Respectful Insolence

Let’s review.

Once upon a time, according to anti-vaccine zealots, the MMR vaccine caused autism. Soon after that, the explanation morphed. No, it wasn’t so much the MMR that caused autism; rather, it was the mercury in the thimerosal preservative that used to be in several childhood vaccines in the U.S. until the end of 2001. Then, as evidence accumulated exonerating mercury in vaccines as a cause of autism, it became the “toxins.” (Antifreeze, formaldehyde, and human fetal parts, oh my!) Finally, it became “too many too soon.”

And the anti-vaccine movement rested, because its latest excuse was good. It was vague and very difficult to falsify.

But even “too many too soon” is no longer enough. Now, according to a press release I received in my e-mail, it’s:

Press Release

Parents of autistic children shed light on controversial vaccinations in new book

Michael J. Dochniak and Denise H. Dunn’s new book calls for removal of allergy-inducing rubber latex from vaccination packaging to minimize cases of autism

MINNEAPOLIS (MMD Newswire) May 10, 2011 — Autism is on the rise, and the latex rubber often used in vaccine packaging and delivery systems may be one of the causes say authors Michael J. Dochniak and Denise H. Dunn in “Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection)” (ISBN 1456570056). Autism Speaks, the nation’s largest autism science and advocacy organization, estimates that doctors diagnose the disorder in about one in 110 American children. These scary statistics highlight a condition now more prevalent in children than cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDs combined. While researchers have not pinpointed the cause of autism, many find that atypical immunity plays a role.

Dochniak and Dunn began investigating the relationship between vaccinations and autism after Dochniak’s son was diagnosed and Dunn’s son developed unusual behaviors following a routine vaccination. This book collects their research on how allergens found in a natural rubber used in the transportation of vaccines are increasing the chances of autism development.

Hevea brasiliensis dry natural rubber (HDNR), derived from the liquid latex found in natural rubber trees, is still used in some vaccine packaging and delivery systems. The authors explain how the naturally occurring proteins found in latex rubber, which are also responsible for latex allergies, can affect the occurrence of allergy-induced regressive autism once one has been exposed to HDNR.

“The increasing prevalence of allergy-induced regressive autism doesn’t have to be the inevitable result of immunization,” Dochniak says. “If vaccination manufacturers and providers start to reduce their use of HDNR, we will see a dramatic reduction of allergy-induced cases.”

Because vaccinations are required by most states for schooling, the topic has proven controversial among parents, scientists and medical providers. Dochniak and Dunn aim to provide more awareness of a potential cause for the disorder that threatens more and more children each year.

“Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection)” is available for sale online at Amazon.com and other channels.

About the Authors:

Michael J. Dochniak and Denise H. Dunn are leading experts in the etiology of allergy-induced regressive autism and have previously authored a book for Nova Science, entitled “Allergies and Autism.” Dochniak is a scientific researcher in the field of Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex induced autism. Dunn is an early childhood educator who works closely with autistic children and adults, and has been teaching for more than 15 years.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Michael J. Dochniak
Email: mdochniak@yahoo.com
Phone: (612) 836-8237
Website: www.amazon.com/Michael-J.-Dochniak/e/B002P9CA2K
www.amazon.com/Denise-H.-Dunn/e/B0037LGJP4

REVIEW COPIES AND INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE

###

The views and opinions expressed in this press release do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of CreateSpace or its affiliates.

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That’s right. According to anti-vaccine zealots, now it’s the packaging and delivery systems used for vaccines that cause autism. It never ends. It never will end.

Because, to the anti-vaccine, first and foremost, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. No matter what the evidence shows. Never forget that.

Comments

  1. #1 Marry Me, Mindy (formerly known as Pablo)
    May 10, 2011

    They wrote a book on it?

  2. #2 Todd W.
    May 10, 2011

    Uh…okay. That’s a new one. I’m a bit at a loss as to what to say, other than seriously?

  3. #3 Marry Me, Mindy (fkaP)
    May 10, 2011

    Rats, the comments dropped out my

    ***jaw drop***

  4. #4 marc
    May 10, 2011

    Who are the leading experts they are referring to who claim immunity issues cause autism?

  5. #5 Beamup
    May 10, 2011

    They have officially lost their flippin’ minds. Do they have ANY CLUE how many things latex is in? How unbelievably tiny a fraction of such exposure vaccination could possibly represent?

