The Corpus Callosum

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The rel="tag">Golden Retriever is the finest breed of
dog in the world.  These dogs are smart, and noble.  

I don’t have any dogs right now, but if I do get a dog, it will be a
Golden Retriever.

The photo was taken by href="http://www.flickr.com/people/59154109@N00/">POHAN.

Comments

  1. #1 Ned in Zurich
    November 18, 2007

    Are you sure retrievers are so smart? I was once told that they are among the least intelligent dogs. The example given was a retriever playing in a garden, and killing itself by running head first and at full speed into a stone wall. My source was a biologist and former president of a kynological society, so I think well informed.

  2. #2 HP
    November 18, 2007

    I’ve always thought poodles get a bum rap as far as dog breeds go. It’s not their fault that poodle owners tend to be vain and foppish. The breed itself was originally bred as a herding dog, and they share many of the same qualities as other herding dogs.

    I don’t currently own a dog, and would most likely adopt a mutt if I decided to get a dog, but if I had to choose a breed, I would get a standard poodle. I’d leave his tail undocked, give him a buzz cut twice a year, and let him be a dog.

  3. #3 Joseph j7uy5
    November 18, 2007

    It is not valid to cite one example and try to generalize to the entire breed. If you search the Internet, you will find many lists of intelligent dogs. Goldens often are near the top. Poodles rank high, too. I once had a Standard Poodle that was an excellent dog.

  4. #4 Ian
    November 20, 2007

    Define “smart”

    The goldens I’ve known from 10 years of agility classes would leap in front of a train in expectation of a pat on the head, (highly trainable) yet not one of the owners I knew could suppress or redirect the breeds orientation to corophagia.

    But this guy would probably have an answer

    http://www.psych.ubc.ca/faculty/profile/index.psy?fullname=Coren,%20Stan&area=Cognitive%20Science&designation=core&keyword=

    Dog Nut and my Psych 100 Prof (1977).

  5. #5 Joel Bass
    November 21, 2007

    I have to say, from experience, that when choosing a canine “best friend,” smarter is not always better. We have two dogs, one who is very intelligent, and one who is a dopey, sleepy buddy. The intelligent one is jealous, neurotic, and always sneaking around trying to get into the garbage can. The not-so-intelligent one is sweet, loves everyone, and just seems to love being a dog.

    Remember why you want a dog — probably not for his witty conversational skills.