Great Spotted Woodpecker At My Window

i-02d89a7e3ed5a48c61fba2b0e9ab1d43-P1030113.JPG

i-17f4876358af62eca5adeea03afe7d1e-P1030115.JPG

i-d11d077beea5be040b62a866d43f3c52-P1030117.JPG

Comments

  1. #1 GaryU
    February 15, 2012

    Nice photos! Thank you for sharing. Do you make your own suet cakes?

  2. #2 tenine
    February 15, 2012

    I looked at photos on Google and not all of them seem to feature the buff color on the breast and forehead. Is this sex, age, or regional variation?

  3. #3 Martin R
    February 15, 2012

    Thank you! I buy the suet balls for the birds. (There’s birdseed in them too. Blackbirds often sit around under the balls and pick up the seeds as they fall.) But I have been known to make suet-based puddings for human consumption.

  4. #4 Martin R
    February 15, 2012

    Or could it be seasonal variation? Doesn’t seem to be sex at any rate. This bird is a female as she lacks a red spot on her neck.

  5. #5 mdprima
    March 3, 2012

    Nice, we dont have that type here..we put shredded breads outside every evening and about 15 types of birds come for their meals.. :)

  6. #6 Elizabeth
    May 11, 2012

    Just catching on some of your earlier missives. Great entertainment over cold winters in interior Alaska: watching the several kinds of woodpeckers, chickadees, and Canada jays demolish the column of beef suet (encased in a chicken wire tube). But, something not experienced before in 50 years watching is the sight of a male hairy woodpecker teaching his young (3 last summer) how to feed from a seed feeder with a narrow, slippery plastic ledge. Much squawking and angst; but, eventually, they all learned how to hang upside down and munch on black oil sunflower seeds. :)