    My mom happens to have a significant (real) latex allergy and the lifestyle changes latex avoidance requires are profound. It’s MAJOR news when she manages to find a clothing brand which doesn’t use latex – and then she has to stock up because they may not last and she won’t be able to buy more clothes for multiple years.

  6. #6 Calli Arcale
    May 10, 2011

    Latex? Latex?! Seriously?

    Dude. Either they have no idea how ubiquitous latex is or they *do* know and appreciate that this makes their theory conveniently difficult for individuals to test. It’ll also feed nicely into the people who’ve been trying the GFCF diet, eliminating colorings, eliminating preservatives, going organic, etc. But then, if they’re jumping on the “environmental toxins” bandwagon, why focus on vaccines, which are a trivial exposure? Because of the injection, I suppose, which of course makes anything a zillion jillion times more harmful.

  7. #7 Dangerous Bacon
    May 10, 2011

    Well, it’s gotta be the latex in vaccine packaging that causes autism.

    Further proof: Latex gloves used to be in wide use in hospitals (including newborn nurseries and pediatric wards), but in recent years have started to be phased out because of latex allergies (mostly a problem for staff). And of course reported cases of autism/autism spectrum disorders have declined paralleling the drop in use of latex gloves, and…wait a minute…

    Nevermind.

  8. Obviously it’s the dihydrogen monoxide, hydrogen hydroxide, oxygen dihydride, diprotium monoxide, or protium hydroxide in the vaccines. Nasty chemicals, all of them.

  9. #9 jypsy
    May 10, 2011

    Here’s his paper

    “Dochniak MJ, Autism spectrum disorders – Exogenous protein insult, Med Hypotheses (2007), Volume 69, Issue 3, Pages 545-549. (Note: The costs of publication of the Med. Hypotheses article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. This article must therefore be hereby marked advertisement in accordance with 18 U.S.C.Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact.)”

    http://replay.web.archive.org/20090402065704/http://www.autismdoc.org/

  10. #10 Richard Smith
    May 10, 2011

    Next: Autism is caused by the presence of medical diplomas, specifically from accredited universities, hanging on the office walls of the doctor administering the vaccines. After all, how many cases of autism have been traced back to vaccine injections administered by homeopaths, naturopaths, accupuncturists, etc?

  11. #11 JustaTech
    May 10, 2011

    These people are nuts. They are absolutely not interacting with this plane of reality. Madder than a hatter, madder than a March hare, completely batshit insane. (My apologies to all the people with real mental diseases and disorders, you do not deserve to be lumped in with these persons, but my language is lacking.)

  12. #12 JoeKaistoe
    May 10, 2011

    Darnit, when will you shills for Big Latex stop covering up the truth?!!!1!!

  13. #13 vic
    May 10, 2011

    @6, @7 – It’s homeopathic – the ubiquitous latex isn’t the problem, because there’s so much of it! The infinitesimal quantity that the vaccine gets exposed to makes it more potent! And if they removed all the latex, everyone would be autistic!

  14. #14 Enkidu
    May 10, 2011

    “Dochniak is a scientific researcher in the field of Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex induced autism.”

    Wait, there’s a whole field? No way. I wanted to kow his qualifications and so I clicked on his link for Amazon. It all became crystal clear:

    “In a ‘Medical Hypotheses’ (2007) paper entitled ‘Autism spectrum disorders – Exogenous protein insult’, he describes how the allergenic proteins in Hevea-brasiliensis natural rubber can cause allergy-induced regressive autism.”

    Dude, my next door neighbor could get an article published in Medical Hypotheses!

  15. #15 Squillo
    May 10, 2011

    Shame there’s no an Olympic event for goalpost-shifting.

  16. #16 jypsy
    May 10, 2011

    Guess my link is holding my comment in moderation…. Until it shows up.. he published in Medical Hypotheses in 2007, Google: “Autism Spectrum Disorders – Exogenous Protein Insult (Hev-b)”

  17. #17 Kristen
    May 10, 2011

    I am not often at a loss…but….ummmm. Are they purposely trying to get laughed at and further marginalized?

    I have a funny coincidental anecdote: my only biological child that doesn’t have an ASD gets hives when she is in contact with latex (band-aids, gloves, balloons etc…). Why isn’t she autistic?

    Was this the big news?

