field guide https://scienceblogs.com/ en The Horses Of The World: Don't say Neigh to this great book. https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2017/08/18/the-horses-of-the-world-dont-say-neigh-to-this-great-book <span>The Horses Of The World: Don&#039;t say Neigh to this great book.</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Over the years, the field guide and the coffee table book have merged, and we now have coffee table-ish books (but serious books) that include a species description of every critter in a certain clade. In the case of <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691167206/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691167206&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=2cc6f66252c4273c59b88a05e0d0e867">Horses of the World</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691167206" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> by Élise Rousseau (Author), Yann Le Bris (Illustrator), Teresa Lavender Fagan (Translator), while every living species of horse is in fact covered, the book is a comprehensive guide to breeds of horses. </p> <p>Of which there are 570. </p> <p>A horse is horse, of course, but but is a donkey or an <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/category/politics/president-donald-trump/">ass</a>? What about zebras? </p> <p>Horse people are very picky about what they call a horse. It is generally thought that there are onlly three living or recent species of horse. The Prewalski's horse (<em>Equus ferus prezewalski</em>), which lives in Asia, the tarpan (<em>Equus ferus ferus</em>) which is the European version of this animal, and went extinct when the last zoo inmate of this species died in 1909, and the modern horse,<em> Equus ferus caballus</em>. But if you think of a horse as a member of the genus Equus, there are more, including the donkey/ass and three species of zebra, the Kiang (a Tibetan ass), and another Asian ass called the Onager. And, since when speaking of horses, the extinct European wild horse is generally mentioned, we will add the Quagga, the half horse-half zebra (in appearance) African equid that went extinct in 1984 (having disappeared from the wild in 1883). </p> <p>Since "horses" (as in Mr. Ed and friends) and Zebras can interbreed successfully, and some of these other forms can as well to varying degrees, we need to think of Equus as a close knit genus and not be exclusionary in disregarding the Zebra and Donkey.</p> <p>Anyway, that is not what this book is about. As noted, there are some 570 or possibly more varieties of horse (no two experts will likely agree on that number) and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691167206/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691167206&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=2cc6f66252c4273c59b88a05e0d0e867">Horses of the World</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691167206" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> covers them all. There is introductory material about horses, breeds, how we tell them apart, conservation status, etc. Each horse breed is then given one half of a page on each of two folios, so you see overleaf some illustrated text on one side, and a fuller and very official illustration on the other, for most breeds, with some variation. </p> <p>This is one of the few books that comes with a movie, compete with some rather galloping music:</p> <iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/218949482" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p> Élise Rousseau is the author of numerous books on horses. Illustrator Yann Le Bris has illustrated numerous books.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-review" hreflang="en">book review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/breeds" hreflang="en">breeds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/equus" hreflang="en">equus</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/horse-breeds" hreflang="en">horse breeds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/horses" hreflang="en">horses</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1484983" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1503067782"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for the great xmas idea!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1484983&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SCebSXiWKv8-5ktYEySQvqkun4DNG6_hJrG66WFh-AI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">L.Long (not verified)</span> on 18 Aug 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1484983">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1484984" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1503344899"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Co-incidentally, I asked a colleague yesterday how he says "horse" in sinhalese. It sounded something like "ahsa".</p> <p>Even more startling is the Google Translate recording for the Russian pronunciation example for "horse":<br /><a href="https://translate.google.com/#auto/ru/horse">https://translate.google.com/#auto/ru/horse</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1484984&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KNCtVcP7CrNOuOH0gOC41WstVF80VwOVVbp8VKXGhOM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Craig Thomas (not verified)</span> on 21 Aug 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1484984">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2017/08/18/the-horses-of-the-world-dont-say-neigh-to-this-great-book%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 18 Aug 2017 14:00:29 +0000 gregladen 34483 at https://scienceblogs.com A guide to the butterflies (book review) https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2017/06/05/a-guide-to-the-butterflies-book-review <span>A guide to the butterflies (book review)</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691176507/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691176507&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=0f1a2f09d3fdd78612442c20d35a53e2">A Swift Guide to Butterflies of North America</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691176507" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> is a field guider's field guide. It is the shape and size of a traditional field guide. The designers of this book said "we don't need no stinking margins" so there are no margins. Color bleeds on the page edges allow a quick index to major butterfly categories. There is a two page spread visual index. A no nonsense introduction give you the basics about how to use the book, how to be a butterflyer, and how to not be a jerk about butterflies (like, don't net them and kill them). The front covers even have those flaps that you can use as bookmarks.</p> <p>Ranges are an interesting problem with butterflies, since their biogeography is both very heterogeneous and in some cases rapidly changing. Also, a key feature of their breeding ranges is not so much when they are there, but how many times they cycle through broods over the warm months. So the maps are interesting:<br /><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2017/06/Screen-Shot-2017-06-05-at-10.12.01-PM.png"><img src="/files/gregladen/files/2017/06/Screen-Shot-2017-06-05-at-10.12.01-PM.png" alt="" width="609" height="294" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-24182" /></a></p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2017/06/Screen-Shot-2017-06-05-at-10.12.46-PM.png"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2017/06/Screen-Shot-2017-06-05-at-10.12.46-PM-300x395.png" alt="" width="300" height="395" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-24183" /></a>A species entry is jammed with info. The color of the species name indicates something about its range, and key information about habitat, timing of adult phase, etc. is pulled out and highlighted. And so on. I'm giving a few examples of the pages here so you have an idea of how no nonsense serious this book is as a field guide. This is the book in which you find the butterfly, no question.</p> <p>This guide, by Jeffry Glassberg, world expert on butterflies, is the revised second edition of what has always been recognized as the most usable and detailed field guid for the average intense person. 3,500 photographs cover all known species in the region, depicting details and variants. </p> <p>The guide is photographic, but using modern techniques to this approach (which, in the old days, was usually not as good as drawing) so you have the best illustrations in this book. </p> <p><strong>-------------------------------------<br /> See also: <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2017/03/19/monarch-milkweed-book-review/">Monarch Butterflies and Milkweed: An amazing new book</a></strong></p> <p>-------------------------------------</p> <p>The information about each species in together with all the other information about each species.</p> <p>Species are grouped in major categories that are essentially morphological. So you go, "look, there's a skipper" and look it up in the section on skippers. </p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691176507/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691176507&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=7a6ae0d17af6bef0e6323e01d2cc10ca">This is an excellent must have field guide.</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691176507" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /></p> <p>From the publisher's site: </p> <blockquote><p>Jeffrey Glassberg is a leading butterfly authority and author. He is president of the North American Butterfly Association, editor of American Butterflies magazine, and the author of many books, including the Butterflies through Binoculars series. He is adjunct professor of evolutionary biology at Rice University and lives in Morristown, New Jersey.