Astronaut https://scienceblogs.com/ en Preventing Muscle Wasting in Space? https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2016/08/20/preventing-muscle-wasting-in-space <span>Preventing Muscle Wasting in Space?</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div style="width: 308px;"><a href="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Astronaut_Robert_Overmyer_on_treadmill.jpg"><img src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Astronaut_Robert_Overmyer_on_treadmill.jpg" alt="File:Astronaut Robert Overmyer on treadmill.jpg" width="298" height="499" data-file-width="179" data-file-height="300" /></a> Photo of Astronaut Robert Overmyer from NASA, via Wikimedia Commons. </div> <p>I recently went on a trip to visit the Endeavour space shuttle currently on display in Los Angeles. Seeing the shuttle up close brought back memories of watching the space shuttle launches on TV and the childhood dream of visiting other planets...a dream that also inspires Hollywood to continue to produce movies and TV shows about space exploration. Turns out, <em>The Martian</em> movie may soon become reality. In fact, NASA is working towards sending astronauts to Mars sometime in the 2030's. Aside from the technological challenges of sending a shuttle to Mars with enough fuel to come home, such a long journey comes with human challenges such as maintaining physical and mental health as well as how to deal with radiation exposure in deep space.</p> <p>In a study conducted in 2010 at Marquette University, researchers predicted that muscle loss alone would be a pretty big deal as the astronauts could lose more than 40% of their strength, even if they exercised regularly. Their results were published in <em>The</em> <em>Journal of Physiology. </em>This means by the time they arrived at Mars, they would have a hard time simply moving around. Even more worrisome is the long trip home, after which they may experience difficulty navigating their spacecraft. This is why astronauts in space try to exercise on a regular basis. The International Space Station, for example, has stationary bicycles, treadmills and equipment for weight training exercises.</p> <p>I was thinking of the issue of muscle wasting when I came across an article published by researchers at Yamaguchi University in Japan who were interested in whether a dietary antioxidant could help reverse muscle loss that was caused by immobilization. Their results were published this month in <em>Physiological Reports. </em>In this study, the team examined a carotenoid pigment called astaxanthin which has known antioxidant properties. They fed astaxanthin or a placebo to rats for 24 days. Fourteen days into the diet, they immobilized one leg of the animals in a plaster cast. Remarkably, rats fed astaxanthin developed less muscle wasting than those fed a placebo.  Their findings also showed that the carotenoid prevented oxidative stress. Aside from obvious applications in treating people with broken bones, I wonder if astaxanthin might help astronauts?</p> <p>You can see a prototype of a plane that just might fly on Mars<a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/armstrong/features/mars_airplane.html"> here</a>.</p> <p><strong>Sources:</strong></p> <p>Space.com</p> <p>Shibaguchi T, Yamaguchi Y, Miyaji N, Yoshihara T, Naito H, Goto K, Ohmori D, Yoshioka T, Sugiura T.  Astaxanthin intake attenuates muscle atrophy caused by immobilization in rats. <em>Physiological Reports. </em>4(15). August 2016. <span id="header-section-doi" class="article-header__meta-info-label">DOI: </span><span class="article-header__meta-info-data">10.14814/phy2.12885</span></p> <div class="journal-header__link">Fitts RH, Trappe SW, Costill DL, Gallagher PM, Creer AC, Colloton PA, Peters JR, Romatowski JG, Bain JL, Riley DA. Prolonged space flight-induced alterations in the structure and function of human skeletal muscle fibres. <em>The Journal of Physiology. </em>588(18):  3567–3592, 2010.</div> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Sat, 08/20/2016 - 12:55</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astaxanthin" hreflang="en">astaxanthin</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/carotenoid" hreflang="en">carotenoid</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mars" hreflang="en">Mars</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/muscle-atrophy" hreflang="en">muscle atrophy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/muscle-wasting" hreflang="en">muscle wasting</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/plaster-cast" hreflang="en">plaster cast</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-0" hreflang="en">space</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2510227" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1471775272"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Given the effects of zero gravity as discussed here: <a href="http://www.space.com/23017-weightlessness.html">http://www.space.com/23017-weightlessness.html</a><br /> it seems at a minimum two spacecraft tethered together to make artificial gravity will be required for long interplanetary voyages. Of couse we may find more damaging changes, which would lead us to using our silicon relatives for exploration. (Since in the next 20 years if you believe Kurzweil they will be as smart as carbon based people.) (Also take a lot less life support, just basically electricity and cooling)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2510227&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="R5ZpwCK0rmLMouPn-Pt4svG25bzpVhbVgeccps91Zb0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lyle (not verified)</span> on 21 Aug 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2510227">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2016/08/20/preventing-muscle-wasting-in-space%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Sat, 20 Aug 2016 16:55:25 +0000 dr. dolittle 150419 at https://scienceblogs.com Bring Inspiring STEM Presentations into the Classroom! https://scienceblogs.com/usasciencefestival/2014/10/03/bring-inspiring-stem-presentations-into-the-classroom <span>Bring Inspiring STEM Presentations into the Classroom!</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Teachers- the USASEF Team is thrilled to announce the launch of our <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations.html" target="_blank">video resource library </a>featuring presentations from our <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations.html" target="_blank">2014 X-STEM Symposium</a>! <span style="color: #363636;">The 2014 X-STEM Extreme STEM Symposium- presented by <a href="http://www.northropgrumman.com/CorporateResponsibility/CorporateCitizenship/Philanthropy/Pages/Foundation.aspx?utm_source=PrintAd&amp;utm_medium=Redirect&amp;utm_campaign=Foundation_Redirect" target="_blank">Northrop Grumman Foundation</a> and <a href="https://www.medimmune.com/" target="_blank">MedImmune</a>- featured interactive presentations and workshops by an exclusive group of visionaries who aimed to empower and inspire elementary through high school students about careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Now, you can bring these STEM Professionals into your classroom with our FREE  library of 15-20 minute videos covering a wide array of subject areas including space exploration, storm chasing, oceanography, the science of social networks, the physics of superheroes, mathematical puzzles and much, much more! </span></p> <p><a href="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2014/10/USASEF_Xstem_VideoLaunchPost_v2.png"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-2609" src="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2014/10/USASEF_Xstem_VideoLaunchPost_v2.png" alt="USASEF_Xstem_VideoLaunchPost_v2" width="401" height="422" /></a></p> <p>Presenters included world-renowned Oceanographers <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/31-dr-david-gallo.html" target="_blank">Dr. David Gallo</a> and <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/21-dr-sylvia-earle.html" target="_blank">Dr. Sylvia Earle</a>, Director of the NIH <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/20-dr-franics-collins.html" target="_blank">Dr. Francis Collins</a>, former NASA Astronauts <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/22-dr-bernard-harris.html" target="_blank">Dr. Bernard Harris</a>, <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/27-dr-kathryn-thornton.html" target="_blank">Dr. Kathryn Thornton</a>, teenage phenom  <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/36-jack-andraka.html" target="_blank">Jack Andraka</a>, <em>National Geographic's</em> <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations/item/28-melina-bellows.html" target="_blank">Melina Bellows</a> and much more! These videos are perfect addition to your STEM lesson plan! <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium/x-stem-video-presentations.html" target="_blank">Click here </a>to access our growing library of videos and be sure to follow us on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/USA-Science-Engineering-Festival/133949023335104" target="_blank">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/USAScienceFest" target="_blank">Twitter</a> to be notified when new videos are added.</p> <p>And stay tuned for more information on our <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/x-stem-extreme-stem-symposium.html" target="_blank">2015 &amp; 2016 X-STEM Symposium </a>open to students K-12!