  18. #18 Beamup
    May 10, 2011

    Dude, my next door neighbor could get an article published in Medical Hypotheses!

    That brings up an interesting question. Ben Goldacre got his dead cat certified as a nutritionist. Perhaps an MH article is next!

  19. #19 Amy
    May 10, 2011

    So that’s why all those guys I screwed in college never called, they became autistic. Phew.

  20. #20 wfjag
    May 10, 2011

    “and the latex rubber often used in vaccine packaging and delivery systems”

    And, how much contact does a sterile vaccine have with this latex? Have either of these guys heard of dose/response?

    The hypothesis reminds me of a Martini recipe I once used: “Gin over crushed ice, shaken in a room containing a bottle of Vermouth.”

  21. #21 superdave
    May 10, 2011

    umm,
    what?

  22. #22 Terrie
    May 10, 2011

    Is anyone else really flipping tired of the “scary statistics” of 1 in 110? You know what has an almost identical prevalence rate? Schizophrenia. And I have NEVER seen scare mongering about the “epidemic” of schizophrenia.

  23. #23 lilady
    May 10, 2011

    @ Kristen: Cleveland Childrens.org (Cleveland Children’s Hospital) has some great articles on children’s allergies including allergy to latex. Latex can be found in baby bottle nipples, disposable diapers, children’s toys including bath “float” toys and many other items that kids are exposed to in their environment. In addition, there may be a cross reactivity to certain fruits (bananas) when a child has a latex allergy.

    On Dochniak’s website (describing his two-year-old’s ER visit)…..”Before leaving the hospital a doctor recommended that a nebulizer be used at home to relieve any recurrent asthmatic symptoms”. Huh? Didn’t Dochniak just describe an anaphylaxis episode? The ER doctor would have prescribed an EpiPen with instructions to fill the prescription immediately.

    Too dumb even, to frame the anecdotal episode in a cogent manner…so that we might believe that his child has a latex allergy.

  24. #24 herr doktor bimler
    May 10, 2011

    “and the latex rubber often used in vaccine packaging and delivery systems”

    Is it actually used any more with vaccines? From my limited experience* I associate the latex seal with multi-dose packaging, which for vaccines were replaced with the more-expensive single-dose packages (as part of the shift away from a mercury-based preservative).

    Blaming autism on latex exposure is weird. Blaming it on the tiny subset of latex exposure involved in vaccination, rather than the exposure in the rest of a child’s life — purely to retain the VACCINES = EVIL position — is raising the weirdness to a level hitherto unseen.

    Also, please stop talking about “Big Latex”, it is making me all hot & bothered.

    * I.e. watching old movies.

  25. #25 Cannabis Fraughtism
    May 10, 2011

    “And I have NEVER seen scare mongering about the “epidemic” of schizophrenia”

    No, they use ‘pot causes schizophrenia’ scare mongering instead. Do we have the 2009 Keele study handy? Have we had pot? Have we had schizophrenia? Are we qualified. I use the term ‘we’ dissociatively, of course.

    Hopefully Clear UK and ReThink will be addressing this abuse of science, pot, and schizophrenics sooner rather than later.

  26. #26 DaveD
    May 10, 2011

    Is anyone else really flipping tired of the “scary statistics” of 1 in 110?

    Everyone is. But it’s only going to get worse; cnn.com had a story yesterday about some Korean researchers who did a more detailed study of a group of Korean kids and discovered an ASD incidence of 1 in 38! (That’s 38 with emphasis, not 38-factorial, wise guys.)

  27. #27 lilady
    May 10, 2011

    @ herr doktor bimler: The information about latex packaging (syringe plungers, vaccine vials) can be found at:

    Pink Book General Recommendations On Immunization (Chapter 2)

    On top of pg, 11 (of 22 pages) “Only one report of an allergic reaction after administration of hepatitis B vaccine in a known severe allergy (anaphylaxis) to latex has ever been published”.

    BTW, Where I worked at a county health department, where nurses and doctors administered tens of thousands vaccines to children and adults, none of the vaccine administrators ever had to break into the epinephrine ampules and administer a shot for a severe allergic reaction…from a vaccine or from latex contained in vaccine vial ports or in syringe plungers; we simply tossed the ampules and replaced them with new (unexpired date) epinephrine ampules.

  28. #28 Christopher Wing
    May 10, 2011

    And I thought I was the only leading expert in the etiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    I guess I should have trademarked it.

