Germ theory denialism explained

Here’s some sheer awesomeness in the form of an explanation of germ theory denialism:

The only thing I would disagree with is the conclusion at the end that germ theory denialists are not much of a threat. In fact, germ theory denialism, usually softer germ theory denialism, such as the kind that says a healthy body can can fight off any bacteria or virus (the implication being that germs can cause disease only if there is some problem in the body) is a major strain of “thought” (if you can call it that) in anti-vaccine circles. In fact, it’s a major strain of “thought” driving many forms of pseudoscience, such as chiropractic and naturopathy, as is shown in the video itself.

Comments

  1. #1 augustine
    August 17, 2010

    anton: [When I dissect the arguments of a Goofus it’s because I think that seeing the arguments dissected could be educational for someone who might otherwise be fooled by them.]

    And then he goes on about accusing of ad hominems and defending the right to use them.

    Goofus: “an extremely incompetent or silly person”
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/goofus

    ad hominem
    # Person A makes claim X.
    # Person B makes an attack on person A.
    # Therefore A’s claim is false.

    Example of Ad Hominem

    1. Bill: “I believe that abortion is morally wrong.”
    Dave: “Of course you would say that, you’re a goofus.”
    Bill: “What about the arguments I gave to support my position?”
    Dave: “Those don’t count. Like I said, you’re a goofus.

    You have to be careful, anteus. You see I’m expected to use a logical fallacy. I’m just a stupid ignorant parent who doesn’t understand science, critical thinking, and that god doesn’t exist. As per your leader, ORAC, you are held to a higher standard and at a disadvantage when arguing for your views. You know the old “the world’s against us” motivational speech.

    Be wary of you scientific and critical thinking standards. I don’t think you can hold yourself to your own standards.

    There is not one single SBMer who can make their case and refrain from using logical fallacies. It’ hypocritical.

  2. #2 Orange Lantern
    August 17, 2010

    @Prometheus: It also seems to me that the fatality rate of measles would naturally be higher now than 1950 because the majority of unimmunized individuals today are also at higher risk of death from measles, i.e. babies and the immunocompromised.

  3. #3 Anonymous
    August 18, 2010

    #200
    “Atheists make up around 4% of the population…”

    Could it be that the other 96% are bible literalists who consider handwashing hypercritical and therefore tabu as per Mark 7?

  4. #4 snerd
    August 18, 2010

    Augustine: Pharyngula is thataway – unless you’re in the dungeon there already.

  5. #5 augustine
    August 18, 2010

    [Nerd: Augustine: Pharyngula is thataway – unless you’re in the dungeon there already.]

    What’s a F…F…Fair…Fair-n…Fair-n-goola?

  6. #6 augustine
    August 18, 2010

    OL: [It also seems to me that the fatality rate of measles would naturally be higher now than 1950 because the majority of unimmunized individuals today are also at higher risk of death from measles, i.e. babies and the immunocompromised.]

    Do you have citations for that or is that your personal opinon?

    @Promo, nice big fat straw man you argued against there. Pay attention.

    [Promo: Or we’ve become more sensitive to measles, which would also speak against Augie’s casual attitude toward measles.]

    Yeh, 50 years of measles vaccine and now we have a “deadlier” measles virus. good job.

    But, I digress. Your case fatatility numbers are flawed because of the inaccuracy of you numbers. They are based on REPORTED cases. Since measles WAS generally mild, most cases didn’t bother to go to the doctor, hence they were not reported. The CDC estimates that 3-4 million cases per year actually occurred as opposed to the 500,000 cases reported. This changes you fear mongering number greatly.

  7. #7 LW
    August 18, 2010

    Prometheus didn’t use the reported measles cases in 1950 in order to get the case mortality rate, augustine. He used your figure for the number of deaths, and the total birth cohort for the number of cases. His estimate is not exaggerated.

    I have figured out why augustine keeps asking how many bullets the virus has and why we can’t just count the number of babies shot to death. It is playing third grade word games. So okay, augustine, I’ll play your game if it makes you happy. How many bullets does the measles virus have? None, the measles virus doesn’t kill with bullets because it is too small to hold a gun. Why can’t we count the number of babies shot to death? Because they’re imaginary babies shot by imaginary attendants using imaginary guns in an imaginary kingdom in a thought experiment.

    There, now everyone marvel at how clever augustine was to think of those riddles all by itself. *pat, pat*

  8. #8 Chris
    August 18, 2010

    Little Augie, the directions to Pharyngula are in the blue text. If you hover your mouse of the text you will see the little arrow turn into a hand. If you click on the blue letters you will go to the new page.

  9. #9 Andy
    November 21, 2011

    Present Science and Medicine is a commersial psudo science.
    Or indoctrinated humans attempt to spread the mind virus to the natural and smart people.

  10. #10 Julian Frost
    November 21, 2011

    Present Science and Medicine is a commersial psudo science.
    Or indoctrinated humans attempt to spread the mind virus to the natural and smart people.

    Nice bit of necromancy.
    Secondly, the correct spellings are “commercial” and “pseudo”. So much for “smart”.
    Thanks for the LOL’s. Now shove off.

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