</p> <p> </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/carlyo" lang="" about="/author/carlyo" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">carlyo</a></span> <span>Fri, 10/03/2014 - 11:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/usa-science-engineering-festival" hreflang="en">USA Science &amp; Engineering Festival</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/x-stem" hreflang="en">X-STEM</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/bernard-harris" hreflang="en">Bernard Harris</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cancer-detection" hreflang="en">Cancer Detection</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/david-gallo" hreflang="en">David Gallo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/dr-sylvia-earle" hreflang="en">Dr. Sylvia Earle</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/francis-collins" hreflang="en">Francis Collins</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/jack-andraka" hreflang="en">Jack Andraka</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/melina-bellows" hreflang="en">Melina Bellows</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa-astronaut" hreflang="en">NASA astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/national-geographic" hreflang="en">National Geographic</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nih" hreflang="en">NIH</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nih-director" hreflang="en">NIH Director</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/oceanography" hreflang="en">Oceanography</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pancreatic-cancer-detection" hreflang="en">Pancreatic Cancer Detection</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem" hreflang="en">STEM</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem-education" hreflang="en">STEM Education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem-education-presentations" hreflang="en">STEM Education Presentations</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/teen-phenom" hreflang="en">Teen Phenom</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/teenage-prodigy" hreflang="en">Teenage Prodigy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/usasef" hreflang="en">USASEF</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/x-stem-sympoisum" hreflang="en">X-STEM Sympoisum</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/usasciencefestival/2014/10/03/bring-inspiring-stem-presentations-into-the-classroom%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 03 Oct 2014 15:40:44 +0000 carlyo 70637 at https://scienceblogs.com Celebrating African American History Month with Role Models in Science & Engineering Achievement: Ed Dwight, Jr. https://scienceblogs.com/usasciencefestival/2014/02/04/celebrating-african-american-history-month-with-role-models-in-science-engineering-achievement-ed-dwight-jr <span>Celebrating African American History Month with Role Models in Science &amp; Engineering Achievement: Ed Dwight, Jr. </span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Ed Dwight, Jr. – Test Pilot, Aerospace Engineer and America's First Black Astronaut Candidat</strong>e</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2014/02/Ed-Dwight-2.jpg"><img class=" wp-image-2142 aligncenter" alt="Ed Dwight 2" src="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2014/02/Ed-Dwight-2.jpg" width="550" height="526" /></a></p> <p><em>Chosen in 1962 by President Kennedy as America's first black astronaut candidate; due to racism in the astronaut program, he resigned; now is a world-class sculptor, specializing in sculptures depicting aspects of Black History</em></p> <p>Ed Dwight, Jr. was a 28-year-old Air Force captain at Travis Air Force Base in California when he got a letter from President Kennedy in 1961 urging him to apply to test-pilot school as a prelude to becoming America's first black astronaut. The son of a Negro League baseball player, Ed had been a B-57 pilot for two years, had flown more than 2,000 hours in high-performance fighter jets and had an aeronautical engineering degree from Arizona State.</p> <p>To put it mildly, flying was in his blood, and the prospect of becoming the first African American in space was a dream come true – but this dream would be cut short.</p> <p>Born on the outskirts of Kansas City, Kansas in 1933, Ed was the son of Ed Dwight, Sr. who played second base for the Kansas City Monarchs in baseball's Negro League. Child rearing fell primarily on Ed's Catholic mother, Georgia Baker Dwight, who convinced her son that he could accomplish almost anything. Ed grew up as an avid reader and a talented artist who was mechanically gifted and enjoyed working with his hands.</p> <p><strong>Why He's Important:</strong> In an era of severe discrimination in the U.S. military (especially in aviation and aerospace pursuits), Ed Dwight made history by becoming the first black to be selected for astronaut training. And although he never did fly in space (Guion Bluford in 1983 would become the first black astronaut to do this), Ed's accomplishments – including his perseverance and bravery against racism in the early days of the space program -- make him a hero.</p> <p>These accomplishments are why he was recently honored by the National Society of Black Engineers' (NSBE) Space Systems Special Interest Group at its Celestial Torch Awards Banquet in Los Angeles. (The Celestial Torch Awards is the only recognition program created specifically to recognize African American excellence in aerospace technical disciplines).</p> <p>Ed joined the United States Air Force in 1953, pursuing his dream of flying jet aircraft. He became a USAF test pilot, and in 1961 earned a degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Arizona State University. At the suggestion of the National Urban League's Whitney M. Young, Jr., the Kennedy administration chose Captain Ed Dwight as the first Negro astronaut trainee in 1962. Catapulted to instant fame, he was featured on the cover of Ebony, Jet, Sepia and in news magazines around the world.</p> <p>Dwight passed the first phase of experimental test-pilot training in April 1963. He was in the space-pilot phase when disaster struck: JFK was assassinated and Dwight was rejected for further NASA training a few months later, in spite of calls to NASA from Robert Kennedy.</p> <p>His race may have provided an entrée via President Kennedy's help, but Dwight feels it also worked against him, fueling racial overtones from others in the astronaut program. "The Air Force and NASA felt someone was trying to cram a [black man] down their throats," Ed said later. In an autobiography, Col. Chuck Yeager (Ed's supervisor in the program) essentially confirms Dwight's view. He writes that, as head of the aerospace pilot program in which Dwight was training, "I was caught in a buzz saw of controversy. The White House, Congress and civil rights groups came at me with meat cleavers.... [I was told] 'Get that colored guy in.'</p> <p>Soon after Kennedy's death, Ed was sent to Germany to work as a liaison for a non-existent German test pilot school. He was later court marshaled after refusing to fly his plane when he had heard that it was made unsafe – purposely.</p> <p>Due to this threatening atmosphere, he resigned in 1966, never having gone into space. Ed chronicles those days in his 2009 autobiography, Soaring On The Wings Of A Dream: The Untold Story of America's First Black Astronaut Candidate.</p> <p><strong>Later Achievements:</strong> After leaving the military with an honorable discharge, Ed took a job at the IBM Corporation as a Marketing Representative &amp; Systems Engineer. After leaving IBM, he became an aviation consultant in Dallas, TX and later started a restaurant chain. He then focused his attention on Dwight Development Associates, Inc., a real estate land development and construction company.</p> <p>In 1977, he earned his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Denver, which greatly enhanced his vision for his current career: that of a world-class sculptor. Ed has sculpted great works depicting aspects of African American history, including the Black Frontier in the American West; International Monuments to the Underground Railroad in Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario; a Dr. Martin Luther King Memorial in Denver's City Park; a bust of George Washington Williams in the Ohio State Capitol in Columbus, Ohio; the Black Patriots Memorial on the mall in Washington, D.C.; the South Carolina Black History Memorial in Columbia, South Carolina; and the Alex Haley-Kunta Kinte Memorial in Annapolis, Maryland.</p> <p>His Quincy Jones Sculpture Park in Chicago brings his total major works to 35, some of which are on permanent display at the Smithsonian Institute. In addition, his "Jazz: An American Art Form" collection is renowned and includes over 70 bronzed sculptures such as Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Charlie Parker and Ella Fitzgerald</p> <p> </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/carlyo" lang="" about="/author/carlyo" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">carlyo</a></span> <span>Tue, 02/04/2014 - 16:30</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/role-models-science-engineering" hreflang="en">Role Models in Science &amp; Engineering</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/african-american-astronaut" hreflang="en">African American Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/african-american-stem-role-model" hreflang="en">African American STEM Role Model</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut-history" hreflang="en">Astronaut History</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/black-history-month" hreflang="en">Black History Month</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ed-dwight-jr" hreflang="en">Ed Dwight Jr.</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem-education" hreflang="en">STEM Education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem-role-model" hreflang="en">STEM Role Model</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/usa-science-engineering-festival" hreflang="en">USA Science &amp; Engineering Festival</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/usasciencefestival/2014/02/04/celebrating-african-american-history-month-with-role-models-in-science-engineering-achievement-ed-dwight-jr%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Tue, 04 Feb 2014 21:30:49 +0000 carlyo 70568 at https://scienceblogs.com Celebrating Role Models in Science & Engineering Achievement: Peggy Whitson! https://scienceblogs.com/usasciencefestival/2013/07/24/celebrating-role-models-in-science-engineering-achievement-peggy-whitson <span>Celebrating Role Models in Science &amp; Engineering Achievement: Peggy Whitson! </span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><b>Peggy Whitson -- NASA Astronaut and Biochemist</b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2013/07/Peggy-Whitson-2.jpg"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-1724" alt="Peggy Whitson 2" src="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2013/07/Peggy-Whitson-2.jpg" width="330" height="316" /></a></p> <p>We continue to recognize <strong>50 Years of Women in Space</strong> with STEM Role Model Peggy Whitson. Peggy Whitson grew up on a farm in Iowa with big dreams of becoming a NASA Astronaut. She was the first female commander of the International Space Station and a veteran of six space walks. She set records among American Astronauts for spending the most time in space.</p> <p>Her achievements as a veteran space explorer are well known among the distinguished ranks of NASA astronauts, but learn of her harrowing and life-threatening journey back to Earth after her space mission in 2008 by clicking <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/2014-role-models-in-science-engineering/1127-peggy-whitson.html" target="_blank">here</a>!