</p></blockquote> <p>The Table of Contents:</p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2017/06/Screen-Shot-2017-06-05-at-10.22.26-PM.png"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2017/06/Screen-Shot-2017-06-05-at-10.22.26-PM-300x470.png" alt="" width="300" height="470" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-24184" /></a>Introduction 7<br /> About This Book 7<br /> Butterfly Identification 7<br /> Butterfly Biology 8<br /> Names 9<br /> Interacting with Butterflies 9<br /> "Releasing" Butterflies 10<br /> Conservation 11<br /> North American Butterfly Association 11<br /> Wing Areas and Body Parts 12<br /> About the Species Accounts 13<br /> Abbreviations, Symbols and Glossary 14<br /> About the Maps 15<br /> Swallowtails Papilionidae 16<br /> Parnassians Parnassiinae 16<br /> True Swallowtails Papilioninae 18<br /> Whites and Yellows Pieridae 36<br /> Whites Pierinae 36<br /> Marbles and Orangetips 46<br /> Yellows Coliadinae 52<br /> Sulphurs 52<br /> Yellows 68<br /> Gossamerwings Lycaenidae 74<br /> Coppers Lycaeninae 74<br /> Harvester Miletinae 83<br /> Hairstreaks Theclinae 84<br /> Blues Polyommatinae 122<br /> Metalmarks Riodinidae 146<br /> Brushfoots Nymphalidae 158<br /> Heliconians and Fritillaries Heliconiinae 158<br /> Heliconians 158<br /> Greater Fritillaries 162<br /> Lesser Fritillaries 182<br /> True Brushfoots Nymphalinae 190<br /> Patches, Checkerspots and Crescents 190<br /> Anglewings, Ladies and Relatives 220<br /> Admirals and Relatives Limenitidinae et al. 232<br /> Leafwings Charaxinae 246<br /> Emperors Apaturinae 250<br /> Snouts Libytheinae 253<br /> Satyrs Satyrinae 254<br /> Ticlears, Clearwings Ithomiinae 277<br /> Mimic-Queen and Monarchs Danainae 277<br /> Skippers Hesperiidae 280<br /> Firetips Pyrrhopyginae 280<br /> Spreadwing Skippers Pyrginae 280<br /> Skipperlings Heteropterinae 332<br /> Grass-Skippers Hesperiinae 334<br /> Giant-Skippers Megathyminae 394<br /> Hawaii 400<br /> Conclusion<br /> Photo Credits 402<br /> Selected Bibliography 403<br /> Selected Websites 403<br /> Caterpillar Foodplant Index 404<br /> Butterfly Species Index 408<br /> Visual Index 418</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Mon, 06/05/2017 - 16:25</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-review" hreflang="en">book review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/butterfly" hreflang="en">butterfly</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/north-american-butterflies" hreflang="en">North American butterflies</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1482635" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1496724317"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Should I let kevin read this one? It's hard to work out what to do when you're so in control of what someone else does.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1482635&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ivTbYEQDy-NIPfVJKaIp2LSf4JQsHJsVR46jE-UD_Wg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Wow (not verified)</span> on 06 Jun 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1482635">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1482636" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1496724320"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If you are trying to win points with <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Nabokov#Entomology"><b>Vladimir Nabokov</b></a>, give it up -- Nabokov has gone on to the Great Butterfly Net in the sky. But if you are trying to ensnare us Army brats who spent our childhood south of the border, down Panama way, you are on target. At Fort Gulick, Canal Zone, the butterflies were an absolute delight. We did not know any better, and we made nets out of sticks, gauze and coat-hangers. We were always in seach of the fabled <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myscelia_cyaniris"><b>Royal Blue Butterfly</b></a>, said to be worth many dollars if you caught one. When Linda Ronstadt sings in Spanish, "y las lanchas como mariposas" at Blue Bayou, it is sweet to imagine "the boats like butterflies." <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matsuo_Bash%C5%8D"><b>Basho</b></a>, the great master of haiku, writes, "Rakka eda-ni kaeru; to mireba, kocho kana" --" Leaves returning to the branches, looking at it, oh -- butterflies!" In Panama, sometimes a flying river of butterflies would fly past our house for hours on end. Now I chase not butterflies but the <a href="http://www.advogato.org/article/1108.html"><b>overthrow of the Chinese government</b></a>, which we may yet achieve by means of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly_effect"><b>Butterfly Effect</b></a>.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1482636&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RbBp00ZfVF1T4U2TQ_r2QF-OMVtNRjvBJkUTGjEAyKQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Mentifex (Arthur T. Murray)">Mentifex (Arth… (not verified)</span> on 06 Jun 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1482636">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1482637" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1496726107"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Welp, someone broke his brain.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1482637&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yvWOgCrnDSNbl2-11PCotI3PNq0H3L1nuq-qca0e0dQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Wow (not verified)</span> on 06 Jun 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1482637">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1482638" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1496733458"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congratulations! You sold a book.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1482638&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_PxFnbmRwRiI2HR14LiJJL3OUKYURphfkKLoN6hKDl0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Williams (not verified)</span> on 06 Jun 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1482638">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2017/06/05/a-guide-to-the-butterflies-book-review%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 05 Jun 2017 20:25:28 +0000 gregladen 34416 at https://scienceblogs.com Birds of Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East: New Field Guide https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2017/03/09/birds-of-europe-north-africa-and-the-middle-east-new-field-guide <span>Birds of Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East: New Field Guide</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Just got my copy of <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691172439/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691172439&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=3f643d3df94b857f67a71c566200a27c">Birds of Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East: A Photographic Guide</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691172439" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> by Frédéric Jiguet and Aurélien Audevard.</p> <p>This is the first and only field-ready photographic bird guide that covers every species in Europe. There are 2,200 photos covering 860 species. The West Asian and North African coverage is of all of the species there that have occurred in Europe, so think of this primarily as a European guide.</p> <div style="width: 310px;float:left;"><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2017/03/Screen-Shot-2017-03-09-at-3.28.01-PM.png"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2017/03/Screen-Shot-2017-03-09-at-3.28.01-PM-300x410.png" alt="The entry for the Mute Swan." width="300" height="410" class="size-medium wp-image-23782" /></a> The entry for the Mute Swan. </div> <p>I hasten to add and emphasize. These are not your grandaddy's photographs. Many photographic guides have pretty nice looking photographs that show a bird, but then, when you go look up the bird you saw, you quickly discover that many of the best guides (such as this one) are not photographic, but rather, follow the Peterson/Pedrides tradition of drawings designed to help in identification. Jiguet and Aedevard use photographs that are then enhanced and set in a non-photographic background or matrix, so they end up looking, and acting, a lot more like the drawings. This means that key features are indicated and notated. </p> <p>Critically important in this guide is the ratio between the above mentioned numbers. For every species, there are potentially several photographs. Sometimes, it is male and female. Some other morphological categories are illustrated. For some birds, especially raptors, there may be numerous views in flight. </p> <p>The amount of information give per bird is minimal (this is a field guid) and the range maps are classic style and well done. Some books have dozens of pages of front matter, but this book has almost none. Other than the index and credits, there is no back matter. Yet, the book is well over 400 pages long. That's a lot of birds in one book. If you want a European bird guide for the field, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691172439/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691172439&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=63d62f7b9d50b7ee00b5252d8abbd056">this is the one</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691172439" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />. </p> <p>About the authors:</p> <blockquote><p>Frédéric Jiguet is one of France's leading ornithologists and a conservation biologist at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris. He is director of the Centre de Recherches sur la Biologie des Populations d'Oiseaux (CRBPO), and serves on the editorial board of France's premier bird-study journal, Ornithos. Aurélien Audevard has been studying birds for much of his life and has conducted several high-profile conservation studies for the Ligue pour la Protection des Oiseaux, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (LPO PACA). His photographs have appeared in many of Europe's leading birding magazines, including Ornithos, L'Oiseaux, Birding World, and Dutch Birding.