Kilnaughton Abbey

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From that soft-spoken friend of all Sweden’s little idiosyncracies, Paddy K, a fresh cell phone snapshot of Kilnaughton abbey in Tarbert, County Kerry, south-west Ireland. The ruins are 600 years old and the site is still in use as a cemetery: among other illustrious lineages, the K clan has a family plot.

Tarbert is a common place name on the Celtic fringe, meaning “isthmus”, Sw. näs, a narrow stretch of land between two bodies of water. A well-informed source assures me that the ones in Scotland are quite inferior to the Co. Kerry original.

Comments

  1. #1 kai
    July 18, 2007
  2. #2 Martin R
    July 18, 2007

    Good grief! Well, as we say in Sweden, everyone reaches beatitude with their own watery gruel…

  3. #3 Frans-Arne Stylegar
    July 19, 2007

    Tarbert/isthmus would be synonomous with Swedish ed/ede rather than ns, Martin.–

  4. #4 Martin R
    July 19, 2007

    Actually näs denotes both a long narrow promontory and an isthmus, while ed means only isthmus.

  5. #5 mary e.
    July 20, 2007

    with that be cognate w/ “nose”?

  6. #6 Martin R
    July 21, 2007

    Yes!