</p> <p>Read more of her fascinating biography <a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/2014-role-models-in-science-engineering/1127-peggy-whitson.html" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p><strong>Learn more about the USA Science &amp; Engineering Festival <a href="http://usasciencefestival.org/" target="_blank">here</a>. Save the dates for April 26-27, 2014 for the Festival Finale Expo in Washington, D.C. </strong></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/carlyo" lang="" about="/author/carlyo" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">carlyo</a></span> <span>Wed, 07/24/2013 - 12:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/role-models-science-engineering" hreflang="en">Role Models in Science &amp; Engineering</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/peggy-whitson" hreflang="en">Peggy Whitson</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/role-models" hreflang="en">Role Models</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem" hreflang="en">STEM</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/usa-science-engineering-festival" hreflang="en">USA Science &amp; Engineering Festival</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/women-space" hreflang="en">Women in Space</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/usasciencefestival/2013/07/24/celebrating-role-models-in-science-engineering-achievement-peggy-whitson%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 24 Jul 2013 16:45:05 +0000 carlyo 70511 at https://scienceblogs.com Celebrating Role Models in Science & Engineering Achievement: Kalpana Chawla! https://scienceblogs.com/usasciencefestival/2013/06/26/celebrating-role-models-in-science-engineering-achievement-kalpana-chawla <span>Celebrating Role Models in Science &amp; Engineering Achievement: Kalpana Chawla!</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong><strong>Kalpana Chawla -- Aerospace Engineer, NASA Astronaut</strong></strong></p> <p><a href="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2013/06/Kalpana-Chawla-2.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-1669" alt="Kalpana Chawla 2" src="/files/usasciencefestival/files/2013/06/Kalpana-Chawla-2.jpg" width="550" height="526" /></a></p> <p>Born in the small town of Karnal, India, she became hooked on flight when she took her first plane ride in a small craft through the local flying club. Kalpana Chawla would later become a certified FAA flight instructor, a talented aerospace engineer, and a NASA astronaut. She was the first Indian American Astronaut and the first Indian-born woman in space. Her promising future ended in 2003 when she died with 6 fellow astronauts aboard the shuttle Columbia over Texas.</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><strong><a href="http://www.usasciencefestival.org/schoolprograms/2014-role-models-in-science-engineering/1104-kalpana-chawla.html" target="_blank">Read more</a></strong> to discover how her memory and love of spaceflight are being kept alive!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/carlyo" lang="" about="/author/carlyo" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">carlyo</a></span> <span>Wed, 06/26/2013 - 12:59</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/role-models-science-engineering" hreflang="en">Role Models in Science &amp; Engineering</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/columbia" hreflang="en">Columbia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kalpana-chawla" hreflang="en">Kalpana Chawla</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-shuttle-columbia" hreflang="en">Space Shuttle Columbia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stem" hreflang="en">STEM</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/usasciencefestival/2013/06/26/celebrating-role-models-in-science-engineering-achievement-kalpana-chawla%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 26 Jun 2013 16:59:01 +0000 carlyo 70506 at https://scienceblogs.com Comparative Physiologist, Dr. Jessica Meir, selected as a 2013 NASA Astronaut Candidate! https://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2013/06/20/comparative-physiologist-dr-jessica-meir-selected-as-a-2013-nasa-astronaut-candidate <span>Comparative Physiologist, Dr. Jessica Meir, selected as a 2013 NASA Astronaut Candidate!</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am thrilled that Comparative Physiologist Dr. Jessica Meir, who was featured in a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/lifelines/2013/04/23/experimental-biology-tuesday/">prior post</a>, has been chosen as a 2013 Astronaut Candidate by NASA! I really enjoyed learning more about her life story in this video and I am looking forward to hearing more about her accomplishments as an Astronaut in the years to come.</p> <p>Congratulations Dr. Meir and the rest of the 2013 Astronaut Candidates!</p> <p>Dr. Meir's introduction as a candidate is at 10:30. Listen to her speak about being chosen at 28:50.</p> <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/WICeFHvFaaE" height="315" width="560" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0"></iframe><p> Click on <a href="http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/06/18/harvard-biologist-chosen-one-new-nasa-astronauts/7xUeLewm0tNsofkyQ6atSM/story.html">this link</a> for an article about Dr. Meir published yesterday in the Boston Globe.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/dr-dolittle" lang="" about="/author/dr-dolittle" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dr. dolittle</a></span> <span>Thu, 06/20/2013 - 08:21</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/life-science-0" hreflang="en">Life Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/candidate" hreflang="en">Candidate</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/meir" hreflang="en">Meir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> </div> </div> <section> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/lifelines/2013/06/20/comparative-physiologist-dr-jessica-meir-selected-as-a-2013-nasa-astronaut-candidate%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 20 Jun 2013 12:21:09 +0000 dr. dolittle 150093 at https://scienceblogs.com The Legacy of Sally Ride https://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/07/23/the-legacy-of-sally-ride <span>The Legacy of Sally Ride</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>"Each generation goes further than the generation preceding it because it stands on the shoulders of that generation. You will have opportunities beyond anything we've ever known." -<em>Ronald Reagan</em></p></blockquote> <p>Earlier today, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sally_Ride">Sally Ride</a>, the first American woman ever to fly in outer space, passed away at the age of 61 from pancreatic cancer. To many different people, her life, her achievements, and her death means <a href="http://trap.it/#!traps/id/db76f8bd-f1a0-4d22-bc19-e451a90df4d6">a great diversity of things</a>. To anyone with a love of outer space, human exploration, and achieving your dreams, her story will likely resonate with you, too. I'd like to share with you what are, for me, the <a href="https://www.regencystamps.com/LotDetail.aspx?lotid=263911">highlights of her career</a> as well as what her legacy means to me.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/855579a_lg.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18721" title="855579a_lg" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/855579a_lg-600x738.jpg" alt="Lithograph of Sally Ride, signed" width="600" height="738" /></a> <p>Sally Ride signed lithograph, from the early 1980s.</p> </div> <p>In 1978, the Space Shuttle program was poised to start up, and that meant NASA was going to be putting out their first call for new astronauts since the Apollo program. There had been seven prior NASA Astronaut groups at that point, and every single astronaut selected in all seven groups was white, male, and from either the Air Force, Navy, or the Marines, with a few civilian scientists thrown in. But all that changed with <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_Astronaut_Group_8">Astronaut Group 8</a>, code named <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking_New_Guy">TFNG</a>.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/NASA_Astronaut_Group_8.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18706" title="NASA_Astronaut_Group_8" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/NASA_Astronaut_Group_8-600x193.jpg" alt="Astronaut Group 8" width="600" height="193" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA, of the "Thirty-Five New Guys".</p> </div> <p>Shown above in their official <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NASA_Astronaut_Group_8.jpg">NASA group photo</a>, the group of thirty-five including the first Army astronaut, the first African-American astronauts, the first Asian-American astronaut, the first Jewish-American astronaut in space, and, of course, the first women astronauts, too. (Although if history had played out differently, <a href="http://www.uidahoblogs.com/science/?p=399">that might have happened sooner</a>.)</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/Group-8-women.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18712" title="Group 8 women" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/Group-8-women-600x450.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="450" /></a> <p>Astronauts (from L-R) Lucid, Seddon, Sullivan, Resnik, Fisher, Ride. Image credit: NASA.</p> </div> <p>This represented a big change from the first seven astronaut groups, and all 35 in the group wound up successfully passing training and flying into space aboard the US space shuttles. The six women, in particular, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2010/04/18/weekend-diversion-the-first-am/">all achieved remarkable things</a>, with Sally Ride becoming the first American woman to reach outer space on June 18, 1983, aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/sally-ride.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18720" title="sally-ride" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/sally-ride-600x782.jpg" alt="Newsweek 1983 cover" width="600" height="782" /></a> <p>Image credit: Newsweek magazine.</p> </div> <p>Sally Ride also became the first woman to use the shuttle’s robotic arm, using it to retrieve a satellite, and returned to space a second time, also aboard Challenger. She later headed the Presidential Commission’s subcommittee of Operations investigating the Challenger disaster. She is also the founder of NASA’s office of exploration.</p> <p>After leaving NASA in the late 1980s, she became a Professor of Physics at UCSD, and in 2001 founded <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sally_Ride_Science">Sally Ride Science</a>, an organization aimed at supporting young girls interested in math and science. She is the author or co-author of five books on space, all geared towards encouraging children’s interest in space and science.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/IMG_0072.