obesity https://scienceblogs.com/ en Having pets can reduce risk of developing allergies and obesity https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2017/06/28/having-pets-can-reduce-risk-of-developing-allergies-and-obesity <span>Having pets can reduce risk of developing allergies and obesity</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div style="width: 341px;"><a title="And then, Reese pulls Sage's ear" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/donnieray/15740414223/in/photolist-pYVJL8-fz533Q-94XrCT-2oUn9r-dngZuU-4cqCDb-4ioja-GNV5-bkzrgg-dngZjQ-aPmUSp-c2uRVu-87Ydu-6DSNPr-qq5VD6-6vQ5TK-8Akkik-9xa4uP-aNYmj4-4euJj-UyTkMb-pPuCus-5ycRmt-bgLBit-bC5DSL-dGGpVS-eeiJdh-bD1u9c-GmNAG-6dQP8D-67g6fv-5Ss3Qr-ZDu3c-34zRXs-8SQt2o-6h7r5a-iBhF23-7Mo3Ez-eh6dvm-s4ZL8E-9qSqJa-8YCsmt-6kc3cW-djy4hX-djyMaQ-aGdJbP-e6RGs8-4mwWJe-aS8n6T-9MmcZn" data-footer="true" data-flickr-embed="true"><img src="https://c1.staticflickr.com/8/7357/15740414223_7b3c3b60f5_m.jpg" alt="And then, Reese pulls Sage's ear" width="331" height="220" /></a> Photo by Donnie Ray Jones from Flickr creative commons. </div> <p>A recent study published in <em>Microbiome</em> from researchers at the University of Alberta shows that babies from families with pets had nearly two-fold increases in the amount of two specific microbes in their guts, Ruminococcus and Oscillospira. These particular microbes are associated with reduced risks of developing childhood allergies as well as obesity. According to study author Dr. Anita Kozyrskyj, “There’s definitely a critical window of time when gut immunity and microbes co-develop, and when disruptions to the process result in changes to gut immunity.” For this study, they examined exposure during pregnancy through three months of age after birth. What is remarkable is that the changes in the microbiome were evident after both indirect (mother transferring to unborn baby) as well as direct contact between the baby and the pet. I am sure pet owners and pet adoption agencies alike will be eager to share the findings from this study.</p> <p><strong>Source:</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ualberta.ca/news-and-events/newsarticles/2017/april/pet-exposure-may-reduce-allergy-and-obesity">https://www.ualberta.ca/news-and-events/newsarticles/2017/april/pet-exp…</a></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Wed, 06/28/2017 - 12:38</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/adoption" hreflang="en">adoption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/allergies" hreflang="en">allergies</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gut" hreflang="en">gut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/microbiome" hreflang="en">microbiome</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pet" hreflang="en">pet</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2017/06/28/having-pets-can-reduce-risk-of-developing-allergies-and-obesity%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 16:38:29 +0000 dr. dolittle 150500 at https://scienceblogs.com Obesity gene found in Labrador retrievers https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2017/05/22/obesity-gene-found-in-labrador-retrievers <span>Obesity gene found in Labrador retrievers</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div style="width: 345px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2017/05/22/obesity-gene-found-in-labrador-retrievers/4724330702_c661f1ddc5_m/" rel="attachment wp-att-3032"><img class=" wp-image-3032" src="/files/lifelines/files/2017/05/4724330702_c661f1ddc5_m.jpg" alt="" width="335" height="222" /></a> Image from Pete Markham via Flickr Creative Commons (<a href="https://flic.kr/p/8ctqVC">https://flic.kr/p/8ctqVC</a>) </div> <p>Researchers at the University of Cambridge in Britain recently studied 'willpower' in pet Labrador retrievers. After allowing each dog to smell a hot dog, the researchers placed the hot dog in a hamster cage and sealed it shut with duct tape. While some dogs showed only mild interest in the sealed-up hot dog, others were fixated on the out-of-reach treat. One dog, named Ash, broke apart the contraption to obtain the treat. This is interesting because although Ash is not obese or overweight, he has a genetic mutation that is linked with obesity. This study is part of an ongoing project examining genetics of obesity in dogs, called the <em>GOdogs Project</em>.</p> <p>The genetic mutation in Ash is caused by a missing piece of the gene that encodes for pro-opiomelanocortin (i.e. POMC). POMC is known to act on the hypothalamus of the brain to regulate metabolism and food motivation. The findings from this study were published last year in <em>Cell</em> <em>Metabolism</em> and show that about 1/5 of Labrador retrievers have this mutation which is linked with obesity and increased appetite. This mutation may also be why Labrador retrievers are easy to train as guide dogs using food rewards.</p> <p>One goal of this ongoing dog research is to help understand obesity in humans. In fact, estimates indicate that around 10,000 people globally have POMC mutations and even a partial loss of function of the POMC gene can contribute to obesity. In addition, errors in a similar gene may likewise impact metabolism. Like humans, obesity in dogs can lead to difficulty breathing, joint damage, and inflammation. Although, dogs are less likely to develop diabetes as obese humans. Thus this research has the potential to lead to a better understanding of the genetics of obesity and possible treatments for the condition in both dogs and humans.</p> <p><strong>Sources:</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/16/magazine/the-genetics-of-pooched-out-pooches.html?WT.mc_id=SmartBriefs-Newsletter&amp;WT.mc_ev=click&amp;ad-keywords=smartbriefsnl&amp;_r=0"><strong>New York Times Magazine</strong></a></p> <p>E Raffan, RJ Dennis, CJ O'Donovan, JM Becker, RA Scott, SP Smith, DJ Withers, CJ Wood, E Conci, DN Clements, KM Summers, AJ German, CS Mellersh, ML Arendt, VP Iyemere, E Withers, J Söder, S Wernersson, G Andersson, K Lindblad-Toh, GSH Yeo, S O'Rahilly.  A Deletion in the Canine <em>POMC</em> Gene Is Associated with Weight and Appetite in Obesity-Prone Labrador Retriever Dogs. <em>Cell Metabolism. </em>23(5): 893-900, 2016.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Mon, 05/22/2017 - 10:42</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/diet" hreflang="en">diet</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/dog-0" hreflang="en">dog</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/genetic" hreflang="en">genetic</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/labrador" hreflang="en">Labrador</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2017/05/22/obesity-gene-found-in-labrador-retrievers%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 22 May 2017 14:42:06 +0000 dr. dolittle 150490 at https://scienceblogs.com Experimental Biology 2017 - Day 3 https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2017/04/25/experimental-biology-2017-day-3 <span>Experimental Biology 2017 - Day 3</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://experimentalbiology.org/"><img id="switchebheader" src="http://experimentalbiology.org/ExternalImages/EBImages/Template/2017/EB%202017%20home%20logo.png" alt="" width="429" height="139" border="0" /></a></p> <p>Highlights from today's sessions included:</p> <p><strong>Norelia Ordonez-Castillo</strong>, undergraduate student from Fort Hays State University, presented her research on channel catfish. According to Norelia, these fish can become obese so her research was geared towards trying to find out how their receptor for LDL cholesterol differs from rodents and humans. But what I want to know is whether the obese catfish tastes better...</p> <div style="width: 354px;"><a href="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5f/Channel_Catfish.jpg"><img src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5f/Channel_Catfish.jpg/1200px-Channel_Catfish.jpg" alt="File:Channel Catfish.jpg" width="344" height="229" data-file-width="1536" data-file-height="1024" /></a> Image of channel catfish by Ryan Somma via Wikimedia Commons </div> <p><strong>Christine Schwartz</strong>, Investigator from University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, studied how the brain of hibernating animals is protected from damage induced by rapid changes in temperature. She found that the extracellular matrix of the brain helps protect it during hibernation.</p> <p><b>Goggy Davidowitz</b>, Investigator from the University of Arizona, studies Carolina sphinx moths (<em>Manduca sexta: Sphingidae</em>). Goggy's research showed that male and female moths utilize amino acids differently. Male moths allocate more ingested sugars to building muscle than females, which suggests that males may need to maintain larger flight muscles to seek out females.</p> <p><strong>William Milsom</strong>, Investigator from the University of British Columbia, spoke about special adaptations in high altitude geese that allow them to thrive in their low oxygen environment. Andean geese live at high altitude year round and have adapted the ability to extract oxygen from the air more efficiently than birds living at low altitude. Their hearts are also able to contract better and thus squeeze out more blood with each heart beat. In contrast, bar-headed geese, which migrate over the Himalayas, use a different strategy. They have adapted by increasing their heart rate and improving their ability to get oxygen into tissues of the body at high altitude.</p> <p>The annual banquet and dinner meeting took place Monday night. It was such a delight seeing all of the award winners. More on that later...</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Mon, 04/24/2017 - 19:29</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/catfish" hreflang="en">catfish</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eb" hreflang="en">EB</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/experimental-biology" hreflang="en">Experimental Biology</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/geese" hreflang="en">geese</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hibernation" hreflang="en">hibernation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/high-altitude" hreflang="en">high altitude</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/moth" hreflang="en">moth</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2017/04/25/experimental-biology-2017-day-3%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 23:29:02 +0000 dr. dolittle 150481 at https://scienceblogs.com An uncomfortable question when you least expect it https://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2017/03/13/an-uncomfortable-question-when-you-least-expect-it <span>An uncomfortable question when you least expect it</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>[<strong>NOTE:</strong> Due to the windstorm last week, I was knocked out of the blogging game for a while and even had to stay in a hotel for one night. We did get our power back late Friday night, but we also didn't get Internet back until much later in the weekend, because our cable went out too. So, I thought I'd have a new post for today, but, alas, I did not. So, continuing on the them of Friday, I thought I'd repost an article of a sort that I almost never do any more. This one was posted over 11 years ago and was last reposted over 5 years ago. Tomorrow, I'll definitely be back.]</p> <p>The patient list for the day had simply the words "abnormal mammogram" next to her name. That used to be the most common reason that of breast patients came to see me. They have their regular mammogram and are told by their primary care physician that it is abnormal. The next thing they know, they're sitting in one of my examining rooms. However, the patient list is quite brief. It's just meant to be a quick capsule of what patient has what basic complaint. These days, because at my current institution so many more practitioners order breast biopsies, most of the patients I see are already pre-diagnosed with breast cancer. Be that as it may, nothing on the list prepared me for the woman I greeted when I walked in the examination room.</p> <!--more--><p>This woman was enormous, and I do mean <em><span style="font-style: italic;">enormous</span></em>. Morbidly obese, she told me she wasn't sure how much she weighed, but that it was at least 450 lbs. As she sat in a wheelchair massive enough to support her, rolls of fat hung over the armrests, and her breath wheezed like a mortally wounded Darth Vader near the end of <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086190/?fr=c2l0ZT1kZnx0dD0xfGZiPXV8cG49MHxrdz0xfHE9cmV0dXJuIG9mIHRoZSBqZWRpfGZ0PTF8bXg9MjB8bG09NTAwfGNvPTF8aHRtbD0xfG5tPTE_;fc=1;ft=20;fm=1"><span style="font-style: italic;">Return of the Jedi</span></a>, right before he took his helmet off and revealed Anakin Skywalker beneath the mask. Indeed, on the same theme, I could not help but be reminded of <a href="http://www.starwars.com/databank/character/jabbathehutt/">Jabba the Hutt</a>. Yes, I know that physicians aren't supposed to think that way about their patients, and, honestly, I tried not to. However, we're human, just like everyone else, and even our years of professional training can't entirely suppress our baser thoughts. Of course, years of practice prevented me from doing the unprofessional and voicing such thoughts to my nurse or any of the clinic staff at all. Not all clinicians exercise such self-restraint, unfortunately, but I try very hard to.</p> <p>Normally, dealing with a patient with suspicious microcalcifications on her mammogram is fairly simple. A biopsy is indicated, and there are basically two techniques to choose from. You can do an image-guided core needle biopsy, either a stereotactic biopsy (in which the image guidance is mammography) or an ultrasound-guided core biopsy (in which the image guidance is from, well, ultrasound). If neither of these are possible, then the patient will require an old-fashioned surgical biopsy, known as a wire localization or needle localization biopsy. This is a technique in which a wire is placed into the breast under local anesthesia such that the wire sits next to the abnormality that needs to be biopsied. In essence, the wire placed under either mammographic guidance or ultrasound guidance, leads the surgeon to the lesion. Given that even the surgical option is usually a same day surgery using local anaesthesia and sedation, even that isn't so hard. The surgery can sometimes be a little trickier than one might think, but even then it's usually not all that hard. Oh, sometimes you get patients with multiple abnormalities, and you have to decide if you want to go after them all or if you want to perform a triage and decide that some of them need to be biopsied and some of them don't, all the while realizing that if you miss a cancer it can be a major disaster for the patient.