  29. #29 Prometheus
    May 10, 2011

    Here’s the truly funny part about this.

    About a decade (or more) ago, the pharmaceutical companies, recognising the rise in latex allergies, started using latex-free stoppers in their vaccines (and other medications using stoppered vials). Not all vaccines come in latex-free vials, but the number of latex-free vials has gone from zero 20 years ago (before the start of the “autism epidemic”) to the present where almost every chldhood vaccine is available in a latex-free container (note: the single-use syringes are almost all latex-free, the vials less so).

    Of course, during the time that latex-free vial stoppers and single-use syringes (not to mention examination gloves, party balloons, toys etc.) have gone from zero to commonplace, the prevalence of autism (as reported by educational and other administrative sources) has….well, it’s actually gone up, hasn’t it?

    That doesn’t make sense…if latex exposure in vaccines is the cause of autism, then why would the prevalence be going up as the exposure to latex is going down?

    One possible explanation would be that autism isn’t caused by latex and that Dochniak and Dunn are barking mad. In fact, that’s just about the only reasonable explanation.

    Interesting point: Mr. Dochniak’s LinkdIn profile (which I assume he wrote) lists his qualifications as a BS in “psychology/chemistry” (1985) and his work experience as “technical consultant” at Jasmine Elastomerics and Menelaus Technologies (which supplies baled natural rubber)and owner/co-founder (an article he wrote lists him as CTO) of Mallard Adhesives, which is apparently a consulting/design firm (the website hs been “under construction” since 2008).

    I see nothing (apart from a BS in psychology) that indicates he has the slightest qualification to discuss the etiology of autism. As I mention above, his hypothesis doesn’t even make superficial sense.

    What next? Will someone be claiming that the ink on the vaccine vials causes autism?

    It seems that the loons will not rest until they find something in/on/around vaccines that causes autism. Despite their monomania on the subject, data supporting their dogma has remained elusive (like El Dorado, often described but never seen).

    Prometheus

  30. #30 alison
    May 10, 2011

    Also, please stop talking about “Big Latex”, it is making me all hot & bothered.
    Herr doktor – I think you need to self-prescribe a nice cold shower…

  31. #31 Heliantus
    May 10, 2011

    Hevea brasiliensis dry natural rubber (HDNR), derived from the liquid latex found in natural rubber trees

    But wait, wait, that cannot be. It’s NATURAL rubber. And natural is safe!!!

    [/parody]

  32. #32 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    May 10, 2011

    The “epidemic” that I’ve noticed since I was growing up 50 years ago, is the enormous increase in allergies—life-threatening toxic-shock-type allergies, I mean. (I had asthma pretty bad as a kid and was allergic to a metric fuckton of stuff, so I’m aware allergies were prevalent then.)

    As a kid, I never heard of anybody being allergic to peanuts or strawberries or shellfish, or any of the myriad things people are allergic to nowadays, when it seems like 3/4 of the people I meet have some sort of really dangerous reaction to some very common substance. My girlfriend has a weird one–we finally figured out it was Annatto. Not really dangerous, but having a violent five-minute sneezing fit half an hour after eating cheddar cheese is kind of a strange thing.

    I suppose some nut has suggested that this enormous increase in allergies has been caused by vaccines—what haven’t they suggested is caused by vaccines? My point is that this is a real “epidemic” that I would be worried about, not an imaginary increase in some ill-defined mental condition that simply is used as a catch-all term for more and more different things and thus diagnosed much more often. There were a lot of weird kids in my school, and a lot weirder kids we never saw because they were institutionalized. Then Reagan emptied the mental hospitals out onto the street and everybody saw them. I don’t think there has been any real increase in “autism”, but believe me, if anybody in my cohort within a hundred miles had eaten a strawberry and keeled over dead, I would have heard about it!

  33. #33 daedalus4u
    May 10, 2011

    There was a comment on the thread covering the association with recommended vaccine number and infant death that pointed out that in the case of very premature infants they don’t give the HepB dose right away, but wait until the infant is bigger, so very premature infants would die before getting the vaccine. That just shows how deadly those vaccines are, they kill premature infants even before they get them!

    But wait, even pharma shill ghouls don’t inject vaccines into dead infants. It must be quantum spill-over from parallel universes where those infants survived and then were vaccinated that is killing those infants!