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18723" title="IMG_0072" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/IMG_0072-600x450.jpg" alt="Sally Ride with three young women engineers" width="600" height="450" /></a> <p>Image credit: Society of Women Engineers -- Pikes Peak Section.</p> </div> <p>It's a life full of remarkable accomplishments, and although she'll likely <a href="http://trap.it/#!traps/id/db76f8bd-f1a0-4d22-bc19-e451a90df4d6">best be remembered for being the first American woman in space</a>, her legacy is far more important than that.</p> <p>The same year that Sally Ride and the other Group 8 Astronauts were selected was the same year I was born into this world. I grew up in a world where yes, American men had walked on the Moon, but Americans of different ethnicities, religions and genders had all been to space. In 1986, they wheeled televisions into our classrooms to watch the launch of the Challenger, where <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christa_McAuliffe">Christa McAuliffe</a> was set to become the first schoolteacher in space.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/Challenger_flight_51-l_crew.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18724" title="Challenger_flight_51-l_crew" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/Challenger_flight_51-l_crew-600x480.jpg" alt="The crew of Challenger flight 51-L" width="600" height="480" /></a> <p>The crew of Challenger Flight 51-L. Image credit: NASA.</p> </div> <p>Instead, of course, as a roomful of 7-and-8-year-olds, we all <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2011/01/28/25-years-after-challenger/">watched a tragedy unfold before our eyes</a> as the shuttle exploded, resulting in the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle_Challenger_disaster">deaths of all seven crew members</a>. Afterwards, I remember learning about the lives of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Challenger_flight_51-l_crew.jpg">STS-51-L crew</a>, how four of the astronauts killed were from Ride's Astronaut group 8, how Judy Resnick loved doing acrobatics in space and how Ronald McNair loved the saxophone.</p> <p>But what struck me then -- and what still strikes me today -- is that these people all <strong>wanted to be astronauts</strong>, and they were all capable of being astronauts, and they all worked hard to get there, and they all made it. And if I wanted to, <em>so could I</em>.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/AP840107010.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18725" title="Sally Ride on Sesame Street, 1984" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/AP840107010-600x426.jpg" alt="Sally Ride on Sesame Street, 1984" width="600" height="426" /></a> <p>Image credit: Dave Pickoff / Associated Press.</p> </div> <p>Many in this world are going to remember Sally Ride as the first American woman in space, and that's fine. Many will remember her efforts in education, in working to improve girls and women in science, and -- as was revealed earlier today -- some will remember her <a href="http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/07/23/1113014/-DOMA-Sally-Ride-s-Partner-of-27-Years-Denied-Federal-Benefits-Is-Romney-Smiling">for her sexual orientation</a>.</p> <p>But the beauty of growing up in a world where Sally Ride happened, where I never knew of a world where there were no women astronauts, no black astronauts, no foreign-born astronauts, no asian or asian-american astronauts, is this: if you're good enough to do it, no matter how different you are from everyone else who's ever done it, <strong>you can</strong>. And that's true whether you want to be an astronaut or <em>anything else in the world</em>.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/Obama-Ride.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18726" title="Obama Ride" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/Obama-Ride-600x336.jpg" alt="Obama and Sally Ride, 2010" width="600" height="336" /></a> <p>Image credit: Susan Walsh / AP.</p> </div> <p>Sure, there will be people along the way who tell you you can't, who won't support you, and who may even work against you. Don't let them discourage you, and don't stop doing what you love. The facts about who you are -- regardless of your gender, your race, your religion, or your sexual orientation -- have no bearing on the person you are, what you can be, or all the things you can (and will) accomplish. Sally Ride wasn't the first US woman to become an astronaut to me, she was an astronaut, a teacher, a scientist, a writer, and a role model <em>who happened to be a woman</em>.</p> <p>Sally Ride didn't teach me that women can be anything they want to, just like men can; Sally Ride helped me to grow up in a world where the notion that you <em>couldn't</em> be anything you wanted because of who you intrinsically are <strong>is absurd</strong>.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/19093209_BG1.jpeg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-18727" title="19093209_BG1" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/07/19093209_BG1-600x338.jpg" alt="Sally Ride speaking at the San Diego Aerospace Museum" width="600" height="338" /></a> <p>Image credit: Sandy Huffaker / Getty Images.</p> </div> <p>You gave us the greatest gift you possibly could: you lived your life true to yourself, and were the best version of yourself you could possibly be. May that be something they can say about us all at the end of our days. <a href="http://trap.it/#!traps/id/db76f8bd-f1a0-4d22-bc19-e451a90df4d6">Rest in Peace, Sally Ride</a>.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/startswithabang" lang="" about="/startswithabang" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">esiegel</a></span> <span>Mon, 07/23/2012 - 16:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronomy-0" hreflang="en">Astronomy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/education" hreflang="en">education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/right-and-wrong" hreflang="en">right and wrong</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/spaceflight" hreflang="en">spaceflight</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/challenger" hreflang="en">challenger</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/equality" hreflang="en">equality</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/human" hreflang="en">Human</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/legacy" hreflang="en">Legacy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pancreatic-cancer" hreflang="en">pancreatic cancer</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sally-ride" hreflang="en">Sally Ride</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-0" hreflang="en">space</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-exploration" hreflang="en">space exploration</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-shuttle" hreflang="en">Space Shuttle</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/education" hreflang="en">education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/right-and-wrong" hreflang="en">right and wrong</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/spaceflight" hreflang="en">spaceflight</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Categories</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/channel/social-sciences" hreflang="en">Social Sciences</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511485" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343083323"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for this. I'm way older than you, and... it was different. God bless these pioneers.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511485&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Vlnm9lgO7MDOixglFzXrJdjTaqZgpm7rNcO0s4I0JtA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Luisa (not verified)</span> on 23 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511485">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511486" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343108756"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This was so eloquently and beautifully written Ethan. Nearly brought tears to my eyes! Sally really was an inspiration.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511486&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GCdyP1t4JfSZLs6rDFwIpIg4L0ur3F7GLqHHvotg-Vo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chelsea (not verified)</span> on 24 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511486">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511487" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343122674"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>We're the same age, had the same experiences watching Challenger, seeing the iconic images of those first STS astronauts. . . can't say any more without once again crying over the loss of Dr. Ride. This is a wonderful piece. Thank you. :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511487&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="d5SGhi7yNOG6BWDr7RCoLNntHkeWao3rw4TvtswE8MM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kristin (not verified)</span> on 24 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511487">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511488" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343126180"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ethan, xkcd has a piece on zombie marie curie that reads like your ending note here.</p> <p>Boils down to: don't try to be the next Marie Curie, be the first you.</p> <p>And you know, for neither woman can I think of what other woman either wanted to be the next of.</p> <p>Can you?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511488&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SU6GrC29ap6BSXhlmLo43M44tz-Y3ubdK6p2Q7Nyncs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Wow (not verified)</span> on 24 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511488">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511489" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343142190"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Beautiful article, Ethan. </p> <p>I wish I had words to explain my feelings about reading this story.</p> <p>But what I can do is follow the bold spirit of people like Sally Ride, remembering me the only one, who really matters, between me and my goals is.... myself.</p> <p>Thank you, for remember me that.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511489&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4pMSVLzGWyQC9fXqcwJ2ODDMl4d3l8fJlLH2YPjo4cM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ChicoPinto (not verified)</span> on 24 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511489">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511490" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343158221"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thank you, that was an incredibly moving bit of writing.