</p> <p>Of course, a 450+ lb. patient adds a new level of challenge. For one thing, she was way too heavy for the stereotactic table; so stereotactic biopsy wasn't even an option, at least not then. (The equipment that we have available now might be able to accommodate someone that large.) Not surprisingly, her health was horrible. She was a smoker, and had severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sleep apnea, plus hypertension, type II diabetes, and a history of congestive heart failure. Her medication list read like the <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://www.pdr.net/">Physicians' Desk Reference</a>. I needed to examine her. However, I had a very real fear that, even if we could manage to get her up on the examination table (which, so sturdy before, now looked pathetically inadequate for the task of supporting this woman), she would have a high chance of damaging it. So I made do and did my best to examine her while she was sitting in her wheelchair. It was a suboptimal examination, but it was all I could manage. Morbidly obese patients, because of their size, frequently make it very difficult to provide optimal care to the, particularly surgical care.</p> <p>By the time I was done, I felt profoundly sorry for this woman. How on earth does such a person live the way she was living, given her physical and medical problems? Despite my empathy, I maintained the professional bedside manner that we're all trained to keep up and explained what was abnormal about her mammogram, that she would need a biopsy, and how the biopsy would be done. I also explained the risks (which, for her, were much higher than the minuscule risks most patients undergoing this procedure face), and arranged for her to be seen by her pulmonologist and cardiologist in case something more than local anaesthesia were needed.</p> <p>When finished, I asked if there were any more questions, gave her my card, and made my way past the family members to the door. Although it was near the end of the day, there were still a couple of more patients to see.</p> <p>There was.</p> <p>"Do you believe in God?" she said, looking at me expectantly.</p> <p>I was still standing there, hesitating. To be honest, my first thought was: Why on earth should it matter whether I believe in God or not? Belief in God has nothing whatsoever to do with whether I'm a competent surgeon or not. Personally, if I needed surgery I'd prefer a surgeon who is a flame-throwing "militant" atheist Richard Dawkins, as long as he or she is highly competent and has a bedside manner that doesn't bother me (and, of course, doesn't push his or her beliefs on me), over an incompetent believer. In the same vein, it wouldn't matter to me if the surgeon is a Bible thumper, again as long as he or she is highly competent, easy for me to get along with, and doesn't push fundamentalist beliefs on me. To me, the question of belief in God is irrelevant to the question of whether a surgeon is skilled or not, but apparently not everyone sees it this way. Thinking back on this incident, I can't help but remember an interview I had heard with <a href="http://www.tabash.com/">Eddie Tabash</a>, an atheist attorney who mentioned during the interview that he sometimes defended prostitutes. During the interview, he went on to mention that it was not infrequent for prostitutes to become very uneasy about having him as their attorney when they found out about his atheism. I had never before encountered this phenomenon among my patients, however.</p> <p>Worse, the question brought into sharp focus a question that I myself have been wrestling with myself for the last three years or so, a question whose answer seems to be yes one day and no on others. There's nothing like being trapped in a small examination room with a 450 lb. woman and three members of her family, with nowhere to run and no way to dodge the question. I was trapped. A believer might have said that the woman's question was God's way of making me face my fluctuation between belief and disbelief; an atheist might say that such an assertion is wishful thinking. Whichever was the truth, that didn't prevent the formation of a little bead of sweat that was slowly enlarging on my brow. I suspect the question would have still been uncomfortable for me to answer even if I were as religious as I had been when I was younger, as even then I tended to view religion as a private matter, one I didn't usually talk about much, if at all.</p> <p>What if I were to tell her that I was an agnostic or an atheist, that I didn't believe in God? Would she have sought out another surgeon? For a fleeting moment, I was sorely tempted to say just that. It could have been an out, a way of not having to do the operation and deal with all the attendant risks of major complications from what is normally a pretty minor operation. On the other hand, this woman had no insurance and had to rely on charity care (this was before the Affordable Care Act, obviously), which meant that she probably didn't have the option of going to a different surgeon, at least not at a different institution. The problem was that, if she went to one of my partners, it might have been perceived as "dumping" on them. If that were the case and I said I was an agnostic/atheist/whatever, she would then be going into surgery with no confidence in her surgeon, clearly an undesirable situation. A patient needs to have confidence in her surgeon, and anything that undermines that confidence, regardless of the reason or what I think of the reason, is to be avoided if it is possible to do so within reason.</p> <p>So what did I finally say?</p> <p>"I'm Catholic," I said. A pause. "But, to be honest, I don't go to Mass much anymore."</p> <p>This answer was true, of course, but incomplete. I had been raised Catholic but long ago drifted away from the Church and, more recently, away from belief itself. It seemed to answer her question, but in reality didn't. Not really. The truth was much more complicated, but she didn't need to know that. Fortunately, because the woman was Catholic herself, my answer seemed to satisfy her. "God will guide your hand," she said.</p> <p>"I hope so," I replied. Bullet dodged.</p> <p>I walked out of the examination room not looking forward to the day when this patient and I would meet again in the operating room--or to contemplating the way I had handled the situation. To this day, I still can't make up my mind whether my choice was a complete cop out or a clever and diplomatic strategy not to undermine a patient's confidence in me. It was probably a little of both. Whatever the case, in that situation on that day it worked.</p> <p>Doctors have to make these decisions sometimes.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/oracknows" lang="" about="/oracknows" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oracknows</a></span> <span>Mon, 03/13/2017 - 05:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/religion-0" hreflang="en">religion</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science" hreflang="en">Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/surgery" hreflang="en">surgery</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/atheist" hreflang="en">Atheist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/catholicism" hreflang="en">catholicism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/religion-0" hreflang="en">religion</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science" hreflang="en">Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/surgery" hreflang="en">surgery</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355603" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489396619"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Most of the time, I find that the more loudly someone proclaims his religion, the more likely his version of that religion is a hopelessly warped version of it. With people who identify themselves as Christians, I find specifically that they are more likely to behave as if the words printed in red in their bibles were mistakes, rather than the words attributed to Jesus. I don't have as much firsthand contact with Muslims, but ISIS/al Qaeda seem to be cut from the same cloth.</p> <p>OTOH, a patient who is so inclined who has been referred to you has better reason than most to consider the nature of any afterlife that might exist. So yes, it's much more uncomfortable for you than for me. You can't simply blow it off like I can.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355603&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2WTtnLgpF22WybqYGgkhTxJAVqC8YIGbdGxdN06QNZo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355603">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355604" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489398505"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As another (atheist) physician I have encountered this question often. Part of the reason for the discomfort is the patient is asking a personal question that breaches the boundaries of the relationship. It would have been just as uncomfortable for her to ask how much money you had in you portfolio or how often you had sex with your wife. The patient's belief system leads them to consider religion part of their health care, and you correctly interpreted it that way. IMO, you gave a compassionate, healing, respectful, and honest enough answer.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355604&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="P80a5bzFzms7dSDMmfSbwnPmiKfcLqfvdIAmkFEJjko"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sarah Sorlien (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355604">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355605" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489398679"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Orac, To answer your final question. Yes it was a very un-machine like cop out.<br /> Entirely understandable as you are human and subject to human frailties and foibles.<br /> Out of curiosity, what would your answer be now? After eleven years, would you still dodge the question, or would you give a straight-forward answer?<br /> For the entirely nothing that it is worth, to spare her feelings and in the spirit of good bedside manner, I probably would have said much the same thing. Outside of professional obligations, I would have shrugged and said I grew out of belief around the same time I realized the Easter bunny and the fey folk were just as real as God.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355605&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tUElPTVA_pOLBZoXNC3kZfMhu68C0EEiVLmINSJ36sI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous Pseudonym (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355605">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355606" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489399537"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@2 Sarah<br /> In-line with your reasoning that it is compassionate, healing and respectful etc to pander to their religious beliefs. Would you be inclined to prescribe placebo/ineffective cures if the patient really believed that they would help? Where is the limit on pandering to someones beliefs? I'm guessing that the state medical boards don't have guidelines on things like this, so I am genuinely curious, and not trying to be any more of an ass then is normal for me.<br /> The thought that asking about someones religious belief is an invasive personal question honestly never occurred to me. I think of it more along the lines of what sports eam do you cheer for or what political group do you like.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355606&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jhtqEDqEJHzOV2-rxSSOKCRDDXGVSQufgnVxorOyrjQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous Pseudonym (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355606">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355607" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489401198"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@AP: I think you are being a bit hard on Sarah (and Orac) here. The boundaries are not quite so bright.</p> <p>If you are just the regular attending physician, then I agree with Sarah that the question is inappropriate. The doctor does not need to know your religious preferences (other than cases where certain specific treatments should be avoided if possible, which is on a par with allergies to commonly prescribed drugs and such). What is different about Orac's work is that he is a specialist in a disease which is potentially fatal. Thus, as I pointed out in my previous comment, he is dealing with patients who have a reason to consider the afterlife. I don't fault Orac for telling the truth but not the whole truth here (i.e., that he's a lapsed Catholic). The best solution might be to refer such a patient to the hospital chaplain, but that may not be practical for people being treated on an outpatient basis.</p> <p>I am aware that often in terminal cases, there is nothing the doctor can do beyond pain management. In such cases the doctor is prescribing a drug that he knows will not help the patient's underlying disease but may help alleviate one of the symptoms. There is a fine line between doing this and prescribing a placebo, and even finer between doing this and prescribing an ineffective cure. Pain management does have a definite downside as well, which is why this technique is normally only used in terminal patients: you worry less about such a patient becoming addicted to painkillers because that is the least of her worries.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355607&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="dlMumcKf8ASv0HFuWYsdPUShPYG9pcMzrA-UvDZ8mnk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Lund (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355607">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355608" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489401304"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Do you believe in sugar pills?<br /> - I love sweet.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355608&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MHCTe2GNIzQHrdki2mvWXl--SySJAAcitoC4Q0PsY4I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Corcos (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355608">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355609" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489402277"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Was the name of the woman Gretchen? :-)</p> <p>Your story was the best real-life example of the "Gretchenfrage" (Gretchen Question) I ever read. In the book "Faust" by Goethe (for those who don´t know this, Goethe is to German literature what Shakespeare is for the English), the girl Gretchen asked the scientist Faust what his stand on religion is, something he would rather not answer (having made a deal with the devil and so). This term is now used in Germany in general to characterize a question that is aiming at the core of a subject and that the other person would like to avoid answering.