</p></blockquote> <p>TABLE OF CONTENTS:</p> <p>Introduction 6<br /> Species descriptions 12<br /> Swans 12<br /> Geese 14<br /> Shelducks 21<br /> Dabbling ducks 22<br /> Whistling ducks 28<br /> Diving ducks 28<br /> Sea ducks 34<br /> Stifftails 41<br /> Vagrant and exotic ducks 42<br /> Gamebirds 45<br /> Divers (Loons) 55<br /> Grebes 58<br /> Shearwaters and petrels 61<br /> Storm-petrels 66<br /> Rare petrels and albatrosses 67<br /> Frigatebirds 75<br /> Tropicbirds 76<br /> Gannets and boobies 77<br /> Pelicans 80<br /> Cormorants 81<br /> Herons, bitterns and egrets 83<br /> Storks 93<br /> Spoonbills and ibises 94<br /> Spoonbills and storks 96<br /> Flamingos 97<br /> Honey-buzzards 99<br /> Buzzards 101<br /> Snake eagles 105<br /> Kites 106<br /> Vultures 108<br /> Harriers 113<br /> Eagles 117<br /> Osprey and Black-shouldered Kite 126<br /> Accipiters 127<br /> Falcons 129<br /> Rails, crakes and gallinules 137<br /> Cranes 143<br /> Bustards 145<br /> Oystercatcher and Turnstone 148<br /> Stilts and avocets 149<br /> Stone-curlews and coursers 150<br /> Pratincoles 151<br /> Plovers and lapwings 153<br /> Sandpipers 162<br /> Woodcocks and snipes 173<br /> Dowitchers and Upland Sandpiper 176<br /> Godwits 177<br /> Curlews 178<br /> Larger sandpipers 180<br /> Phalaropes 185<br /> Skuas (Jaegers) 187<br /> Gulls 190<br /> Terns 211<br /> Auks 222<br /> Sandgrouse 227<br /> Pigeons and doves 229<br /> Parakeets 234<br /> Cuckoos 235<br /> Owls 238<br /> Nightjars 246<br /> Swifts 248<br /> Contents<br /> Kingfishers 251<br /> Rollers 253<br /> Bee-eaters 254<br /> Hoopoe 255<br /> Woodpeckers 256<br /> Larks 262<br /> Swallows and martins 269<br /> Pipits 274<br /> Wagtails 279<br /> Accentors 284<br /> Wren and Dipper 286<br /> Robins and chats 287<br /> Redstarts 291<br /> Stonechats 295<br /> Wheatears 298<br /> Rock thrushes 303<br /> Thrushes 304<br /> Bush warblers and cisticolas 311<br /> Grasshopper warblers 312<br /> Reed warblers 315<br /> Tree warblers 320<br /> Sylvia warblers 324<br /> Leaf warblers 333<br /> Crests 341<br /> Old World flycatchers 343<br /> Tyrant flycatchers 348<br /> Penduline tit and leiothrix 350<br /> Reedling and parrotbill 351<br /> Long-tailed tit 352<br /> Tits 353<br /> Nuthatches 358<br /> Treecreepers 360<br /> Wallcreeper and Golden Oriole 361<br /> Shrikes 362<br /> Crows and jays 370<br /> Starlings 377<br /> Waxwings 379<br /> Bulbuls and mynas 381<br /> Sparrows 382<br /> Introduced exotic finches 386<br /> Finches 389<br /> Buntings 404<br /> Vagrant Nearctic passerines 417<br /> New World warblers 433<br /> Index 434<br /> Photographic credits 444</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Thu, 03/09/2017 - 09:29</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aves-birds" hreflang="en">Aves (birds)</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books-birds" hreflang="en">Books-Birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bird-books" hreflang="en">bird books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birds" hreflang="en">birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birdwatching" hreflang="en">birdwatching</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/europe" hreflang="en">Europe</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/middle-east" hreflang="en">Middle East</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/north-africa" hreflang="en">North Africa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/west-asia" hreflang="en">West Asia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2017/03/09/birds-of-europe-north-africa-and-the-middle-east-new-field-guide%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 09 Mar 2017 14:29:26 +0000 gregladen 34301 at https://scienceblogs.com The Mammals of Borneo https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/08/28/the-mammals-of-borneo <span>The Mammals of Borneo</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How do you judge a field guide? </p> <p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691169411/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691169411&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=589fd38dc5c91c51e81be008625c4714">Phillipps' Field Guide to the Mammals of Borneo and Their Ecology: Sabah, Sarawak, Brunei, and Kalimantan</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691169411" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />Some field guides you leave on the shelf and rarely look at. Others you may put in the living room to spice up the coffee table, because they make great eye candy, but are otherwise not that useful. Others you take out, and at least have around in case you need them. Others you make sure you are never very far away from because you find yourself looking for them all the time. </p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/08/rajah640h.png"><img src="/files/gregladen/files/2016/08/rajah640h.png" alt="rajah640h" width="283" height="640" class="alignright size-full wp-image-22791" /></a>And, every once in a while, a field guide comes along that you want to take to bed with you.</p> <p>I'm sure you know what I mean.</p> <p>It is such a beddable field guide. </p> <p>Sure, if you are going to Borneo, you may want to check this out because it covers that region. But really, when you are out and about in the wilds of Borneo, you'll be with a guide. Most of the mammals you'll ever see can be listed on an index card, with large hand writing, and the few others that might come along, you'll only see for a fraction of a second, and your guide will be able to make up something good about them. </p> <p>So, yeah, bring it, and it will serve you well, help you keep the guide honest, etc.</p> <p>But then take it to bed with you, because <a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691169411/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691169411&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=589fd38dc5c91c51e81be008625c4714">Phillipps' Field Guide to the Mammals of Borneo</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691169411" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> by Quenton Phillipps and Karen Phillipps is some serious reading. </p> <p>There are 277 species of mammals covered for the region, including the fish-like mammals such as whales. Most of the hard work in this book is done with drawings, which are excellent, but there are also photos. The drawing-photo combination is quite rare among field guides.</p> <p>Note the second half of the title: "And their ecology." There is about 75 pages of text prior to the "field guide of mammals" part, which blend interestingly and smoothly into one of the key mammal groups, the fruit eating bats, while still talking about ecology. The last 75 pages or so are detailed expositions of key ecologically important areas, and other back matter. The middle 225 pages or so have the "field guide" but about 25% of that space is not just field guide, but rather, some other information about the mammals being covered. </p> <p>Here is an example of why this is a great book. It is a field guide to mammals. <em>And their ecology.</em> Thus, an entry on a fruit:<br /><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/08/fig640h.png"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2016/08/fig640h-610x470.png" alt="fig640h" width="610" height="470" class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-22790" /></a></p> <p>That's not the last of the figs. Lots more on figs. Figs are keystone species in Borneo. </p> <p>This is a book you can browse through, as your night time reading, enjoy immensely, learn a great deal from and never actually go to Borneo. But if you are going to go to Borneo, get the book. And spend a little quality time with it before your trip. Bring it along on the trip. Then, after the trip, use it to fill in the blanks.</p> <p>Borneo, by the way, is pretty interesting. </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Sun, 08/28/2016 - 10:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-review" hreflang="en">book review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mammals-borneo" hreflang="en">Mammals of Borneo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2016/08/28/the-mammals-of-borneo%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sun, 28 Aug 2016 14:01:59 +0000 gregladen 34032 at https://scienceblogs.com The Wildlife of Southeast Asia https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/08/27/the-wildlife-of-southeast-asia <span>The Wildlife of Southeast Asia</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691154856/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691154856&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=6753efd12eb0e365ff19558c7a16ce5b">Wildlife of Southeast Asia</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=am2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691154856" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> by Susan Myers, is a new pocket identification guide covering "wildlife" in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, West Malaysia, and Singapore.</p> <p>It covers birds, mammals, reptiles, frogs, and invertebrates. Considering that there must be tens of millions of inverts in Southeast Asia, the coverage here is very minimal, just the highlights, just a few pages. This is mainly a bird book, with pretty good coverage of mammals, a bunch of snakes, some of the more important frogs, and some of the more obvious insects, etc. </p> <p>It is standard field guide size, and uses photographs rather than drawings. The first several pages outline the better wildlife viewing spots. </p> <p>The animal info comes with very little geographical information (i.e., no maps) presumably because the area of coverage of this book is actually fairly small and somewhat homogeneous. </p> <p>There are 500+ photos. </p> <p><strong>Table of Contents:</strong></p> <p>Introduction 6<br /> Geographic Coverage 6<br /> Measurements 6<br /> Basic Tips for Visitors 8<br /> Guide to the Best Spots for Viewing Wildlife in Southeast Asia 10<br /> Species Accounts<br /> Birds 26<br /> Mammals 174<br /> Reptiles 210<br /> Frogs 226<br /> Invertebrates 230<br /> References 244<br /> Photo Credits 244<br /> Index 249</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Sat, 08/27/2016 - 11:51</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books-birds" hreflang="en">Books-Birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-review" hreflang="en">book review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/southeast-asia" hreflang="en">southeast asia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/life-sciences" hreflang="en">Life Sciences</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2016/08/27/the-wildlife-of-southeast-asia%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sat, 27 Aug 2016 15:51:55 +0000 gregladen 34028 at https://scienceblogs.com Bovids Of The World https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/04/13/bovids-of-the-world <span>Bovids Of The World</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, there are 143 species of bovids. The Animal Diversity Web is a bit less precise, indicating that there are "more than 140 extant and 300 extinct species." That second number is highly questionable because today there exist sister species that are so similar I doubt they could be told apart from fossils alone. If you check around the internet, this ~140 number comes up again and again, and Wikipedia says 143.