    But if vaccines in parallel universes are enough to cause infant deaths via quantum spill-over, then surely vaccines in parallel universes are enough to cause autism too.

    That is why the mercury that is causing autism can’t be found and why chelation does absolutely nothing to cure autism. It is the mercury that is still being used in a parallel universe that is causing autism in this universe. It is children in the parallel universe that need to be chelated!

    Using non-latex rubber in the seals of vaccine vials will do nothing to stop latex from causing autism. It is latex in parallel universes that is causing autism in this universe.

    That is why science can’t prove these things! Science is useless for proving what is happening in parallel universes and how those parallel universes are affecting us.

    On the other hand, according to The Secret, if you think very strongly that something will happen, then the thing you are thinking about does happen. It is all the anti-vax people that are responsible for the autism epidemic. They are very strongly thinking that autism is going up, that vaccines cause autism, and so, autism is going up and vaccines cause autism, whether they actually use vaccines or not!

  34. #34 Michelle
    May 10, 2011

    I’m not sure how this persists. This is something I’ll never understand.

  35. #35 Militant Agnostic
    May 10, 2011

    Prometheus @28

    Dochniak and Dunn are barking mad

    Isn’t that a requirement for being published in Medical Hypothesis?

    Interesting point: Mr. Dochniak’s LinkdIn profile (which I assume he wrote) lists his qualifications as a BS in “psychology/chemistry” (1985)

    I assume “psychology/chemistry” involves the copious consumption of psychoactive chemicals. The BS is an inevitable side effect.

    Orac – please go easy with the insolence when Medical Hypothesis publishes my paper linking fracing* (especially multi fracing horizontal wells) with autism.

    *”fracing” not “fracking” is the correct spelling since the the verb frac is an abbreviation for hydraulic fracturing.

  36. #36 NJ
    May 10, 2011

    MA @ 34:

    Orac – please go easy with the insolence when Medical Hypothesis publishes my paper linking fracing* (especially multi fracing horizontal wells) with autism.

    Ahhh, but then Neil Craig will pop up to accuse you of being an eco-fascist or eco-Nazi or maybe an eco-Bin Laden and add to his #:nil count of arguments he imagines he has won.

  37. #37 Matthew Cline
    May 10, 2011

    I suppose some nut has suggested that this enormous increase in allergies has been caused by vaccines—what haven’t they suggested is caused by vaccines?

    I remember at least one anti-vaxxer saying that allergies didn’t exist before vaccines.

  38. #38 Melissa G
    May 10, 2011

    I wish antivaxxers would just come right out and say what’s REALLY bothering them: “TEH NEEDLEZ IZ SCARYYYYYYYY!!!!”

  39. #39 daedalus4u
    May 10, 2011

    Nah, allergies and autism are caused by the same thing, not latex but being too clean.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=a3mwmXzpsjkC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA103#v=onepage&q&f=false

  40. #40 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    May 11, 2011

    I can kind of believe the “too clean” theory–except we baby-boomers were practically raised in bubbles compared to any previous generation, so you’d think we’d be the ones poleaxed by peanut butter. Maybe when baby-boomer mothers went on to have kids their immune systems were subtly defective and couldn’t protect the fetus the way they were supposed to?

    The difference is, if you want wild speculation from me, you don’t have to pay for it.

  41. #41 Liz Ditz
    May 11, 2011

    more autism causation woo

    The vaccines the parents received

    Too much prenatal ultrasound

    Vitamin something underdose

    etc.

  42. #42 shawna.burt
    May 11, 2011

    Seriously?

    Seriously?!

    Is there nothing they won’t blame?

  43. #43 Narad
    May 11, 2011

    Is there nothing they won’t blame?

    Do you mean the transgenerational effect of vaccines? Yah, that’s common as dirt. I haven’t quite figured out the “religious” objections to PKU testing, though.

  44. #44 MikeMa
    May 11, 2011

    One of the worst effects of these insane conspiracies and unsupported graspings is that it detracts from real efforts to help those with autism and often siphons money away from legitimate research.

  45. #45 technically impartial
    May 11, 2011

    I know it’s not April 1, but Orac must be joking about this *clicks on Amazon link*

    He’s not. Oh, sweet lord, this is happening. Someone is actually blaming latex for… so, out of idle interest, does this mean that nearly every person who has used contraception is now at risk, or am I taking the lunatic idiocy a little too far there? I only ask because morbid curiosity is compelling me to find out exactly how far this goes.

