish you a good trip, and please, tell us if hot lava is still present under the solidified new ground.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210188&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UWS930oH29JtErMxEgOQhKXIGIpze24fe4W7qupYyGc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210188">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210189" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282187276"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Cool Heidi! Throw some scoria at the wind for me.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210189&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FE9LDjwIOfLLCUIvIPVyWpbWjr3bs_5UxaMJmWRvB_8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210189">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210190" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290242211"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hey that's an amazing insight on the subject, thanks so much! never heard it more clear.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210190&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="i6YUxWZ3C1qqc6_oLdTWbLxGeM_vUM7eV3lZd8IgyXg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ipod-ipad.nl" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">John iPad (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210190">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210191" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290243309"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hey that's an amazing insight on the subject, thanks so much! never heard it more clear.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210191&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ag1gr3XuXigbZ0doK59Qd9x1WwmTSCBhpcVQN7n1XQQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ipod-ipad.nl" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">iPod iPad (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210191">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210192" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290260666"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Saw some kids coloring, I told them stop wasting their time, they're never going 2 need that in the real world, then I gave baby crack pipes</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210192&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Fi9XKgkZmAzqN1s69ng6csVkNbNoi4AwtIL6ZaSvH_A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://easy-woodworking.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Elsie Ratcliffe (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210192">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210193" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290293492"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It will sound eerie still my safari browser doesn't appear to be allowed to display your piece correctly? It looks like a whole chapter of it has not been correctly presented and then the design inside the site doesn't look like right. Can you confirm this post has been created for my browser?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210193&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="x8_aatnKyVjQhl251bb3CECr1r1OayHfSwSmT52I_DE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://stemcellumbilicalcordbloodbanking.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Umbilical cord blood banking">Umbilical cord… (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210193">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210194" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290321200"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That is getting a speck extra subjective, yet I a good bit favor the Zune Enterprise. The interface becomes colourful, has over style, and certain peaceful benefits just like 'Mixview' that let you rapidly look at related albums, song, and sometimes a another individual users linked to how you're listening to. Clicking one of those can base in that item, and an extra number "neighbors" will come towards regard, allowing you to steer circa probing thanks to related artists, tunes, and sometimes a clients. Speaking of users, the Zune "Shared" can be great fun, charter you discover others are present using communal tastes and becoming associates together. After that are able to recognise a playlist created resulting from an combination of what all your friends can be listening to, that is as well interesting. A lot of concerned about privacy are going to be solved to fnd out you may hinder most people because of experiencing your personal listening behavior if you therefore choose.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210194&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gHXyDmg0cfHDR_bSkWLgYlDZ-XilsbgVU4pMWe5mt9o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.journalhome.com/rubyedistinblog/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lorie Wycuff (not verified)</a> on 21 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210194">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210195" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290359768"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My my my, I can feel the nostalgia. Those Golden days are still worth remembering. You presented a true picture of Alfred Rugby and i hope they will keep our heads high</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210195&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6ERrWUXCwrodnAMcs_fh6fpdSF-ePpiNPeAwFokfhM8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.encognito.com/madabelle/blog/post/2009/10/12/Happy-30th-Birthday-Mom!.aspx" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Michele Reagor (not verified)</a> on 21 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210195">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210196" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290399331"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello there! I really enjoy reading your blog! If you keep making great posts I will come back every day to keep reading!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210196&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WDVXUkblx9TLs2UxEvoRlVt2SrZaqkbDR7sjClDpct8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://forextradingexperts.net" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bernard Garzone (not verified)</a> on 21 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210196">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210197" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290658207"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Iâve always hated silent sex and thats why i moved out -- - They stayed away in droves. Samuel Goldwyn 1882 1974</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210197&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ObZdX9ymmRyVw2ygO69CeuIkXVX_Lsq0WF8gAUnbYXU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.learningupgrade.info" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kate Pirrello (not verified)</a> on 24 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210197">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210198" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290921536"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is excellent! How did you learn this stuff?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210198&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="grigY8UDR77TqbSQV0y5uEdFXnR6SgrPkl9p0ba0Y74"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://articles.usewho.com/articles1152285Cadvertising.htm" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Debra Barnhart (not verified)</a> on 28 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210198">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210199" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290960342"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I enjoy to play games, but I particularly like to play Big Game Hunter. Desire to find some Big Game Hunter Cheats? Just press my link. - Thank you for your email. This Internet of yours is a wonderful invention. (email to Al Gore, mocking his famous Internet invention claim, quoted in Newsweek, Mar 2000) Attributed to George W. Bush</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210199&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0tIKXetAEHcpr8kT4jz5-DkqPtWNvcnRzHcoa4K4Yvw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://moviesfilmsvideos.com/billingandmedicalcoding/?p=42" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kelly Galustian (not verified)</a> on 28 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210199">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210200" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291403899"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thing you are talking about sounds right. Nevertheless, consider this, what if you included a little more? I am talking about, I do not tend to tell you the way to write your site, however if you actually added extra content that can easily get people's attention? Simply like a video clip or a image or maybe 2 for getting your readers psyched concerning what you mentioned.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210200&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xwRKHn8WJzsMpMtVI3iWzq6ge9Bqku7fb2HvZYfLrfE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://ezinearticles.com/?Be-Svelte%2C-Wear-a-Belt%21=&amp;id=3651843" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Toby Imboden (not verified)</a> on 03 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210200">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2210201" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291629070"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There are more ways of killing a cat than choking it with cream</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2210201&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="I53PLBHmswQ3NirHYlCclGdsL0ka1sIJ7KFyiWbBR94"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://bamabelles.co.cc/bama-belles-real-housewives" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Amie Pollard (not verified)</a> on 06 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2210201">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/10/odd-volcano-news-volcano-stadi%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Tue, 10 Aug 2010 09:10:01 +0000 eklemetti 104349 at https://scienceblogs.com The Eyjafjallajökull eruption and you https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/04/the-eyjafjallajokull-eruption-1 <span>The Eyjafjallajökull eruption and you</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://www.televisionbroadcast.com/uploadedimages/TVBroadcast/Special_Features/EyjafjallajokullNASA.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Eyjafjallajökull erupting in the spring of 2010.</em></p> <p>I have a request for all of you <em>Eruptions</em> readers! In a few weeks I will be giving a talk here at Denison on the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/eyjafjallajokull/" target="_blank">Eyjafjallajökull eruption</a> and especially the aspects of how the eruption unfolded on the web. I think the shared experience of the seismicity, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/fimmvoruhals/" target="_blank">fissure vent eruption</a> and explosive eruption - along with all the ramifications of the air traffic stoppage over Europe - was a fascinating phenomenon. So, I ask you readers: <em>How would you describe your experience on <em>Eruptions</em> during the Eyjafjallajökull events?</em> By that I mean in terms of finding information, sharing information, sharing experiences or whatever - what stands out in your mind that made the Eyjafjallajökull so unique for a volcanic eruption in recent memory, especially in regards to the internet and the blog. Did you feel you got something more out of the collective experience than just following the news events on normal media?</p> <p>If you are willing and able to share, please send me your thoughts to <img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-84cc6bc3cf2966742ba05c49f79ef53a-email.jpg" alt="i-84cc6bc3cf2966742ba05c49f79ef53a-email.jpg" /> or leave a comment on this post.</p> <p>Thanks for any help!</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Wed, 08/04/2010 - 07:52</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/class-participation" hreflang="en">class participation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eruptions-blog" hreflang="en">Eruptions Blog</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eyjafjallajapkull" hreflang="en">Eyjafjallajökull</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eyjafjapll" hreflang="en">Eyjafjöll</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/fimmvapradeguhals" hreflang="en">Fimmvörðuháls</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/historic-eruption" hreflang="en">historic eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/iceland" hreflang="en">Iceland</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-journalism" hreflang="en">Science Journalism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aviation" hreflang="en">aviation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eruptions" hreflang="en">eruptions</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-society" hreflang="en">volcanoes and society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/class-participation" hreflang="en">class participation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/historic-eruption" hreflang="en">historic eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209580" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280924183"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I thought it was an information bonanza. After figuring out where decent seismic data was for Iceland (courtesy of this blog) I was able to get an idea of how things were working under the island. </p> <p>As for the populace at large, I think the combination of experts who had no problem with discussing the mechanics of the event along with the webcams that showed up made for an enhanced learning experience for all of us. I know I certainly learned a lot. Being fan of geophysics and having reasonable data juggling skills made it into a highly entertaining event for me.</p> <p>Of course I do have an obsessive-compulsive issue forming... I can't go a day without pulling down the SIL data to my spreadsheet... (if you don't get it, you miss it)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209580&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3XxpTnqfjXJm0WlRy6uZokB_NzF8nWjI55oX60DPL24"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209580">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209581" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280925781"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Tremendously informative site. I work for a major US airline and was monitoring many information sources as the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull and airspace closure unfolded. Your site is unique as it gives a perspective and view not found anywhere else.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209581&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UpDVqxGRXQbg7KzQNsc9whmKzI6xzQ254tbeTaHV7r8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kim (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209581">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209582" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280926040"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I thought the whole eruption was a tremendous learning experience on many different levels. I was taking a volcanism class at the time of the eruption so Eyjafjallajökull provided an excellent, real-time, example of strombolian vs plinian eruptions and what causes them. The data that was made available to us on the composition of the ash at Eyjafjallajökull was part of a larger project on magma categorization. </p> <p>We also talked about volcanic hazards of course, but more importantly how delicate our "advanced society" seems to be. Eyjafjallajökull erupted a relatively small amount of material, and yet, because of it's location caused a lot of problems for Europe. My class and I went through a quick study of all the active and dormant volcanoes near populated areas and made some simple ash cloud projections and we got a sobering look at the volcanic hazards right in our back yard. </p> <p>In addition, I'm obsessed with volcanoes in general. I follow fantastic blogs like Eruptions and the SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic report religiously. All the webcams and pictures of Eyjafjallajökull were a lot of fun to get.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209582&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cJijm5u-rJ9yUe4OtY2JEkBcxC1VKtbOP-2c2bC9x7Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hobie (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209582">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209583" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280926816"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I remember the excitement and anticipation, based on Jon Frimann's posts. He was so accurate in his predictions and I was watching the Iceland met. office graphs several times a day as the quakes came up from the depths closer and closer to the surface. I was then so annoyed to be away from my computer when it first erupted, so that I had to rely on television and then catch up on the web-cam images after I got home. Then, to watch it grow, from a little fissure to a full-blown crater was an experience enhanced by the interesting mix of posts on this site, from experts and enthusiasts from so many places across the world. Thanks must go to all the people who helped to allow us to see the eruption in their photographs and on the web-cams. And most of all Thank You Erik for this wonderful website.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209583&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KROuUxlYDOz9Kv4Hcgons-qN8N6XM4llBfWornf2B_8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alyson (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209583">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209584" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280927750"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Erik<br /> I've already repeated it many times: I have got addicted to this blog, and even more, after eruption started from a crack in the earth at Fimmförduháls.<br /> I have a lot to say and to thank you and all the people in this blog, and I hope I'll have time any soon to send you a looong e-mail sharing my experiences (and learnings) since then.<br /> I've been trying to do all my homework on volcanoes, EQs, minerals and magma, but the more I study, the farther I am from understanding the whole picture. But I'll keep trying, if my time so permits.<br /> Following @Diane, N Ca's example I've been doing my own geological researches here in Rio's most famous "postcards" and couldn't ever imagine how interesting this planet can be when carefully looked at from our backyard - thanks to you people!<br /> Renato Icarahy da Silveira</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209584&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Nhe4B1rZYRPBMw2bxAKtsTwP1qM8hWmnkCp-oSLf3bI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato I Silveira (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209584">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209585" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280928065"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#5 PS: Hope this thread will bring back people who shared the same excitement provided by this eruption... I miss them.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209585&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qaldx0Vy0iR5nIeVS0YxLKmxrcW-F8C8FHBBreB5L98"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209585">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209586" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280928328"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#5 PS 2: Is Katla going to erupt soon? (Hehehe) ;)<br /> (This was supposed to be a joke, but just for the sake of information, there has been a couple of jolts under the glacier).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209586&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K0Afo3DjYEFgu_8utGl6hHEt-X0qzcbvafwWLNtoyEA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209586">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209587" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280929386"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>for me this site has been unique and given me so much insight to understand how everything hangs together.<br /> With the Eyjafjäll eruption, I got first class information and to be able to see the eruption not only from the news, but also get insight from people that understands volcanoes and how they interact ..<br /> so a big Thank you to all on this site,and Erik for being such a great sport blogging on this Great site. </p> <p>Now I live In Aalesund, only a few hours from Eyjafjallajökull,I felt her as close as she could be,the air was filled with the smell of sulphur and it "rained" ash,those days it was possible,and i kind of felt that this Volcano was kind of our volcano too,.<br /> The mass hysteria of the public not being able to fly and all the chaos on the Airports was kind of fun,but also very<br /> Informative as it shows how small we humans are compared to Nature it self.. we are just mere dots in the big picture,even our planet are merly dust compared to the galxy we live in..</p> <p>well I really would give a BIG HUG to all and Thanks from my heart,.</p> <p>Its always fun and informative to be here, and read all the good stuff :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209587&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1vI16VXzMdwtbabulZOBk4376wfYsn6LTR96ERwAdf8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209587">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209588" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280929847"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In addition to vigorous exchange of information on the volcano itself, it stimulated what seems to have been a long repressed desire for some (me at least) to share haiku, folk tales, linguistic curiosities and engage in many other on-line community building behaviors. What impressed me most was the polite and civil tone to the conversation, even in the presence of many different opinions and perspectives. I don't find this on any other blog that I regularly access. Maybe that helps explain Renato's addiction (#5), you can open the comments section without having to anticipate a insults and pointless attacks between the participants.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209588&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-DPuw1-7bJfPHTFhOAEFGUwOVG-jAtLdPvSDjEqB2Lk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">doug mcl (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209588">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209589" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280929935"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>found this about the tought Plume under Iceland</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209589&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0TqEbFqyPqx15VWPtFJ5BxQhzIEaxk_M9jI49IvC4ko"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://media.aftenposten.no/archive/00758/_minn1jordskorpen06_758702a.jpg" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</a> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209589">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209590" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280934025"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>humm no link??</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209590&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3NGaN-FI8F5JexPlGRVObhLG9P_cKbGewSii3jHAWYo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209590">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209591" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280934327"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>sheepers... Erik, when's the deadline? I could write a book on this. I 've got a big job to finish off this week but as soon as I get the chance after that I'll try to get down my thoughts down on paper at the weekend. Will that be too late?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209591&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8_5JlrgpviWsE_OEdiGY7voaqJ-KQdfO9fNEAL2BMEE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209591">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209592" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280936844"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From the UK perspective, it was the first time in recent memory that a volcano directly affected us, both with the stopping of flights and seeing volcanic dust on one's car in the morning. My university department had student field courses marooned in Spain and Singapore.</p> <p>This site was invaluable to me in finding news. Having the site already in my RSS feed I saw the whole story unfold in nearly real time. I've done pieces for local radio before on earthquakes and so I got contacted by the BBC to do some radio interviews on the eruption (our volcanologist was away at a conference for part of the time). It did all my research starting from the links provided by this site and the interviews were done from my study with my laptop open at the most recent update plus the latest London VAAC maps.</p> <p>The hardest thing was learning to pronounce Eyjafjallajökull.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209592&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2pvUFayhiRj-JzXEgMGk1U-0J7-UWOULt_ZZYLow78Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://hypocentral.com/blog" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hypocentre (not verified)</a> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209592">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209593" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280939946"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Renato, we haven't gone anywhere and I still check Eyja at least once a day. Just have moved into lurking mode, as I have nothing to contribute scientifically or otherwise.