</p> <p>I can understand your decision to "avoid" the question, I guess as a medical doctor you are more inclined to put your patient´s well being over your own beliefs. When I was asked similar questions in the past I state my atheism in a simple, matter-of-fact way. No problem here in Europe, but I did get some shocked responses while visiting the USA a few times. :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355609&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XA-vdhpEntvvUrgehCddjQJKJ-moqqs2WKjqdK4hhHM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="StrangerInAStrangeLand">StrangerInAStr… (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355609">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355610" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489402767"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I think the hardest thing about a question like that is not merely what impact the answer will have but wondering what the motivation is. It's a minefield, and there will never be a perfectly safe answer for all situations. I think you answered appropriately, for what it's worth.</p> <p>It looks like this was a case where the woman wanted to give you encouragement, as her surgeon, and first wanted to see if the way she wanted to encourage would offend you. That's about the best-case scenario in which someone asks. They're not asking to trap you, but to see whether this sort of faith-based encouragement would be welcome.</p> <p>But you couldn't have known that before answering her question, and that's the tricky part. What if she was troubled by the fear of surgery gone horribly wrong, and wanted to talk about the afterlife? Awkward x1,000 at that point, and a conversation better had with a clergyperson or other religious advisor. But I could totally see someone asking.</p> <p>Kudos to you for how you handled it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355610&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5A64N_RuPd1mICY2_SDceZCX03imBOysQRW5mbDCeEs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Calli Arcale (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355610">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355611" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489402952"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@5 Eric<br /> I don't mean to be overly harsh or hard on either of them. I understand that different people will have different boundaries as I alluded to with saying **I** saw it as no different then what sports team do you cheer for or what political group do you like. I am also honestly curious what Sarah sees as the difference between prescribing something a patient wants that is useless(placebo or quackery), and encouraging a belief that is false (The doctor shares their religious convictions)</p> <p>Terminal patient management is another kettle of fish entirely. That is NOT placebo. That is making the patients last days as comfortable as possible. The patient and the doctor should both know that is the case. If the patent doesn't, then there is a major failure in communication. The physicians faith or lack there-of, in my mind, should have no bearing on the treatment provided. Here is where you get into the right-to-die, and religious beliefs interfering with a patients desires. Hence me wondering, where is the line drawn by physicians. I assumed that the state boards don't provide anything more then broad brush guidance, but I don't know and am curious.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355611&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BhXbTxPzzmzJO9lMHK21J0sSkSFDdN6k3nSrM4RUYwI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous Pseudonym (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355611">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355612" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489409511"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>So what happened with this patient? Sounds kind of iffy whether she'd be alive today, even if she didn't have cancer.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355612&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SHjrLKLsWAVHDFVhNgH0z6gnrLRmyD3QSeMlOeNY66g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mark Thorson (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355612">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355613" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489410222"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>Outside of professional obligations, I would have shrugged and said I grew out of belief around the same time I realized the Easter bunny and the fey folk were just as real as God.</p></blockquote> <p>And if the patient were then to ask how you knew you were "real" or – even better – whether you though she was "real," how would you roll on with this Easter bunny patter?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355613&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MvFwTrnMfaGrIP_DE2Lh5Cpvmt01DbugrysIy-GB32k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Narad (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355613">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355614" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489410571"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>. To me, the question of belief in God is irrelevant to the question of whether a surgeon is skilled or not, but apparently not everyone sees it this way. </p></blockquote> <p>I would see it as a handicap. To believe in something as silly as 'god' is an indication if soft-headedness. Religion is just as bad as woo,since there is absolutely no evidence to support a man the sky.</p> <p>This is worse than homeopathy. I would believe in homeopathy over Christianity anyday.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355614&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LmKAwiCgyBpcFWe56AXNel_A2vmnJ-WPdFPJWzGCX94"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">RobNYNY1957 (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355614">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355615" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489410925"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@11 Narad<br /> I'd keep it simple. If I can see, hear, touch and interact with you, then we are both real. If she wanted a philosophical debate on what is real and reality, I'd tell her I have other obligations and she can find a philosophy major to debate at the local pizzeria (Yes I am mostly kidding). In essence, anything that can be scientifically proven to exist, I'm happy to acknowledge the existence of. All else is fantasy and word games. Fantasy does have its place, but not in medicine.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355615&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kL26AN4nGrjwik5kqxNCC6aUCPqIe4Y5jb0udhj8elY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous Pseudonym (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355615">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355616" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489411146"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hey Orac,</p> <p>I had a similar situation recently, but this involved my new dog! Not to say this has any equivalence or catharsis with your turmoil. I'm just reminded and amused. </p> <p>The shelter said he was boston terrier mix. He is not. He looks very much like a pit bull. Of course that breed has a stigma associated with it. Some building and communities have bans on the breed. My province has a muzzle law. He's the sweetest dog though. Then it became time to register him with the city. Primary breed : Boston Terrier [hey, you guys said it not me] Secondary breed : ____. So should I say pit bull and fight the stigma with my pal? or should I put people at ease and keep my living arrangements open?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355616&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PViu6I_5GXmCrKFPVvCM-LTQpKNF1cVbk73FaTcoQoQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Paul de Boer (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355616">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355617" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489415017"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Out of bounds questions do not get direct answers. As a general rule, state your role and then elicit support from the questioner to try and address the concern. In short: My job here is to assess the possibility that you have breast cancer as that is what I specialize in. I will also be calling on additional help from your pulmonologist and cardiologist in order to get the best possible outcome for your problems. We will need your co-operation in order to achieve that, and if you find it helpful, we will accept your prayers with gratitude. My experience says next to no-one is aggressive enough to ask the same question again, but if they did, in this case, there is 3 members of the family, which is good, as then one can get more specific on co-operations to take care of her diabetes, hypertension, smoking etc but do not repeat the religion or god part, and I think I would leave the obesity alone, even though there is almost certain probability that the adiposity is the root cause.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355617&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_YvIRxHTIsoyf-Z6wfjaPOWPxgra49dhXhnL2KE5gE0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ross Miles (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355617">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355618" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489416258"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Orac,</p> <p>As I've stated in the past, I was over 511 pounds and had prostate cancer 31/2 years ago. I never would have worried about what religion my doc and other medical providers were or weren't. (Prostate cancer is gone or in remission and I've lost 200lbs)</p> <p>This woman seemed more concerned with her religion than her health.</p> <p>How long would this woman have complained if your first question to her was do you believe in god. I would imagine it would have been long and loud.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355618&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4fLS_1P0vHLPyu5NSo_6jQ-qX6leK-51fvs9mG-2S4E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355618">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355619" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489418171"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Rich Bly,</p> <p>I was a power lifter in college and my best dead lift was 475 lbs. (once).</p> <p>You must have been very strong to walk with such weight.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355619&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3h315BBJVs8DOeMnuXOAXMEu5hKUC0ih87ER82HvWHQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Michael J. Dochniak (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355619">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355620" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489418522"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p> It’s a minefield, and there will never be a perfectly safe answer for all situations. </p></blockquote> <p>I agree. In a polite conversation, I've used the Tom Hanks line in <i>Angels &amp; Demons</i> "Faith is a gift that I have yet to receive". </p> <p>I've also been known to answer with a flat "no", which can be fun. There is often a follow-up question along the lines of 'are you spiritual?', which I answer 'define spiritual'. I've never received a coherent answer. </p> <blockquote><p> I don’t have as much firsthand contact with Muslims, but ISIS/al Qaeda seem to be cut from the same cloth. </p></blockquote> <p>In my experience, yeah. I've worked with a few Muslims over the years, even supervised two, one of which made the hadj twice while I knew him. We had several chats about the theory and culture. He gave me a copy of the Koran on his last day.</p> <p>Like most people, most of them are good guys (and gals). The ones that aren't, aren't.</p> <p>I think the biggest problem with the perception of Islam is that there isn't an overall leader to denounce ISIS and associated groups. Individual Muslims and Imams do, but that never makes the news.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355620&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="sFGokkEYTfERjjIiE5TL1eZ4ODXC7vnTy5Khr-ZK21M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Johnny (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355620">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355621" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489419066"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Anonymous Pseudonym I think that the asking of someone what their religion is is one of those things that has a very variable acceptability in dfferent cultures. In the UK it has traditionally been in distinctly bad taste to discuss ones religious beliefs, although it's quite often possible to guess someones likely beliefs/denomination from various social cues one just doesnt talk about it and actually asking is really rather too intimate in most contexts.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355621&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="naMbtyXVa5LqCwjIz7r0uW0s5B1aEcV2Gdzt_a086Pw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jazzlet (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355621">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355622" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489420869"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MJD,</p> <p>Back when I could leg press 1100 lbs and in my mid thirties I slant boarded 875 lbs to show off to a future first round draft choice (9th grade at the time), he played middle linebacker for 10 years.</p> <p>So when I am in shape, I am fairly strong. I am working my way back, I am now 320lbs. It is a lot of work when you are in your 60's.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355622&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RUvmXgcV7M3eqabS_v4aRBmRN8fvucdPJRqaFxCBbsk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rich Bly (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355622">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355623" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489422720"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p># 19 Jazzlet</p> <p>Essentially the same here in Canada. I was talking to an America and he suggested that is was a friendly way of getting to know who you were in the USA. Weird.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355623&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="asQC8y3BmjTte_i3NJvOce0e2DIMEcHV8HRiRjt29wY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jrkrideau (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355623">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355624" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489423136"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><i>“God will guide your hand,” she said.