Tangled Bank 83

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i-bc090b9968c64fca214d69e168433b3c-220px-SheelaWiki.jpg

Welcome to Aardvarchaeology and the 83rd Tangled Bank blog carnival! This is the blog where all of science — natural, social and historical — is just seen as one big bunch of adjunct disciplines to the study of societies of the past. “What about medicine?”, I hear you ask. It is very good for prolonging the working lives of archaeologists. “Physics?” We do need dating methods, you know. “Zoology?” Help us classify faunal remains and reconstruct ancient economy. “Astronomy?” It’ll get us to distant inhabited planets with interesting material culture.

Biotech

  • Steppenwolf at the Skeptical Alchemist takes a look at a recent experiment where a microbe of one species was changed into another species. Now he doesn’t know if he’s a man dreaming that he’s an E. coli, or an E. coli dreaming that it’s a man.

Medicine

Cultcha

  • Alex at the Daily Transcript reports from a bar conversation about how science publishers try to adapt to the interactive web. You know, “blogs” and such. You may have heard of them — apparently they’re the next big thing!

  • Tara at Aetiology reports from a visit to the Cincinnati Creation Museum. Her brain hurts.
  • Paddy at the Swedish Extravaganza sheds some light onto the circadian cycles built into Scandy culture.
  • In my own contribution, I report from on-going research into Mesolithic seal hunting camps in a landlocked former archipelago near Stockholm, currently a mountainous area. It was recently ravaged by a forest fire that exposed hundreds of previously unknown sites.

Ecology

  • Jeremy at the Voltage Gate offers new insights into deforestation on Madagascar.

  • Jim at from Archaea to Zeaxanthol discusses Pleistocene Rewilding: suggestions that Northern America might be returned to an Ice Age ecosystem through the introduction of modern relatives of extinct animals.
  • Jennifer at Invasive Species reports from the fight against the invasive wetland plant Purple Loosestrife in the U.S.

Zoology

  • Jeremy at Another Blasted Weblog has interesting news about fishing and ecology.

  • John at A DC Birding Blog offers some thoughts on the occasion of the removal of the bald eagle from the Endangered Species list.
  • Brian at Laelaps answers the question “What is a nimravid?” (It’s an extinct group of sabre-toothed carnivores.)
  • Mike at 10,000 Birds works through emerald birds until he finds one that’s green.

Botany

That’s all for now, kids. I want you to know that archaeology is very pleased with you. You’re all doing fine work in the service of society’s main goal — the exploration of forgotten cultures. Two weeks from now on 18 July, you will be able to read more about the ongoing quest for improvement of the archaeological toolkit at The Voltage Gate. Send your submissions to Jeremy. Until then — if someone gets Medieval on your ass, make sure they get Early Medieval, because that’s where all the animal art is.

Comments

  1. #1 Amanda
    July 5, 2007

    Does the Sheela pic relate to any post in particular? I have that one as a tattoo.

  2. #2 Martin R
    July 5, 2007

    No, the sheela’s just there to set the tone of the whole thing, brighten the blog, put the readers at ease.

  3. #3 steppen wolf
    July 5, 2007

    Thanks for including my post.

  4. #4 via
    July 5, 2007

    E. coli dreaming that it is a man is how I think of George Bush. However, the E. coli certainly serves a much better purpose.

  5. #5 Martin R
    July 5, 2007

    I am very glad that Mr Bush is nowhere near my gastro-intestinal tract.

  6. #6 degustibus
    July 7, 2007

    Thanks to Amanda for providing a clue to the Sheela–the photo may have been put there to “set the tone” but without identification it was an annoyance. (OK I might have gotten a clue from the name of the image, as I see now.)

    Labels help. Anyhow I’m glad you provided the image, led me to dig for more info on the whole Sheela na Gig thing.