</p> <p>Erik, as I think I mentioned somewhere back a ways, this was my first and so far is my only online community experience, and I couldn't have stumbled into a better spot. With limited &amp; very basic geological knowledge (to say the least) but a keen interest in things Icelandic thru travel and Icelandic friends, it was the perfect place to combine learning and keeping up. And thru you I still stay tuned to the world of volcanism. It has been a tremendous learning experience and seems to foster a real sense of community and collegiality. I wasn't tuned in before the main eruption of Eyja, more's the pity,( thus missed the lead-in,) so I don't have a sense of who the long-term members are, but I am extremely grateful to all who patiently shared in all ways from their knowledge and inspiration in this instance (Dagmar, I still smile over your drawing for us Eyja-followers. And Helen, your arch..?? Princess Frito, are you there?) Eruptions and it's folks and guardian have become the source of a daily dose of learning even if it will never be applied by me in the real world. How many people are fortunate(I use the word in its broadest sense) enough to in some way be a part of this sort of event in all its many human and scientific aspects.Thru Eruptions and its many links we have had a unique perspective.Thank you Eric and ALL.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209593&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="o1GTIKpQdOj3HHYBX_mUCwVSnIuNuL-TcqfwW-8zgoo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdeyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209593">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209594" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280940146"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I was vaguely trundling round the various blogs here after visiting one I have followed for a long time elsewhere and discovered a whole community obsessed with volcanoes - just like me :)</p> <p>Not only that - I found an eruption with a name I still have problems pronouncing being covered like a blanket and completely fascinating.</p> <p>I don't comment much because my geological background is limited to first year university level from about 17 years back but I always visit :) (I'm a fibre artist not a scientist btw)</p> <p>viv in nz</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209594&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_YEAQCnr5smRceUKjH6ylogJo7vsjYQJ7s_b04eedxI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">knutty knitter (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209594">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209595" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280942122"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Volcanic eruption, unique identifiers:</p> <p>1. Near-real time provision of seismic, GPS, tremor recorders, and hydrology data from IMO, plus daily updates, photographs and videos from various sources. </p> <p>2. 24/7 real-time visual monitoring by the interested public through a variety of commercial and noncommercial webcam sources, affording a 270+ deg perspective of the main crater and biaxial monitoring of the vent, day and night, and included infrared/thermal imaging.</p> <p>3. Four continuous months of website volunteer eruption activity monitoring and reporting, much of it round-the-clock during intense periods of activity. </p> <p>4. Website tracking of geologic and hydrological activity, before, during and after each eruptive phase included daily movies built from video feeds, posted video capture images, an indexed (wiki-type) web page of information links, constructed graphics of data, including rolling graphics, comparative 3-D box plots (color-coded) and depth/location and temporal analysis. Ash emissions were collected and subjected to particle size distribution and electron micrographic analysis. </p> <p>4. Provision of background science, article links, technical discussion of historical geology and volcanology by IES, science professionals and knowledgeable laypersons.</p> <p>5. Global recognition: the daily hit-rate to Scienceblogs website was almost entirely boosted by Eruption reader access, as shown by site monitor and search word statistics. </p> <p>The blog audience (lurkers) monitoring posts here included the public, science agency and science technical professionals, news reporters, and government and industry officials.</p> <p>6a. Proximal issue of glacier geography, ice mass-balance measurements and temporal shifts, outlet glacier recession and their relation to climate change and large climate ensemble latitude effects were explored in-depth and with technical reference annotation as a possible catalytic mechanism for volcano eruption timing (historical and present). </p> <p>6b. Icelandic seismic activity centers - the two transform faults in N and S Iceland, Askja and Bardarbunga - background articles, theory, swarm historical trends and geological mechanics were introduced and explored in depth, to answer questions of daily and episodic burst patterns of EQ activity. </p> <p>6c. Large climate ensemble effects, namely coupled ENSO-NAO-Polar Flow patterns that initiate and sustain atmospheric blocking. Theory and effects were introduced, explained, discussed (with technical references supplied). We suggested using this pattern as risk indicator of plume-path probability forecasting for Icelandic volcanic eruptions with potential to disrupt regional, continental and trans-oceanic air traffic.</p> <p>7. A peripheral issue of geothermal field activity and it's potential relationship to Reykjanes Peninsula and South Iceland Seismic Zone EQ activity was raised, and has since been explored in the technical literature (Kelding et al, 2010).</p> <p>Impacts: Very quietly, information posted here was seen to effect public responses by air traffic regulators during the ash crisis and afterwards, in airspace management of passenger backlog issues, regional airspace control oversight amalgamation (already planned, but accelerated, post flight-ban) and in hazard policy changes put into effect. </p> <p>Indirect benefits: </p> <p>Emerging applied science for surface and in-flight detection was discussed here and elsewhere. Extant technology (commercial and agency-owned) was quickly adapted for improved surveillance and industry advisory actions. </p> <p>Topics brought up here were likely to be included in discussion between European and North American authorities on coordinating hazard and environmental policy on ash cloud risks and public and industry safety.</p> <p>ESA, NASA, NOAA and others were observed to be responsive to requests made here for additional satellite and thermal image capture, analysis. Data was posted to agency websites. Agencies, private and commercial sites providing webcam video access were also found to be responsive to requests posted here for international access, camera positioning, and maintenance issues.</p> <p>In the ash-cloud aftermath, realistic questions were raised here and elsewhere concerning purported versus actual economic cost and annual revenues impact to regional, transcontinental and trans-Atlantic passenger and commercial jet and tourism industry revenues. </p> <p>This site also served as public record of response to a major volcanic eruption and ash-cloud over a densely populated region.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209595&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6s--VcMB67DIHdb1QqRAFoZBHPsNOD85PwLSCECtBOY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209595">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209596" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280946920"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>We all should thank the internet.<br /> Thank you internet</p> <p>Say "Thank you internet!"<br /> Thx</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209596&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GUcNVbj8R9C_cnGA5k-b1e7TBK4n2HnLZgBuvurSDYU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lazouille (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209596">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209597" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280949214"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OT: a 4.8 in the Tetons just a bit ago, about 100 km from Yellowstone.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209597&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8fts5Qot0FmQfiC-hVsfbl3cyHlYmBfo25-BDR9b__0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jen (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209597">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209598" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280949915"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Passerby, you would give a very scientific rundown on Eyjaf, now, wouldn't you? BTW, I mean that as a compliment. I think it sums it all up.</p> <p>I had a fabulous time watching the eruption and I enjoyed the conversation and speculation of what the depth and position of all the quakes could mean and when it was going to go. Thank you, eveybody, for great contributions here and doing all the work that was done early on showing the quake models and all the graphs. I have learned a lot and I have all those who posted to thank so I say it again; thanks for the info and great discussion. Let's keep going!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209598&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zuS1gRS-uON8uc-2RJNCgMKpT5EsdAI4T1-biMYRC2c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane N CA (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209598">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209599" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280950420"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you Eruptions for teaching Non-Science folks like me about volcanoes. The blog provided invaluable information and links during the Ejya eruptions, (which is currently at 9:45PM EDST 8/4/2010, launching a steam plume about 8,000'). I would have never thought to watch an eruption live on a webcam. The excitement on the blog bubbled over for weeks in literary exclamation and mirth. The Eruption was hauntingly beautiful and your blog was completely enthralling.<br /> Now I watch cams, earthquake plots, look at graviational variance graphics....which is asking a great deal from a clinical social worker.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209599&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AJ3R21AdhVMc-j1oOGHehWABXFiwlaRxm21gOnadt-o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jeff (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209599">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209600" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280951313"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From my point of view, this event should show the general public that the earth and mother nature is in charge of their lives.<br /> This was a small event in geologic, meteorological history not to mention possible extra terrestrial disasters (meteors or C.M.E.'s). The general public must be aware of other historical potential disasters and how it will affect their lives.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209600&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ES6Xj80tz6JinMcgR0FgBrxpUAHMbCcPUs9QrHUwVec"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Beano (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209600">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209601" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280952080"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OT 7.0 near Pago in Indonesia. The volcano is in A bigger caldera . This is worth watching IMHO.</p> <p>The quake was not in the caldera however.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209601&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CG-RJHnton7K-ptMILc81jG-hJqGp2uwxhFjBPrB_Yg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dasnowskier (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209601">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209602" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280954461"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>&gt;Now I watch cams, earthquake plots, look at gravitational variance graphics....which is asking a great deal from a clinical social worker. </p> <p>See? This is the intrinsic and incalculable value of a science blog that has a dedicated readership. </p> <p>To change the way you view your world, that is the only way to impart 'mindfulness' to all inter-dependents that inhabit this Rock.</p> <p>To change the way each of you view and interact with Terra Firma: therein lies the conjoint solutions to our most pressing global problems.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209602&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="VokNk_6tCHaSuaPf5TBCsZTY0eutrbAJ1M3MdK_8CP4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209602">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209603" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280956656"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I, personally, love the site... I've always had a huge fascination with all types of geological events and the effects long and short term resulting from them. I've primarily been a lurker here reading the articles and comments and absorbing as much information as I can and I can say the commentary is extremely insightful and relevant. </p> <p>During the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, the links provided to the mila and other webcams and other seismic sites were awesome. The frequent updates and resulting discussions were generally excellent. I usually check this site once a day to see if anything is going on as well as the usgs global EQ site. Love the blog will continue to be a frequent visitor.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209603&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="U7zb-32xkAJzah6HoPwQoQfpWLIaaVi2OAw4LkCsa7k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">IndyBearFan88 (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209603">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209604" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280958229"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"Did you feel you got something more out of the collective experience than just following the news events on normal media?"</p> <p>Definitely. I've never been part of anything like this before. By following this blog, I was in on the story before the media caught onto it, and I was able to watch the story build while officials were downplaying it. The drama of seeing events build to an eruption was incredible, not to mention the drama of seeing Jon Frimann go up against the official experts and get the story right. An added bonus was getting to know the participants as real people. Rather than just exchanging information, people were talking about how the unfolding events were affecting or even consuming their own lives, and it was fun to watch the interplay between the different personalities involved. Not to mention how informative it was to be hearing from seasoned experts such as Boris Behncke. I would have felt even more a part of the story if I had been able to contribute more, but alas all I could do was refer people to a cousin's article on Pat Robertson and natural disasters.</p> <p>All in all, this was what journalism strives for but so rarely achieves - information, explanation, drama, and a sense of personal involvement - yet done without artifice and seemingly without planning. Erik and his contributors had built a knowledgeable, dedicated, and friendly community, and then when events started at Eyjafjallajökull, everything was in place for an amazing experience to happen. Thank you, Erik, and thank you to everyone who contributed.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209604&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lQHQXqg4AuZzclZjqdksvdv-Aj2WCfxLWS7VOYqiLe8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Barry Abel (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209604">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209605" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280959404"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Not much to add to Passerby's description (#16) of the what, where, and how.</p> <p>Maybe I can add a little to the "why', as in: Why was it was so interesting / addictive to follow this blog and to follow the eruption of the relatively minor volcano Eyjafjallajökull. (Of course, this is my personal account only.)</p> <p>I think it was the empowerment and enabling aspects of the internet with all its resources that led a lot of people on a path of discovery - in real time - on a real event (with very real consequences). Therefore, a great 'Thank You' to the people and institutions of Iceland without which we wouldn't have had much to work with.</p> <p>While it is normal for the geologists, volcanologists, and other related scientists to have access to ample sources of information if a volcano starts to show signs of unrest, the lay public had to wait for official announcements about the status of the volcano in question. But slowly more and more information is being made available over the internet for lay people to follow the events as they evolve.</p> <p>Here, Eyjafjallajökull was still special in that this blog was alerted very early on (a great 'Thank You' to Erik about that) about an increase in seismicity before any official would acknowledge such a development. With all the information that was being made available, we were free to speculate (occasionally moderated by Erik and Boris), to formulate hypotheses, and to simply marvel at the unfolding spectacle.</p> <p>Lastly, there is the aspect of the community that formed here on this site. On busy days/nights there were up to 200 new posts to read, a very lively and active discussion of events, updates -often by the minute - on the latest developments, and eye-witness accounts by people who live nearby or who visited the site(s). Other sciences can't offer anything similar (at least that I'm aware of) - just imagine a live report about the daily going ons in a biotech laboratory - how boring would that be. That's why this place became special and why I still come back every day to check up on the latest developments.</p> <p>These are my two cents....</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209605&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NTZAyZX3YZfo4BdiQY-4O5hstpHlXK1ZkP-Lyl2garE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Holger, N California (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209605">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209606" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280960747"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#14 @birdeyeUSA (isn't it supposed to be @birdseyeUSA? "rusty fingers", uh?) - Welcome back from "lurking mode". Still waiting for the others to show. ;)<br /> I apologize, but I'll need more than one comment to wholly express this experience (in my case, the first time in a web community).<br /> Looks like @Passerby (as usually) has said everything to it, but I think there's still much more to be "unwoven".<br /> Even though it's supposed to be a scientific blog, and by all as such regarded, kept away from personal subjectivities, I daresay we can, with time, tell who is who, recognize the styles, the thoughts and almost "feel" the presence of people who we don't even know but for their nicknames and opinions - something really amazing.<br /> I don't want to be sentimental over this, but I must say I've spent much of my leisure time (sometimes sleeping time) watching lava flows, steam plumes, quake plots and reading posts, and developed a certain degree of affection (?) to you guys whose names and whereabouts I don't even know!<br /> Quite remarkable.<br /> And thank you for your patience and forgiveness for my "killing" of Shakespeare's language so many times, but in time I also grew unaware of my writing skills (if there's any left)- for spontaneity's sake. :)<br /> That's it (for now). Keep it going...<br /> Good night everyone</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209606&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="L-aRxTFN9_nBmMo9HQz_lWMuV35qzGO4O2uL7w0bHTA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209606">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209607" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280961406"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is a long story, so get a coffee or something before starting reading this.</p> <p>This all started back in 2008, after the Mw6.3 earthquake that year. Following that earthquake I did notice small changes in earthquake pattern in Eyjafjallajökull. Given that data that I had (and IMO staff too), I did give a notice to IMO about this changes. But I also told them (according to memory) that it might be a while until something happens.</p> <p>The pre-history of the Eyjafjallajökull goes back to the year 1994 at least. So the eruption would have happened even if there had not been any earthquake in the SISZ. But I have my suspicion on that the earthquake might have speed up the process that lead up the eruption. But that question can only be scientists them self, not by me.</p> <p>For the longest time, nothing did happen at Eyjafjallajökull. Nothing but few earthquakes, and even for weeks there was nothing. But I was watching, and recording from the summer of 2008, as earthquakes from Eyjafjallajökull appear really good at my Hekla station most of the time.</p> <p>Now, fast forward to the October of the year 2009. That month I start to notice repeated patterns appearing in Eyjafjalljökull earthquakes. This patterns where however unstable, and came and did go away at random times and even then nothing could happen for weeks in Eyjafjallajökull.</p> <p>Things really started to get interesting on the 20th of December 2009. But then something really changed in Eyjafjalljökull. Then the earthquake pattern became repeated, lasting longer. But not yet continues. I had to wait for few weeks until that happened. I also started to record earthquakes from Eyjafjallajökull on my Hekla sensor if they where big enough. But many earthquakes that happened where less then ML1.0 in size, and those I did not record.</p> <p>In the beginning of the year 2010 I see more pattern changes in the earthquakes happening in Eyjafjallajökull. They became ever more intense as the time passed.</p> <p>Around third week of January 2010 I became sure in that Eyjafjallajökull would start erupting. The question now was just when, not if. When was just a question about time.</p> <p>Around end of January everything did go crazy at Eyjafjallajökull. The earthquake count was up trough the roof in literal sense of the word. The intense of the earthquake was increased by every week almost, with few days or weeks where it remained low. The most intense earthquake swarms did happen three weeks before the first eruption. During that time in February (last week) and March I did record well over 2000 earthquakes happening in Eyjafjallajökull far as I can tell (my March folder has 4281 earthquake files, one earthquake is three files, my February had ~600 files I think. But I am almost done plotting the data from February already. The earthquakes in those folders are mostly from Eyjafjallajökull).</p> <p>When the first eruption started I got the announcement via phone call around 23:30 UTC. The second eruption I did see it on the news in my phone, but I use to check for news during the night (too lazy to go the computer). </p> <p>Rest is history as we all know.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209607&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="M4u4scEN44PKuzy_Qairx0Nn0Qub3BXkCAtMxTmWIio"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209607">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209608" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280962239"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>More on OT Yellowstone:<br /> Looking at this webicorder: <a href="http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/moow_webi.htm">http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/moow_webi.htm</a><br /> there have been quite a few aftershocks, which USGS is not posting to the map.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209608&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="up1KuVNVECU3TY0GIYBZPd9CSJPBN15dPoa7KS7r3bU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jen (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209608">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209609" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280962824"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It was great to have a specific place (this blog) to go to to get both the latest information, as well as a timeline of events as they unfolded, AND links to other discussions ranging from close-up photos from locals to a discussion on Language Log on how a) people were pronouncing Eyjafjallajökull, b) how locals pronounce Eyjafjallajökull, c) how Eyjafjallajökull should be anglicised and d) some songs about Eyjafjallajökull.</p> <p>I showed a significant portion of the above stuff to my non-net-savvy parents as well!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209609&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="EZhyCNpFJrLnlUyczfYva0spw59roYtglLnEMFG5g7A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Katherine (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209609">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209610" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280963478"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>After the Chile quake, I went searching the web. First I found Science Blogs, &amp; then Eruptions. Wow! So much information; so much discussion by folk who have quite diverse educations, &amp; from all over the world. I remember the brainstorming, prior to the eruption, which went on &amp; on between several readers here: crustal ups &amp; downs; mantle plumes; pressure bubbles rising (w/ the tides? with the moon? over millenia?) Someone, Bruce Stout maybe, talking about historical tsunami evidence in northern Europe from a look at population movements. More influence from volcanic activity. The discussion about the hydro-thermal plant locations; the graphic depictions of how quakes propogate along faults (I don't remember what that is named, but I got it), how much &amp; what kind of ash does it take to scrub a jet engine. One of the really cool parts to this blog is how the people like Erik or Boris or Ekoh, the folks who really know what's happening &amp; why, let the discussions go, covering so much interesting territory, &amp; only steer things from time to time. It was &amp; is really great to watch the discussions unfold. I also appreciate how readers responded to "trolls", or to comments which indicated despondency (in this last case, perhaps lovingly sharing photoes of prized minerals found on trips into the great outdoors.) All the graphs, links, utube finds, sending us into so many directions. When away for a couple of days it would take hours &amp; hours to catch up - didn't want to miss anything. I have never followed a blog before, but since I found Eruptions, I have found a few more. I notice that their readers &amp; commenters are not so witty or polite, or frankly so interested in spreading their knowledge in such an understandable manner. I greatly appreciate the time &amp; effort you must put into keeping the posts coming, Erik, even when out of town. If you have a cat, does it get fed as well? I believe this last is also one of the reasons so many have come to use this blog to stay informed. During the Eyaf days, where else could anyone find clear, intelligent &amp; current information of the caliber which seems to be an ongoing event here on Eruptions? Thank you, all, &amp; keep it up, please!