</i><br /> Perhap God guided her own hand away from the cigarettes.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355624&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="n6Fg6Z1WgS4KWNaOkbF20P3iGwv7-KKEU1T70iRXnKI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">herr doktor bimler (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355624">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355625" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489424552"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Funny how I view this patient's question in a totally different light . . . and her answer as well . . . than most everyone else here.</p> <p>My response would have been quite different. For me, it would be a golden opportunity to elicit more information about her health care needs from a spiritual perspective.</p> <p>My answer would have been something like, "What does my answer mean to you?" or "What role do you want God to play in your health care choices?" or "What do you think your diagnosis will mean for you and your relationship with God?" or even a simple, "Do you want me to pray with you?"</p> <p>I would want to find out if this patient is in spiritual distress. Is she thinking she might soon be meeting her maker? Is she frightened she might die and have to account for her life? If she is, that anxiety is going to impact her decision making process, her response to a cancer diagnosis, her choices in regards to treatment, and even her response to that treatment. </p> <p>It doesn't matter whether her God exists or not, or if he exists the way she envisions he does (and as a Catholic myself, even in the Catholic Church there is a spectrum of belief, liberal through conservative thinking). It's her anxiety that matters regardless of its source, and it's part of her health care needs. </p> <p>What her answer to me indicates is she wanted to talk about her own mortality, and had to accept she couldn't do so with Orac. She wanted someone she could pray with, because she was afraid.</p> <p>You don't have to be a believer to offer spiritual comfort to a patient who is. You don't even have to admit you're not a believer. All you have to do is offer to pray with the patient. I do this all the time with patients, and did before the gift of faith (to paraphrase Tom Hanks's character) came my way. It makes a world of difference.</p> <p>If the thought of invoking God or Jesus really bothers you that much, let the patient lead the prayer. Or use the term "We call upon our Higher Power." A friend of mine who is a minister often does that when he's leading an interdenominational effort (especially when he knows some of the audience may be atheists or agnostics).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355625&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bQIwEAfrsUpK_BR-fsxg46ItFwhabFj_oVxuslfQhEA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355625">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355626" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489429281"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Panacea @23 I have no problem with your approach as, for you, it is a question which is in bounds. However, I would have to be a believer in order to pray with someone in that circumstance, as otherwise, one is condoning a misrepresentation, and from my point of view breaks a bond of trust. Gotta be who you say you are.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355626&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UiMQtjSO08D8vigRKbCZTHwsw2pJ5eZgNR0fUYStJWY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ross Miles (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355626">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355627" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489430286"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You really are not misrepresenting yourself. You are supporting a need of the patient. You can tell the patient I'm not a believer but I will pray with you if you really feel you must. I find it's the support patients really want, not belief.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355627&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="S9fMQ5GnfpuKrQTMwy56LDg-iPwxUAr2x5tewfwl7EU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355627">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355628" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489432098"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I noticed the examination room chosen by Orac to begin this post contains boxes of gloves formed exclusively from polychloroprene.</p> <p>Thank Orac, oh what a relief it is!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355628&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2I_hvltDc_aY_PxP33-dBLhAT45U5uamBGlPqTlFyLM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Michael J. Dochniak (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355628">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355629" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489432908"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Panacea @25 Would the patient then not see that in reality a praying non believer / atheist then would not be actually praying? Does that not start one down the road to the patient thinking about what else may be compromised? Or is the answer as I interpret you, is that believers have a different mindset and are happy to get all the support they can in the world in which they live, not thinking about the implications?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355629&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="c8uX_lXrzOEzljMl9It31g95eitHQIRyx0SR9lJyDHY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ross Miles (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355629">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355630" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489433894"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ohh. That is a big woman. Baby got back. I would have thought that the most uncomfortable and practical question would be "did you just fart?"</p> <blockquote><p>“She wanted to know whether she was contaminating the operating theatre she worked in by quietly farting in the sterile environment during operations...</p> <p>“Our deduction is that the enteric zone in the second Petri dish was caused by the flatus itself, and the splatter ring around that was caused by the sheer velocity of the fart, which blew skin bacteria from the cheeks and blasted it onto the dish. It seems, therefore, that flatus can cause infection if the emitter is naked, but not if he or she is clothed.</p></blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1121900/">https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1121900/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355630&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OgzWawgNACOsb2L02rP-okTbR9dUtErqZiybezF9izE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gilbert (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355630">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355631" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489446595"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Ross #25:</p> <p>I've never met a patient who thought someone praying with them compromised their beliefs. If anything, they might think they're opening the door to faith for such a person. I don't really know what they think about the implications; that's a philosophical discussion not a spiritual one, and it's counterproductive to their needs at the moment to raise the issue.</p> <p>What matters is the support system we offer. If we're seriously going to claim that we provide holistic care, we have to include the spiritual. Otherwise, we're full of shit, and it's why the quack crowd is able to get a wedge in with some folks--they don't hesitate to stroke someone's spiritual ego whether the quack themselves are believers or not. </p> <p>Now I'm not suggesting stroking anyone's ego just to get them to go with the SBM program. Far from it. I'm suggesting we take the spiritual needs of our patients seriously regardless of what we ourselves believe. It really doesn't have to be that complicated. You simply have to ask the patient what they need form you on a spiritual level. Be available to the patient on a spiritual level. You don't have to claim to have all the answers or even share the faith or any faith with the patient. You don't have to lie to them or compromise your own beliefs. Just be sensitive. </p> <p>Sometimes the needs are as simple as allowing a woman from some faiths to cover her head when an unrelated male is present. It only takes a second, but I've known many male physicians and nurses who are oblivious to this need and just barge into a room even when there's a sign on the door asking them to knock and wait for permission to enter first. </p> <p>Really, how hard is it to hold someone's hand and pray for them?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355631&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ZLgaAvdNl5JkeqPmqXOyeNtf7Y4pZlC6jlzlrTnQdxA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 13 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355631">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355632" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489472842"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Quite easy for me, I do believe, but not in any dogma. No books or prophets for me. I feel it quite wrong for a man to get between a man and the creator.</p> <p>It really throws em</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355632&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="b6WPK_nL6rWCn_TxxZAwUlWG6wQD4pItkqXS8kO3yDw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jay (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355632">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355633" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489478143"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Similar to Panacea's posts, her question could have been her way of trying to do a good deed for a doctor who did an excellent job of caring for her, Orac. Patients with multiple morbidities like hers are, sadly (as you note), often either openly disrespected by health care providers or criticized harshly during office visits for their lifestyle choices; so, when a doctor doesn't do that, they are very grateful. People with strong faith can be more concerned about what happens after they die than having/keeping good health while alive on planet earth, and this could have been her reaching out to help with that (from her perspective). If you had told her you didn't believe in God, she might have told you why she feels you should (and offered to pray for you) instead of dismissing all you'd just covered with her--but I also agree there's no easy way of knowing and the safer answer was not to say no out of fear of derailing the whole visit). I've never had that question asked of me--and I agree it's a tough one to field especially at the end of a clinic visit.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355633&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rNrKKTYbPqidNfSX9gfuqaWR_AshhC5n3MANbmWx55E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris Hickie (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355633">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355634" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489486846"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Panacea @29<br /> Thanks for taking the time to expand.<br /> Seems we are essentially back to what Orac wrote: "To this day, I still can’t make up my mind whether my choice was a complete cop out or a clever and diplomatic strategy not to undermine a patient’s confidence in me. It was probably a little of both."</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355634&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NVtVj2DRNUkUe-jPErTf2BTdkKcqdrip1EdyR1YwdJA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ross Miles (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355634">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355635" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489488566"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You're welcome, Ross :)</p> <p>I would suggest that this post (repost) is an opportunity for those of us here who are health care providers to think about the issue, and how we would respond to a patient who asks a question like this.</p> <p>Addressing the spiritual aspect of our patients is something many providers don't do well, and feel uncomfortable doing. It doesn't have to be hard and it doesn't have to mean compromising our own values or beliefs systems.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355635&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LqnCmHk-UTTA67lww1hwM3602Yw50yGpywY_xHy_3S0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355635">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355636" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489502160"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I tried the "I was raised Catholic" dodge once, but it didn't work. </p> <p>Who ordered a mammogram for a woman with so many comorbidities? I covered the hospital one weekend and cared for an 84 year old with recently diagnosed BC and end-stage COPD. At that age, with an FEV1 of 0.27, and frequent lung-related admissions, a mammogram was not indicated. The cancer diagnosis was more cruel than helpful.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355636&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LEo-hRVrBOI32nN9GgcwzL77yHisq-gMTTSWUzx8S8M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">StellaB (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355636">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355637" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489510426"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Panacea, what you have described is literally a nightmare for me. I am having a physical reaction to the idea of someone asking me to pray with them, let alone the idea that *I* would ask them to pray with me.<br /> It's just about the most private thing I can imagine and I have never been able to understand why people want to share it outside of a designated space (eg worship).</p> <p>If that's what's required of clinicians and anyone who works directly with the public then I guess I'm going to have to stay on the investigation/data side of public health.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355637&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="agcEkiKGTSi1QzXTHl_vMbvRSpLoPbRjeSObCv3q9vY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355637">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355638" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489510478"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>StellaB @34: Maybe the patient found a lump herself and asked for a mammogram?