</p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/04/horns640h.png" rel="attachment wp-att-22367"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2016/04/horns640h-300x440.png" alt="horns640h" width="300" height="440" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-22367" /></a>Research published in 2011 and later by Colin Groves, Peter Grubb, and David Leslie, which has been tagged as controversial by some but accepted by others, puts this number much higher, over 270. Why such a difference, and why is this controversy only emerging recently? It isn't like bovids are barely studied, or highly cryptic. </p> <p>One of the reasons probably has to do with vagueness in the species concept itself, and it may well be the case that there are sets of species defined by Groves et al that are too finely split. But, the most likely explanation is that more modern methods, using DNA and recently developed statistical techniques, simply come up with a larger number. I've only read some of this literature, but I'm pretty sure the larger number is much closer to correct than the smaller number. </p> <p>This has an important impact on understanding and addressing problems of ecology, diversity, evolution, and conservation. With respect to conservation, this means that some populations of bovids, the more rare and geographically restricted ones, are likely to be more at risk of extinction, if there are other populations at different locations that can no longer be referenced as survivors. It has been suggested, indeed, that splitting large taxonomic groups into larger numbers of species is some kind of pro conservation shenanigans. Such hippie-punching has no place in modern biology, of course. The increase in our accounted-for diversity that happens with more research is both expected from historical trends over recent decades (though it is a reverse of earlier decreases in diversity as more was learned about certain groups) and is predicted by evolutionary theory. </p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/04/Screen-Shot-2016-04-13-at-3.00.19-PM.png" rel="attachment wp-att-22368"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2016/04/Screen-Shot-2016-04-13-at-3.00.19-PM-300x277.png" alt="Screen Shot 2016-04-13 at 3.00.19 PM" width="300" height="277" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-22368" /></a>Anyway, I'm not here to talk about that controversy exactly. Rather, I want to point you do a new book, a really fantastic book, called <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691167176/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691167176&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=XIM2GFUCGKGXUVLT">Bovids of the World: Antelopes, Gazelles, Cattle, Goats, Sheep, and Relatives</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691167176" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />, by José Castelló. </p> <p>Castelló uses the larger number, by the way: 271. And this book includes all of them.</p> <p>The majority of this 664 page book consists of plates and a species description on the left, and details on the right, including excellent range maps, with one species in each layout. The species are divided by the usual commonly accepted tribes. This also means that many but not all of the species are grouped by very large geographical regions, because that is how the bovids are organized across our global landscape.</p> <p>The back matter consists of nothing more than an index, critical in such a volume, and the front matter has an overview of what a bovid is, and details about key anatomy used in the field guide.</p> <p>This book is one of a handful in the emerging subcategory of animal books that covers an entire taxonomic group either globally or nearly globally. I recently reviewed Waterfowl of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/03/18/waterfowl-of-north-america-europe-and-asia-beautiful-new-book/">North America, Europe and Asia</a> by Reeber, which isn't quite global but since waterfowl tend to migrate is nearly so. A while back I reviewed the guide "<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2015/07/04/guide-to-the-sharks-of-the-world/">Sharks of the World</a>" by Compagno, Dando, and Fowler. And I've reviewed one of my favorite guides of all time, "<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2011/11/27/a-field-guide-to-all-of-the-ca/">Carnivores of the World</a>", which covers all the carnivores except those that evolved partly into fish. </p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/04/pantelope640h.png" rel="attachment wp-att-22369"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2016/04/pantelope640h-300x353.png" alt="pantelope640h" width="300" height="353" class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22369" /></a>This category of book is not meant to be the one book you carry with you while touring around in the field. If you go to Africa, bring <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691164533/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691164533&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=TWSBHKIDKLFIVG4T">The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691164533" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> (it includes the bovids), for example. Rather, this book is to understand the bovids as a major and important taxonomic group.</p> <p>Paging through a given tribe's entries, you can come to understand biogeography better, as you see the ranges depicted on the maps of a continent or region. Also, small bovids tend to have smaller geographical ranges than larger bovids, but there are major exceptions. Why those exceptions? </p> <p>Looking at the physical variation in key features, such as body size, sexual dimorphism, head dress, and markings, you can see patterns that are best explained with interesting evolutionary and ecological theories. If you teach behavioral biology or zoology, this will be a useful reference point for your thinking on all those key bovid examples. Or, if you are just interested in animals, or are planning a trip to a place where you'll be observing antelopes or other bovids, you may want to invest in this. </p> <p>And when your crotchety Uncle Bob is over for a holiday dinner and you get into an argument about how many duikers there are in West Africa vs. Central Africa, you can pull out your copy of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691167176/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691167176&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=DSC6ETLSAHWVAJYO">Bovids of the World</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691167176" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> and settle the bet!</p> <p>The plates are drawings, not photographs, which is entirely appropriate in this sort of book. Habitats matter to photographs and that would bias the physical comparisons. Also, I can tell you from personal experience that many of the bovids, especially the forest dwellers, just don't have great photographs anyway. </p> <p>I studied the information on the bovids with which I'm familiar from my own fieldwork, and I see only quality information. </p> <p>As far as I know, there is not another guide like this available. Also it is not that expensive. </p> <p><strong>Table of Contents:</strong><br /> FOREWORD by Brent Huffman and Colin Groves 5<br /> ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 7<br /> INTRODUCTION 8<br /> TRIBE AEPYCEROTINI<br /> Impalas 24<br /> TRIBE NEOTRAGINI<br /> Sunis, Royal Antelope, Pygmy Antelope 28<br /> TRIBE REDUNCINI<br /> Reedbucks, Waterbucks, Rhebok 38<br /> TRIBE ANTILOPINI<br /> Gazelles, Oribis, Steenbok, Grysbok, Dik-diks 82<br /> TRIBE OREOTRAGINI<br /> Klipspringers 224<br /> TRIBE CEPHALOPHINI<br /> Duikers 244<br /> TRIBE CAPRINI<br /> Sheep, Goats, and relatives 302<br /> TRIBE HIPPOTRAGINI<br /> Horse Antelopes 466<br /> TRIBE ALCELAPHINI<br /> Tsessebes, Topis, Hartebeests, Wildebeests 496<br /> TRIBE BOSELAPHINI<br /> Nilgai, Four-horned Antelope 542<br /> TRIBE TRAGELAPHINI<br /> Spiral-horned Antelopes 546<br /> TRIBE BOVINI<br /> Bison, Buffaloes, Cattle, Saola 596<br /> SKULLS 650<br /> REFERENCES 659<br /> INDEX 660</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Wed, 04/13/2016 - 09:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/artiodactyla" hreflang="en">Artiodactyla</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mammals" hreflang="en">mammals</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/animals" hreflang="en">animals</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/book-review" hreflang="en">book review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bovidae" hreflang="en">Bovidae</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bovids" hreflang="en">Bovids</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/jose-castello" hreflang="en">Jose Castello</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mammals" hreflang="en">mammals</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2016/04/13/bovids-of-the-world%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 13 Apr 2016 13:11:29 +0000 gregladen 33904 at https://scienceblogs.com Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia: Beautiful new book https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/03/18/waterfowl-of-north-america-europe-and-asia-beautiful-new-book <span>Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia: Beautiful new book</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There are three kinds of books that count as animal (usually bird) guides.</p> <p>1) A pocket field guide of the critters of a reasonably circumscribed geographical area, like the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0547152469/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0547152469&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=2GAWR32PLWSUJ4GQ">Peterson Field Guide to Birds of Eastern and Central North America</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0547152469" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />. This is a small book that can fit in a big pocket, and a classic guide like this one is something you'll want to have with you while bird watching in the eastern or central US. </p> <p>2) A big book, not suitable for pockets, of the critters of a reasonably circumscribed geographical area. A great example of this is <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691147787/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691147787&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=BAW7XPLFXU36QNSP">The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds </a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691147787" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />. It covers the same geographical area as the aforementioned Peterson guide, but the book's authors and publishers sacrifice portability for other characteristics like richness of detail and more book real estate for many more images. </p> <p>3) A book, larger or smaller, that focuses on a specific geographical area but covers most of the visible wildlife including, often, plants, and maybe including additional information for the traveller. A recent example of this is the just published <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/03/04/wildlife-of-the-galapagos-updated-field-guide-review/">Wildlife of the Galapagos</a>. </p> <p>4) A book that covers a large taxonomic group, but over a vast geographical area. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691152284/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691152284&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=FVZZHNBF3YIS6LYP">Carnivores of the World </a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691152284" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> is an example of this. It covers all of the non-aquatic carnivores, everywhere on the planet. This particular book is a pocket field guide, but in a way that is kind of funny because you'd have be on quite a trip to need a pocket guide for the Earth for a given type of animal. I quickly add, however, that while it might seem a bit silly, the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691152284/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691152284&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=FVZZHNBF3YIS6LYP">Carnivores of the World </a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691152284" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> is actually a fantastic book.</p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/03/barrowsgoldeneye640h.png" rel="attachment wp-att-22290"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2016/03/barrowsgoldeneye640h-300x533.png" alt="barrowsgoldeneye640h" width="300" height="533" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-22290" /></a>The book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691162662/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691162662&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=55W2GKKYSVZUDAWP">Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia: An Identification Guide</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691162662" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />, by Sébastien Reeber, overlaps with some of these categories. The title could be rewritten to say "Temperate and Subtropical Waterfowl of the Northern Hemisphere," though that would be a bit misleading because a large percentage of these birds migrate long distances, so really, it is more like "Waterfowl of the world except the ones that stay in the tropics or otherwise don't migrate north of the tropics," but that would be a silly title.</p> <p>Also, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691162662/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691162662&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=55W2GKKYSVZUDAWP">Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia: An Identification Guide</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691162662" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> is large format. The up and down and back and forth dimensions are not as large as Crossley's bird guides, but it is way bigger than a field guide, and thick ... 656 pages. The plates start on page 32 and the detailed text and photograph rich species accounts run from pages 177 to 616, to give you an idea of the balance and expansiveness found in this volume. </p> <p>This book is organized in a unique way. There are two main parts. First, 72 plates show peterson-style drawings of all of the birds that are covered, with the drawings arranged on the right side, with basic ID information, range maps, and references to other parts of the book on the left side. This allows the user to find a particular bird fairly quickly. Importantly, the pictures cover both sex and age variations. </p> <p>The second part of the book significantly expands on the plates, and is cross referenced by plate number, with extensive text and multiple photographs to add very rich detail. </p> <p>So, when it comes to your preference for drawings vs. photographs, you can have your cake and eat it too. Also, when it comes to your need for a basic field guide vs. a more in depth discussion, you can have your cake and eat it too there as well.</p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2016/03/easternspot-billedduck640h.png" rel="attachment wp-att-22291"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/files/2016/03/easternspot-billedduck640h-300x294.png" alt="easternspot-billedduck640h" width="300" height="294" class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22291" /></a>Aside from these two main sections there are sections on how to use the book, basics of taconomy and systematics, the physical anatomy of birds and how that relates to identification, important information on moulting and plumage variation as well as age and sex, which as you probably know are key in identifying waterfowl because this varies so much. There is an extensive section on hybrids, which, again, is a big deal with many waterfowl, and a very large number of hybrids are addressed in the book. (There is a separate hybrid index.) </p> <p>The book is extremely well produced and presented. I love this book. </p> <p>Since <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691162662/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691162662&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=55W2GKKYSVZUDAWP">Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia: An Identification Guide</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691162662" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> is brand new, if you've got a birder friend or relative with a birthday coming up soon, <em>this is the perfect gift</em>. Meanwhile, migrations are underway. You need this book now. </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Fri, 03/18/2016 - 05:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aves-birds" hreflang="en">Aves (birds)</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books-birds" hreflang="en">Books-Birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bird-watching" hreflang="en">bird watching</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birding" hreflang="en">birding</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birds" hreflang="en">birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/waterfowl" hreflang="en">Waterfowl</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/life-sciences" hreflang="en">Life Sciences</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1470168" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1458295210"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For those of us in North America, the table top companion is newly published 2nd edition of the classic Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North America. It's a gorgeous, beautifully written, 2 volume encyclopedic treatise <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1421407515/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1421407515&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=2MXT3QKGVF6NUXMV">https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/ducks-geese-and-swans-north-america</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1470168&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MNnwWdaSRI1qFaLpKAjsa0JkX6pLClemGUP4f1AzrIE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hunter (not verified)</span> on 18 Mar 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1470168">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1470169" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1458756845"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I was also going to mention the book Hunter mentioned above. It is an "update" from Bellrose's classic waterfowl book, although update is an understatement as this is now two volumes vs Bellrose's one book. </p> <p>It is worth having. My one quibble with it is that they didn't reproduce the summary graphs in the new volume. Not sure why...they would only have taken a couple of pages...maybe they were just too generalized to be useful. </p> <p>Looks like this new waterfowl book also has pictures of wings, speculum markings? That's handy. I have a separate book just aging and sexing ducks by wings, but I'd like something similar in an identification guide so I see it more regularly (not often I'll pull out my age/sexing book just to look at wing pictures...I still have good memories of doing those weekend marathon wing-bees going through boxes of wings to identify, age and sex the wings hunters sent in; that was early in my career before disillusionment about job prospects in the biology field set in :).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1470169&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CbMhk6LaCjdor6PXaIwR4v8RkaOdLCEJjPtm1nd0YqQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dan Andrews (not verified)</span> on 23 Mar 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1470169">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1470170" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1458888930"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There was also <a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wildfowl-Europe-America-Identification-Guides/dp/1472912349/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1458910243&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=Waterfowl+of+North+America%2C+Europe%2C+and+Asia%3A+An+Identification+Guide">this one from the same author late last year </a> but having studied neither I cannot comment further. Is there overlap here?</p> <p> I am interested as would be a grandson who is at uni studying zoology I know either/or both books could be right up his street. Grandad may have to pay though.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1470170&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7CxUMYVzrHdHWz7pM3JQhDivvd9vNoC8DbNkOpqv9tw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lionel A (not verified)</span> on 25 Mar 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1470170">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2016/03/18/waterfowl-of-north-america-europe-and-asia-beautiful-new-book%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 18 Mar 2016 09:40:19 +0000 gregladen 33880 at https://scienceblogs.com Wildlife Of The Galapagos: Updated Field Guide (Review) https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2016/03/04/wildlife-of-the-galapagos-updated-field-guide-review <span>Wildlife Of The Galapagos: Updated Field Guide (Review)</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691170428/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691170428&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=LRGYDQFWXSJ4VASQ">Wildlife of the Galápagos: Second Edition (Princeton Pocket Guides)</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691170428" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />, by Julian Fitter, Daniel Fitter, and David Hosking is both a field guide and a travel guide, focusing on the Galapagos Islands. It includes basic information about each island and each town or tourist destination, and a comprehensive guide to how to visit, what to bring and not bring, and otherwise plan your trip to these amazing evolution-drenched islands.