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511490&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="k41rCtpvT8O6jZ-QevoUH5WryG4xQLW6b3gqrV-gnYA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Vince Whirlwind (not verified)</span> on 24 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511490">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511491" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343193088"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A 'Mustang Sally' dedication to the aforementioned Sally Ride (ride, Sally ride). Couldn't hear that song without thinking about her after she went up. </p> <p>See PZ Myer's blog at pharyngula about the Mercury 13 sex discrimination at NASA.<br /><a href="http://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula">http://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511491&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WKUP0NpvHVcJ-LbuiHe8qSLKOMe5uCv7zQ_CTjq7jhg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Greg23 (not verified)</span> on 25 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511491">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511492" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343219684"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Same here. Surprising 'Ride, Sally Ride' wasn't the standard byline all over the web. A modern heroine.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511492&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lh8cDoR2pfT7FT5BO6SLFPaqZGXrwXh7JCD_cFHhc9I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mark McAndrew (not verified)</span> on 25 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511492">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511493" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343226748"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm the third or fourth me. :(</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511493&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zQHIudSJOrm-tGdknjpmy-AxAHz5CjolURUlZFI7rMc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">CB (not verified)</span> on 25 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511493">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511494" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343284965"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for this. Very moving and appropriate.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511494&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="bSEz2eLK5zSBO3ZqSkke2MPcmtKag3OV5AtKlYkuwbU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Terry (not verified)</span> on 26 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511494">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511495" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343303472"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You are a good man Ethan. Keep writing!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511495&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OtD_0W2qpNT2mwaNcD3Fnb2CvH3BuAKt7MFHCa28Igk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Tihomir (not verified)</span> on 26 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511495">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511496" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1343310408"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"Sally Ride didn’t teach me that women can be anything they want to, just like men can; Sally Ride helped me to grow up in a world where the notion that you couldn’t be anything you wanted because of who you intrinsically are is absurd."</p> <p>Agree completely! I never realized that it was weird for a woman to be in science until I got accepted to Purdue University for physics, and my acceptance came with a bunch of flyers for the Women in Science Programs. Only then did I realize that I would be a minority!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511496&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WJ7HgJcqqI66rQuMfv-bbO9NmYOmMG6jeN6TnAhIHuI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Desiree&#039; (not verified)</span> on 26 Jul 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511496">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1511497" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1347016478"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks for posting this .. and everything else you do..</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1511497&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FpKLkvwySh3oxdZ_Oy8nEIRBlmR3iy68cTm-k0dla28"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kevin Dowd (not verified)</span> on 07 Sep 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1511497">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/startswithabang/2012/07/23/the-legacy-of-sally-ride%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 23 Jul 2012 20:05:31 +0000 esiegel 35456 at https://scienceblogs.com Incredible Star Trails, from Earth and Beyond https://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond <span>Incredible Star Trails, from Earth and Beyond</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><blockquote><p>"Building one space station for everyone was and is insane: we should have built a dozen." -<em>Larry Niven</em></p></blockquote> <p>Here on the solid ground of the Earth, the Sun and Moon rise and set on a daily basis. During the hours where the Sun is invisible, blocked by the solid Earth, the stars twirl overhead in the great canopy of the night sky.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/star_trails_1/" rel="attachment wp-att-17167"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17167" title="star_trails_1" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/star_trails_1-600x345.jpg" alt="Star trail" width="600" height="345" /></a> <p>Image credit: Chris Luckhardt at flickr.</p> </div> <p>In the northern hemisphere, they appear to rotate around the North Star, while in the southern hemisphere, the stars appear to rotate about the South Celestial Pole. The longer you observe -- or for photography, the longer you leave your camera's shutter open -- the longer and more spectacular are the paths that the stars trace out.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/201205-perth-observatory-southern-startrails/" rel="attachment wp-att-17168"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17168" title="201205-Perth-Observatory-Southern-Startrails" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/201205-Perth-Observatory-Southern-Startrails-600x408.jpg" alt="Southern Star Trails" width="600" height="408" /></a> <p>Image credit: Roger Groom at <a href="http://www.AstroPhotography.com.au">www.AstroPhotography.com.au</a>.</p> </div> <p>This, of course, is because the Earth rotates on its axis. The North and South Celestial Poles are aligned with that axis, and so the stars appear to, with a 24-hour period, rotate about that same axis.</p> <p>But perhaps, you might think, you <em>wouldn't</em> suffer those same trails from outer space. Not being bound to the surface of the Earth, the stars would appear to be stationary, while the Earth beneath you would be the only thing that rotated. <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=42770">Where would you go</a> to look and test this?</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/iss022-e-068726_xlrg/" rel="attachment wp-att-17169"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17169" title="ISS022-E-068726_xlrg" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/ISS022-E-068726_xlrg-600x410.jpg" alt="ISS Cupola" width="600" height="410" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory / International Space Station / Johnson Space Flight Center.</p> </div> <p>To the International Space Station, of course! The relatively new cupola, shown from the outside (above) and the inside (below), allows ISS astronauts to get a prime view of Earth and the 360° horizon, <a href="http://www.gravityloss.com/2010/11/the-future/">all at once</a>.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/tracy_caldwell_dyson_in_cupola_iss/" rel="attachment wp-att-17170"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17170" title="Tracy_Caldwell_Dyson_in_Cupola_ISS" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/Tracy_Caldwell_Dyson_in_Cupola_ISS-600x399.jpg" alt="Tracy Dyson in the ISS Cupola" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA, of Tracy Caldwell Dyson, via Wayne Hale.</p> </div> <p>If this cupola-type structure in space looks familiar to you, that's because you've probably seen something <em>very</em> much like it, long ago, in a galaxy far, far away...</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/tumblr_kxzzlnddys1qzyhb5o1_500/" rel="attachment wp-att-17171"><img class="size-full wp-image-17171" title="tumblr_kxzzlnDdys1qzyhb5o1_500" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/tumblr_kxzzlnDdys1qzyhb5o1_500.jpeg" alt="Was the cupola REALLY based on a TIE fighter?" width="600" height="450" /></a> <p>Image credit: George Lucas / LucasArts / <a href="http://www.jrbassett.com">www.jrbassett.com</a> / #pleasedontsueme.</p> </div> <p>But I digress. Like practically every one of Earth's satellites, the <a href="http://hico.coas.oregonstate.edu/gallery/gallery-instrument.shtml">International Space Station</a> makes a nearly perfect, circular orbit just a few hundred kilometers above our surface. Since it's in low-Earth orbit, it <a href="http://hico.coas.oregonstate.edu/gallery/gallery-instrument.shtml">zips around the Earth</a> -- a more than 25,000 mile journey -- in just 90 minutes.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/issorbit/" rel="attachment wp-att-17172"><img class="size-full wp-image-17172" title="ISSorbit" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/ISSorbit.jpeg" alt="ISS orbit" width="600" height="509" /></a> <p>Image credit: Oregon State University / U.S. Navy / Jasmine Nahorniak.</p> </div> <p>It <em>needs</em> to move at that speed; that's the only speed that will keep a satellite moving in a circular orbit just a small distance above the surface of the Earth!</p> <p>But this isn't the only motion happening; while this is going on, the Earth is rotating <em>beneath</em> you, with a 24 hour period!</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/wtoearth2/" rel="attachment wp-att-17173"><img class="size-full wp-image-17173" title="wtoearth2" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/wtoearth2.jpeg" alt="As the world turns..." width="600" height="515" /></a> <p>Image credit: Sky &amp; Telescope.