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355638&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="izQ-Ja-KPOE8G3AyOd0RUg-5gcyCXbAumrtOsICzG2I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355638">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355639" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489510780"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@JustaTech: it might surprise you to hear me say one of my favorite Bible verses is Matthew 6:5, which pretty much tells the faithful to keep their prayers private.</p> <p>In health care though, when a patient asks me to pray with them, they're typically looking for support and comfort, not to proselytize. </p> <p>Naturally if a patient traps a caregiver trying to convert them, the caregiver is not obligated to stick their hand in a steel trap.</p> <p>Required is a loaded term. You won't find it in any job description, and lots of people dodge the bullet.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355639&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jXP1wagAAx7k3GVytTKhTEhgxLzl16CItl-0M166BjE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355639">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355640" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489512194"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Panacea @37: And if you can't give them comfort that way? I can fake it through grace before dinner, but I really don't think I could hide how uncomfortable I am at someone praying out loud in a language I understand.</p> <p>My spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) are no one else's business, and anyone else's spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) are none of my business. And I really resent when people interrupt an unrelated situation, like a visit to the doctor's office, to ask.</p> <p>A psychologist as part of determining a treatment plan? Sure. My GP? No. It would seriously damage the relationship I had with my doctor.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355640&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="W4PhTk5IhQPPI7wYHyiLqxjxq2e6f6aJodf__l--W_o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355640">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355641" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489514990"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>My spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) are no one else’s business, and anyone else’s spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) are none of my business. And I really resent when people interrupt an unrelated situation, like a visit to the doctor’s office, to ask.</p></blockquote> <p>Aye, and it can go both ways, so to speak. I was told by one of the <i>staff members</i> at the psych ward I was in this past summer that suicides go to hell. I don't know if she was aware that my dad committed suicide when I was a kid.</p> <p>At the same place, another staff guy explicitly asked during group therapy who believed in the "power of prayer." I was the only one among the two staff members and numerous patients who didn't raise my hand. This was uncomfortable, to say the least. I was then later interrogated by yet another (very Catholic) staff member later on when I was reading the Bible if I "didn't believe in it." I answered that it was because it was the only piece of real literature in the library there, and it sure beat reading crappy mystery novels. Granted, when the other <i>patients</i> told me I was going to hell or tried to preach to me or whatever, that couldn't be blamed on the institution, but <i>staff members</i>?</p> <p>I mean, at St. Joe's in Michigan they had Mass, and I think somebody once told me that it was available (for Catholics, I presume), but nobody ever pestered me about religion there. Not even the other patients, for whatever reason.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355641&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GuSGa0arG3-Q4Wp-uskhuvY5APpqMTOnDa9zMwYv7x4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JP (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355641">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355642" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489516699"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm not asking anyone to do something if they're so diametrically opposed to doing it. I'm merely suggesting spiritual care is something over looked or ignored by health care providers of all stripes, and something we should take more seriously as a profession.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355642&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="r_Z4zag6KhIsWgHHV6AkLPwm_zNOlQ2i1IDagk1m49c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355642">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355643" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489521385"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Belief can be dangerous, for example it can stop people considering the truth.<br /> Where's your report on this study?<br /> Is it coming?<br /><a href="http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/316334.php">http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/316334.php</a><br /> I hope those that said vitamin c was quackery are held accountable for the deaths of the many people who were convinced not to try it.<br /> Insolence. Beliefs are like stones, the immovable ones are deeply entrenched</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355643&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PHyIYjzYN56VSu1Oz10hpJnZEF3aG9zM4RDwtWv1gAM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jim Hunt (not verified)</span> on 14 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355643">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355644" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489585646"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Maybe you noticed the study you quoted is an in vitro study?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355644&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ZfVO5KqNI4R6rrjwyxrGZ3G3gGjyp2PnfUAoo3h5Z-o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Perodatrent (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355644">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355645" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489586532"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Perhaps Mr. Hunt thinks petri dishes are equivalent to full human body. Relevant graphic:<br /><a href="https://xkcd.com/1217/">https://xkcd.com/1217/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355645&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="F5OTed4yKAhTagT3NNsiJICbgfs0JQYFTqCDsvu8geY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355645">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355646" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489598378"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Jim Hunt @ 41</p> <p>Looks like you will have a long wait for a report on how it may work in humans, as the authors in the conclusion state: "Future studies will be necessary to test their potential for clinical benefit in cancer patients."<br /> Always better to read and understand the study, rather than read a news summary. Saves on erroneous conclusions.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355646&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="UmZ_Nb6eMMkFRTNbSgiBd8CYg_dVzfUgaVK_S-nIXwQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ross Miles (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355646">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355647" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489602129"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Panacea @40: You did say that if SBM clinicians don't talk about spirituality with patients then the patients are driven to woo. That's a pretty strong statement.</p> <p>I would also suggest that there is an entire profession of people who's only job is to look out for the spiritual needs of people. Just as I wouldn't ask my priest about this funny mole (she would tell me to go see a doctor) I wouldn't ask my doctor to explain transubstantiation.<br /> But I guess most patients don't have that kind of boundary?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355647&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8kTzVPEEtxSSgCNigfMEXIaDGNxXddc1KthkdLaOapY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355647">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355648" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489605708"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My first thought was that she was trying to find out if you were saved. And if not, to share the Good News™ with you. I am not a medical professional of any kind but if asked the same question the answer you gave substituting Baptist for Catholic would be accurate. </p> <p>Your reply did not answer her question. But it did defuse a potential awkward situation while maintaining professional conduct.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355648&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NOtQaW_Fp5ojxvwasqs4tF4fdzkdHAPlQeCeXLzxTtQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Peter B (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355648">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355649" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489613334"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@ Chris #43</p> <p>Ha! I wondered how long before someone linked to that.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355649&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ALPgMdd237298Q6McnGLvcEJgC3eJdNzQE3kqCf7nIo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">NumberWang (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355649">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355650" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489613961"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>NumberWang, I think in this case it is pretty much mandatory.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355650&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6VLuDi-1VIkUEpP84YZVPXWMaLwIpFcJ9OMq092i2bc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355650">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1355651" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489615280"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@JustaTech: uh, when did I say that? That's not what I said. </p> <p>Here's what I actually said: "If we’re seriously going to claim that we provide holistic care, we have to include the spiritual. Otherwise, we’re full of shit, and it’s why the quack crowd is able to get a wedge in with some folks–they don’t hesitate to stroke someone’s spiritual ego whether the quack themselves are believers or not. "</p> <p>I stand by that statement. But what I said was if SBM providers ignore the spiritual needs of their patients, that opens the DOOR for the woo meisters; it gives them an avenue to make a connection with a patient who might otherwise not be inclined to it. What I said does not mean that every patient who is spiritual will go towards the woo, whether their spiritual needs are being met or not.</p> <p>We all know that the quacks are attractive to some patients because they are good at talking to their patients. We also know that some physicians, PAs, even some NPs and nurses, are lacking in the bedside manner department. Quacks work hard on building a personal connection with patients. People are inclined to trust practitioners who build a personal connection with them. </p> <p>So it follows that if a practitioner cannot or will not address the spiritual needs of a patient, even acknowledge that they exist, then patients who are looking for that connection will find it elsewhere, and they may find it with a quack. Improving our approach as SBM practitioners, we can head that off and keep patients where they can get care that actually works, and is in their best term long interest.</p> <p>None of that means that failing to address the spiritual literally drives patients to woo.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1355651&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="555yex8Iz6U7gHYCjhBapDjEB-JnI0GZzsg1t4gXt5w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Panacea (not verified)</span> on 15 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1355651">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/insolence/2017/03/13/an-uncomfortable-question-when-you-least-expect-it%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 13 Mar 2017 09:00:41 +0000 oracknows 22510 at https://scienceblogs.com More soda tax success: Study finds Mexico’s tax reduced sugary beverage buys two years in a row https://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2017/03/10/more-soda-tax-success-study-finds-mexicos-tax-reduced-sugary-beverage-purchases-two-years-in-a-row <span>More soda tax success: Study finds Mexico’s tax reduced sugary beverage buys two years in a row</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Another day, another study that shows soda taxes work to reduce the consumption of beverages associated with costly chronic diseases in children and adults.</p> <p>This time it’s a study on Mexico’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax, which went into effect at the start of 2014 and tacked on 1 peso per liter of sugary drink. Published this month in the journal <em>Health Affairs</em>, the <a href="http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/36/3/564" target="_blank">study</a> found that purchases of sugary drinks subject to the new tax went down more than 5 percent in 2014 and nearly 10 percent in 2015. At the same time, purchases of untaxed drinks went up by slightly more than 2 percent. The study notes that prevalence of overweight and obesity reached 70 percent among Mexico’s adults and 30 percent among the country’s children as of 2012. In addition, sugar-sweetened beverages account for 70 percent of added sugars in the typical Mexican diet, making sugary beverages a “logical target for lowering the intake of added sugars,” the study stated.</p> <p>To conduct the study, researchers used data on monthly household store purchases from the Nielsen’s Mexico Consumer Panel Services between January 2012 and December 2015. They found that purchases of taxed beverages declined by an average of 5.5 percent in 2014 and 9.7 percent in 2015, resulting in an overall average decline of 7.6 percent. Purchases of taxed sugary drinks went down at all socioeconomic levels, though such reductions were largest among the lowest-income households.