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209610&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="shLarLzuZAn-MY7mcv9eQ9zog4OAM6BIxgKdO7NyhLY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy B. (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209610">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209611" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280964373"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well Jon, I think IMO/IES had a reasonably solid seismic knowledge and experience database to draw upon, with respect to EQ activity at Eyjaf.</p> <p>Cumulative seismic history Feb 2009-Aug 2010:<br /><a href="http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/eyja_uppsafn.html">http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/eyja_uppsafn.html</a></p> <p>Activity can be clearly seen to pickup in frequency and magnitude in early January 2010. Note the summer months cluster/swarm of EQ activity in 2009. That's a clue.</p> <p>First major post and following develop, March 3rd, here at Eruptions. Posts on this starter thread would continue through March 23rd and number close to 700. Socuel would provide useful cumulative plots and running timeline EQ graphics for more than a month.</p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/03">http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/03</a><br /> /increasing_signs_of_activity_a.php</p> <p>A good time was had by all.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209611&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7BqD1jMNeSCdln_xzpFv6_5Bjn6G5jTC3FYRMDvZhQY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209611">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209612" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280973573"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Good Morning,<br /> I have been interested in tectonic activity of all kinds for a long time now, and came across "Eruptions" while looking for more info on the new Icelandic fissure eruption.</p> <p>While I most definitely found what I was looking for on the day, I also realised that I had found a warm, intelligent and well mannered community that I felt I wanted to join and contribute to.</p> <p>Six months and more on and nothing has changed. The topics are broad,the comments generally relevant and sometimes downright erudite, and the links almost invariably worth looking at. I have a host of interesting sites on my favourites list, a list of volcanic webcams I visit daily (sunrise on Nevado del Huila!) and input from a pile of people I'd like to share a weekend with.</p> <p>Thanks Eric.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209612&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xDqH8o5NzhMtl8tI00drubd--Dtcyz3RDXxp5QsaC-4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gordon (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209612">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209613" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280973677"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi,</p> <p>i am a volcanophile from germany and filmed the first part of the fissure-eruption at fimmföruhals. i was eyewitness of many eruptions, but this was first time at iceland and so very special for me.<br /> after my first visit i tryed to visit the second eruption at eyjafjallajökull, but had bad luck with canceld flight for 4 times. i was sad about this, but hope that katla will following within month.</p> <p>best regards, marc szeglat</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209613&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RV87taAk57dJ95saNM2-X1hYT4WtCKB2vmgILGcI938"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.vulkane.net" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Marc Szeglat (not verified)</a> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209613">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209614" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280982212"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The Eyjafjallajökull eruption and the related discussion on the Eruptions Blog (including the current thread) have been a wonderful occasion to learn about how a volcanic event is perceived by different people who share the same passion that I discovered during childhood. Obviously the eruption itself was an outstanding event, for the multitude of eruptive processes and products, for the transparency of multidisciplinary monitoring data, and for the impact it had both locally and regionally. It is a pity that the wonderful book "Volcanoes - Global Perspectives" by Lockwood and Hazlett was published just before this event, which would probably have featured strongly in it had the book been finished a few months later!<br /> Besides the numerous fascinating and intriguing aspects of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, it was quite an experience meeting (virtually) with all you folks here on the blog. Sometimes my loudly voiced concerns about other bloggers' statements caused a bit of friction, which I still believe is necessary once you professionally work in the sector. This is something that will come up again during future volcanic crises, and especially so once these happen in the country where I live and work, this extremely volcanic Italy.<br /> I particularly appreciate to have gotten to know, and discussed with, our ingenious Jón FrÃmann, whom I wish to proceed successfully with his study of volcanic seismicity. Certainly the dynamic Icelandic tectonics and volcanism will keep him busy and all of us who are following the events and what Jón makes of them.<br /> This blog also brought me back in touch with a few of you who had e-mailed me a decade ago when Etna went through one of its most frantic eruptive periods. Glad Marc Szeglat (#34) has joined the party, see you when Etna erupts next (I am not very sure that I wish Katla will erupt anytime soon, though on the other hand I think that volcano is totally overrated)!<br /> Thank you all for being there and for the feedback, both positive and critical (it's all important, maybe the latter still more so); see you back on this blog soon, and greetings from sunny Sicily and a still drowsing Mount Etna</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209614&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SYH6h_X2Pd_8PL4zViJhPt6sc1DTnNKfkmXHE6L7DZg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Boris Behncke, Catania, Italy">Boris Behncke,… (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209614">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209615" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280983980"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>ok, just skimmed through the responses and it's hard to add much more, so I will save myself my weekend missive and jot down a few things here:</p> <p>The main thing for me was that a blog is categorically different to any other existing medium for an event like this (stress that word categorically).</p> <p>All our lives we have grown up as passive consumers of knowledge. We read books, we watch TV documentaries, we listen to the radio. We form weird theories in our heads and that is where they stay.. or at least that is where they stood until the advent of the internet. This blog turned all that into active participation.</p> <p>From the moment the first reports came of a swarm happening and the intial heads-up of "watch this space" that were posted here, I experienced a number of things that were just sheer mind-blowing. I'll try and go through them chronolgoically but you can be sure I'll miss 50% of the fun:</p> <p>1. Pretty early on I posted a naive question of why on earth you would get a rhyolite eruption on a spreading plate boundary and I got answered by Ekoh, a real-life volcanologist ;-) , within a matter of hours as to why a. this was not a stupid question and b. explaining how it could happen (key words: personalized response, interaction of total noobies like myself with absolute professionals, benefit for all others, I guess, due to public nature of innernet)</p> <p>2. Following the rhyolite issue I got sent a thesis on the neighboring thorsmork ignimbrite by Heidi Ritterbusch, the author, which doubled my understanding of pyroclastic flows in one slash and gave me a fantastic insight into what Iceland was capable of (key words: same as 1. above plus one-to-one tuition of a caliber you normally only get at university)</p> <p>3. Then there followed the input of Peter Cobbold, a scientist from an entirely different discipline who saw a high degree of symmetry in the seismic traces that he was familiar with in his work in biology (calcium concentrations in cells if I remember rightly) and the fascinating debates that ensued about what would explain the symmetry. For all our floundering I learnt an awful lot in a hands on way, discovering things for myself (that was certainly old hat to the professionals but for me totally new). For instance, the fact that we were probably looking at a number of cells or pods of melt rather than one textbook magma chamber that was primed for eruption. When Erik later confirmed that that is indeed how volcanologists view a lot of magma chambers, as multiple lenses of crystal mush, it was a bit of a Eureka moment. (key words: learning by doing, hands-on science, exploration). Bouncing our various theories off each other was fantastic fun.</p> <p>4. Then there was the amazing lengths others went to such as Socuel and Korf to chart the activity and present it to us. Most of the discussion would have died but for this and I am eternally grateful to them. More to the point, you could actually ask them to do a chart for you! And they would!</p> <p>5. Finally there was the amazing immediacy of the event, no better expressed than Jón's laconic one-liner: Eruption started at Fimmvorduhalsi, or words to that effect. It was almost like being there.</p> <p>Seriously, it doesn't get much better than this. I could go on.. the web-cams, the service from IMO, the input from so many individuals,.. great stuff and an amazing experience.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209615&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8ulnu40L1pnRRYA5PTLjhkKVUrvL0VG9qnjomHCShUU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209615">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209616" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280984603"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Interesting about those aftershocks at yellowstone. Is there something brewing there? The recent CME ejection from a solar flare on the Sun is currently interacting with the earths magnetic field, I almost wonder if there is some slight interaction?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209616&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GyUPKNR4cpp5Up5rqSerBd8AgrG8UCj73Vmy2DdO8Os"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209616">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209617" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280985141"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>cripes, I nearly forgot!! The e-beers!!! (I still owe some people a few)</p> <p>PS.. #31, Kathy, (smallprint) That was not me with the tsunami threat. That was Randolph Kruger, I believe.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209617&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FbXvVk5Gw8WaS-fnEt_J4uaAIlTagGikHGL6WkyinG8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209617">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209618" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280985221"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Yellowstone is very calm at this moment. Less aftershocks than I expected.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209618&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="sdzyzgxm0xJUjUa2mw8ZstjHiYBRD42xUDw3KYsKlGc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dasnowskier (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209618">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209619" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280991187"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Bruce 38 My apologies. But not Randolph, either, I think. He joined the party later on. Bird species &amp; floweering weed varieties of Iceland. Prose &amp; poetry, from the Bard &amp; homegrown. Now solar flare activity. The road goes ever on!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209619&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nl2veiJXwzvhNkICHPT7g4SA-3t7NCAqy5K6AS1Q2t0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy B. (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209619">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209620" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280991424"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From my point of view, the Ejaf eruption occurred at about the same time as I was starting to try to get my head around the Earth's energetic self regulating mechanisms as a whole - and this eruption (and Iceland activity as a whole) has been fascinating as there has been so much data to view and try to correlate to observed events; very useful for someone learning 'on the fly'. It has also been fascinating to read all your comments and very gradually start to make some sense of the process of volcanism. I have a very long way to go, but still watch Iceland becuase there is so much available data to view - for example, does the Tjornes fracture zone have an erupting underwater volcano, or is current earthqueke activity heralding an eruption in the near future? Lots of fun! Thanks to all here for their patience.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209620&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RDcy809DIZnsgceEUuA1VBmP9jlB3SjqlBDdPHkzk0g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jules P (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209620">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209621" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280992542"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>To be honest, during the beginning and for that matter during the whole eruption I think that there was more information availible here on this blog than any other place. Media had its Katla mongering and not much information at all related to the eruption of Lady E.<br /> But by reading all the posts, questions, theorys and answers from laymen as my self to fully educated geologists/volcanologists a better picture as to what was actually going on became clear. Not only at Lady E but on the whole mechanics of different volcanoes.</p> <p>So a big thank you to all who has contributed to this! </p> <p>Now a bit OT. Not that I am one of those Katla mongerers isnt ther a bit much shaking beneath her lately (past 48 hrs)? I am sure that much of it has to do with shifting ice but there are quite a few at larger depths. Between 7-16 km I count 7 tremors and there are a few at 2-3km as well. I know that its probably nothing without swarms of EQ´s but still...Abit out of the ordinary if you look at the period between Lady E calming down up to today.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209621&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3bYK5O2l-qhmNm5yfehyAlUPD1MXmmIuHUNO9kgDo88"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209621">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209622" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280993779"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>WHY, BENEFITS &amp; COMPANY QUARTERLY REPORTS </p> <p>After Passerbys wonderfull writ on what was great with the site during the Eyjafjalljökull eruption I will just add my personal why, the benefits for me, and what it meant for me professionaly.</p> <p>My Why on why I searched the internet for a great place to find information on the eruption. When the eruption started I was winding down my then engagement as investment director for a financial company at the same time as I sat on five boards, ie. I worked then in 4 separate countries on 2 continents.<br /> What I am trying to say is that I desperatly needed to know when and where I could fly. I was actually not a volcano-afficionado when I started (although generally interested), but now I am hooked badly due to the "evil machinations" of Erik and others here;)</p> <p>Thanks to the wonderfull and wonderfully accurate information here I got to all necessary meetings with a minimum of delays and reschedulings. And the meetings I couldn't attend I could well in advance book as videoconference-calls.</p> <p>After a couple of days I started to sum up the info from here (which was far better then any other I could find) into small company volcano-letters that I circulated at my former job and to the companies I am a board-member at. The result of this was that all employees saved a lot of down-time at airports waiting for airplanes to lift off.</p> <p>Quarterly reports for Q2 summed up the effect nicelly, in five companies the average net savings on travell during the eruption period was 150 K⬠per company in airfare without missing any vital personal meetings, and the investments in videoconference-call equipments is prognosticized to keap airtravell down in the future with 20 percent on average.<br /> So from a company perspective the Eyjafjallajökull was a real benefit for the companies I have the honour to represent.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209622&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ceTtxve_f6zpYQ2wLXs9sWWoc9BBoqHHpFd_9T-1jOs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209622">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209623" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280995878"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Lurking</p> <p>can you make a graphic of the lastest earthquakes over katla?</p> <p>the is a change in the dept of the quakes which makes me wonder how they would look on one of your plotts.</p> <p>(several quakes betwen 10 and 7 km dept)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209623&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_b7-5M6FIzes5u-voPajj9BhPSDLN1qgPUHNlP97ar0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stefan (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209623">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209624" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280996810"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I lost track of the eq's at Katla for a couple of months. Those are deeper eq's than the usual shallow ones we've moslty been seeing and being associated with glacial activity. Maybe Katla, is becoming a bit restless? What's the usual eruption delay between Eyja and Katla? 1 - 2 years?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209624&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="S36dxzADrNfKq9koVHH4RAmU88FbczWHq1inIhEG9XI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">chris (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209624">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209625" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280998754"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'll just summarize, since there are already many interesting sequential reports. During the eruption, this site became a real-time classroom-with-many-teachers for me. Erik's photos and posts, plus the comments and links offered by dozens of knowledgeable participants, led me to do my own Internet research in an area that was new to me, to test the information I found in other sources (often incorrect or misleading), and to ask questions--and get good answers. For me, it was a remarkable experience that could never have been duplicated on a "news media" site. I'm a regular reader of this blog now, have added several new books to my library, and am paying more careful attention to volcanoes and earthquakes, both historical and current.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209625&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="O_Fm4HU0QvbRi4doE5_GUdGWzTXtNLdYBhhwdxc21AU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.susanalbert.typepad.com/lifescapes" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Susan Albert (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209625">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209626" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280999724"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I took a look at the GPS data today, and I found GOLA, FIM2 and SOHO data interesting, as they seem to show a slight inflation trend. <a href="http://notendur.hi.is/runa/eyja_gps.html">http://notendur.hi.is/runa/eyja_gps.html</a></p> <p>As to why on the Eruptions blog? This blog got some paper coverage here at the start of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, mostly because it was run by Dr. Klemetti, a fairly well-known family name here. I looked into it and never left after that: this blog acted like a hub for bringing in data from various sources, so following the goings on was easy.</p> <p>Various people have given very good reasons for reading the blog, and I agree with them.</p> <p>I have no comparison, but I don't think I'm very wrong if I say that the Eyjafjallajökull eruption is unique where it comes to coverage: web cameras, tremor plots, EQ data both on map and in tabular format, ash dispersion patterns both in satellite pictures and model animations, etc. Hard, verifiable data and this blog often offered interpretation of that data. </p> <p>Of course the media coverage was extensive, too, but the quality of that coverage...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209626&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oRsovqELviW5V3YubGV_HxxFLQYNHeFxC8x0iyDuP5I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209626">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209627" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281000075"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@44 and 45</p> <p>I was wondering why no one mentioned the â10 km quakes.</p> <p>Katla area, view north, 1 Aug 2010 to present:</p> <p><a href="http://i34.tinypic.com/ieedfk.png">http://i34.tinypic.com/ieedfk.png</a></p> <p>Similar plot, but color coded for time. (lets you know which ones came first) No terrain topping.</p> <p><a href="http://i37.tinypic.com/243rtd2.png">http://i37.tinypic.com/243rtd2.png</a></p> <p>Same dataset as #1, but view east.</p> <p>i37.tinypic.com/33lfk0z.png</p> <p>*note, copy past it to your browser, http stuff left off to avoid the Spam filter</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209627&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="B3hhOkE7sBWAXQm4KH4utxcbko_MMX1gWqawDsieeLY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209627">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209628" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281000115"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>First, I agree with everything everyone else said. (Yeah, what they said :-D)</p> <p>My experience on this blog was, (and is) wonderful. That is, filled with wonder and awe. I've always been a lurker, but the friendliness of the community got me involved in the discussion. When I try to discuss plate tectonics or the mechanisms of volcanos with friends, I get that "what planet are you from" look. Here, I get friendly discussion and equal enthusiasm. People in other disciplines brought their skills to the table and gave us wonderful graphs and charts (Soquel and lurking). And I get perspectives from all over the world! How delight-full!</p> <p>During the eruption, I always (from the time I woke up until I went to bed) had a screen open for this blog, and at least two of the cams on the vents. Obsessive behavior is putting it mildly. A big thank you to everyone who participated and to Mila for the cams.</p> <p>I've learned so much from this site that I can't even begin to list the information. I've got hundreds of new bookmarks to scientific articles, USGS information sites and equivalents around the world, google translate, google earth, webcams all over the world. I've been inspired to indulge my passion for geology, and have started really reading on the subject. My view of the world around me has been transformed.</p> <p>In terms of news, during this eruption I stopped watching cable and broadcast news. The irritation I felt about the lack of understanding of basic science and statistics was exacerbated to the point of revulsion. This site brought me news. Since then, I've been hunting for primary sources of other news on the web. Semi-successfully.</p> <p>In terms of community, this is the best. I agree, the trolls are kept away. I'm not sure why. Perhaps it's because of a lack of response to the nasty guys. There was one case of a flame war. Certain members tried to mitigate the nastiness, but Eric finally kicked them off. I think, mostly, people who come here are trying to learn, and that shared experience is what keeps the blog civil.</p> <p>Thanks @everyone. I'm grateful to you all (and as I write this, I'm feeling a great surge of affection).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209628&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6qbMIClY8Cy_C_syrzjZMf_0GSHkj92tVvY1wnZMsE8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair NoCal USA (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209628">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209629" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281000217"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you Lurking</p> <p>As always your plotts are quite informative</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209629&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pQ41un_sjNEJ5n8ESlP-DxE3Y8qv9u2zubAl0zTNib8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stefan (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209629">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209630" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281000692"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Speaking of community, my sweetie and I are heading out for Yellowstone next month. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good book on the geology of the place? I've got a pile of articles bookmarked, but a book is still the handiest way to carry info. Thanks all.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209630&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0Jzp1QWd265p22uJFaQaEAiL3iUnI9896H0_S9Gh8m8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair NoCal USA (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209630">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209631" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281001996"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Timely topic. I just discussed Eyjafjallajökull in a summer course I am teaching. I spent some time discussing how the eruption became and internet phenomenon. I also pointed out how an equivalent eruption a century ago would have had a much smaller global impact, as there would have been no disruption in transportation. It's an interesting thing to consider - how our high-tech world is actually more vulnerable to natural events that would have had minimal impact in the past.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209631&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Cs5CAH2xfY-_7SaOs9w7SwHkYODxa4ItN3M6pSj_EH0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">EKoh (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209631">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209632" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281002402"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@52</p> <p>Concidering that we just had an impact by a CME, and the auroras to go with it, could you imagine the impact on today's world of a CME on the scale of the Carrington event of 1859?</p> <p>(reportedly, some telegraph equipment actually caught on fire from the induced currents)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209632&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Cx1SOw8e5IFlb0KjHI-N82bmZCD5UwwE_21qs_AM9zw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209632">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209633" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281002923"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Lurking, indeed that's another good example.<br /> The more I think about it, it may not be correct to say that technology has made us MORE vulnerable, but instead we should say it has created NEW vulnerabilities.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209633&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GfOIaklfvL6ycaS_RHVK3ubz9bus7v8GpFoBrThxMFc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">EKoh (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209633">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209634" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281003046"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Katla will erupt very soon.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209634&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8KHHFiVhx7WRTAAnOCrlfPd4NTukoLZ4ubBpBlQeCIQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik W. (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209634">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209635" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281003273"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi all yes i agree with everyone else above with this site its the best one so far i came across with its info and right answers.As at the start when i first came on to this site didnt realize i was dealing with real people or experts in what they do? since may 2010 i have learned more stuff different things than ever so a big thank you to you all.<br /><a href="http://modernsurvivalblog.com/natural-disaster/katla-volcano-10x100x-eyjafallajokull/attachment/eyjafjallajokull-katla-vei-comparison">http://modernsurvivalblog.com/natural-disaster/katla-volcano-10x100x-ey…</a> this site i believe came from Eruptions which shows the current/daily katla quakes had this bookmark for a while now</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209635&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Q53uyAJ3KbfU7sTxaL1Fun_SE3MDITE32XCi4hw3iRU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leon (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209635">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209636" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281003391"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Boris Behncke, Catania, Italy, I sure that Katla is underestimated volcano. The reason for that being the record is rater poor, even if there is a good record of the eruption over the past 1200 years or so. But there is little information on the size of those eruptions.</p> <p>The Katla eruption in 1918 is considered rater small for Katla volcano. Given the break and the current time since the last eruption happened in Katla I am expecting a big eruption next time Katla goes.</p> <p>Currently I am seeing more low-frequency earthquakes coming from Katla, and that is a bad sign in my opinion.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209636&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eBFFZwFgfWRJsJBNHheAPhsxW8xQkISheIus80FntBk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209636">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209637" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281009054"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Jon Friman, I am a bit concerned my self..</p> <p>last time Katla went of, we ended up with 20 cm of ash here, hope when she finaly sings, she sings with a light and gentle tone and not giving us a full symphony..<br /> anyways, only time will tell.<br /> And what seems strange to me ,is it seems like volcanoes breaths?? could I say that??<br /> cause the Quakes seems comming in some patterns, first a period with quakes, then is seems silent, then a new perios of quakes..<br /> is there a word for such behaviour, and am I right on this or is it just imaginations??</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209637&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jWiZ56dTpFdQpjeUhYo0gvjuH72o2iazV3021BKi2BU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209637">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209638" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281009596"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thor, I noticed this too, but it looked more like a resonance pattern to me</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209638&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2aIjcmkoTwYuQoR-93t9IUPKfKfPtc-rA2nd2TX0bJ0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jules P (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209638">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209639" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281011306"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@48 I did mention it but not in a "loud" way. ;)</p> <p>Anyway if you look at the timeline all the deep quakes occured at roughly the same time. And at that depth it surely can not be Ice movement.</p> <p>Isnt the most logical conclusion that it was probably cause by magma movement i.e intrusion?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209639&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UqZs6T0B52StTHmPlvYC7I119BNgOSOkCtBg4GCDwnc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209639">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209640" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281012513"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@60 </p> <p>Not necessarily. Do remember that this is a border region between two rather massive plates. There will be some creaking. </p> <p>I'm gonna leave this in the "dunno" pile, with a keen eye towards Jón FrÃmann's concern about low-frequency earthquakes. He has gear in the area and can see much more than we can.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209640&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="u5ZznWgkTWMs-WDXSjPgchLz1qV38uvLFkWP8XysqbM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209640">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209641" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281013686"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Jón, good to be chatting with you again! About Katla, I think the general public does not at all underestimate this volcano, they're making a big story of it since many months. I personally might seriously underestimate it - but that's rather because I fear people get too fixed on one determined volcano when there are so many dangerous volcanoes on this planet. In my opinion, Katla is just one of many volcanoes that have a terrible potential. This is why sometimes I try to make people look in more directions than just one.<br /> There may have been two small eruptions of Katla in 1955 and 1999, so it is not useful to believe that because so much time has passed since the last major eruption the next eruption will be more violent. There are volcanoes where the violence of an eruption is a function of the preceding repose period, like Vesuvius - the longer the repose period, the more powerfully explosive the next eruption. Other volcanoes don't seem to obey to that rule, like Avachinsky in Kamchatka which had a violent eruption in 1945 after 7 years of repose, and a much weaker eruption in 1991 after 46 years of repose.<br /> Anyway Jón, given your record of being right when we were discussing, Katla will possibly erupt very soon and very violently, although for once I really really hope you're wrong :-D ... in the meantime I wonder what you would make of all the seismic signals we're getting here at Etna. One day we should invite you here.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209641&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DyHJdCdXtyGIs6963DoxA8WVIDMpCaT6Fx5xfE-YllA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Boris Behncke, Catania, Italy">Boris Behncke,… (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209641">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209642" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281014818"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@61</p> <p>Yes i thought about that too but isnt the depth too shallow for tectonic EQ´s? I thought if there would be tectonic EQ´s the depth would be 20km or deeper? </p> <p>@ Jón</p> <p>The helicorders you have placed out would they pick up tremors from Katla? If so would smaller tremors on your instruments indicate a larger event? What i mean is would the seismicity "loose" strenght before reaching yuor helicorders?</p> <p>Dont know if what I write is the same as what is in my head. ;)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209642&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Jk-5c-QeWWML293ftzPLtF-Mkt7yQaklgCzp59sPXQI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209642">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209643" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281016863"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm giving my vote to Parclair for making the most eloquent response so far! really well said.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209643&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8t4Szis7zwc8kIgQASAmcZNGaRY7Ik6pRB5huR3M-gY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209643">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209644" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281016956"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, while we all busy watching Eyjafjallajökull over the last few months, Katla has been accumulating it's own quakes. For the most part, they have been somewhat ignored, not being indicative of imminent activity.</p> <p>Now that Eyj has quieted down, and Katla seems to be doing a bit-o-rumbling on it's own, this plot is to serve as a placemark and reference for whatever analysis the knowledgeable people wish to make.</p> <p>The bounding box was set up to try and exclude quakes that are outside the glacial area of Katla.</p> <p>For the cursory observer, remember that this plot holds about 4 months of data.</p> <p><a href="http://i35.tinypic.com/28h21rl.png">http://i35.tinypic.com/28h21rl.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209644&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="91XvgEaTlFO3XB_xzZ99sK6bykuxiffudtq8UmkJnWs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209644">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209645" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281018803"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Lurking [65] -<br /> Too few and too far apart still to indicate anything imminent. I think the Tjörnes site is more likely to go pffff, with the way the EQs are condensing there.</p> <p>I'd like to know: 0.09 degrees latitude is quite close to 10 km in distance; what are the distances for longitudes at the Icelandic latitudes?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209645&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qohAUH9e0EdEu9cBrz28N7vCJkDyat0Y7Uozko6XFJs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209645">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209646" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281020598"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Boris Behncke, Catania, Italy, Given the type and historical record of Katla I would guess that over the history there have been many small events like the one in 1955 and in 1999. In the end they might not play any role at all in regards to the size of the eruption that happens in the end. Katla is a lot harder volcano to predict the Eyjafjallajökull. Mostly for the reason it is bigger, but bigger volcanoes appear to have the tendency to be more unpredictable then smaller volcanoes. I do not know why that might be, but I figure as of now that it might have something to do with the dynamics of the magma chamber. Then to complicate matters even further Katla has seasonal earthquakes, it happens every year. It starts around middle of July and lasts usually to November or to December depending on how much the snowfall is on Mýrdalsjökull. In regards to inflation at Katla it is interesting to notice that it stalled, or stopped around the year 2003 or 2004. It has not changed much since. What that means I am all not clear on as of yet.</p> <p>I don't like the fear mongering in the media about Katla. But there is a good reason to worry about Katla. </p> <p>In regards to Etna, you can send me earthquake data in map form and I can try to give you estimate on it. But it would have to be broken down to a seven day (week) period. But I use that standard to work out what is going on. But that is only half of the data, as GPS data helps a lot on trying to figure out what is going on in volcano.</p> <p>@Daniel_swe, There are few factors that depends on if I can record the earthquake or not. Those factors are, size, location, depth and type. Normal tectonic earthquakes are easy to record due to there high frequency nature. The harder ones I get from Katla are low frequency earthquakes. They are both hard to locate (IMO job) and to record.</p> <p>@Kultsi, Askola, FI, TFZ is a fracture zone. It has no volcanoes. The only volcanoes close to are located at the south end of it, and in the north end. But not in the middle of it. So it is just tectonic earthquakes taking place there.</p> <p>@thor, As Eyjafjallajökull showed clearly. The ash fall depends on the wind. Just hope that the wind direction is in your favor when Katla starts.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209646&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="J2QiGk79_YTGgyRQlZuSoygmlmr46f7DEw6St0B4OIs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209646">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209647" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281023329"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Kultsi, Askola, FI [66]</p> <p>According to <a href="http://www.csgnetwork.com/degreelenllavcalc.html">http://www.csgnetwork.com/degreelenllavcalc.html</a></p> <p>At 63.8°N, one degree of latitude is 111471.07 meters</p> <p>One degree of longitude is 49630.00 meters.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209647&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NhLX6uicOz5EQDXNG8bRJxgTF86uLrjN1nC8Q5O_iIY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209647">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209648" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281023708"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If this is a duplicate, please forgive, at first the forum accused me of making too many posts in too short of a time, but it's been over an hour.</p> <p>@Kultsi, Askola, FI [66]</p> <p>According to <a href="http://www.csgnetwork.com/degreelenllavcalc.html">www.csgnetwork.com/degreelenllavcalc.html</a></p> <p>At 63.8°N, one degree of latitude is 111471.07 meters</p> <p>One degree of longitude is 49630.00 meters.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209648&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jblQgF6jwK0JED6HBQfXCtew2sBkvrYr-pxP7p9bZIE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209648">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209649" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281026621"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Kultsi @Lurking<br /> I found a similar figure browsing with Google Earth's ruler from -20º to -19ºW at 63º 62 N (roughly Eyjaf and Katla's lats.). One degree = 49,40 km. But that's Google's not Lurking's precise formulas. :)<br /> @Daniel_swe I think I had the same question in mind, but didn't quite know how to formulate it. From Jón's answer, I understand that his calculations are not based only on what we see on his Hekla's helicorders, but from IMO's data as well, which are available at the site. Is that correct, Jón?<br /> And it would be very interesting to follow Jón's readings on Etna's plot.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209649&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6S2zKWcyYarn_9q14V7EZTN06Re-9H-BGsv8xhhqLEM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209649">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209650" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281026647"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@64 Bruce Stout. Why, thank you.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209650&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5gtrCWE3ZWO-gM5zXltyn189KWqB4yMTdh_TAlNz8io"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair, NoCal (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209650">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209651" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281027451"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#69 following the same procedure I got:<br /> 1 degree at 60º 52'N (Askola, Finland) = 54,92 km<br /> 1 degree at 23ºS (Rio, Brazil) = 102,75 km<br /> Lurking?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209651&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="khqzTYM-VMkmKBGwSdfuJN2VgTXAuaRFuVPznSDHgm0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209651">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209652" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281027830"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#70 @parclair I agree with what Bruce "said". ;)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209652&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-bUMPHDgJVOTDxM6W4WUEGyZNMJzLAG_gt5KiLCphho"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209652">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209653" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281027936"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato Rio, I have to use data from IMO network, as my sensor network is not good enough to locate earthquakes, and I don't have the software or the hardware for the detailed information that I need to figure out what is going on inside the volcano.</p> <p>I don't however base my judgment on one set of data. I try to use what I can.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209653&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Uy_KPsm9UAA6wX06sP3eLqS6W-jBwI6HBIamxr719zk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209653">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209654" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281029169"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#73 Thank you, Jón, that's what I believed. All I hope is that when it comes, the winds will blow into the right direction. :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209654&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xJ0Ev-8BIls72n2fjrXjlYdRhxW-MRB7cmeJIhAqd9I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209654">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209655" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281031257"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Greetings everybody!!!</p> <p>As I was reading all the posts, I kept saying to myself "darnit it! I was gonna say that!" :)</p> <p>I really can't add much more to what has already been stated so eloquently. I feel very lucky to have found this place when I did; there's simply no other place that has as many pleasant, funny, extremely intelligent and curious people.</p> <p>I still try to find the time to lurk at least every other day. In fact, I had a question about solar flares a couple of days ago and the first place I thought to go was here but then I thought "naw". Silly me. Then again, today I was reading about "spacequakes" and though of the gang so I headed here to say Hi!.</p> <p>Silly me! I should have known you guys would be talking about these things too! And that's what I love about you guys - you all have a such a strong thirst for knowledge about, well, everything!</p> <p>Ok I also miss cuddling with Gordys on our cyber couch while watching Mother Nature in all her fury, the strange cravings for breakfast at 11 pm as the sun rose on our Lady Eyja, guessing when Helen's Arch might collapse, the many ways we would entertain each other during lulls (opera, trivia, jokes, etc.). Gosh, I could go on, so I won't ;)</p> <p>It truly is a special place that puts someone like me at a loss for words to describe my experience here.</p> <p>Thank you Erik!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209655&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SBhCnCkNBEegd6sFfpdr4M09iVvlxzlKngTsehw56W8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209655">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209656" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281031539"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I can't suppose that this comment is much of an addition to the above, except as another expression of "Thanks" and "Wow, fascinating!" from a non-scientific type. Laypeople who are interested, in a lay way, in natural phenomena often come at the topics from an esthetic angle, and/or (as in this case) because they want more specific understanding of something exciting that's happening right now. I got both kinds of satisfaction from this blog - the links to the Icelandic sites and webcams and to other visual resources (that fabulous photo essay on boston.com's bigpicture, and the photos of eruptive lightning, for instance), and the expert discussion here that sent me scurrying to look up some of the specialized vocabulary. All that plus the rounded viewpoint that took issues like the air travel ban, media influences, etc. into account, and the real sense of community from reading the comments... seems to me this is science blogging as it should be, as least from this non-pro's POV. I can't share the enthusiasm of, say, a group of theoretical physicists, but here I was able to feel that I had a fundamental understanding of what the excitement was about. So - Thanks, and Wow, fascinating!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209656&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8nNky6ZKzZM6pYnsy3MnhABd1ZJ608A06HLrWhWsj-M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Ellen (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209656">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209657" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281031556"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Correction: Thank you to all of you! :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209657&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tjlklCvHe_AiQSWNkzHv09YtCVWpvrIDbKmsE5diXXI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209657">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209658" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281031720"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato Rio</p> <p>"...Lurking's precise formulas..."</p> <p>Thanks for the accolade but they aren't my formulas. I'm just parroting what that site spit out.</p> <p>If I were to actually calculate the distance of a great circle path, I would use the <i>angle in radians x sphere radius</i>, but that is only as good as your sphere radius measurement... and the Earth is not a very good sphere. So, I cheat where I can or use a few Excel formulas I found at </p> <p><a href="http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html">www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html</a></p> <p>Really handy thing during hurricane season. As for plots, you ought to see some the really wild ones I made last year that tracked the landfall aimpoint vs various coastal cities as each update came out. I don't think I'll be doing that this year just form the workload aspect of it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209658&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qxTehCkCNqO62Sy-lLpFogJ2zSW4N4kuh8iPfRV9v6w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209658">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209659" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281032287"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I ought to add that I come back here every other day or so, too - - volcanoes may be awesome and quivering with the excitement of potential danger, but it's also strangely calming to keep track of grand, complex events that change every day and owe nothing <i>at all</i> to human passions and foibles. If we all vanished tomorrow, or if we had never evolved in the first place, the earth would still shake, and the steam, ash and lava still rise.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209659&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XBT_jFXJTnR9UNwfNM1IV28D0CxbwxRvWHMAJKHbfQM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Ellen (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209659">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209660" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281033216"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I warn iceland.. take cover soon... it starts with a new moon.