</p> <p>The wildlife that is covered includes birds, other land vertebrates including the famous tortoises and lizards, offshore mammals, fish, insects, and plants. There is even a short section on the different geological features, which are not technically wildlife, rounding off the guide as the only book you really need to bring. Oh, and there is also an overview of the Islands's history.</p> <p>Over 400 species are covered with 650 illustrations including maps and drawings. The wildlife (and geological features) are represented mainly as photographs. It is a pocket size pocked guide similar to your average portable bird book. </p> <p>The authors are experienced guides and have been involved with Galapagos conservation and tourism for years.</p> <p>The first edition of this book was widely used. The second edition has added fish, Spanish names, more information about history, climate, geology, and conservation, and of course, updated information on visitor sites. </p> <p>You can't go to the Galapagos without this book. You can, however, get this book and not go to the galapagos, and pretend you are going! (Or, get inspired, and start saving up now!)</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Fri, 03/04/2016 - 07:49</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birdwatching" hreflang="en">birdwatching</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books-birds" hreflang="en">Books-Birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bird-watching" hreflang="en">bird watching</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birds" hreflang="en">birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/fish" hreflang="en">fish</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/galapagos" hreflang="en">galapagos</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/reptiles" hreflang="en">Reptiles</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birdwatching" hreflang="en">birdwatching</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1469913" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1457096738"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Greg:</p> <p>Thank you for the cite.</p> <p>My son did a study abroad for 4 months in Ecuador and spent a few weeks in the Galapagos.</p> <p>He will enjoy this book and am going to get it for him.</p> <p>Thanks again.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1469913&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nlddyvqyfjGuZfJNI7Ws4Q382-QYs6z5zfxRhFKBbaM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">RickA (not verified)</span> on 04 Mar 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1469913">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1469914" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1457164548"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for the review; I'll have to check it out. Anyone reading this may also be interested in: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1472928598/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1472928598&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=HC57F53WB3LNXUZ3">Galapagos: Preserving Darwin's legacy</a> - ISBN 978-1408108666. It is a collection of different research that has been done on the islands. I've only looked at and slugged through parts of a spanish version but i plan on getting a cersion</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1469914&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SKAwhGmph4CJklN2e0xgNOi4j1BwdloAeQqRRFbYHoc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Seth Finck (not verified)</span> on 05 Mar 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1469914">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1469915" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1457164868"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for the review; I'll have to check it out. Anyone reading this may also be interested in: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1472928598/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1472928598&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=grlasbl0a-20&amp;linkId=HC57F53WB3LNXUZ3">Galapagos: Preserving Darwin's legacy</a> - ISBN 978-1408108666. It is a collection of different research that has been done on the islands. I've only looked at and slugged through parts of a spanish version but i plan on getting a version in a language I'm fluent in at some point in the near future since it was a great collection. (Sorry for accidental double post)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1469915&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6Rqyu-_1jzKprN1_wYdm7GEHy-Pt0Q465cYn3w81NBQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Seth Finck (not verified)</span> on 05 Mar 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1469915">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2016/03/04/wildlife-of-the-galapagos-updated-field-guide-review%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 04 Mar 2016 12:49:58 +0000 gregladen 33862 at https://scienceblogs.com Golden Eagles and Free Coffee! https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2013/03/19/golden-eagles-and-free-coffee <span>Golden Eagles and Free Coffee!</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You’ve heard of the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691147787/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691147787&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds (The Crossley ID Guides)</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691147787" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />. It is a revolutionary new way to assemble a field guide, where each page has a drawing of what it would look like if suddenly outside your living room there was a full blown habitat for some species of bird, with individuals from that species flying or sitting all over the place in different positions, doing different things, and at different distances. These pages in the field guide almost give you the experience of having seen many of this partiuclar species of bird, like you were suddenly an experienced birder. In preparation for a birding trip, you can prepare by going over the birds you hope to see, and during or after the trip you can use this guide to check your ID’s. </p> <p>Well, now, there is also the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691157405/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691157405&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691157405" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />. This is the same thing but for Raptors. The book is coming out RIGHT NOW so Princeton has organized a major blogging tour, and right now, you’re on the tour! The other blog posts are as indicated <a href="http://blog.press.princeton.edu/the-raptor-blog-tour-schedule/">here, on this schedule</a>. I recommend visiting all the other entries. Some of them are giving away prizes, so especially check those out.</p> <p>As a matter of fact, we’re giving away a prize here, right now, on this blog post, and you may be able to win it. Details are below. But first, a word about ….</p> <h3 id="goldeneagles">… Golden Eagles …</h3> <p>Golden Eagles are a bit of a sore spot with me because they are rare and said to be hard to distinguish from immature Bald Eagles. This is not their fault. But when one claims to have seen a Golden Eagle the automatic reaction among most birders is to claim that you are wrong, that it was an immature Bald Eagle you had seen. This is especially true in Minnesota. If you look at bird books, they are sometimes not shown to be here at all, even as migrants, or otherwise, only rarely. </p> <p>Stan Tekiela’s <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1591930375/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1591930375&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Birds of Minnesota Field Guide, Second Edition</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1591930375" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> does not even list Golden Eagles. The <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0061120405/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0061120405&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds of North America</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0061120405" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows northern and central Minnesota as a migratory route, but the rest of the state is indicated as “rare.” <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1551053241/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1551053241&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Birds of Minnesota and Wisconsin</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1551053241" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> indicates them to be an uncommon migrant or winter visitor in parts of the region. The <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691151407/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0691151407&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Birds of North America and Greenland: (Princeton Illustrated Checklists)</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0691151407" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows them as occassional winter visitor in only a small area to the West of Minnesota. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1426208286/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1426208286&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America, Sixth Edition</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1426208286" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows them only rarely in Minnesota, but more in the eastern part of the state. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1552978478/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1552978478&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Hawks and Owls of the Great Lakes Region and Eastern North America</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1552978478" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows them as an occasional winter species in Minnesota and a very large area of the plains and the eastern US. </p> <p>The <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001I4BGQE/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B001I4BGQE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Kaufman Field Guide to Birds Of North America</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=B001I4BGQE" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows them totally absent in the state, but this book also has another interesting geographical observation. There is a huge area of eastern Canada with a dotted line around it indicating that they may or may not breed there. This is an interesting thing about Golden Eagles. When you look into it, you find that there is this large not very mountainous region in which this mountain bird seems to breed, migrate to and from, but is not observed within. Like they were hiding out there. The <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1551053691/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1551053691&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Birds Of The Great Plains</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1551053691" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows them rare in Minnesota and more common to the west than the east. </p> <p>Of course, one always wants to consult the bible in these matters. The <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0618966145/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0618966145&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America (Peterson Field Guides)</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0618966145" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> shows them totally absent in Minnesota, but also indicates the big mysterious region to the north where they may or may not breed. </p> <p>Now that we’ve established that there is no agreement whatsoever on the distribution of, timing of, or even existence of, the Golden Eagle in Minnesota, let me tell you about two of our sightings of the bird (there’s been a few but these two are particularly interesting). </p> <p>The firs sighting was about 10 years ago. Julia was about seven, and we were visiting the Minnesota Raptor Center in Falcon Heights. We were being given a tour of the cages, where various raptors were kept. These birds were all rescued from somewhere, generally with injuries. Some would be rehabilitated and released. Some would become ambassador birds, traveling around the area with experts from the Raptor Center for educational purposes. Some would simply remain in the cages forever. </p> <p>As the tour progressed, the tour guide would say a few things about each bird as we approached the cage, then we would look at the bird for a while, then move on to the next cage. At once point, she said, “And here is the Golden Eagle. There are no Golden Eagles in Minnesota, not at all. If you ever think you are seeing a Golden Eagle, I assure you that it is merely an immature Bald Eagle. There are no Golden Eagles in this state.”</p> <p>Then, as we stopped in front of the cage to look at the bird, Julia pointed to it and said, “There’s one!”</p> <p>“What?” the guid said.</p> <p>“There’s a Golden Eagle. It’s in Minnesota. So you’re wrong.”</p> <p>I was fully expecting to find, on further inquiry, that this particular bird had been found injured along the highway in some other state and brought here to the Minnesota Raptor Center for treatment. So, I asked, “Where is this bird from?”</p> <p>We were given a very precise location, along a road near a particular town. In Minnesota. In fact, within a one hour drive from where the bird was sitting in the cage. So, there you go.</p> <p>The second sighting was up at the cabin. It was early fall and we were sitting on the deck overlooking the lake, to the north. Although we were located a short distance outside the Chippewa National Forest, which is known to have the highest number and highest density of Bald Eagles in the US outside of Alaska, the tree line across the lake was in the forest proper, and in fact, this was an excellent place to see bald eagles. A nesting pair lived in sight just a few hundred yards to the left, and hunted in this bay. Sometimes other eagles came by, and the pair often had a young one. If you want to see a bald eagle from that spot, all you had to do is look. If the eagle was not visible that instance, all you had to do was listen and you’d hear either the eagles themselves or some other bird complaining about the eagles. Indeed, that is the main reason for the local loons to holler. If you hear the loon going loony just look up. There will be one or two bald eagles reeling at altitude over the loon, sharing the fishing grounds.</p> <p>Anyway, we were sitting there looking north when suddenly there appeared over the tree line to the north, across the lake, a bird that was clearly a very large eagle, and it was flapping its wings in powered flight going in a straight line right for us. We knew it was an eagle because of its shape and size. However, it was significantly larger looking than any of the bald eagles in the area. I should note that despite the large number and high density of eagles in Chippewa Forest, these Bald Eagles are smaller than the Alaskan kind. But this bird was whopping big. </p> <p>Also, it was flying funny. Not only was it not soaring as eagles tend to do, it was flapping its wings in what looked like an unusual pattern. And, it was not a bald eagle. As it got closer, we watched it with binoculars and could see the field markings very clearly. </p> <p>“That was a Golden Eagle, wasn’t it?” I said to Amanda. </p> <p>“I guess so,” she replied.</p> <p>“You could see a bit of white on the upper wings before it came over us.”</p> <p>“Yeah, I saw that. You could see white on its tail shinning through with the sun.”</p> <p>“It had a small head.”</p> <p>“And a smaller bill.”</p> <p>“I know, and that color was different than an immature Bald Eagle.”</p> <p>“When it stopped flapping for a while its wings almost looked like a vulture.” </p> <p>“I know. All the field markings seem to suggest a Golden Eagle, not an immature Bald Eagle.”</p> <p>“Yeah, and you know what,” Amanda said.</p> <p>“What?”</p> <p>“We know what an immature Bald Eagle looks like. That wasn’t one of them.”</p> <p>And now it’s your turn. The following illustration shows several raptors. Each is labeled with a letter. Some of these raptors are Golden Eagles, some are not.</p> <p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2013/03/EagleQuiz.jpg"><img src="/files/gregladen/files/2013/03/EagleQuiz.jpg" alt="EagleQuiz" width="640" height="843" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-16133" /></a></p> <p>Your job is to identify the Golden Eagles. Put a set of letters that represent only Golden Eagles in a comment. I will collect all the perfectly correct answers and send them to Price Waterhouse in a briefcase, where one of the correct answers will be randomly selected. </p> <p>If you use a proper email address when you sign in to comment, then I’ll be able to contact you if you are chosen. Otherwise I’ll just mark the correct and chosen comment here on this blog and you can check back later, and if you were the winner we’ll work out how to send you your prize, provided by Princeton University Press.</p> <p>The prize will be two pounds of <a href="http://www.birdsandbeans.com/">Birds and Beans Coffee</a>! It will be sent to you by the good people of Princeton. </p> <p>Also note that Princeton has a contest in which you can win a pair of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NK6XJ4/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000NK6XJ4&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Nikon 8220 Trailblazer 8x42 ATB Binoculars</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=B000NK6XJ4" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> and some autographed bird books. Details are <a href="http://blog.press.princeton.edu/win-a-crossley-id-guide-prize-pack/">HERE</a>. </p> <p>Happy Birding! </p> <p>__________________________________</p> <p>We'll pick the winner on April 1st.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Mon, 03/18/2013 - 19:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aves-birds" hreflang="en">Aves (birds)</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books-birds" hreflang="en">Books-Birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birds" hreflang="en">birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birdwatching" hreflang="en">birdwatching</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/golden-eagle" hreflang="en">golden eagle</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451193" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363686978"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I have seen Golden Eagles here in Saskatchewan, the problem I usually have isn't so much distinguishing them from Bald Eagles but from the big Buteos, especially Red-tailed Hawks and Swainson's Hawks. In the summer, there are many large raptors around, often flying up suddenly from roadside ditches when a car drives past.</p> <p>None of the big raptors I see are particularly fond of getting photographed.</p> <p>My guess for the Golden Eagle Identity Challenge: A,C,E,H,I</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451193&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qyMNudt43tTTNQYFJiZbtDg6sw3O9UREso6V9LAuip8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">TheBrummell (not verified)</span> on 19 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451193">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451194" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363697575"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>ACEHI</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451194&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mwqZKli2RAMH5Gb0lEqkk3vojT9scULVuHF7eDZUOY4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jerry Marmon (not verified)</span> on 19 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451194">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451195" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363701783"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Golden Eagles are rare in most of Minnesota, mostly from late fall through early spring. However there are several places to go where you can improve your chances of finding one (or more). Whitewater Wildlife Management Area (from Weaver to Elba, Winona Co.) is one good place. Houston County blufflands are also good. Several Golden Eagles have been fitted with satellite transmitters and are being tracked in these and other areas; check the National Eagle Center’s (Wabasha) website for more information. However, the best place is Hawk Ridge, Duluth, in late autumn. Hawk Ridge raptor counters (counting all raptors daily during daylight hours) totaled 211 Golden Eagles migrating past the ridge in autumn 2012; most (150) were in November. More than 10 were counted on several days last fall, with a peak of 57 (a record single-day total) on Nov. 12. Check the Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory’s website for details. To find one this spring, go out now as they are mostly gone from Minnesota by early April (they do not breed here).