</p> <p>Researchers noted that the larger purchasing decline in the second year after the tax was enacted “suggests that in the case of these beverages, the long-term impact of a price change may also be larger than the short-term effect.” They went on to say that such results contradict statements from the beverage industry that the effects of a soda tax tend to wane after the first year of implementation. Researchers also noted that declines in sugary beverage consumption could have positive impacts on people’s health as well as on health care expenditures in Mexico. Study authors M. Arantxa Cochero, Juan Rivera-Dommarco, Barry Popkin and Shu Wen Ng write:</p> <blockquote><p>Given the sustained effect of the tax on sugar-sweetened beverages over a two-year period and findings that responses to prices of cigarettes (price-elasticities) increase monotonically with prices, the impact of the tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico could be increased by raising the tax to at least 2 pesos per liter (resulting in a 20 percent increase in price). At the global level, findings on the sustained impact over two years of taxes on the beverages in Mexico may encourage other countries to use fiscal policies to reduce the consumption of unhealthy beverages along with other interventions to reduce the burden of chronic diseases.</p></blockquote> <p>Of course, this study isn’t the only one to show the positive impacts of sugary beverage taxes. This <a href="http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303362" target="_blank">study</a> on Berkeley’s soda tax found a whopping 21 percent decrease in sugary beverage consumption. At Harvard, researchers <a href="https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/spotlight-on-soda/" target="_blank">predicted</a> that Philadelphia’s sugary beverage tax, which went into effect this year, could prevent 36,000 cases of obesity over 10 years, prevent more than 2,000 cases of diabetes in the first year after the tax reaches its full effect, and save $200 million in health care costs over a decade. (On a side note, Pepsi recently announced it was laying off workers at its Philadelphia-area plants due to the new soda tax. However, a spokesperson for the city <a href="http://www.phillymag.com/tag/soda-tax/" target="_blank">called</a> the action a “new low,” citing the company’s $6 billion in profits last year. In addition, the mayor’s office recently <a href="https://beta.phila.gov/press-releases/mayor/icymi-philly-beverage-tax-is-working/" target="_blank">announced</a> that the city is on track to meet soda tax-related revenues, which are being invested in education and anti-poverty programs.)</p> <p>Last year, voters approved soda taxes in Oakland, San Francisco and Albany, California, and in Boulder, Colorado. In San Francisco alone, officials <a href="http://sfgov.org/elections/sites/default/files/Documents/candidates/Controller%20Statement%20Prop%20V%20-%20Tax%20on%20Distributing%20Sugar-sweetened%20Beverages.pdf" target="_blank">predict</a> the soda tax will generate $7.5 million in fiscal year 2017-2018 and $15 million in fiscal year 2018-2019. In Boulder, the approved ballot initiative requires the city to release an annual report showing how soda tax revenues are used — the revenues are intended to support healthier school food initiatives as well as programs aimed at preventing diabetes and other costly chronic diseases.</p> <p><a href="https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2012/10/sugary-drinks-and-obesity-fact-sheet-june-2012-the-nutrition-source.pdf" target="_blank">Research</a> shows that sugary drink consumption is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The <a href="http://www.diabetes.org/advocacy/news-events/cost-of-diabetes.html?referrer=https://www.google.com" target="_blank">American Diabetes Association</a> estimates that the cost of diabetes in the U.S. went from $174 billion in 2007 to $245 billion in 2012 — that’s a 41 percent increase in just five years.</p> <p>For a copy of the new study on Mexico’s soda tax, visit <a href="http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/36/3/564" target="_blank"><em>Health Affairs</em></a>.</p> <p><em>Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for 15 years.</em></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/kkrisberg" lang="" about="/author/kkrisberg" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kkrisberg</a></span> <span>Fri, 03/10/2017 - 10:25</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/government" hreflang="en">government</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health-general" hreflang="en">Public Health - General</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/child-health" hreflang="en">Child health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chronic-disease" hreflang="en">chronic disease</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/diabetes" hreflang="en">diabetes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/prevention" hreflang="en">Prevention</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health" hreflang="en">public health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda-tax" hreflang="en">soda tax</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sugar-sweetened-beverage-tax" hreflang="en">sugar-sweetened beverage tax</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sugar-sweetened-beverages" hreflang="en">sugar-sweetened beverages</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sugary-beverages" hreflang="en">sugary beverages</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/taxes" hreflang="en">taxes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1874270" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489163525"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That's excellent news! In Seattle the mayor has proposed a $0.02/oz tax on sugar-sweetened bottled beverages (fizzy or flat).<br /> There has been some concern expressed that the populations who buy more sugar-sweetened beverages, as opposed to diet beverages, are more likely to be people of color and have lower socieo-economic status, and therefore would be unfairly targeted by this tax. Personally I think diet soda should be taxed too and only unsweetened beverages excluded, but this is a simpler distinction to make.</p> <p>It's great to see that these taxes are effective at reducing consumption as well as raising fund for prevention.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1874270&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LIl4NN90_dYC2R5g4XGaMpkDZZjWpnoOECobdTvTgOM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 10 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1874270">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1874271" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1489694663"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Parallel statistics for beer sales, por favor--</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1874271&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2X_ZmK12YhXNQO1z3cGF4g6Q3jW83xxXp2HhiIM5CQc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Russell (not verified)</span> on 16 Mar 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1874271">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/thepumphandle/2017/03/10/more-soda-tax-success-study-finds-mexicos-tax-reduced-sugary-beverage-purchases-two-years-in-a-row%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 10 Mar 2017 15:25:34 +0000 kkrisberg 62807 at https://scienceblogs.com The obese marathon mouse https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2017/01/12/the-obese-marathon-mouse <span>The obese marathon mouse</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div style="width: 457px;"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://www.fbn-dummerstorf.de/fileadmin/media/I2.0/GOH-MAUS-603.jpg" width="447" height="318" /> Dummerstorf marathon mouse, Image from <a href="https://www.fbn-dummerstorf.de/institutes/institute-of-genetics-and-biometry/units-and-groups/service-group-lab-animal-facility/?L=1">Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology</a> </div> <p>As the name implies, Dummerstorf marathon mice are bred to run. If allowed to be sedentary, these animals can build up quite a bit of fat within their peripheral tissues even if they do not overeat. If given an exercise wheel, however, they burn fat very quickly.</p> <p>In a new study published in the <em>Journal of Comparative Physiology - B,</em> researchers discovered that the livers of these mice have an increased ability to not only store fat but to also rapidly mobilize fat when necessary for exercise. If they are able to identify genes or proteins that can turn on (or off) similar signaling pathways to promote fat mobilization and utilization in humans, the research may be relevant to the treatment of obesity or perhaps non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.</p> <p><strong>Source:</strong></p> <div id="enumeration" class="enumeration" tabindex="-1"> <p>Ohde D, Brenmoehl J, Walz C, Tuchscherer A, Wirthgen E, Hoeflich A. Comparative analysis of hepatic miRNA levels in male marathon mice reveals a link between obesity and endurance exercise capacities. <em>Journal of Comparative Physiology B.</em><span class="ArticleCitation_Year"><time>186(8): 1067-1078, 2016.</time></span></p> </div> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Wed, 01/11/2017 - 18:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/exercise" hreflang="en">exercise</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/fatty-liver" hreflang="en">fatty liver</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gene-1" hreflang="en">gene</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mouse" hreflang="en">mouse</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/steatosis" hreflang="en">steatosis</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2510255" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1488188948"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Skipping breakfast is another reason that prevents you from burning belly fat. Research has shown that people who skip breakfast have a tendency to store abdominal fat. When you skip breakfast, you activate your body’s starvation response.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2510255&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RYtqI3Hv-iMnwxSXtCdSpu0CMSptoKavkQJLKUiqgfs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dianabol Supplement (not verified)</span> on 27 Feb 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-2510255">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2017/01/12/the-obese-marathon-mouse%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:41:06 +0000 dr. dolittle 150455 at https://scienceblogs.com Eating saturated fat is bad for the brain https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2016/11/30/eating-saturated-fat-is-bad-for-the-brain <span>Eating saturated fat is bad for the brain</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img class="" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.themonitordaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/diet1.jpg" width="366" height="229" /></p> <p>I know this is not a comparative physiology topic, but this article caught my attention as I know I just ate a rather high fat meal last week for Thanksgiving and I plan to do the same throughout the holiday season.</p> <p>Insulin does more than just lowering blood sugar by increasing its uptake into tissues. It can also increase blood flow to the hippocampal region of the brain to help cognitive function. This area of the brain is important in memory formation and spatial orientation. A new study published in the <em>American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism</em> used ultrasound to measure blood flow to this region of the brain in rats fed either a normal fat or high fat diet for 6 months. Their results show that eating a high fat diet over a long period of time causes blood vessels in the brain to lose their ability to respond to insulin, meaning blood flow to the region is reduced. Because this area is so important in our ability to recall information, the researchers speculate that insulin resistance in the brain of people who are obese or diabetic may help explain why they experience cognitive impairments or even dementia.</p> <p><strong>Source: </strong></p> <p>Z Fu, J Wu, T Nesil, MD Li, KW Aylor, Z Liu. Long-term high-fat diet induces hippocampal microvascular insulin resistance and cognitive dysfunction. Articles in PresS. <em>American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism</em> (November 29, 2016). doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00297.2016</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Wed, 11/30/2016 - 13:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/dementia" hreflang="en">dementia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/diabetes" hreflang="en">diabetes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/diet" hreflang="en">diet</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/fat" hreflang="en">fat</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/insulin" hreflang="en">insulin</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/memory" hreflang="en">memory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2510243" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1480535238"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There seems to be an emerging consensus that the active transport of glucose to the brain diminishes with aging, whereas the route for ketone bodies-the other fuel-does not. So coconut oil, a source of medium chain triglycerides (and a saturated fat!) which quickly convert into ketone bodies is being advocated for brain health and function, including avoiding Alzheimer's. What do you think of this?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2510243&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qo6SAES0C6Wp8qCvr9dA0wzsl2kEb3SfW8vGvu2zUzg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Milind Padki (not verified)</span> on 30 Nov 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-2510243">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2510244" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1486561528"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If you read the literature collected from cardiovascular disease research, you will find that any saturated fatty acid smaller than Myristic Acid (C:14) will raise serum cholesterol. You might also like to know, but it sounds as if you already do, that short chain saturated fats go straight to the liver while the longer chain saturated fats go into the serum as in lipoproteins.</p> <p>So I would exonerate coconut oil, but little else. The fatty acid composition of coconut oil is somewhat unique.</p> <p>When I looked up insulin resistance, I found two culprits: a high-fat diet, and a diet high in heme iron. Heme iron absorption is poorly regulated and is speculated to play a role.</p> <p>But frankly, the evidence that a high-fat diet leads to insulin resistance is overwhelming.