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209660&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cSryJ2XvIAC27YXb-iyORc2h2sCKkF6fUXYyiw23-M8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik W. (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209660">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209661" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281033847"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#75 @Princess Frito!!! I knew Erik would find a way to bait you back. Just in time. I thought you were drowned somewhere in the Mariana trench. Good to hear from you!</p> <p>#78 @Lurking "I'm just parroting what that site spit out." I'm most thankful to all your "parroting"! </p> <p>#79 @Mary Ellen: I feel very much the same way. And maybe that explains why we became so close, yet living so far apart. This kind of understanding could mean a step forward to human evolution.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209661&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Ad95l_cxQRZj31PLeEXFV5A5-YELKaQDgTUZYnZ0uyg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209661">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209662" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281034083"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello all. I had to pop in on this one. Been away from home for almost a month and won't be back for another few days, so I haven't been around except for a little lurking now and then. (Does Lurking have little lurkers? Or would that be lurkinglers?) :) </p> <p>Admittedly the information posted here has been way over my head, but that has not stopped me from trying to learn. Until Eyjafjallajökull, I have never really paid any attention to the geological side of volcanoes, only their historical impact. If I had to rely on the news media for good information I never would have kept following what was happening. But this blog and the information, analysis, even educated guesses, reeled me in and I couldn't stay away. I even created a blog on a weather site to disseminate information. Little did I know it would be visited by people from 43 different countries.<br /> But beyond the scientific aspect, I think what really kept me here and posting was the people here. This is a place where there really is no stupid question. People have given freely of their knowledge to those of us who know little or nothing about volcanoes. And then there was the brief interlude when we couldn't see anything that haiku's (and one limerick) became the filler so we didn't lose touch. We have had language lessons (it's not poro, it's thoro). I could go on, but you get my point I believe. </p> <p>Thank you Erik for this blog and thank you everyone else for sharing your knowledge.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209662&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eCrkgBpy7dUEUtm8Ix8Vf2dzyvfi2AS-sctzD21RRhY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.wunderground.com/blog/PcolaDan/show.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dan, Florida (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209662">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209663" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281035509"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@81 @Renato!!</p> <p>Just when I thought I was out... they pull me back in! </p> <p>And every day I still keep loyal watch over this camera at Taal Lake for someone here and I don't even remember who it was anymore!</p> <p><a href="http://www.mycam-asia.tv/cams/philippines/luzon/batangas-taallake-yc/display_current.php">http://www.mycam-asia.tv/cams/philippines/luzon/batangas-taallake-yc/di…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209663&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hnw3e9nEGA7fcfKw7WLdg4IqZ1HstPemCzvSK6WkH_w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209663">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209664" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281036520"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Dan Margueritas, Florida!<br /> Hope you guys keep dropping by even just to say hello.<br /> @Everyone<br /> According to EMSC there were two quakes that were not mentioned in USGS reports: a 5.0 in Mianmar and a 4.7 in Vanuatu.<br /><a href="http://www.emsc-csem.org/#2">http://www.emsc-csem.org/#2</a><br /> And another 3.7 in Long Valley.<br /> Solar flares? &gt;:-}</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209664&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="53rWN6F8NaXIHqrV5SpOLrxOwi-iFxT6Fci54cibM3k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209664">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209665" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281036685"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#83 Hehehee! YRH</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209665&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rkLzH9fGv2vR10pVy29hHIyvwwvtFUVZtfCS-F-dT1M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209665">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209666" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281038431"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@83 Princess Frito-- thanks on keeping watch over Taal for me. Heh, I'm back, but never know when I'm off again. (family crises). Since Taal's been downgraded, I guess we can move onto other things. Altho' I do like the view. </p> <p>I've been watching the AVO cams lately, the weather's been good enough to see the volcanos there.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209666&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2FTqBZLAPx5AXtHTKbi2OtCX17TxP5TgybCEjqK3CkE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair, NoCal (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209666">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209667" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281038491"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Beware the Spacequakes!</p> <p><a href="http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/27jul_spacequakes/">http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/27jul_spacequ…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209667&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7LnJvXR8eOUBwUeeMpNBTCTyjlbGm2WOI5OCT8FTaLI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209667">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209668" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281038912"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@86 parclair I was 99.9% sure it was you but I didn't want to embarass myself in case I was wrong since it's been a while. That Taal cam is kind of soothing, isn't it? I wish you all the best and pray that you and your family have the best possible outcome to your situation. :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209668&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="acWYbh4lUsmF3HMZ6uILpRu2CbRbS1XKNOD02UYSdQo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209668">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209669" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281040014"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>BBC news article on geomagnetic snapback:<br /><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-10880852">www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-10880852</a></p> <p>2 large CME events, yesterday and today<br /><a href="http://www.spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&amp;day=04&amp;month=08&amp;year=2010">www.spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&amp;day=04&amp;month=08&amp;year=2010</a></p> <p>Major jump in USGS Global EQ Map events: 150%, 18 hours.</p> <p>An interesting overlay graphic:<br /> This plot<br /><a href="http://www.solen.info/solar/images/solar.gif">www.solen.info/solar/images/solar.gif</a><br /> with this semi-transparent layer<br /> hraun.vedur.is/ja/Katla2009/god_trem.gif</p> <p>Remember the timing lag: 3 days</p> <p>Yellowstone uptick: geothermal/pore pressure with tectonic response.</p> <p>Tanzania quake: geothermal/gas exploration</p> <p>For Kultsi: Tjornes - geothermal with occasional magmetic fissure flux. </p> <p>Hydrothermal fluid flow within a tectonically active rift-ridge transform junction: Tjörnes Fracture Zone, Iceland. J GEOPHYSICAL RES 115:B05104, 2010. doi:10.1029/2009JB006640<br /><a href="http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2010/2009JB006640.shtml">www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2010/2009JB006640.shtml</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209669&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="E4Pt-zi6fJgRF3Ho3WDfFlG1bGJ9baJa0KiIxmOCxBQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209669">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209670" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281040146"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@29: What you describe about October 2009 is eerily similar to what is going on at Katla right now. Any significance to this?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209670&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UL5Z_Tyj3nD9mbmWkwFbxTuCSuGhNkDnu7bAEvcIu7U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">StarBP (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209670">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209671" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281040573"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So...I concur with Kultsi, a reasonable probability exists for a larger shake, 5.3-6.3 Mag on the Tjornes Transform Fault, 1-6 months, probably sooner over later.</p> <p>Chance of Katla erupting: remote at present.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209671&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="T-h8G0BhIOtUBzVXCeU1yJPi6yRSVMsgR_I9j0gb_aA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209671">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209672" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281040728"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@89 Passerby: Thanks for the great links. The bz's direction just turned south (although weak) so I'm running back outside with my trusty digicam in hopes of catching some of the Lights. Wish me luck!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209672&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GwlB8mosOzgPGaEpMenbJcuguWRvBA2tG6suZEGpERI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209672">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209673" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281041831"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Don't need luck, except maybe with respect to cloud cover: aurora was photographed as far south as Iowa last night.</p> <p>Now: Kp=6 (storm).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209673&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="f4H9hhuWpLaUWj0BQ2XRqAywQh8Tc1BUUM0z9hf_daI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209673">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209674" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281042518"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@93 Passerby - Kp=2 now, no?</p> <p><a href="http://spaceweather.com/">http://spaceweather.com/</a></p> <p>Yes, cloud-related luck. :) Cloud cover looks 2/10 scattered. Another band on the way, but lots of stars are visible right now. I'll try again in 20 minutes. </p> <p>I'm at about 55 degrees magnetic lat - about the limit where the chances are 50/50 from what I've read)</p> <p>It's going to be a long night :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209674&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nE4k_xCq2AbPtoMfBGvkxVrIpxg1hCIU_I44jCdmXfg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209674">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209675" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281043144"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@93 Passerby I believe I need a Kp of 6 - 6.5 at my latitude.</p> <p>Bz switched from north to south and increased from 1.7 south to 2.3 south in the past 20 minutes. Should it follow then that the Kp will also increase (and thus increase my chances)?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209675&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="VvyO4UIOgRrJM-dfdPsAtZLtsCecgzpl99oV_lVeSvs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209675">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209676" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281044501"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Darn it! From spaceweather.com:</p> <p>"The show is over ... for now: Geomagnetic activity has subsided to low levels and the aurora show of August 3rd and 4th has come to an end. "</p> <p>But for the sky's next act:</p> <p>"Mark your calendar: On Thursday, August 12th, an alignment of planets in the sunset sky will kick off the finest meteor shower of 2010, the Perseids".</p> <p>*Sigh*</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209676&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gCwxBSuLUt5JDvaytKTYRZJNez431-22FUSVZuq5-J4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209676">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209677" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281046267"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sorry, it was Kp=6 when I last checked a few hours ago. We should see a corresponding decline in EQ activity on the USGS global and US maps.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209677&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GZRh94bChSKY99LXtIz8KhQ81QKhaBBmzK5ELVWLWkg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209677">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209678" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281050788"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, I wasn't going to go there, but I did do a plot earlier today. I dropped the K index chart in as the background of one of my global Earthquake Power plots and scaled to match the timelines. This is for Mag 4.5 and higher as reported by the USGS. The K index plot background is from solarcycle24.com</p> <p><a href="http://i34.tinypic.com/2hdnscp.png">http://i34.tinypic.com/2hdnscp.png</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209678&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="APCMwGSiP7-C5kUpoEMs_cnVZwliBUFdE-ydi7vY994"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209678">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209679" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281051210"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Whoa Lurking! As always, you rock!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209679&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aWLXbnrUsKskcOnswhZV9Er6qZkuRp87K1VhNRTZNZU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209679">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209680" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281051566"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Whoa Lurking! As always, you rock!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209680&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MFx_8t401HX17uvKeRueYG3V0h0s6ENOrPQ42PDS0I0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209680">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209681" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281051694"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If I said it once, I've said it a thousand times - Lurking, you r..</p> <p>No but seriously folks, sorry for the double post. It seems there's a glitch tonight.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209681&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WFBa6OTN9gBtUb3ep_AvxqZyYOZ18YIFgjSv4ev9cmA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209681">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209682" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281053261"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby - No probs. Thank you again for the info.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209682&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Y-E9C6PkKQILdzdqC-pUOG_ng0NgNVyW6roDv4_V9wI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209682">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209683" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281054527"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Rock or not, I don't have an explanation for it. Looking just at Iceland, you don't see it. But then Iceland has a whole lot of other stuff going on that will affect the activity, things like volcanoes with upset tummys, shifting plates etc.</p> <p><a href="http://i35.tinypic.com/4t1yjn.png">http://i35.tinypic.com/4t1yjn.png</a></p> <p>Passerby or someone else on here may be able to explain it... I've only done one CME event verses Quakes, and that doesn't make for a good indicator.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209683&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bJdmQN2ieVU_Bj_vhBA2632_MxS8gDTf89a1HXDdkQg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209683">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209684" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281055381"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Lurking @Renato -<br /> Thanks for the numbers! What I was looking for was a good grid for the plots, and around Mýrdalsjökull a spacing of 0.09 degrees for latitude and 0.2 degrees for longitude would give a 10 kilometer grid close enough for plotting purposes - that combined to a similarly spaced depth axis would give plots with only slight distortion.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209684&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2GoANLorMsCjdZfHuEQ0zHvDN_ZR2fMPUYgbELRR048"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209684">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209685" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281056369"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby [89] re. geomagnetic storms &amp; tremor plots</p> <p>Could the Occam's razor here be that the recording devices sensitive enough to pick up a man farting would also record the changes in the magnetic flux? They are, after all, electro-magnetic pickups.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209685&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="snn395amvrXJRDtsIUs6-wRbc6qfyFs6W9kxBZv6AhQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209685">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209686" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281057150"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>While rummaging around for data to get an idea of what things are like under Mt Hood (historically) I ran across an odd... "thing." I don't know what it is, other than a collection of quakes somewhat North of Madras OR in the in a river plain south of the Columbia River.</p> <p>The location is 45.1173 -120.9467.</p> <p>Any one have any ideas?</p> <p><a href="http://i34.tinypic.com/2ywa649.png">http://i34.tinypic.com/2ywa649.png</a> </p> <p>( Note, the quake data is from 1975 until present, data from teh ANSS catalog quake.geo.berkeley.edu/anss/catalog-search.html )</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209686&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IvMhz9R-jBp0a0KbWU52Ra_ZpM5hNiDgUgxAIrPN9HM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209686">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209687" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281065138"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hello all,<br /> Just wanted to join in and add my name to those before me who have expressed so well how much they have learned and what enjoyment this blog has given them. I stumbled upon it in April when the eruption was well under way and immediately became addicted to it (much to the bafflement of my family), religiously watching the cams and the tremor graphs, all at the same time, and reading the fascinating comments from learned experts and lay volcano enthusiasts alike. Besides experiencing the beauty and drama of such a big show of Nature, and learning about Icelandic tectonics, magma intrusion, ash components and so on, I particularly loved reading all the other contributions, the haikus and the other volcano-related literature references, the information about language and culture and even the posters who simply expressed their awe and wonder or shared their discovery of rabbits and bears in the plume.<br /> All in all, it was a wonderful experience enabled by the Internet, empowering people to watch and share their experience in real time as the events unfold, and by all you great people who have made this possible.<br /> I continue to check the blog every day and learn about other volcanoes, but I still find it oddly soothing to just gaze at the Thorosfell cam (even when itâs foggy).<br /> Thanks to everyone!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209687&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XNvC0kDjlmw6JIvwvWSjXSJqPFhoW3Jv73GZqeL5-AQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anita from Austria (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209687">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209688" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281065606"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I wouldn't have been following news of Eyjafjallajökull's eruption at all if it wasn't for your blog, actually. And I didn't follow the media reports at all. Too much sensationalistic crap. Here, I could get far better information without the ZOMG WE'RE ALL GONNA DIIIEEE!!! hook, and in a place where I could be sure that the science was accurate (and if something was reported incorrectly, you'd correct it as more information became available). </p> <p>Before Eyjafjallajökull, I'd never really considered the implications of a volcano erupting under a glacier. That stands out far more than the impact on air travel for me - it's obvious a lot of volcanic ash in the air is going to have an impact on jets. What we don't encounter as often is what happens when a volcano blows under an ice sheet. Learning how that works and seeing the result here was the best part of the eruption. Sorry, Iceland! ;-)</p> <p>You did a brilliant job, Erik. Thanks!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209688&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eltwfArNpi1N8CCsdAQmymjnNUp0HA1lb4X2_Y13JR4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://entequilaesverdad.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dana Hunter (not verified)</a> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209688">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209689" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281066843"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@67 (Jón):</p> <p>Actually I for once have to disagree with you Jón. There are 4 Volcanos in the area that we see on this link.</p> <p><a href="http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/tjornes-small/">http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/tjornes-small/</a></p> <p>You have one submarine volcano that erupted in 1868, another that erupted in 1755 (Kolbinsey Ridge Volcano), and of course the 2 dormant (or dead) volcanos of Kolbeinsey and Grimsey.</p> <p>The distance from the 1755 volcano is just 10 kilometres away from where the quakes are occuring, they follow the fault line, and as Lurking has proved, they make up a clear tube pattern. Secondly, both the 1868 and 1755 eruptions where in Fimmvörduhals style (I didn't want to use the word Laki-style for so many reasons...), ie. long rift wents. So I have no problem with seeing a possibility for a new rift opening up at a slightly other part of the FZ than the KRV proper.<br /> For all we know it might allready have been rift-eruptions on the site, but it has not been recorded. Actually the sea-bed in the area looks decidedly odd when I look at the marine charts for the route from Grimsey to Husavik and Akureyri. There are really "flat" areas marked as stone bottom there, which might be indicative of old lava-beds.</p> <p>I am not saying that you are not right, I just want to throw in a little bit of a spanner into the machinery. For being Iceland TFZ is unusually volcanically quiet, but...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209689&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Gzuo6F6dAtX-HzSyYUkyKb7Cs82XqcFQEOvQnok4cls"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209689">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209690" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281067847"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@68 Lurking:</p> <p>In a perfect world you would be correct, but...<br /> For some reason they whey back when decided that it was easier for sailors if a latitudinal degree was 60 minutes times the nautical mile. So a lat degree is actually 60 X 1852 metres = 111.120 metres.<br /> This was all very well back in the days of the clippers, but today with the satellite tracking positioning systems it is a bit of a bother since they present your figure (which in a way is absolutly correct). So instead your little GPS recalcs it into the older number so it fits the maps.<br /> The original problem comes from the old calculation of the earths circumference which gave the result of 40003,2 kilometres. But since nobody changed it the problem is still there... I don't know if some modern land-maps use the correct number, but all naval-charts use the original 60 nautical miles per degree lat.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209690&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5ov_0J0gmSgS8J-tcR73EXzTGWGDg_DdcIONwFlJzMk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209690">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209691" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281073562"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hmm not even one little shake. Its almos eerie how quiet Myrdalsjökull is now. :) Not even some trembling from shifting ice.</p> <p>24 hours of complete silence and counting.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209691&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ObFw5wbesmMIdNBPi0ZFg7UKoGbPaTGmp2ZYh690ObU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209691">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209692" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281074583"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Kathy # 40:<br /> For want of loads of better things to do (like work) I went through the posts again just before the eruption (great reading btw !! Did anyone mention James? He was really on the money!!)</p> <p>... long story short.. you're right, it was Micheal Cerulli Billingsley who championed the tsunami threat, not Randolph. Apologies all round.