The following is rare footage of the Huxley vs. Wilberforce debate. Wilberforce, the one in pink, appears to be on top but he clearly has no chance against the brilliant Huxley.

Comments

  1. #1 J-Dog
    February 12, 2010

    Brilliant!

  2. #2 Charles
    February 12, 2010

    With Huxley’s Vulcan neck grip, Wilberforce didn’t stand a chance.

  3. #3 NewEnglandBob
    February 12, 2010

    If Huxley could converse in English right now, he would say:

    “Daaaaaaaaad! you keep putting me in embarrassing videos…
    …and you’re showing to whom?
    Stop it.”

  4. #4 Art
    February 12, 2010

    Don’t forget to archive those pictures and videos. Some day a 16yo Huxley will want to get a whole-body tattoo, take up toad licking (for spiritual reasons), and move to a commune to eat organic quantum-laser-tuned wheat grass juice, and worship the latest incarnation of “The Great One” … and the leverage will come in handy.

  5. #5 Stephanie Z
    February 12, 2010

    Cute. Thanks. The perfect start to a relaxing evening.

  6. #6 Katkinkate
    February 12, 2010

    That bear must have been heavy. The poor little tyke is breathing hard.

  7. #7 Greg Laden
    February 12, 2010

    He’s got a cold. In this case, it turns out to be a special effect.

  8. #8 Jason Thibeault
    February 12, 2010

    Cold nothing. He was clearly trying to take Wilberforce’s head off! I don’t normally encourage debates to get violent like this one, though I have to admit it was entertaining to watch.

  9. #9 Denmark
    February 12, 2010

    This is off-topic, but Greg, I wondered if you know of the economic historian Gregory Clark?

    He has written a new paper claiming, for instance:

    “First, England, all the way from the heart of the Middle Ages in 1200 to 2009, is a society without persistent social classes, at least among the descendants of the medieval population. It was a world of complete social mobility, with no permanent over-class and under-class, a world of complete equal opportunity.”

    Anyway, here is a post about the paper:

    http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2010/02/social-mobility-in-the-longrun.html

    The comments make interesting reading, and Clark himself shows up.