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2510244&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="woSyS09UrjweVd2F28cAwsZfKzr4Mjv5imk5p6Z6Yok"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Science Mom (not verified)</span> on 08 Feb 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-2510244">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2510245" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1487460785"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Can't win! I find that a high fat diet is the only thing that allows me to win the battle with obesity (I have other health issues which prohibit any significant exercise). Strangely, high fat/few carbs cuts hunger attacks enough that I can average fewer calories in than out, and thus slowly but steadily lose weight. It's not the healthiest diet, but 50# of extra fat wasn't healthy either. Sounds like this diet has at least one more disadvantage than I knew of.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2510245&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KkayWN3uLm3VQPeODwKKCWtd6N-mHaENNreUB6P1yng"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">PassingBy (not verified)</span> on 18 Feb 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-2510245">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2510246" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1487894845"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Fat and sugar must never be consumed in the same meal. Sugar will spike your insulin. The same also happens when you consume too much refined carbohydrates.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2510246&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="t3ZzJCAhychzqErPL4r5Vw7-owsyuxbKHPvpve8MEA8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="http://dianabolsupplement.com/">http://dianabo… (not verified)</span> on 23 Feb 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-2510246">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2016/11/30/eating-saturated-fat-is-bad-for-the-brain%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:05:25 +0000 dr. dolittle 150447 at https://scienceblogs.com Highlights from final day at APHA’s Annual Meeting https://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/11/03/highlights-from-final-day-at-aphas-annual-meeting <span>Highlights from final day at APHA’s Annual Meeting</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Kim Krisberg and I were in Denver this week at APHA’s 2016 Annual Meeting and Exposition — the year’s largest gathering of public health professionals. In our blog posts from earlier this week (<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/11/01/news-from-the-apha-annual-meeting-and-expo-in-denver/">here</a>, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/11/02/more-news-from-aphas-annual-meeting-and-expo-in-denver/">here</a>, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/11/03/apha-adopts-policies-on-minimum-wage-fluorinated-chemicals-at-annual-meeting/">here</a>) we recapped just a few of the scientific sessions and events from the week. Below are some highlights from the final day at the meeting. You can read many more courtesy of the <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/">APHA Annual Meeting Blog</a>.</p> <p><strong>Public health in the headlines: How does news coverage impact health?: </strong>Media. It’s everywhere these days. So, it’s not surprising that it impacts our health and behaviors as well as our perception of serious public health problems. Such influence was the topic of a Wednesday morning Annual Meeting session on “Media News Coverage of Health and Risk,” which began with a deeper look at how the media covers community violence and safety. Presenter Laura Nixon, of the Berkeley Media Studies Group, studied news coverage of community violence in California from 2013 to 2015. She found that the kinds of community violence solutions represented in the media evolved over the years. For example, in 2013, policing was most commonly reported as a solution. But in 2014 and 2015, community prevention programs became the top solution cited in media coverage. <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/?p=16594">Continue reading</a></p> <p><strong>For a LARC: It’s no joke — better training expands contraception access: </strong>Long-acting reversible contraceptives — intrauterine devices and birth control implants — are the most effective methods to prevent pregnancy. But too many people who want to choose LARC as their form of birth control are unable to get it in a timely manner because community health clinic staff is untrained or unprepared to perform an insertion.</p> <p>But that doesn’t have to be the case. At a Wednesday morning session on “Expanding LARC Access and Training the Community Health Workforce,” reproductive health experts shared their tools for success in preparing community health clinic staff to stock, educate about and insert IUDs and implants. <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/?p=16587">Continue reading</a></p> <p><strong>Farmers markets, community gardens improve health. And not just for rich people: </strong>Farmers markets are great for our health, especially our nutrition. But there’s one big problem. “Unfortunately, the people that shop at farmers markets are usually white, middle-to-high income, highly educated and female,” said Jennifer Casey, executive director of the Fondy Food Center in Wisconsin, at an Annual Meeting session on “Community Gardens and Food Systems to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption.” “And that’s missing a huge segment of our population.”</p> <p>In both Wisconsin and Wyoming, researchers have taken giant steps to increase access to healthy food systems like farmers markets and community gardens. For example, Casey and researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin collaborated on a two-year program to improve access to healthy food for diverse populations — especially people who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/?p=16581">Continue reading</a></p> <p><strong>Taking on obesity one soda at a time: </strong>Because problems like overweight and obesity don’t respect county borders, public health agencies are finding more ways to work together.  An example: the Denver area Metro Healthy Beverage Partnership that’s already had success in raising awareness about sugary beverage consumption and is helping local communities change their unhealthy ways. The partnership formed in 2013 after six health departments (which cover seven Denver area counties and more than half the population of Colorado) decided to zero in on obesity and the risk factor of sugary beverage consumption as a priority.</p> <p>“I must say, I thought, writing a grant across six health departments, that’s going to be like herding cats,” said John Douglas, director of the Tri-County Health Department. But focusing on a common goal has proven easier than he expected, he told Annual Meeting attendees during a Wednesday session “A Collective Impact Approach to Reducing Sugary Beverage Consumption in Denver Metro.” <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/?p=16600">Continue reading</a></p> <p><strong>Children who witness violence or are sexually abused are 3 and 5 times more likely to inject drugs as adults: </strong>Children who are sexually abused are nearly five times more likely to inject drugs in adulthood as those who are not — while children who witness violence are about three times more likely — according to new research released today at the American Public Health Association’s 2016 Annual Meeting and Expo in Denver.</p> <p>Researchers from NYU School of Medicine and The Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research used a nationally representative sample of more than 12,000 Americans to explore associations between nine childhood traumas and adult drug use. Additionally: the association between sexual abuse during childhood and injection drug use was more than seven times as strong for males as females. <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/?p=16608">Continue reading</a></p> <p>Catch up on all the news from the APHA Annual Meeting <a href="http://www.publichealthnewswire.org/">here</a>.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/cmonforton" lang="" about="/author/cmonforton" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmonforton</a></span> <span>Thu, 11/03/2016 - 08:52</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/agriculture" hreflang="en">agriculture</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/apha-annual-meeting" hreflang="en">APHA annual meeting</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gun-controlviolence" hreflang="en">Gun Control/Violence</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mental-health" hreflang="en">mental health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/physical-activity" hreflang="en">physical activity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/womens-health" hreflang="en">women&#039;s health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/farmers-markets" hreflang="en">farmers markets</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/long-acting-contraceptives" hreflang="en">long-acting contraceptives</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sexual-abuse" hreflang="en">sexual abuse</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/snap" hreflang="en">SNAP</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda-drinks" hreflang="en">soda drinks</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/violence" hreflang="en">violence</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/agriculture" hreflang="en">agriculture</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/apha-annual-meeting" hreflang="en">APHA annual meeting</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mental-health" hreflang="en">mental health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/physical-activity" hreflang="en">physical activity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/womens-health" hreflang="en">women&#039;s health</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/medicine" hreflang="en">Medicine</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/thepumphandle/2016/11/03/highlights-from-final-day-at-aphas-annual-meeting%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 03 Nov 2016 12:52:14 +0000 cmonforton 62725 at https://scienceblogs.com Study finds dozens of health, medical organizations take soda company money https://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/10/19/study-finds-dozens-of-health-medical-organizations-take-soda-company-money <span>Study finds dozens of health, medical organizations take soda company money</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>After years of alarming increases in child and adult obesity and billions spent to treat related medical problems, one might think health organizations and soda companies would be on firmly opposite sides of the fence. But a new study finds that a surprising number of health groups accept soda sponsorship dollars, inadvertently helping to polish the public image of companies that actively lobby against obesity prevention efforts.</p> <p>“To be honest, it was really shocking,” study co-author Michael Siegel, a professor of community health sciences at Boston University School of Public Health, told me. “I was especially surprised to see that organizations with direct missions to fight obesity are taking this money.”</p> <p>Siegel said he and his co-author, Boston University medical student Daniel Aaron, had heard anecdotes about health groups taking soda company money, but quickly realized that no one had comprehensively catalogued such sponsorships. So, they decided to take on the task. To conduct their <a href="http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(16)30331-2/fulltext">study</a>, recently published in the <em>American Journal of Preventive Medicine</em>, Siegel and Aaron searched online and through databases to pinpoint records of corporate philanthropy and lobbying expenditures on public health legislation by soda companies in the U.S. between 2011 and 2015, focusing on the Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo.</p> <p>They found that during that time period, the two companies sponsored 96 health organizations and lobbied against 29 legislative efforts to reduce soda consumption and improve nutrition. Among the organizations sponsored (picking at random, click the study link above for a full list) were the American Diabetes Association, National Breast Cancer Foundation, American College of Cardiology, National Dental Association, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Food Science Policy Alliance, National Physical Activity Plan, the Obesity Society and the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition. (Since the study's publication, the authors have acknowledged that they incorrectly identified the American Medical Association (AMA) as taking soda company sponsorship. The AMA did not accept soda sponsorship money during the time period studied.)</p> <p>Overall, the sponsored groups included 63 public health organizations, 19 medical ones, seven health foundations, five government organizations and two food supply groups. Among the bills Coco-Cola and PepsiCo opposed during the study period were 12 soda taxes, four Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) regulations and three advertising restrictions. Siegel and Aaron write:</p> <blockquote><p>Previous literature suggests that sponsorships of health organizations can have a nefarious impact on public health. Studies of alcohol company sponsorship and tobacco sponsorship suggest that corporate philanthropy is a marketing tool used to silence health organizations that might otherwise lobby and support public health measures against these industries. For example, Save the Children, a group that promoted soda taxes, suddenly dropped this effort in 2010 after receiving more than $5 million from the Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo in 2009. Further, the principle of reciprocity suggests that sponsored organizations may not simply become silent, but may also support initiatives of soda companies.</p></blockquote> <p>Obviously, many of these health organizations would argue that soda sponsorships in no way influence their decisions or policy stances. But Siegel said it’s not as simple as that — “this isn’t a conscious effect,” he said. He noted that a significant amount of literature shows that taking money from anyone creates a subconscious effect — a bias, if you will — to which we’re all susceptible.</p> <p>“It’s basic psychology that when getting money from someone, your attitude toward them will improve,” he told me. “We’re not arguing this is a conscious effect…but conflict of interest, by definition, means being influenced by financial relationships without realizing it. These conflicts of interest operate subconsciously and it’s an automatic phenomenon that can’t be avoided.”