</p> </div> <p>You've got a couple of options as to how you'd run your spacecraft. One option -- and this is what the Hubble Space Telescope does, for example -- is to totally ignore the Earth. Have your spacecraft not rotate at all, point it at a target away from the Sun, one where the Earth will never get in your way, and observe it for as long as you like. Run your satellite like that, and, like Hubble, you'll never see a star trail.</p> <p>But the ISS wasn't built for looking into space, it was built for <a href="http://urthecast.com/">looking at the Earth</a>. And if you look down, from the ISS, what would <a href="http://www.scibuff.com/2009/05/21/iss-above-london-3/">you pass over</a>?</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/iss-orbit/" rel="attachment wp-att-17174"><img class="size-full wp-image-17174" title="iss-orbit" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/iss-orbit.gif" alt="ISS orbit" width="600" height="300" /></a> <p>Image credit: Ground Track of the ISS during orbit #60142, via Heavens-Above.com.</p> </div> <p>Every ninety minutes, you'd pass from the equator up to the northern latitudes, then all the way down towards (but not quite flying over) Antarctica, and back towards the equator. Because the Earth is rotating, the longitude of the place you're passing over changes by about 20° every time the ISS passes.</p> <p>But because the ISS is designed to look down, rather than -- like Hubble -- not rotating at all, it rotates once every ninety minutes, so that the cupola I showed you earlier <strong>always points directly down at the Earth</strong>. Which means, if you stuck a camera in the cupola, you'd be able to see something akin to what <a href="http://youtu.be/TOQrx-7qgak">Alex Rivest has stitched together</a>, below.</p> <object width="600" height="338" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="src" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/TOQrx-7qgak?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;start=16" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><embed width="600" height="338" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/TOQrx-7qgak?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;start=16" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object><p> As you can see, the stars <em>do</em>, in fact, appear to rotate! This is <em>entirely</em> because of how the ISS rotates in space. Unlike the star trails on Earth, which would take 24 hours to make a complete circle, the trails on the ISS would make a complete loop in a mere 90 minutes, because that's the period of rotation of the ISS around the Earth. (Just like the period of the Moon around the Earth -- both the rotational period and the revolutionary period -- is one lunar month.)</p> <p>This is by design, of course, and it allows the ISS's cupola to always point at the Earth's surface, perfect for studying our own planet from space. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reading_Rainbow#Show_details">But you don't have to take my word for it</a>, because I now have the photos to show you!</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7197235782_37e7cd0b03_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17175"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17175" title="7197235782_37e7cd0b03_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7197235782_37e7cd0b03_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Star trails from the ISS" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Astronaut Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>NASA astronaut and photographer extraordinaire, Expedition 31 flight engineer Don Pettit, took a whole slew of image composites from in cupola of the International Space Station, and stacked them together to produce <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa_jsc_photo/sets/72157629726792248/with/7257866592/">these fabulous views of star trails from the ISS</a>.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7197236116_3de6a4a0c2_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17176"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17176" title="7197236116_3de6a4a0c2_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7197236116_3de6a4a0c2_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Near the equator" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>How did he do it?  In <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa_jsc_photo/sets/72157629726792248/with/7257866592/">his own words</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.</p></blockquote> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7197236836_8f40592c8a_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17177"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17177" title="7197236836_8f40592c8a_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7197236836_8f40592c8a_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Looking north?" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>Unlike on Earth, the International Space Station's star trails don't grab either the North or South Celestial Poles as the stationary points that the heavens appear to rotate about. Because the ISS doesn't rotate <em>with</em> the Earth, the points that appear to be stationary are the ones along the ISS's axis-of-rotation, which precesses 360° throughout the course of a year!</p> <p>In each composite photo, though, in addition to the stars and the star trails, there are some remarkable things to observed by looking <em>at the Earth</em>!</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7197237418_755f756ef7_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17178"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17178" title="7197237418_755f756ef7_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7197237418_755f756ef7_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Star rain" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>Above, for example, you can see the greenish airglow of the atmosphere, as well as the yellow streaks of passing cities and blue speckles -- which, believe it or not, are <em>lightning</em> strikes -- dotting the image.</p> <p>The stars appear like rain, thanks to a narrow-angle photograph parallel to the International Space Station's direction of motion.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7197239570_374a3a5d11_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17179"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17179" title="7197239570_374a3a5d11_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7197239570_374a3a5d11_b-600x399.jpg" alt="More, please." width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>There's also, at much higher altitudes above Earth, a much fainter airglow that comes in a <a href="http://www.atoptics.co.uk/highsky/airglow2.htm">dim, red color</a>. That's due to oxygen atoms very high up slowly de-exciting over the course of the night. While the bright, thin green layer is from a layer of air 90-100 km in altitude, the red layer is from 150-300 km up, nearly as high as the station itself!</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7216877416_8329cf7f51_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17180"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17180" title="7216877416_8329cf7f51_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7216877416_8329cf7f51_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Thunderstorm" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>As you may have guessed, a thunderstorm produces spectacular results on a time-lapse photo, with every single blue speckle representing a lightning bolt.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7216877764_0ab079b7cf_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17181"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17181" title="7216877764_0ab079b7cf_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7216877764_0ab079b7cf_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Calm" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>While over a calm region, a much more serene composite results. The "blur" you see in the upper-middle of the image? That's because the solar panels, necessary for powering the station, move as the ISS is in orbit, in order to maximize the power they receive from the Sun.</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7216878128_d59931eba8_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17182"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17182" title="7216878128_d59931eba8_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7216878128_d59931eba8_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Planet in view" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>And while the stars may be dim, one object in the sky still appears incredibly bright: <strong>the Moon</strong>, visible above. Note how, without the Earth's atmosphere to refract and disperse the intense amount of light coming from it, there is no light pollution in the other parts of the sky resulting from the Moon!</p> <p>And finally, an example to show you that not even Don's amazing photography and photo-stacking is flawless; even his star-trails sometimes suffer from imperfections!</p> <div style="width: 610px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond/7257865176_d7b1bb23f9_b/" rel="attachment wp-att-17183"><img class="size-medium wp-image-17183" title="7257865176_d7b1bb23f9_b" src="/files/startswithabang/files/2012/06/7257865176_d7b1bb23f9_b-600x399.jpg" alt="Wides view" width="600" height="399" /></a> <p>Image credit: NASA / Don Pettit / @astro_pettit on twitter.</p> </div> <p>All told, Don has created <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa_jsc_photo/sets/72157629726792248/with/7257866592/">26 of these image composites</a>, viewable on <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa_jsc_photo/">NASA's flickr photostream</a>. These trails are different yet similar to the ones taken on Earth, and now you know the science behind it, as well as what you're looking at.</p> <p>Now, go forth and enjoy them all!