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451195&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="67H3oEvb4sEZYPWgwzp5oHzrrw-JlUXSFt-5EDZLNr0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bruce Fall (not verified)</span> on 19 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451195">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451196" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363702481"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>We saw a Golden Eagle in the Vancouver region one year. Have good pictures of it too, sitting in a naked poplar by the river near the Reifel Bird Sanctuary. People came from all over looking for it once it hit the hotline.</p> <p>About 4 years later a local bird expert was fielding questions on eagles at a Q&amp;A site. He said flatly, "you won't see Golden Eagles here. They're all immature Bald Eagles". Two days later he humbly retracted his comment and told people they could stop sending him emails and pictures of various Golden Eagles spotted in the lower mainland. </p> <p>By the way, don't drink coffee so no point in trying for that prize (except to show off :-). But I did attempt the nemesis bird one, and will enter for the Nikon one.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451196&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="iQZ_NKdGYIhlYCzrxBcraToPVQdH_3DAH7LrB7mWarQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dan J. Andrews (not verified)</span> on 19 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451196">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451197" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363722745"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A.,C.,H.,I.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451197&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FeIlvWVYUo2zs26bTN-rTmlWEuTEZnIQAebK3EKfo0c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris Bortz (not verified)</span> on 19 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451197">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451198" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363775826"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A,D,H,I</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451198&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5DC1-JlTfCL-cu0pE8dG4yzF-WWl4zHA6zlk_itPJfU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Swain (not verified)</span> on 20 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451198">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451199" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363785258"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A, C, E, H, I</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451199&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oSzmoNJUZeFi_d7QRcv0PwaS0CsHCGNAiwTX_l1UYkQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kurt Helf (not verified)</span> on 20 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451199">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451200" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363798304"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>ACEHI, but I misidentify birds all the time...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451200&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="EoXBr7mlrVjQcIChhXaZDLlwgV_m8Iyd746KVd71qp4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.pacinst.org/about_us/staff_board/gleick/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Peter Gleick (not verified)</a> on 20 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451200">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451201" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363832543"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A,C,H,I</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451201&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_LAeI5OpDQ88jEAC2qfW5lDZtotKHAZ_QSzACpg8zGE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Wade (not verified)</span> on 20 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451201">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451202" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1363961377"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A, C, H, I</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451202&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mgizJy8AqDgfxkzAoL4Lu6uCi0MViwpzP5Ads5Dk_t4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dawn (not verified)</span> on 22 Mar 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451202">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="31" id="comment-1451203" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1365236976"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>And the winner is .... </p> <p><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2013/04/06/crossley-coffee-contest/">http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2013/04/06/crossley-coffee-contest/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451203&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cMPEFPm-mD-I3sZc7luvy1Bu1-x4CPoI1jnYOnan6eM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a> on 06 Apr 2013 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451203">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/gregladen"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/gregladen" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/pictures/HumanEvolutionIcon350-120x120.jpg?itok=Tg7drSR8" width="100" height="100" alt="Profile picture for user gregladen" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1451204" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1408031423"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Pretty sure I saw a golden eagle sitting by my fire pit for quite awhile, then flew off. We have bald eagles and I know what the juvenile one look like. The one I saw was huge and I'm quite sure not a bald eagle.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1451204&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="U2Ckp63hRR5W7Zvmgp5SFlLplgfp_EU7URSMqHbsUkQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary mcwethy (not verified)</span> on 14 Aug 2014 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/5940/feed#comment-1451204">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2013/03/19/golden-eagles-and-free-coffee%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 18 Mar 2013 23:01:42 +0000 gregladen 32581 at https://scienceblogs.com Update Your Southern African Bird Guide Collection https://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2012/11/26/update-your-southern-african-bird-guide-collection <span>Update Your Southern African Bird Guide Collection</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="/files/gregladen/files/2012/11/Screen-Shot-2012-11-26-at-4.22.50-PM.png"><img src="/files/gregladen/files/2012/11/Screen-Shot-2012-11-26-at-4.22.50-PM.png" alt="" title="Screen Shot 2012-11-26 at 4.22.50 PM" width="318" height="479" class="alignright size-full wp-image-14492" /></a>When traveling and working in South Africa, I've always used Newman's guide to the birds of Southern Africa, and more recently, I found the Sasol guide to be helpful as well. (I discuss both briefly <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2009/04/29/bird-and-mammal-field-guides-f/">here</a>.) Now, I've got on my desk a copy of Princeton's <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/069115225X/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=069115225X&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Birds of Southern Africa: Fourth Edition</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=069115225X" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> by Ian Sinclair, Phil Hockey, Warwick Tarboton and Peter Ryan. You will know Sinclair from his South of the Saraha bird guide. </p> <p>All three books cover about the same species, as far as I can tell (just under 1,000) and have a similar range of illustration and information. They all have overview graphics that help narrow down the species, and other helpful information. </p> <p>There are things I like about the new Sinclair book that you might appreciate as well. First, the range maps are more detailed and updated, and probably the most accurate of any in a current field guide. Sasol has helpful inflight graphics arranged to group several similar species together, but Sinclair has the in flight images in the same place as the other images of each species. That might make Sasol better for the novice who needs to narrow down "hawk thingie" to a more fine detail, while Sinclair would be more useful to the pro. (Sorry, I'm not making the comparison to Newman right now because I can't lay my hands on my volume right now. Might have left it at Lynne's house. In Pretoria.)</p> <p>Obviously, you need more than one field guide, especially if you are traveling with more than one person. (Always bring different guides, not copies of the same, where possible!) and at the moment I'd suggest the new <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/069115225X/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=069115225X&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wwwgregladenc-20">Birds of Southern Africa: Fourth Edition</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwgregladenc-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=069115225X" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /> because it is the most up to date, along with the Sasol. </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/gregladen" lang="" about="/author/gregladen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gregladen</a></span> <span>Mon, 11/26/2012 - 10:23</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books-birds" hreflang="en">Books-Birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/birds" hreflang="en">birds</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/field-guide" hreflang="en">field guide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/south-africa-0" hreflang="en">south africa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/gregladen/2012/11/26/update-your-southern-african-bird-guide-collection%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 26 Nov 2012 15:23:49 +0000 gregladen 32297 at https://scienceblogs.com