It seems that Brock University in St. Catherine’s, Ontario really likes me. Two years ago, the Library kindly invited me to speak during their Open Access Week festivities. And this year the Physics Department has also very kindly invited me to be part of their Seminar Series, also to talk about Getting Your Science Online, this time during OA Week mostly by happy coincidence.

It’s tomorrow, Tuesday October 23, 2012 in room H313 at 12:30.

Here’s the abstract I’ve provided:

Physicist and Reinventing Discovery author Michael Nielsen has said that due to the World Wide Web, “[t]he process of scientific discovery – how we do science – will change more over the next 20 years than in the past 300 years.” Given the cornucopian nature of the Web, there’s a tool or strategy that will help most everyone with concrete goals in their research program. In this session we’ll take a look at some of the incredible opportunities the Web has opened up for scientists, from Open Access publishing, Open Notebooks and Open Data on the one hand, to blogs, Twitter and Google+ on the other.

It looks to be great fun! I’d like to thank Thad Haroun and the Brock Physics Department for kindly inviting me. I’ll post the slides on the blog later this week.

The rest of this post is what I guess would count as “supplemental materials” for the presentation. The first chunk is a bunch of links on the main topics of the presentation, all the various “Open Whatever” topics. The rest is a long list of readings on blogs, Twitter and general social media for academics that I’ve assembled over the years and at least somewhat digested into the presentation, mostly based on a post from last year but will some extra and more recent items added.
 
Open Access

 
Open Access Mandates & policies

 
Open Access Repositories

 

 
Open Notebook Science

 
Blogging networks

 

Blog Aggregators

 
Some physics & math blogs

 
And here are the blogs/twitter/social media resources I promised.

Feel free to add any suggestions in the comments.

Comments

  1. #1 Ian Gibson
    October 23, 2012

    Enjoyed your talk today. You might be interested in this article by Melissa Terras in the Journal of Digital of Humanities. In it she talks about the impact of blogging and tweeting on the dissemination of her work.

    Obviously, she has the advantage of an already engaged readership but I think it still makes for interesting reading about what is possible.

  2. [...] Getting Your Science Online: Presentation at Brock University Physics Department [...]

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