</p> <p>Another problem with such sponsorships, Siegel said, is that health organizations inadvertently help soda companies boost their public image and reputation. He noted that corporate sponsorships are much more than simply philanthropy; they’re a precise function of corporate marketing. In other words, he said, such sponsorships enable soda companies to tie their brands to that of reputable health and medical organizations and, in effect, “borrow some of the good will” that such organizations have built up.</p> <p>“One purpose (of sponsorships) is to divert attention away from the negative things these (soda) companies do and away from the role they play in the obesity problem,” Siegel said. “The end result of all of that is to promote their bottom line, which is soda sales.”</p> <p>So, what about that old cliché about keeping your enemies close? Or the argument that such financial partnerships could help engage soda companies as serious partners in fighting the obesity epidemic, especially since their products are such significant contributors? Siegel says it doesn’t work that way. In fact, he called on health organizations to either reject soda company money outright or make it a condition of sponsorship that such companies stop campaigning against public health measures. (For example, soda companies are now <a href="http://www.politico.com/story/2016/08/next-round-of-soda-tax-fight-brings-piles-of-cash-227487">working and spending</a> to defeat a number of soda taxes on the ballot this November.)</p> <p>“The way to solve public health problems is by going after industry and holding them accountable,” he said. “(Sitting down with industry) could potentially work if the ticket to getting to that table is that companies drop their opposition to public health policies. It’s simple — if you want to come to the table, stop lobbying against public health.”</p> <p>Siegel told me he does envision a day when the “reputational cost” of taking soda money will simply be too high to risk. That’s what happened with big tobacco, which had long given money to mission-driven organizations to help bolster the public reputation of tobacco sellers — “ but now, tobacco companies can’t buy friends. They’re completely isolated,” Siegel noted.</p> <p>Still, Siegel doesn’t blame the soda companies for their sponsorship strategies.</p> <p>“We recognize that they’re in the business of selling soda and we don’t suggest that they should be in the business of improving the public’s health,” he said. “So, we’re not blaming them; if anything, we’re recognizing what a great job they’re doing in marketing their product. …What we’re really criticizing are the organizations that are enabling them and making it possible for them to use this marketing strategy. Those organizations are the ones responsible for putting an end to it.”</p> <p>For a full copy of the soda sponsorship study, visit the <a href="http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(16)30331-2/fulltext"><em>American Journal of Preventive Medicine</em></a>. For more on the state of obesity in the U.S., click <a href="http://stateofobesity.org/">here</a>. And to read about the positive public health effects of soda taxes, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/08/24/study-finds-berkeley-soda-tax-led-to-a-huge-decrease-in-sugary-drink-consumption/">read our coverage</a> of the recent Berkeley soda tax study.</p> <p><em>Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for nearly 15 years.</em></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/kkrisberg" lang="" about="/author/kkrisberg" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kkrisberg</a></span> <span>Wed, 10/19/2016 - 12:26</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/government" hreflang="en">government</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health-general" hreflang="en">Public Health - General</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/child-health" hreflang="en">Child health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/childhood-obesity" hreflang="en">childhood obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/conflicts-interest" hreflang="en">conflicts of interest</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/diabetes" hreflang="en">diabetes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nutrition" hreflang="en">nutrition</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/prevention" hreflang="en">Prevention</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health" hreflang="en">public health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health-policy" hreflang="en">public health policy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda" hreflang="en">soda</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda-sponsorship" hreflang="en">soda sponsorship</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda-tax" hreflang="en">soda tax</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/healthcare" hreflang="en">healthcare</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1874127" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1477038891"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>America’s beverage companies are engaged in public health issues because we, too, want a strong, healthy America. We have a long tradition of supporting community organizations across the country. As this report points out, some of these organizations focus on strengthening public health, which we are proud to support.<br /> We are making a difference through the voluntary actions we are taking to reduce calories and sugar from beverage consumption - and by working together as competitors. Through our efforts, we’ve engaged with prominent public health groups on how best to help people moderate their calories in what is the single-largest voluntary effort by any industry to address obesity.<br /> Yes, we may disagree with some in the public health community on discriminatory and regressive taxes and policies on our products. But, we believe our actions in communities and the marketplace are contributing to addressing the complex challenge of obesity. We stand strongly for our need, and right, to partner with organizations that strengthen our communities.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1874127&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="H6P-4by28FBwOM7uDwSVrOfXwVTyNNCqV0rU6jgG6ro"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">AmeriBev (not verified)</span> on 21 Oct 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1874127">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/thepumphandle/2016/10/19/study-finds-dozens-of-health-medical-organizations-take-soda-company-money%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 19 Oct 2016 16:26:42 +0000 kkrisberg 62713 at https://scienceblogs.com Study finds Berkeley soda tax led to a huge decrease in sugary drink consumption https://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2016/08/24/study-finds-berkeley-soda-tax-led-to-a-huge-decrease-in-sugary-drink-consumption <span>Study finds Berkeley soda tax led to a huge decrease in sugary drink consumption</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On the question of whether a soda tax can actually reduce the amount of sugary drinks people consume, a new study finds the resounding answer is “yes.”</p> <p>In November 2014, Berkeley, California, voters passed the nation’s first tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in an effort to reduce their impact as a major contributor to chronic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The small tax was just a penny-per-ounce on sodas, energy and sports drinks, fruit-flavored drinks, and sweetened water, coffee and teas. But according to researchers, that small tax is already having a big impact. In a <a href="http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303362">study</a> published earlier this week in the <em>American Journal of Public Health</em>, researchers found that just a few months after the tax went into effect, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption went down by a whopping 21 percent in Berkeley, while such consumption increased in comparison cities.</p> <p>To conduct the study, researchers surveyed a total of nearly 3,000 residents across Berkeley, San Francisco and Oakland both before and after the soda tax was implemented. (San Francisco also attempted to pass a soda tax in 2014, but voters rejected the measure.) The surveys were focused in low-income and minority neighborhoods, where people are “more likely to consume (sugar-sweetened beverages) and suffer related consequences,” the study stated. Survey participants were asked how often they drank sugary drinks as well as how often they drank plain water from a bottle or tap.</p> <p>Here’s what the study found: In low-income neighborhoods in Berkeley, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption plummeted 21 percent over a one-year period from before the tax to after the tax, while such consumption actually increased by 4 percent in comparison neighborhoods in Oakland and San Francisco. More specifically, soda drinking went down by 26 percent in Berkeley, while increasing by 10 percent in the comparison cities, and consumption of sports drinks went down by 36 percent in Berkeley, while increasing 21 percent in comparison cities. In addition, water consumption in Berkeley increased by 63 percent over the study period, but only by 19 percent in San Francisco and Oakland.</p> <p>The study noted that the Berkeley result may not be entirely due to higher prices, but “could also reflect effects of the campaign surrounding the tax, which may have shifted social norms and thus reduced consumption.” Study authors Jennifer Falbe, Hannah Thompson, Christina Becker, Nadia Rojas, Charles McCulloch and Kristine Madsen write:</p> <blockquote><p>(A sugar-sweetened beverage) excise tax is one of the few public health interventions expected to reduce health disparities, save more money than it costs, and generate substantial revenues for public health programs. Already, Berkeley City Council has allocated $1.5 million to fund programs to reduce (sugar-sweetened beverage) consumption and address obesity for the 2016–2017 fiscal year. …If impacts in Berkeley persist, and evidence from other cities passing (sugar-sweetened beverage) taxes corroborate our findings, widespread adoption of (sugar-sweetened beverage) excise taxes could have considerable fiscal and public health benefits.</p></blockquote> <p>In June of this year, Philadelphia joined Berkeley in passing a soda tax. According to the <a href="http://phlcouncil.com/council-preliminary-approval-to-beverage-tax">Philadelphia City Council,</a> the 1.5 cents-per-ounce tax on sodas and other sweetened beverages will raise $91 million over the next year to fund quality pre-kindergarten expansion, community schools, parks and recreations centers, and help pad Philly’s General Fund.</p> <p>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/adult/causes.html">reports</a> that U.S. medical costs related to obesity reached $147 billion in 2008, while the <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics/2014statisticsreport.html">bill</a> for medical care and lost wages and work associated with diabetes is $245 billion.</p> <p>To request a full copy of the new soda tax study, visit the <a href="http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303362"><em>American Journal of Public Health</em></a>. For more on the Berkeley vs. Big Soda campaign, click <a href="http://www.berkeleyvsbigsoda.com/about">here</a>.</p> <p><em>Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for nearly 15 years.</em></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/kkrisberg" lang="" about="/author/kkrisberg" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kkrisberg</a></span> <span>Wed, 08/24/2016 - 17:42</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/government" hreflang="en">government</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health-general" hreflang="en">Public Health - General</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/berkeley" hreflang="en">Berkeley</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/child-health" hreflang="en">Child health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/prevention" hreflang="en">Prevention</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/public-health" hreflang="en">public health</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda" hreflang="en">soda</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soda-tax" hreflang="en">soda tax</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sugar-sweetened-beverage-tax" hreflang="en">sugar-sweetened beverage tax</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sugar-sweetened-beverages" hreflang="en">sugar-sweetened beverages</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sugary-beverages" hreflang="en">sugary beverages</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/type-2-diabetes" hreflang="en">Type 2 diabetes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/food-0" hreflang="en">food</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/obesity" hreflang="en">obesity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1874087" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1472533707"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Sugar is one of the worst drugs in life. Thanks for this interesting post.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1874087&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="M4DzCwymFaFji6_DAbzpGq0xs0EjvpMgefEJl5O0-og"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Nootropic (not verified)</span> on 30 Aug 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1874087">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1874088" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1472574368"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Most of the metabolic systems in the human body are for breaking foods down into sugars. Your brain runs on glucose, in large quantities. Without food products that can be broken down into sugars (carbohydrates and fats) you will die. (Often called rabbit starvation, because rabbits are so lean.)</p> <p>No, refined sugar is not good for you, and no one should eat excessive quantities. But it's not a poison or a drug. Unless you also consider oxygen a drug.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1874088&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-0Er_AbD1djw9w_JJAs9pp1e-BAoOFI_-QXMqFLZwCI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">JustaTech (not verified)</span> on 30 Aug 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/3256/feed#comment-1874088">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/thepumphandle/2016/08/24/study-finds-berkeley-soda-tax-led-to-a-huge-decrease-in-sugary-drink-consumption%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 21:42:38 +0000 kkrisberg 62676 at https://scienceblogs.com