What I Had for Lunch Today

Let me go bloggy on you for a moment ….

This morning, I gave a talk for the Humanists of Minnesota. The talk was organized by Scott Lohman, and I want to give a shout out to August Berkshire for supplying his projector. The talk was about key events in human evolution, and overlaps somewhat with a Cafe Scientifique I’ll be doing early in 2010.

I love giving talks to groups like the Minnesota Humanists, because I know I’m not going to get those questions … the ones from people who question the basic premise of the science (or of science itself). Not that I mind having those discussions in a public forum, but it is nice to be in a room full of people who all relish rational thought and prefer it over other approaches. The questions the audience had were outstanding, and the post-talk conversation was way above average.

Giving the talk was a bit of a nostalgic experience, because it was at the Nokomis Community Center and that is my old neighborhood. There was one summer when I would start out at this location (or another one nearby) and walk around the lake. Twice on a good day.

I’m also feeling a little nostalgic about the weather, watching this Nor’easter hit NY and New England. Twenty inches. Now, THAT’s a snow storm. The kind of snow storm in which one may or may not survive the walk home from work or school. In fact, some people won’t. I hope they’ve got enough National Guard troops in the area because they may be needed.

Snow storms. They just aren’t what they used to be.

Comments

  1. #1 atheismisdead
    December 19, 2009

    Looks like your website is under attack from supernatural forces…

    http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2008/12/how_can_you_tell_a_christian_i_1.php

    you really need to add comment moderation to your blasphemy…

  2. #2 Bill James
    December 20, 2009

    The majority portion of a ten piece chicken mcnuggets before complete disassembly, cleaning, reassembly, adjustment and test of one rather marvelous Duo-Therm carburetor for me. Of particular intrigue was the cantilevered double float, one of which resided in a dry sump as properly designed in flawless operational conjunction with but a singular needle and seat. The remainder consumed in return transit.