</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/startswithabang" lang="" about="/startswithabang" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">esiegel</a></span> <span>Fri, 06/08/2012 - 13:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronomy-0" hreflang="en">Astronomy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/solar-system" hreflang="en">Solar System</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stars" hreflang="en">Stars</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/air" hreflang="en">air</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/airglow" hreflang="en">airglow</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astro" hreflang="en">astro</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/circle" hreflang="en">circle</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/composite" hreflang="en">composite</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/don" hreflang="en">don</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/earth" hreflang="en">Earth</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/flickr" hreflang="en">Flickr</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/glow" hreflang="en">glow</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/green" hreflang="en">Green</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/image" hreflang="en">image</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/international" hreflang="en">international</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/iss" hreflang="en">ISS</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lightning" hreflang="en">lightning</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/moon" hreflang="en">Moon</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasas" hreflang="en">NASA&#039;s</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/orbit-0" hreflang="en">orbit</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/orbits" hreflang="en">orbits</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/outer-space" hreflang="en">outer space</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/oxygen" hreflang="en">oxygen</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/panels" hreflang="en">panels</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pettit" hreflang="en">pettit</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/photo" hreflang="en">Photo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/photostream" hreflang="en">photostream</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/red" hreflang="en">red</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/solar" hreflang="en">solar</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-0" hreflang="en">space</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/star" hreflang="en">star</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/station" hreflang="en">station</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/trail" hreflang="en">trail</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/trails" hreflang="en">trails</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/stars" hreflang="en">Stars</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1510394" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1339188177"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>awesome - I just found a new batch of desktop wallpaper images!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1510394&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="y6s9sA58WVfTl4jixnsSx3zNmmzL3IWI4Ep_HKeAKzs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">critter42 (not verified)</span> on 08 Jun 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1510394">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1510395" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1339217391"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Really great blog!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1510395&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ZcMQU99C6j6CR5obdsnnEzznnzLmo-6zkriOS5UiXsI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Shasta (not verified)</span> on 09 Jun 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1510395">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1510396" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1339441301"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>the idea that these are actual pictures - and an actual video - of our planet taken from the fringe of its atmosphere feels, to me, completely unreal. I'm so used to seeing these things on Sci-Fi shows, where they show you a rotating panorama of another planet - the idea that those types of images can be generated by a camera rather than created digitally seems utterly bizarre.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1510396&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mfCYrtMVAjic3CvBAlrNBRm4WmJCoTe9kW-QTLf_T5A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">NDJS (not verified)</span> on 11 Jun 2012 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1510396">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1510397" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1474580343"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>the fifth picture from the bottom has a number of broken star lines yet the adjacent star has no broken star track? Makes no sense. Suggests draftsman took too long a break. In addition, the star trails, usually congruent going into the same direction show some not part of the overall pattern of direction. What's up. I'd like to believe these pictures are untouched but I do have a brain and visual perception.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1510397&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yz0gM_zA8O1y4I8t4Vp3gO0eKXGpXzLMJ1TK3Vdp21k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">billy stargazer (not verified)</span> on 22 Sep 2016 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1510397">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1510398" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1486116725"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>the iss does not rotate on an axis if it did why is the planet always visible. how can the iss travel around the earth in 92 min and still have ground level star trails.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1510398&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="iD3FUiW5x4u4aVzL7ryxSRMVc9Hoy2DrAwy9Wn4ZHF4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cm baker (not verified)</span> on 03 Feb 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1510398">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1510399" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1486124950"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>cm, get an adult to help. have them stand in the middle of the floor. You walk around, always facingone direction, never turning round. Say, for example, always facing the road at the front of the house. Do you always see that adult as you go round?</p> <p>No.</p> <p>Now try again and keep facing the adult in the middle of the room.</p> <p>Do you find yourself turning around to keep them in view as you circle them?</p> <p>Yes.</p> <p>That is how.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1510399&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6elAOqYc5Nc8yxZ4-YsX1Pni_u7NA5gUIY3TXg6nxq4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Wow (not verified)</span> on 03 Feb 2017 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-1510399">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/startswithabang/2012/06/08/incredible-star-trails-from-earth-and-beyond%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 08 Jun 2012 17:02:42 +0000 esiegel 35432 at https://scienceblogs.com Earthbound astronauts set out for Canada https://scienceblogs.com/sciencepunk/2011/08/30/earthbound-astronauts-set-out <span>Earthbound astronauts set out for Canada</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A group of 'astronauts' and a mechanical rover have set sail <strike>through the stars</strike> across North America to an impact crater near Mistastin Lake in the wilderness of Canada, travelling by helicopter rather than rocket ship, in what is known as an "analogue mission":</p> <blockquote><p>Beginning today (August 29), a team of scientists and engineers led by Dr. Gordon Osinski from The University of Western Ontario will travel to an impact crater at Kamestastin Lake, Labrador, where they will run analogue human and robotic sample return mission scenarios. An "astronaut" team will conduct a series of investigations in the area surrounding the lake supported by a robotic rover. Ultimately the astronaut-robot team is anticipated to be able to gather relevant scientific data more effectively than either could achieve independently.<br /><br />"The Kamestastin Lake crater was chosen because it has a very similar geology to the Moon," says Osinski. "Conducting analogue missions like this one allows scientists to determine not only what kind of samples they would encounter on the Moon, but which instruments are best suited to help them determine the samples that should be returned to Earth for further analysis."<br /><br />The mission astronauts will be able to do a quick intuitive assessment of the quality of the samples they select, something that would not be done in a purely robotic mission. Data will be relayed back to mission control, which is located at The University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, throughout the mission.</p></blockquote> <p>The team are keeping a blog of their <strike>extra</strike>terrestrial mission <a href="http://cpsx.uwo.ca/news?category_id=61">here</a>, and the rover team has their own blog <a href="http://utiasasrl.blogspot.com/">here</a>. Already they've been shaken by a passing hurricane, proving that even in space, no one can stop Irene. (I'll get my coat...)</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/author/sciencepunk" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sciencepunk</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/30/2011 - 06:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/general" hreflang="en">General</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/exploration" hreflang="en">Exploration</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-0" hreflang="en">space</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2452116" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1314724128"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This sounds like a `keeping busy' project. ISTM that the main issue and focus should be on figuring out the way a human can survive and function for any length of time on the moon. That's step one, i.e. to establish a habitat. Or what? Until that happens, all else, while it may be the reason to go there in the first place, is, don't you think, unimportant if step one is not achieved?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2452116&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="toa4X0fV7Y3_fNeWdXyG7N_ATtEwg_BKkKmSIvBqXWA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">oldebabe (not verified)</span> on 30 Aug 2011 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2452116">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2452117" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1314745130"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>OT, but if you haven't seen The Moon, it's a must-see:<br /><a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2009/jul/17/film-review-moon-sam-rockwell">http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2009/jul/17/film-review-moon-sam-rockwell</a></p> <p>I think the review is a bit harsh, but you can't really discuss the movie's important themes without ruining the plot.