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209692&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pW2gzaNxdwQSOlczlpysf8VLQiO2M5RuCQwMep9plIY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209692">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209693" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281074601"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>good morning all - I think this thread has just demonstrated what makes Eruptions so special. It feels like a family reunion....</p> <p>those of you who have mentioned the Mila cams and other live links (alas, poor vodacam) have hit a uniting factor, without them I have a feeling that a lot of us would have checked from time to time for discussion, links and updates, but with them, we who are not scientists became truly involved. That's a unique privilege. Thanks, Mila, I hope Thorocam stays up even if the mountain stays quiet, we can always keep track of the glacier...Anita@108,'oddly soothing,' I couldn't agree more. (There's a caravan of white vehicles out and about this morning.)<br /> 'Sue's' pbworks links page was wonderful. </p> <p>Boris,we'll join you at Etna for sure!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209693&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="D5xTvLH0APnrZnOXnQttWXjLW7dU0UMErWZst9L18x8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209693">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209694" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281075196"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi all first start with Colin looking at the weather maps T storm Colin might curve round and head towards Iceland or between Greenland and Iceland in the coming days you want to keep a close eye on this,and the Atlantic ocean is looking very active from the 20/21 August</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209694&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Z7DdfxG5bCGNITG1-wF5JVLStWyvnKCnoLeW96ZUf5E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leon (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209694">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209695" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281077747"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is a question for all of you who know more than me.<br /> This is all in theory of course!</p> <p>What if there was a large magma chamber beneath myrdalsjökull which during the past<br /> years/decades was slowly but steadily filling up. This would for sure create some minor<br /> tremors, EQ´s and such I assume? </p> <p>What happens when it is filled up completely? Would the EQ´s cease and the minor tremors from strain<br /> in the bedrock increase as the chamber began pressing upward? Or would there simply be<br /> even more and larger EQ´s?</p> <p>Around 2 days ago there was a few deep EQ´s (7km or deeper) on the southern end of the glacier. Since then<br /> the EQ´s has come to a complete stop (almost).</p> <p>Could it be that the chamber has been "topped off"? I realize that its not just a big hole in the ground<br /> but rather a mix of magma/solid and so on.</p> <p>Trying to educate myself a bit more and I find it more unusual with a complete lack of EQ´s than the prescence<br /> of such events... :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209695&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="v9IkhF5sqcwB2inBOqXJ_BHw72fYEe_V7PKH9k2lfRo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel_swe (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209695">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209696" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281078572"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby 89 Thanks for the links - I stand corrected &amp; furtherly (:&gt;) educated - not solar flares.<br /> @ Bruce Stout 112 See this is just one of the coolest things about this community of curious folk - leaving no stone unturned. Thanks!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209696&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bg6ej8j47BJPHS0Y0XJetPRsVcQd5S92aTRqY2mtGHY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy B. (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209696">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209697" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281081264"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Carl, The only known volcano close to TFZ is at it south end. It last erupted in the year 1868, that is confimred anyway.</p> <p><a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1703-10=">http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1703-10=</a></p> <p>Here are good maps of TFZ and it's movements.</p> <p><a href="http://sites.google.com/site/jacquesangelier/platedivergenceiniceland">http://sites.google.com/site/jacquesangelier/platedivergenceiniceland</a></p> <p>Kolbeinsey ridge is a diffrent system, and is the system that starts where TFZ ends. There are at least one active volcano. There might be more there. More information, <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1705-01=">http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1705-01=</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209697&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oZkpD9CWyKqMeu6AcxbwPkBamH3HJT7VnQm7Y9HeMiU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://earthquakes.jonfr.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jón FrÃmann (not verified)</a> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209697">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209698" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281082182"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The combination of an unusually articulate and interesting professor-blogger, along with current data-events covered from almost every perspective, along with exceptionally gifted commenters makes for a blog I visit daily. I have followed more links from Eruptions to fascinating research than from any other source. Eyjaf... news and discussions gave blow-by-blow, moment-by-moment coverage that deserved its tremendous following. What many scientists and "lay" people like myself now know about volcanic processes and their effects on humans has been tremendously expanded. Finally, what we do not know today, and what we may never know, has been emphasized and adds a humbling element to the great technological strides in volcanology knowledge. I thank Erik and all those contributing to Eruptions.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209698&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0Lt3eBqqmMaRda2vh4IbgKu4sOmhfO5RiO4qAho-YHI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">pyromancer76 (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209698">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209699" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281084511"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@99, Lurking. Answer to your query on the origin of seismic activity south of Madras, OR.</p> <p>Smith Rock. 'The main vent feature of the Lower Crooked volcanic field is the large Crooked River caldera, which erupted the voluminous Tuff of Smith Rock at 29.56 MYA.</p> <p>Field trip guides to the geology of the northern half of Lower Crooked Basin, Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson Counties, Oregon - Overview.</p> <p><a href="http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/og/OGv69n01-LowerCrookedBasinOverview.pdf">www.oregongeology.org/pubs/og/OGv69n01-LowerCrookedBasinOverview.pdf</a></p> <p>THE CROOKED RIVER CALDERA: IDENTIFICATION OF AN EARLY OLIGOCENE ERUPTIVE CENTER IN THE JOHN DAY FORMATION OF CENTRAL OREGON. 2007 GSA Meeting Abstract.<br /> gsa.confex.com/gsa/2007CD/finalprogram/abstract_120471.htm</p> <p>Geologists discover Oregon's largest volcano, the Crooked River Caldera. Local news article, March 2008.<br /><a href="http://www.thecreswellchronicle.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=5008">www.thecreswellchronicle.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=5008</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4z5jK85Hs0">www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4z5jK85Hs0</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209699&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="g7vluykfYwvZ25Su9ao3McmB31j4sI52p4IubhZHHXQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209699">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209700" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281085371"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi; Nasa-Great ball of fire image of the day<br /><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1732.html">http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1732.html</a><br /> Katla some photo's going back 1997/99 and info<br /><a href="http://www.earthice.hi.is/Apps/webobjects/HI.woa/wa/dp?id=1011072">http://www.earthice.hi.is/Apps/webobjects/HI.woa/wa/dp?id=1011072</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209700&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fo-fxoT29eaQQCM8DFmSwVMOuVyBJxVCKPK2vxfiabA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leon (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209700">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209701" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281085555"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Above post for #107. Interesting plot, post 99. Thanks, Lurking.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209701&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K9hjO2PDW9V9HMLX2XJlgkU3RuPxr44H8tjgt2ViyQc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209701">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209702" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281085931"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.earthice.hi.is/Apps/WebObjects/HI.woa/wa/dp?id=1011072">http://www.earthice.hi.is/Apps/WebObjects/HI.woa/wa/dp?id=1011072</a><br /> Katla i hope this work i missed some caps</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209702&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rTrceQ_KCpXxB5cMeM6VXSqDsSyQ3znwSZaUIBPoaxE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leon (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209702">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209703" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281086267"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for the links, Leon.<br /> A report posted in Icelandic shows the huge amounts of tephra and water/steam ejected from Eyjaföll as well as melted ice.<br /> "100 million cubic meters of ice melted in Eyjafjallajökull"<br /><a href="http://www.hi.is/frettir/100_milljonir_rummetra_af_is_bradnudu_i_eyjafjallajokli">http://www.hi.is/frettir/100_milljonir_rummetra_af_is_bradnudu_i_eyjafj…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209703&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oc64aDDI5kg9voWFU2d6Bqoak4UR9JXzEUbJqEcdSV0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209703">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209704" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281086893"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks Leon and Renato.</p> <p>For those who can't get enough of Icelandic webcams, Mila has added a few more! Now you can view a geyser, watch people swim at the Blue Lagoon (no men in thongs please!), or watch traffic in Reykjavic. They've added back in a cam on the south side of Eyja but it's not currently working.</p> <p>Fill your boots!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209704&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KGz8p6V6sH6u15Gcq4muMCuaQTw9AmGJtXJOOTsHI8U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209704">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209705" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281087003"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Of course, a link would probably be helpful ;)</p> <p><a href="http://eldgos.mila.is/english/">http://eldgos.mila.is/english/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209705&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bCce7nubmKfyfTog3YihIZ27XzKrTeVNa8QuJbCkYE8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209705">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209706" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281087803"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#125-26 Thanks, Your Highness. Leon and Kultsi had already provided us with the link, but this one is a good reminder.<br /> My compliments to the Icelandic dietary habits - most people swimming in the Blue Lagoon appear skinny and fit. A little bit more of suntanning would help, but then again, congratulations for their bravery (weather maps show max temps of only 11º C at the site!).<br /> People browsing at Yellowstone Park should take it as an example.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209706&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8g-BxldV-oLobNjRTXYnp_0W7aF4E8u1HD93yg5Etjo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209706">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209707" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281088439"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Things are starting to shake up at Yellowstone, check out this link.</p> <p><a href="http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/imw_webi.htm">http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/imw_webi.htm</a></p> <p>I really enjoy this site, all of your comments are great while being 100% better than the news.</p> <p>Thanks everyone.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209707&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="S8d1L1cdf5CcTIGO8MyR62j6xe9TiLKlOBB6Ev9YLWA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">RH (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209707">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209708" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281088630"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>but also thankyou to you all, so much info! i have this link sent to me earlier Iceland should take a look whats coming but still it could miss you<br /><a href="http://northeastquadrant.blogspot.com/">http://northeastquadrant.blogspot.com/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209708&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4QHwi4jE-r87a-oBgbCTCtoGG_hGV7wb22oqY63yg_4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leon (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209708">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="148" id="comment-2209709" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281092898"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wow, I bring up Eyjafjallajokull and suddenly we have 100+ comments! I was hoping to get a few comments to use for the talk, but this is overwhelming. Thank you all for the kind words about the blog, but really, I'm just a moderator, you are the community, to you should all give yourselves a hand. I should be able to post a PDF version of the talk on the blog, so look for that sometime in September.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209709&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IkpY5FToePyyp-9GsWQoxYljDRSZvq0NiVzLhZfiD2M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209709">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/eklemetti"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/eklemetti" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209710" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281093225"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Passerby [120]</p> <p>The cluster is actually north of Madras, and using your reference data, seems to be under the Mutton Mountains. It also seems to be associated with that structure, being in an area that would have likely been under the northern reaches of that caldera. </p> <p>What I find interesting, is that the the crooked river caldera predates the flood basalt event by â10 myr, then there was the CFB event, then the caldera march up the snake river plain, ending with Yellowstone.</p> <p>Thats the cool part about this site, it's almost impossible to come here without learning something.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209710&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DK85euJ2X6aZIkF5gXVEV8p6umKmW-pYaCEkLHonGRg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209710">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209711" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281094302"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The only suggestive point of reference I could find was to the South.</p> <p>I found an interesting explanation other than the Yellowstone hotspot. That would be: subduction zone backwash upflow at volcanic 'roots' (eg., the caldera). </p> <p>The Oregon High Lava Plains: Proof against a plume origin for Yellowstone? </p> <p><a href="http://www.mantleplumes.org/HighLavaPlains.html">www.mantleplumes.org/HighLavaPlains.html</a></p> <p>This mechanism is mentioned in technical discussion of the Newberry Volcano (see wikipage).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209711&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Jx0IQCnIsKBovnA3eUX1nvdSuA6EFYTVoVE9K1Nf5NQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209711">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209712" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281096279"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In seeking information on volcanoes, I came across this blog, which is rich, relevant and interesting so it is magic because every day I visit him as a friend. Thank to all. Merçi à vous tous. Sorry for my bad english</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209712&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CUwfCqOIdw39MfYmSf_T-SAUMiqGEHhRWDCUM93Cubc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sherine de France (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209712">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209713" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281096442"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, Erik, you are still the one who made the decisive difference by actually encouraging participation and then treating everyone with respect, no matter how stupid the question (ok, there are no stupid questions, right? ;-)</p> <p>This started way before Eyjaf with the mystery volcano series and other events. Without these signals from you a lot of people (like me) would never have dared to participate here. So, seriously, hats off to you. You've created something particuarly special with this blog and I hope a lot of other teachers take you as an example cause you can't do it much better than this.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209713&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FRL-9E0mjydpjYNP_E-yUABbo_nFk8TE7-KAcbxjVyk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209713">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209714" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281099001"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby</p> <p>If by backwash, they mean the turbidity set up by the loss of the Farralon plate, I can agree with that. Roughly 20 to 30 myr ago is when the western side of it started dropping under the North American plate. Things were probably a bit chaotic then.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209714&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ebnw4-1hfRJlKC5otrotPImtMx3a1VcHw5c7u_NiFtA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209714">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209715" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281101636"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@135: Wrong plate. There is recent seismic data for the The High Lava Plains that argues for upper mantle partial melt, but the mechanism promoting upwelling is as yet is unknown. </p> <p>The first paper cited below suggests lithosphere tectonics and not aesthenosphere flow is responsible for HLP volcanic activity, but the second argues against this and suggests aesthenosphere turbulence, using the same method (SKS-splitting).</p> <p>Origin of the Newberry Hotspot Track: Evidence from shear-wave splitting. Xie and Allen (2006), Earth Planetary Sci Lett 244:315-322. </p> <p>&gt;The average fast directions ENEâWSW to the northwest are consistent with generation by mantle shear parallel to the subduction of the Juan de Fuca Plate, and the more EâW fast directions to the east are perhaps due to shear caused by the Basin and Range extension. </p> <p>Shear wave splitting and the pattern of mantle flow beneath eastern Oregon. Long et al (2009), Earth Planetary Sci Lett 288:359â369.</p> <p>&gt; We infer from the large split times and homogeneous fast directions that there must be significant active flow in a roughly E-W direction in the asthenosphere beneath the HLP; this inferred flow field places a strong constraint on models that seek to explain the young tectonomagmatic activity in the region.</p> <p>The area to the north, the Blue and Wallowa Mts, are apparently more complex.</p> <p>earth.geology.yale.edu/~mdl2/papers/long_et_al_2009_epsl.pdf.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209715&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_oLRwyEiErJ5PmSWjr0ZWDfJTRJc6SQo7uPfuoaEm64"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209715">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209716" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281103157"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As the slab (Farralon) drops downward and to the east should there not be a flow from East to West as the existing material flows back towards the direction that the slag came from?</p> <p>A short time ago in the responses to our guest poster Dr. Ed Kohut, there were links to articles that suggest that as a slab lands on the next boundary layer plumes may be generated from the displaced material as it is forced upwards. </p> <p>One would think that if plate/slab dynamics are a representation of solid/fluid interaction in ultra slow motion that there would be a reverse current as it sinks.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209716&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hmAVHkSBkdpytRZJQKMdGMpqPb8fmaPIUGN4pjt5Q30"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209716">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209717" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281106430"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The papers I cited mention the Juan de Fuca, to avoid confusion. You're not incorrect at calling it the Farallon plate, but the subduction forces arise from its small remnant.</p> <p>Reconstructed past plate history, Univ Wisconsin:<br /><a href="http://www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/platetec/kula.htm">www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/platetec/kula.htm</a></p> <p>Regional general direction of flow is said to be from the Juan de Fuca Plate; the Farallon plate is largely subducted under the NA Plate. The Juan de Fuca, one of the smallest tectonic plates, is a Farallon remnant. Eg: most of the Farallon plate is folded deeply under North America.</p> <p>svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002400/a002410/</p> <p>en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_de_Fuca_Plate</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209717&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="JpZnESh5sTsmrgdj5bruvpePcZk7AuhZRik_B_PDpZU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209717">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209718" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281107311"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I came across this in my alum magazine - no answer given - a geology 209 course on natural hazards. Fun, perhaps, for some of you (not me!) My addition is, with given parameters, would it overrun Hvol or Thoro cams. Possibly there are some missing parts, I don't know enough to tell.</p> <p>"Example of weekly problem set:<br /> In a volcanic eruption the tephra (...) reaches a maximum elevation (ho) of 10,000 feet from the vent of the volcano.</p> <p>a) what was the initial velocity of the tephra as it was ejected (assume..(a vent) elevation of...2500 meters.) To find the velocity use the kinetic energy equation and set the kinetic energy of tephra as it explodes equal to the total potential energy the tephra has as it stops at its maximum elevation.<br /> KE=(1/2)mv2<br /> PE=mgh</p> <p>b) once the tephra starts flowing down the side of the volcano it will start to lose its total energy through friction as a function of the horizontal distance (x) away from its starting point. The total energy, as a function of horizontal distance, decreases as:<br /> Etotal(x)=mg(ho-Ax) + KE + PE</p> <p>where x is the horizontal distance away from the summit and A is the friction coeffiecient, A= 0.2. What is the maximum total distance the tephra can travel? (Hint: the maximum distance is reached when the tephra's velocity is zero.)"</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209718&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8lBj-fN_sAwA27Bcx3fxVXvlyCtKjFhsdhl9ediWWv4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209718">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209719" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281107379"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That pretty much fits with my notion of it. The logic I used in associating the Farralon demise with the Crooked Creek/CFB/and Snake river march have to do with the timing of Farralon's demise. (â30myr)</p> <p>The CFB and Yellowstone aspect of it arising from the "turbidity" from the tail end of the drop. (Sort of hard to call it turbid when it's going so slow)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209719&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mU21pVjYM0cSX44IHlAJiW9ISHKmqLGSdIpc8ucwGkI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209719">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209720" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281107993"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Tout a été dit, non?<br /> I'm totally addict....<br /> J'adore...