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2452117&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7oujKnsF4gaziVqnoEj_YM6L6dH9jfXvIkKSqHSvP5Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Vince whirlwind (not verified)</span> on 30 Aug 2011 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2452117">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/sciencepunk/2011/08/30/earthbound-astronauts-set-out%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Tue, 30 Aug 2011 10:10:34 +0000 sciencepunk 138296 at https://scienceblogs.com Meeting an Astronaut https://scienceblogs.com/universe/2010/06/18/meeting-an-astronaut <span>Meeting an Astronaut</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/universe/wp-content/blogs.dir/447/files/2012/04/i-afdd0bab9112de378f42163ef9c48124-To-Universe.jpg" alt="i-afdd0bab9112de378f42163ef9c48124-To-Universe.jpg" /></p> <p>Last week, fresh off the fourth-to-last Shuttle mission, STS-131, <a href="http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/dutton-jp.html">NASA astronaut Jim Dutton</a> <a href="http://www.kgw.com/news/local/NASA-astronauts-from-NW-make-OMSI-visit-96057784.html">came to speak at OMSI</a>, my local science museum. When I got the email about this event, I RSVPed immediately -- after all, an astronaut in my town? How urbane. Surely the intelligentsia of Oregon would come in droves to discuss the boggling phenomenological experience of spaceflight and the uncertain future of NASA with one of our nation's "right stuff." As usual, I was wrong; the only adult in the museum unaccompanied by a least one small child, I felt somehow like a pervert, as though the harried parents in the diaper-smelling conference room thought me maladjusted for harboring an adult interest in space. A tiny blond boy, boogers cresting the threshold of his button nose, repeatedly poked my friend in the arm. I waited in line to meet NASA astronaut Jim Dutton between gaggles of grade-schoolers, all rendered desperately antsy by the fluorescent overhead lighting. Do I regret this embarrassment?</p> <p>No way. First of all, the above image is now in my possession, one more piece of Universe ephemera for the archives. Second of all, Dutton was an excellent speaker: with the clipped, professional vocabulary of an ex-military man and the warmth of a young dad, he narrated a video of his mission, explaining its objectives (to install a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-Purpose_Logistics_Module">Multi-Purpose Logistics Module</a> nicknamed "Leonardo" on the International Space Station) and dropping conceptual aesthetic bombs about things like the smell of space (a "metallic odor, almost like something burnt") and the beautiful pink and yellow glow of the plasma as it lights up around the Shuttle in re-entry. Basically, Dutton divulged all manner of the kinds of sincere insidery things I love learning about being an astronaut. He spoke with fondness about spending hours in the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola_(ISS_module)">International Space Station's new cupola module</a>, gazing down at the Earth, and made a point of saying that while space itself is impressive, it just doesn't hold a candle to the view of our planet. He confided that the interior of the famous <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrovan">Astrovan</a> used to ferry astronauts from the Operations and Checkout Building to the launch pad is "not very exciting," adding that he was "a little disappointed." He said he felt enormously pleased to stick the STS-131 mission sticker on a wall of the Space Station before heading back down to Earth, a little ritual not many people know about. He also showed footage of the first ever sushi dinner in space, with his crewmates Japanese <a href="http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html">JAXA</a> astronauts <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naoko_Yamazaki">Naoko Yamazaki</a> and <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwqLSHvu3E">Soichi Noguchi</a> preparing handrolls for the Space Station crew, as well as some insane videos of Naoko doing a Japanese fan dance in zero-gravity, playing a miniature <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koto_(musical_instrument)">koto</a> in full kimono, and tossing bits of dried ume plum into floating water droplets, images which I will herewith seek desperately to find.</p> <p>Above all, Dutton seemed genuinely hopeful about NASA's future, despite the fact that his first shuttle mission was also his last; when asked about a post-Shuttle world, he explained to the kids and adults alike that many commercial firms are now building vehicles to replace the old bird, and that "exciting, real progress" is being made. "We're all waiting anxiously to find out" what happens, he said. Maybe this was PR, but it was nice to hear -- just as it was nice to hear an astronaut, with sincerity, repeatedly emphasize that while the Space Shuttle was special, the International Space Station, "as a nation, and as a world, is something to be very proud of." Ad astra indeed!</p> <p>Below, Dutton answers a fourth-grader's question about "how come you don't burn up in the atmosphere when you come back to Earth?" Charming.</p> <object width="500" height="283"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=12561120&amp;server=vimeo.com&amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portrait=0&amp;color=00adef&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=12561120&amp;server=vimeo.com&amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portrait=0&amp;color=00adef&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="500" height="283"></embed></object></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/cevans" lang="" about="/author/cevans" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cevans</a></span> <span>Thu, 06/17/2010 - 21:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/happenings" hreflang="en">Happenings</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/human" hreflang="en">Human</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-0" hreflang="en">space</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/astronaut" hreflang="en">Astronaut</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/jim-dutton" hreflang="en">Jim Dutton</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa" hreflang="en">NASA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/omsi" hreflang="en">OMSI</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sts-131" hreflang="en">STS 131</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/space-0" hreflang="en">space</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2511070" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1276883038"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What a lovely story, a really genuinely nice space hero, and very polite Portland kid at the end. Cutest video I have seen in a long time. Thank You!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2511070&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aZbH62zeymNTuTuboECW-19eO_Xmcr8HwGQ24F5WKTM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Colin (not verified)</span> on 18 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2511070">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2511071" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1276885972"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Very cool, I've had that same sort of experience with different elements of an interest in science. Meaning, I'd think everybody and their brother(sister?)would be interested. Only to find out most folks were alot like the old joke: "You're suggesting I'm ignorant and apathetic? WELL, as to science I just don't know and I don't really care!" The nice part about being interested in current space exploration is that it combines applied knowledge with an adventure. Sadly, to many people it simply has all been done before. I'm glad you had a good time. Personally, keeping the attitude of a child, and always being interested in learning has always seemed to me to be a good way to stay young for a really long time. Just remember, that doesn't mean you keep eating the same sand you did when you were four...or making mud pies for that matter...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2511071&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XtajBaqX2t3LQYky4Gb94AeTQNhjm_f4lNCIJAfmT9I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike Olson (not verified)</span> on 18 Jun 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2511071">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2511072" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1279943681"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>good-----morning---------astronauts-----nasa----team------------------from----name-------montra-----trimek-----pig-----thailand--------------thankyou</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2511072&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NFVF_pvzPzjJAH3LfQ5Znd8cv2PSd9wI3iTyhgvNKtE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="montra---trimek----pig-----thailand---">montra---trime… (not verified)</span> on 23 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2511072">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2511073" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280611922"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>send---name------montra---trimek----pig----thailand---------go---to---spacestation--------</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2511073&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IjQbf9VMZSndktKjD43_2GB9lL-nB5IAV6TRCRfVe1c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="montra---trimek----pig----thailand----">montra---trime… (not verified)</span> on 31 Jul 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2511073">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2511074" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1280988992"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It's very sad that this kind of event wasn't more attended by an older audience. Very sad that superheroes of science end up just being childhood entertainers...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2511074&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K7jHIUSEnzdra5NefpIJIiaTQEGIZXI08JQ_DMLQoSU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Adrian J. Ebsary (not verified)</span> on 05 Aug 2010 <a href="https://scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/8673/feed#comment-2511074">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/universe/2010/06/18/meeting-an-astronaut%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 18 Jun 2010 01:00:00 +0000 cevans 150664 at https://scienceblogs.com