<br /> Thanks Eric,Thanks Community<br /> Mumu of france</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209720&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rUIrY5DtvRF8ufj8WwvZygO7JPWD4l6PYAJPZsw6VDQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">muriel (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209720">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209721" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281113558"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Regarding feed-back request:</p> <p>Since I only discovered the blog May 2, I missed most of the Eyja excitement. Besides the general coverage and discusion, I also liked the photos and especially the many great links to more sources of information. Additionally, I appreciate that someone unknown to me gave a helpful reply to a question I asked in the comments area. :&gt;)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209721&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hgYbyIW222yeS5W0z3IvHielTkvuGAmKnmGkBFwk9pc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">William Boston (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209721">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209722" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281117140"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@birdseyeUSA</p> <p>Wouldn't this require the ability to see the top of the tephra column? At what point do you call it ash being carried along on prevailing winds as opposed to tephra that falls back to ground?</p> <p>Or, is the level that the ash can be found at an indication of how high the tephra was thrown?</p> <p>(general curiosity)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209722&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DY2LlDrS4z3YQUDzuIwVec8BlqfO-1uPWEqcsBV9FXE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209722">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209723" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281119075"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#139 @birdseyeUSA Interesting question. But don't you think it is a purely theoretical one? I don't think that all these formulas work in this case. Maybe this is a stupid statement of my lay opinion. But further I go:<br /> 1. "maximum elevation (ho) of 10,000" - I agree with Lurking: how can you tell it precisely? Ok. it's a given figure. proceeding...<br /> 2. "...as it stops at its maximum elevation" - does it stop only because of gravity or atmospheric pressure, temperature and winds play a significant role? don't know the answer.<br /> 3. "...once the tephra starts flowing down the side of the volcano" - now I think this is the weakest point. What kind of tephra? Lava? Pyroclast flow? Ash? Lahars?<br /> 4. "...friction as a function of the horizontal distance" - that sounds weird. or maybe it's me. How steep is the slope, how viscous the magma?<br /> I think we lack some information here, don't we? Please, tell me if I'm wrong.<br /> Amusing, though. Thanks a lot.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209723&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UuUqpi8uoCQlIL7UrvY84wily9FpkLFEhosEOzyJueg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209723">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209724" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281121592"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>500 feet :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209724&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RUwtIffTYDQvuDFhLayHtx6HWP-cOAvQjK1Buk7CKAY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209724">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209725" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281121738"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>No wait! 50 feet. Not sure if my decimal is correct :) Ok my final answer is 250 feet ;)</p> <p>What did I win?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209725&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WhGdsGpFsSk32lw3yBRi1E2wmuqt7OrUcYZqFFyROdU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209725">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209726" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281122931"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato I'm thinking this is a trick question (ergo, the fun factor). ;)</p> <p>If the tephra reaches 10,000 FEET ASL, and the vent is at 2500 METRES ASL, the vent-to-maximum-tephra-height distance is only a measly 250 feet. </p> <p>Am I right, birdseyeUSA?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209726&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BsrvbKTvji1LLnLJ8sIAzyXbxbdrAalwiBtgGBjQIRY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209726">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209727" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281123263"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato,Lurking, Your Highness,you win my undying admiration for even trying out an answer! : ) As I said, no answer was given in the article I read.....yes, absolutely a theoretical college question, but I thought it was interesting that the professor was teaching an undergraduate course that tries to get students to think about these things, and then about how to be prepared in areas where there are problems. And yes, there is a lot left out - maybe someone else can make a better problem for the mathematically inclined? Using a generic volcano?<br /> @Lurking, Renato,tephra was defined for the problem as the total ejecta product, no distinction as to type..</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209727&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bWn8QCyUejdJSL-7aUFkMaIVtBUo3SdSkhWgg2Ebdic"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209727">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209728" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281123359"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>And if I'm wrong, I'd like to Phone a Friend. </p> <p>Erik, Boris, your numbers? :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209728&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zEzewkJY0RjcSo-PI4T_kCs0DmCBtYsQcXVeyVP6epQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209728">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209729" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281123967"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Awwww birdseyeUSA, you're the perfect example of how people here challenge our grey matter every day. Ok admittedly my matter has more rust spots than most, but I feel grateful that I'm able to participate.</p> <p>My "in-depth research" (that lasted no more than 10 minutes once I saw a formula that involved sin) resulted in finding this paper about Dispersal and Total Mass of Tephra and Comparison with Plume Transport Models at: </p> <p><a href="http://www.raunvis.hi.is/~mtg/nemritg/BO-MS_2007.pdf">http://www.raunvis.hi.is/~mtg/nemritg/BO-MS_2007.pdf</a></p> <p>Of course I haven't read it ;) but it might be useful for others here. :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209729&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hSMpE34PVciHKj8J6IhBN5c0gYzMxhOAspCLkV2NrdI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209729">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209730" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281128947"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Princes Frito - There, you see, works every time, what a great place - more reading matter. My pile (I print out everything,I'm a committed hard copy old fogey) of Ejya material is (I just bundled it) about 6" thick....now all I need is a blizzard and I'm all set.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209730&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="wYo1h3y6b3VaLTw3nTYy3ia3XWHV4PghY3OvxgVSgvY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209730">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209731" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281133404"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Don't try this at home: volcano eruption demonstration and calculation of velocity, pressure, from vertical travel distance. You'll approve of the photographed efforts.</p> <p>classes.colgate.edu/kharpp/Depth_Charge/default.htm</p> <p>Pdf format, for the intrepid geology course instructor.<br /> nagt.org/files/nagt/jge/abstracts/Harpp-1_v53n2p173.pdf</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209731&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ybiP7LyHOSWWeaBbBZhPP9hoX_LPGDLh87J524c5o0E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209731">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209732" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281135019"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@birdseye - I can relate! If it isn't in print form sitting on my desk in front of me, I can't do the "read, recite, repeat" enough to get my head wrapped around it, let alone retain the info. I was a textbook junkie at an early age :-(</p> <p>6" of print? You're hard core! :) Ok I'll start our session. </p> <p>Hello, my name is Princess Frito and I'm a paper-and-ink addict when it comes to the earth sciences. </p> <p>*heads off to the free donuts and coffee in the corner*</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209732&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fFIKUpc8qVDP5bGGqFM4eBFEPIAEUHO8CF2IVTEwgCQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209732">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209733" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281135783"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Passerby - Cool! Thanks for sharing.</p> <p>I approve of the photographic efforts, and will definitely <i>not</i> try that at home! :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209733&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pWpSqVN6vMuwwwWfEskgBgKqsx_r37lBtP2K7kGaJEs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209733">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209734" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281136409"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My name is parclair lost in the ether. I'm a print addict. although when traveling I succumb to the addiction of my pda reader. Help me, I've even downloaded the adobe pdf reader so I can read the yellowstone papers next month. *looks for chocolate and a cigarette*</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209734&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Qvwb-8fAr0yHh11pv9xqZutHz2P3VecjhneqhTFEQ58"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="parclair, lost in the ether">parclair, lost… (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209734">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209735" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281138198"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There there, parclair. We're here for you. *gives parclair a Toblerone and a lit cigarette*. Put down your pda reader so you don't get it wet, because the first stop on your road to recovery is the Blue Lagoon! Guaranteed no Speedos or thongs, or your money back :)</p> <p><a href="http://eldgos.mila.is/english/lonid/">http://eldgos.mila.is/english/lonid/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209735&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cFPpERTpRXsoHlO0xA8x8WqCcSf1qfjprtpasqk7Q60"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209735">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209736" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281139823"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Or you could take a trip to the Twilight Zone, where you encounter a new and strange vision of the Earth's Core.</p> <p>Melting-induced stratification above the Earthâs inner core due to convective translation. Nature 466, 744-747 (5 August 2010). Doi:10.1038/nature09257.</p> <p><a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v466/n7307/pdf/nature09257.pdf">www.nature.com/nature/journal/v466/n7307/pdf/nature09257.pdf</a></p> <p>See Fig 3 (yes, you can see it, 'Figures Only link', even if you can't read the whole paper). We have an oblate, asymmetric core that is more dense and hotter on the east side, and cooler, lighter and pushing up a bit, on the West side.</p> <p>Then, I want you to think about this ocean floor gravity map:<br /><a href="http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif">www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif</a></p> <p>Where oh where, do you think the West side of the core sites on this gravity map??</p> <p>Hint, hint: dense iron 'pushes' strong gravity (geoid) features 'upward', like say...over Iceland. And its less, where the cooler iron is crystallizing out.</p> <p>Damn me, but I think this might explain why the earths surface features are arranged in space, that look as they do. Why the Pacific Plate is a major dominating feature with its bright green subduction surface zones closer to the cooler, crystallizing and less dense side of the core.</p> <p>Must think on this more. Not sure I have the geometry right, but it does seem to fit...<br /> Off to bed.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209736&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="neaSI99t2kS2uXfjKoZWo2qbvhxLqBdefJveGUc85aw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209736">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209737" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281142948"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You guys make me laugh. And I love it!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209737&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yyZ3rPhzVgoUwGp5ZH6fWNHoXAv7f8Srr4M2mz1_4wQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209737">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209738" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281143382"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Princess Frito</p> <p>"..that lasted no more than 10 minutes once I saw a formula that involved sin.."</p> <p>Is that opposite/hypotenuse or moral turpitude?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209738&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="U-oRrboJXR0qdtYOWgSi9LT50VXCvJieCoMnFg1pfOE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 06 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209738">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209739" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281163441"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@passerby152 Good one - I'll pass it on to hazards prof.<br /> Ref. stacks of paper, that's not including all the screen shots trapped in my computer - probably have at least one for every day after 14 April (haven't checked dates lately.) Requests?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209739&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_zhlZnWTk-LuxEwz8IDA0s80-Wr81wG3l25uqrz859E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209739">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209740" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281166648"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik, you put up "The Eyjaf... Eruption and You" Aug 4 and here "we" continue to post on the 7th -- not just about our appreciation and what it is that draws us here, but about what is happening in the world geologically and cosmically (CME) speaking in relationship to Eyjaf.... </p> <p>That wonderful human passion we call curiosity is powerfully stimulated by your blog. And this is scientific curiosity, the truth no matter how it hurts or how ignorant our questions can make us feel. Your blog gives and receives in an unusual way. I am grateful for your gifts as a teacher of the next generation and as a conduit for current knowledge. </p> <p>I returned to my life-long interest in the geological sciences (actually all the sciences, but there's only so much time in one day) because I wanted to find out the science re "Anthropogenic Global Warming". I felt almost certain about its scientific truth because I was a reader of Science and Nature. Needless to say, once I started researching the physics of CO2, the quality of both thermometer siting and raw-data "adjustments", the chaotic nature of Earth's climate, and feedback mechanisms, I was able to let open scientific discussion show me the evidence -- mostly the lack of the scientific method. More than anything else, I fear for the reputation of science. </p> <p>Your blog has given me hope -- especially about the science that "young people" will learn from you and your colleagues. Your focus and reasonableness must inspire your community of readers from the novice to the most experienced because the science here is kept as "pure" as humanly possible and immensely interesting.</p> <p>Thr other concern that drew me "back" to scientific research is the safety of human communities and that of my family. "The sky is falling" attitude that has become group think on the part of academics, politicians, media, and many scientists is very worrisome. I am grateful for the your reasonableness and that of those professionals who contribute here. For example, Boris Behncke, "I personally might seriously underestimate it [Katla]- but that's rather because I fear people get too fixed on one determined volcano when there are so many dangerous volcanoes on this planet. In my opinion, Katla is just one of many volcanoes that have a terrible potential." Because of my renewed interest in science, I can reasonably store food and other emergency items (see Leon @56) for future large eruptions or earthquakes (So California here). </p> <p>This is only one thread with 159 posts at present and the breadth and depth of the comments and topics is, well, breath-taking. I deeply believe that the kind of science you promote here is the hope for the future. With gratitude.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209740&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RMopdigZnaJ_h_gKQQV5PQgmo5vUO9d988e7iyVmm4o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">pyromancer76 (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209740">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209741" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281170850"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here is a great paper about the fracture zones and volcanoes of Iceland, it isn't too long and it's very very well written.</p> <p><a href="http://www.episodes.org/backissues/33igc/12-2new.pdf">http://www.episodes.org/backissues/33igc/12-2new.pdf</a></p> <p>Enjoy everyone,</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209741&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="k8SZMMYQPRs6UHyvirB5ID44paqkydmJu5YPG3FJmCM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Hurst (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209741">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209742" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281172151"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>AAAAAHHHHHHHHH......I'm still on my first cup of coffee, go to blue lagoon, beefy guys in speedos. aaahhhhhhhhh pda, can't see........</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209742&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="evooxCVqtFDXvDm_Mlo7C4Vkggq-aAgKKLHftqqOHWw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="parclair, lost in the ether">parclair, lost… (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209742">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209743" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281174021"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My first post got caught in review. Dave's Landslide Blog has extensive coverage of the British Columbia landslide. Like this blog, the comments are informative:</p> <p>daveslandslideblog.blogspot.com/2010/08/landslide-at-meager-creek-british.html</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209743&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aeTIWFTkB5uZYekTIZ4AndNq38b0n96zEuf6X7YNmnY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">parclair, NoCal (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209743">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209744" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281176021"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@robert hurst 162, nice one, I like it, I like it - thanks! *adds more paper to copier* and parclair, NoCal (send recipes, please) thanks also for BC link. Ya just never know...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209744&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="S6k2GRyrRPAppvJFJa-fbWWYggxaBC_A_10y2UACEgA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209744">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209745" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281176470"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi as this is all to do with volcanoes,so i thought i would liven up the blog a bit.<br /> The Eyjafjallajokull-volcano song http:/<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlzJCuC9UE8">www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlzJCuC9UE8</a><br /> Fatal volcanic eruption<br /><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hO381ku1u4">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hO381ku1u4</a><br /> This is a Pyoclastic flow<br /><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbkPo0Hws0M">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbkPo0Hws0M</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209745&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="sDg33EiivoLsOpMgR0P1J0PMJzer864fQ5GMRaJS7Zo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leon (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209745">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209746" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281182376"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#166 Thanks, @leon. The last is a very sad one.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209746&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="r1W28_QCqGBXedXJXd5tUOI3HFEmWi2wnO5yfnuhFmg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209746">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209747" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281182457"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Whoahhh....</p> <p>A TV station picture gallery of it is located here:<br /><a href="http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/gallery/html/bc_mudslide_100806/photo_6.html">www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/gallery/html/bc_mudslide_100806/photo_6.html</a></p> <p>I linked to what appears to be the (or a) scarp face. This was not a small slide based on the amount of tree cover scoured off the valley walls.</p> <p>Reporter Leah Hendry: "...it's made out of this kind of volcanic rock, almost like the kind of feeling of a pumice stone, so when the water ends up getting in there and ah it's been warm and the waters melting and it ends up breaking that rock right off, which is why they're concerned about the rain..."</p> <p>Well, she's excited and on scene. At least she wasn't seen dragging a fallen limb into position set up a more exciting camera shot like Geraldo did here in Pensacola.</p> <p>And just in case the TV station changes the content around (which many tend to do), here's that scarp photo squirreled away for safekeeping:</p> <p><a href="http://i34.tinypic.com/osh5yc.jpg">http://i34.tinypic.com/osh5yc.jpg</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209747&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mkONMw63Ua3qNqRG7xL-slXxnt8tjfnpXwvc2j5ByFw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lurking (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209747">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209748" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281187536"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>According to RUV news, there was an avalanche downslope Eyjafjallaökull. There's an image posted with the news showing huge blocks (of ice?). If anyone could take a look and explain what are those circular marks on all the blocks I would be glad to hear. :)<br /> In Icelandic:<br /><a href="http://www.ruv.is/frett/aurskrida-vid-eyjafjallajokul">http://www.ruv.is/frett/aurskrida-vid-eyjafjallajokul</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209748&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="i4j6clSqzkZ3PN6hqav6iNB2HP8S9mNa0eRTcbaU8rU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209748">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209749" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281188135"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hey Renato, those white things are cylindrical bails of hay wrapped in white plastic, the markings are probably the farms logo, I live in the country and they are all over the place.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209749&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5AovOWkkvS39fZXZGWxQNrUc25-YvmMh9x4RctFNi18"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Hurst (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209749">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209750" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281188836"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#170 @Robert Hurst LOL! I was assuming they were huge ice blocks. Well, but there has been an avalanche, you can see the trail (but not as big as what I thought.) Thank you very much! :}<br /> PS: I think they are called "cow-eggs" aren't they? Second time I take them for another object, since we don't get those down at the tropics.<br /> Another lesson from Iceland...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209750&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UMlF7ATFpDy28ZvhwWC9EwL_hLLNsQi4WeexgyGrB-A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209750">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209751" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281189191"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I think that you're right about them being called "Crow Eggs", what's up with all of these avalanches today? The one in British Columbia was caused by the volcanic rock getting saturated with water and just letting go, I'm amazed at the size if it.</p> <p>If you ever decide to get out of the tropics for a vacation and decide to check out Canada just let me know but unfortunately there are no volcanoes around Ottawa, lol.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209751&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bgbkxokri-KDZsxvbwWTFO0srs5nHDB3L0URiU5Pbwk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Hurst (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209751">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209752" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281189740"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#172 @Robert: Sad news indeed. But you don't need volcanic rocks to get mudslides as those. You might have heard about the recent deadly mudslides in Rio (January and April). Those were caused by human irresponsibility, both governmental and civil.<br /> And yes, I would love to visit Ottawa (even better with no volcanoes around). Actually I should have gone there long ago, since I have a very good friend, (also "Robert") living there. Thanks a lot.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209752&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="h4be8vrY0_Isd5xFWtjNNml2BNUDWDlfpuYrXw8Pkd8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209752">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209753" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281192470"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi guys,</p> <p>If you haven't already, check out the amazing photos of the landslide and other areas around Pemberton, BC at this guy's photo albums. This has got to be the greatest collections of albums I've ever seen:</p> <p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbsteers/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbsteers/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209753&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="TBcpTfdEM4aUOS--6LQ-OvZCcwyKUPdi5AAzBdmoXu4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Princess Frito (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209753">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209754" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281192534"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Renato #169 - That was a mudslide (likely rain-saturated ash). The Icelandic word for avalanche (aka lavina) is 'snjóflóð' (lit. snow-flood).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209754&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jpxDDB8c7cGH9UupMn0sqM0eAaQrGy1hQsrOfk_0fh4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reynir, NK, .is (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209754">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209755" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281193873"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>#175 Thanks Reynir, NK. Google translator is to blame, but I didn't question assuming the hay bails were ice blocks.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209755&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ViGzRIZZ2fXPuB_DQfiO7koJhSXEvRVqKRbSNpC-dQ8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Renato Rio (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209755">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209756" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281194278"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>mudslide on Eyjafjöll, one in British Colombia and a jökullhaup here in Norway, wich came from a glacier, that burst a wall of water.</p> <p>I will put up a link :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209756&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bf3HFeXdPBcUGX3lS7YnqNCeWWaKv9XuyeJlKPKBcJQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/iriks/article3759607.ece" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</a> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209756">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209757" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281194731"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/iriks/article3759607.ece">http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/iriks/article3759607.ece</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.tv2nyhetene.no/innenriks/vurderer-flomevakuering-i-luster-3260528.html">http://www.tv2nyhetene.no/innenriks/vurderer-flomevakuering-i-luster-32…</a></p> <p>here is the link about it , sorry that is not in English,.</p> <p>but what NVE(norway water and energy)says its a rare phenomenon happen in norway a so called jökullaup, has occured and burst out from the glacier "Harbardsbreen"the cause of the burst is a sudden melting under the glacier and that the water pressure was so high that it could not be contained so it burst out and down the slopes.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209757&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="d123o99j8sy7PP8B-ETsOKSRqBpXOq_ynAtwEUSMQnc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209757">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209758" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281195174"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This being the nostalgic [copy] Eyjafjallajökull [paste]topic, here is a Google Translate memento of <i>Icelandic whale tongues</i> <a href="http://i34.tinypic.com/16hivba.jpg">http://i34.tinypic.com/16hivba.jpg</a></p> <p>The web page photos has been revised. The former picture is pasted in and squared off at the LRH corner</p> <p>(Google Xtr'd from <a href="http://www.ruv.is/frett/aurskrida-vid-eyjafjallajokul">www.ruv.is/frett/aurskrida-vid-eyjafjallajokul</a> ) </p> <p>:D</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209758&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hTQTM9YtmGwRxI3RLNsQgZipNVPFs8ntuYf1pHboeuw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Raving (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209758">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209759" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281197106"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thor,Raving,thanks. Poor google trans, we must not be exercising it enough, it's forgotten everything it learned earlier.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209759&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bI4y-VBomLKSd-iTsjPpypWsp7Z-3JSpW0g5W8nXe44"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">birdseyeUSA (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209759">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209760" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281197393"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hahaha google translate, has problems I recon?? haha</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209760&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="trCOyN95C7tyIFqwX1kMGIB_62ecZ4WFot3fHRXauZQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">thor (not verified)</span> on 07 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209760">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209761" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281266709"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As I've been reading 'Eruptions' from the pre-Eyaf times it was mostly a great excitement to feel the heartbeats of the volcano-fanatic people here having the same pace. :-)<br /> This blog was a very fresh information source about this certain eruption, it was like a long-long discussion show about the volcanoes in general. It was an experience watching the eruption of Eyaf through other people's eyes, to read their reactions on the events, to get info from local people, to cross fingers for the ones who had the possibility to travel to Iceland and personally smell Eyaf. The gratest of the experience here was to read the scientists' opinion, learn a lot from them, thanks to Erik and Boris Benchke.<br /> If something happened this blog was the best place in the 'be the first to know' contest in media.<br /> An last but not least I met a grat bunch of lovely people here. :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209761&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Oc6C4kM_dN72E5ty-PPMoDw7rkRv0_mR7KUTHPYQLPA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Monika (not verified)</span> on 08 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209761">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209762" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1281423338"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is a timely thread! I've been persuaded to give a short talk on Eyjafjallajokull in November (not a massively scientific one, I hasten to add!). I'm not sure what exactly I'm going to be covering, but am going to carefully read all these posts for inspiration! I'll add my own thoughts too, once I've had a moment to think about it. </p> <p>Erik, is your talk going to be recorded and put online anywhere? I'd love to see it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209762&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Z-D1lzkz1H3rrVrfBXffTL9jee10cJOxwUaORmgUepU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://chocolateandvodka.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Suw (not verified)</a> on 10 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209762">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209763" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1282303765"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Eyjaf:the Volcano that ate my Vacation. There's a children's book in that title, methinks. And I did make it to Belgium...but not until June. All my travel preparations had been prepaid with a no cancellations/no refunds clause. When my flight was cancelled, after long anticipation and a close watch on "Eruptions", I thought I stood to lose a bundle. But all of the companies refunded my money, and when I rebooked for the supposedly more expensive season in June...everything was cheaper. Let's make that Eyjaf: the Volcano that Partly Paid for my Vacation.<br /> But best of all, in searching for reliable information as to what Eyjafjallajokull might reasonably be expected to do, (volcano psychology if you will,) I stumbled upon the "Eruptions" website, which cut through the chaff and provided up-to-the second data, rationally analyzed. The caliber of scholars and inquiring minds I found here outstripped any gathering of people I had ever run into anywhere, bar none. The grandeur and power of the visual images was soul shaking, and the guidance from those of you with a deeper understanding of the forces at work took me to a vantage point I could never have reached on my own. One day in future travels, I plan to hike up Eyjaf, and drink a cup to you all!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209763&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="g_j8Bzcb79hLlVnieJ8glmg1VjRZvjG-EBfSpgSpKUA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Janice Sutcliffe (not verified)</span> on 20 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209763">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209764" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1289923131"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You really neaten it seem so smooth with your presentation but I conclude this topic to be rattling something which I guess I would never see. It seems too complicated and really clear for me. I am perception saucy for your close spot, I give try to get the fix of it!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209764&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="D_ZyikEJGmclyQVZy-UTDUuNcnT2rNRjHtuJvBQF1Ec"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.hotwebcambabes.net/free-webcamsex" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">live chat (not verified)</a> on 16 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209764">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209765" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291670346"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>asqcqwcmqwcopqwc</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209765&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6GEhDahqmZz7IHNjbOxCJ3EbrBE2ltQrvoKB4LTtfN8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://qwdoqwpjc.ccqw" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Harry Potter A. (not verified)</a> on 06 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209765">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209766" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291788960"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great info. I will take a bit of time to think over this content!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209766&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="a2cuaFbV3EM0QraKCohbgbUSKGfCLcnsJJch1bxl0uw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://aeryhwryjdm.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Don Dubuc (not verified)</a> on 08 Dec 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209766">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/08/04/the-eyjafjallajokull-eruption-1%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 04 Aug 2010 11:52:58 +0000 eklemetti 104344 at https://scienceblogs.com Wednesday Whatzits: Mixing it up at Hood, alert lowered at Taal and plumes over Vanuatu https://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/08/04/wednesday-whatzits-mixing-it-u <span>Wednesday Whatzits: Mixing it up at Hood, alert lowered at Taal and plumes over Vanuatu</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/Hood2008.jpg"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-4005bd2b71eb06d646bc9af44676ff84-Hood2008-thumb-400x266-54102.jpg" alt="i-4005bd2b71eb06d646bc9af44676ff84-Hood2008-thumb-400x266-54102.jpg" /></a><br /><em>Mt. Hood in Oregon, taken August 2008. Image by Erik Klemetti. Click on the image to see a larger version.</em></p> <p>Quick news!</p> <ul><li>I'm not going to go into too much depth right now about <a href="http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/ngeo924.html" target="_blank">the recent study published in <em>Nature Geoscience</em> on Mt. Hood</a> in Oregon - I plan to talk about it more in a few weeks. Why is that? Well, the lead investigator on the study, <a href="http://www.science.oregonstate.edu/~kentad/" target="_blank">Dr. Adam Kent of Oregon State University</a>, is a friend of mine (and occasional <em>Eruptions</em> commenter) so I plan to get the details from him before posting. I was also peripherally associated with some of this work - mostly in the field acting as a pack mule and offering my witty observations. Nevertheless, the <a href="http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=117434&amp;WT.mc_id=USNSF_58&amp;WT.mc_ev=click" target="_blank">long-and-short is that magma mixing seems to be a strong control</a> on eruptions at <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1202-01-" target="_blank">Mt. Hood</a>, where mixing of two different magmas (one felsic, one mafic) can trigger an eruption. This mixing could be only weeks before the eruption, suggesting <a href="http://news.opb.org/article/10304-study-finds-key-past-eruptions-mount-hood/" target="_blank">short time intervals between the trigger of an eruption and the eruption itself</a>. Interestingly, Mt. Hood seems to play by its own rules in this respect relative to what we know about how other Cascade volcanoes behave.</li> <li><a href="http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/hawaiinews/20100803_Lava_flows_pretty_spectacular.html" target="_blank">Lava continues to flow</a> from Kilauea into the area around Kalapana, although it has slowed. Only <a href="http://www.hawaii247.com/2010/08/02/kalapana-lava-update-aug-2/" target="_blank">two breakouts were noted near Kalapana on August 1</a>, suggesting that less lava is flowing. However, lava continues to reach the ocean to the southwest of Kalapana.</li> <li><a href="http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/breakingnews/regions/view/20100803-284686/Taal-volcano-alert-level-down-island-still-off-limitsPhivolcs" target="_blank">PHIVOLCS lowered the alert status</a> at Taal to <a href="http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&amp;task=view&amp;id=393&amp;Itemid=1" target="_blank">level one after signs of eruption waned</a>, with only 5 earthquakes over the last 3 weeks. However,<a href="http://www.gmanews.tv/story/197593/phivolcs-lowers-taal-alert-level-to-1-but" target="_blank"> the restrictions for tourists remain in place</a> for the time being as new measures are created, especially when it comes to approached the main crater. At the crater, steam explosions can still happen unexpectedly and the concentrations of volcanic gases can be dangerous.</li> <li>The <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/" target="_blank">NASA Earth Observatory</a> posted <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=44995" target="_blank">an image of the plumes from Ambrym and Gaua</a> in Vanuatu. You can see the thin, wispy plumes of mostly steam and volcanic gases (which possibly some very minor ash) drifting to the northwest.</li> </ul></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Tue, 08/03/2010 - 22:09</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ambrym" hreflang="en">Ambrym</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ash-plumes" hreflang="en">ash plumes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cascades" hreflang="en">cascades</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gaua" hreflang="en">Gaua</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hawaii-0" hreflang="en">Hawai&#039;i</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hood" hreflang="en">Hood</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kilauea" hreflang="en">Kilauea</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lava-flows" hreflang="en">lava flows</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mitigation" hreflang="en">mitigation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa-earth-observatory" hreflang="en">NASA Earth Observatory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/oregon" hreflang="en">Oregon</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/philippines" hreflang="en">Philippines</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/remote-sensing" hreflang="en">remote sensing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-images" hreflang="en">Satellite images</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/taal" hreflang="en">Taal</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/united-states" hreflang="en">united states</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vanuatu" hreflang="en">Vanuatu</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ash-plume" hreflang="en">ash plume</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/earth-observatory" hreflang="en">earth observatory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hawaii-1" hreflang="en">Hawai`i</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-image" hreflang="en">satellite image</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lava-flows" hreflang="en">lava flows</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mitigation" hreflang="en">mitigation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/remote-sensing" hreflang="en">remote sensing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209567" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280898147"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So if there is an earthquake swarm at Mt Hood it would be best to take notice earlier rather than later.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209567&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MyO8jjqsGScBaFzv6qB31pqSQIOsBBqPbbcQP5-ZMMA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dasnowskier (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209567">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209568" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280905308"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here is the abstract of an interesting paper. I wonder if the full paper gives any specific info on plate tectonic differences below Mt. Hood? (From mantleplumes.org) </p> <p>Xue, Mei; Allen, R.M., Mantle structure beneath the western United States and its implications for convection processes, J. Geophys. Res., 115, No. B7, B07303, 2010.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209568&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ht0uMv5m8S2oPFgbdKUJujS80LvyrhKPCsrQsPAB8pw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">pyromancer76 (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209568">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209569" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280913025"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@2: No, it's a 'Big Picture' type article. Better reads on the cold mantle down-welling process under Western US:</p> <p>Dripping 'Blob' Under Western U.S.: A Hidden Drip, Drip, Drip Beneath Earth's Surface. Science Daily May 2009</p> <p><a href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090526171813.htm">www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090526171813.htm</a></p> <p>John D. West, Matthew J. Fouch, Jeffrey B. Roth, Linda T. Elkins-Tanton. Vertical mantle flow associated with a lithospheric drip beeath the Great Basin. Nature Geoscience 2, 439 - 444 (2009) DOI: 10.1038/ngeo526<br /> (full paper below)<br /><a href="http://www.iris.edu/hq/esreg/priv/download_file/127">www.iris.edu/hq/esreg/priv/download_file/127</a></p> <p>Western USA mantle structure and its implications for mantle convection processes. (same authors as paper cited by Pyromancer)</p> <p>seismo.berkeley.edu/annual_report/ar07_08/node14.html</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209569&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0mvVSyj4atURAbFeBEXIviLekXfL8JiEkt-9aiGCBjw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Passerby (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209569">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209570" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280918252"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"Nevertheless, the long-and-short is that magma mixing seems to be a strong control on eruptions at Mt. Hood, where mixing of two different magmas (one felsic, one magma)"</p> <p>I am assuming you meant one felsic, one mafic...or did you mean that a felsic magma can interact with any other type to trigger an eruption?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209570&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="C29iCFf5eYtHUF7Cn1Con7PwZj7qDGC1p78D-Q0fDHo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">VolcanoMan (not verified)</span> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209570">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="148" id="comment-2209571" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280918406"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@VolcanoMan - Oops, thanks for catching that. It was supposed to say "mafic". Will fix it now.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209571&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_uCxCw180-3Atij0iJaT_HI2CN3fs1lM3mwOmWE2aL4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a> on 04 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209571">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/eklemetti"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/eklemetti" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209572" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280997122"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>TJÃRNES FZ:</p> <p>I have been waiting for someone with a bit of knowledge to write about the long series of quakes we have been seeing at TFZ (about 10 km north of Grimsöy).<br /> It has after all been going on for more then 2 weeks now without letting up.<br /> The action is not situated at the site of the 1868 underwater eruption, it is to the nort-west to it. Lurking did a nice picture of it a week ago that seemed to show that it was a pipe pattern to the quakes.</p> <p>So, anybody with a take on this? Is it an eruption, or a what?</p> <p>Looking forward to any answer.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209572&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zsRU8AkrtFMJ1iLJLpixa29ecuUtN1LS-EZpM6XoE0E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Carl (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209572">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209573" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290242213"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hey that's an amazing insight on the subject, thanks so much! never heard it more clear.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209573&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mDGFAzaFfi9FPWlIcXXNlMow9tIEhDdICD7DUaADgCs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ipod-ipad.nl" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">iPad iPod (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209573">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209574" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290243935"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A sense of humor... is needed armor. Joy in one's heart and some laughter on one's lips is a sign that the person down deep has a pretty good grasp of life.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209574&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="HfrNBrGq9UYkWt2x1HcffPiCr03UNqR4pZgUbbT8F0k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ultimategamechain.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="alliance leveling guide">alliance level… (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209574">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209575" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290260835"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Just texted my mom to see if she wanted to get pedis after work. It was only after I sent it that I realized iPhone corrected 'pedis' to 'penis'. I asked my mom if she wanted penis after work. Brilliant.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209575&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6qSngiJFdtctZuv4WNwGx7PHxq3JTDNi8-X-cXKa2x0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://easy-woodworking.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Iris Kunze (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209575">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209576" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290262751"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I hope that guy that "wants to be a billionaire" makes $999,999,999.00 and then gets hit by a bus</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209576&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="x-2ZoSiPmyDYNldplMosAVFgHr8Z5R-BHeXOJi6THo4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.hudeem-vmeste.ru/blog" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Raymundo Reitman (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209576">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2209577" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290371246"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You must never promote a journey of revenge without giving a lunatic : Confucius</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2209577&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vIa893Bd1-Xh_MK9k1vzzvepoHHGHfJUp75RHXmC36Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://oriollo.com/recipes/cookies" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cookies (not verified)</a> on 21 Nov 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/28162/feed#comment-2209577">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div>