  46. #46 Andreas Schaefer
    May 11, 2011

    If the “Autism Epedemic” coincides with the decline in the use of latex it is obviois that the latex was protecting the kids and the lack of latex is causing the autism.

    Just saying. Seriously the anti-vaxers always come up with new stuff.

  47. #47 reasonablehank
    May 11, 2011

    They may have a point. There is latex in condoms; when the parents conceive, the ejaculant is caught in the latex barrier which then would indeed affect the sperm travelling to the… oh no, wait. Not that. Carry on.

  48. #48 triskelethecat
    May 11, 2011

    @daedalus4u (#33): I LOL’d. What a wonderful, snarky comment. (I realize I’ve been away for a while due to personal issues, but when did your “2″ become a “4″? Or have I been crazy..which is always possible..)

  49. #49 Kristen
    May 11, 2011

    Thank you for the information Lilady. I’ll go read the article you suggested.

  50. #50 Vera
    May 11, 2011

    cordialdestruction @8

    And that’s why homeopathy can help!

    If it causes symptoms in healthy people, it will cure them in sick people.

  51. #51 Mu
    May 11, 2011

    amy +10 internets, but unfortunately wrong: External latex application (or does that count as internal) doesn’t cause autism, it’s the injection directly into the bloodstream that makes it so devastating (which also explains why the removal of latex from gloves didn’t change anything).

  52. #52 Old Rockin' Dave
    May 11, 2011

    Of course it’s not the latex. It’s the adhesive that holds the label on the vaccine vials. It alters the non-crystalline amorphous structure of the glass, which causes the vaccine in solution to take on a harmful energy structure (don’t ask what kind of energy. We only play scientists on television.).

  53. #53 kd
    May 11, 2011

    @Prometheus

    What next? Will someone be claiming that the ink on the vaccine vials causes autism?

    No, silly, it’s the vial itself! In my soon-to-be-published paper, I describe how the slightly alkaline pH of the vaccine solution etches the vial over time, causing a buildup of microscopic silica particles which cause irreparable CNS damage upon vaccine administration.

    We need to make the public more aware of the dangers of the use of glass medication vials for storage of solutions of non-neutral pH! The health and well-being of our children may be at stake!

    I just purchased a chemistry degree from a non-accredited online university (it was on sale for 50% off this week only!) and am already at work submitting my hypothesis for publication by the highly-respected National Vaccine Information Center.

    Big Silica has victimized our children for far too long!

  54. #54 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 11, 2011

    Hey Prometheus,

    Your sarcasm is funny! I remember you attacked the allergy-induced regressive-autism etiology many years ago. Hope you read the book!

    Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  55. #55 JayK
    May 11, 2011

    Wow, Prometheus, you really hooked a big one! Congrats.

    Maybe Michael J. Dochniak can tell us why he publishes in Medical Hypothesis rather than a respectable journal, or why he publishes books instead of having peer-reviewed journals publish his hypothesis about allergies?

    As well, it looks like Nova Science Publishing will pretty much put out anything that looks plausible and charge exorbitant prices for it. Tell me, Mr. Dochniak, do you think you deserved “#5,625,032 in Books” from Amazon?

  56. #56 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    May 11, 2011

    So let’s assume just for a second that subcutaneous exposure to latex proteins is the major cause of autism. Are there any other ways that someone could be so exposed except for vaccines? Will there be a campaign against those?

  57. #57 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    Actually the Pink Book is scheduled to be revised and available shortly. I located the updated packaging for vials of vaccines at:

    Entire Contents of Pink Book Appendix B

    On Pages 19-20 in Appendix B (February 2011) you will find the presence of latex in certain vaccine vial ports or stoppers and syringes. Also, there is a Pink Book Errata that states some additional vaccines’ packaging contains latex (May, 2011)

    @ Michael J. Dochniak: I still don’t believe your child is “vaccine injured” and your theory has absolutely no scientific basis.

  58. #58 Calli Arcale
    May 11, 2011

    Mephistopheles — no, latex certainly isn’t used anywhere else besides medicine, and subcutaneous injuries involving latex are completely unheard of outside of vaccines.

    And birthday parties, of course. And amusement parks. And restaurants. And car dealerships. And hairdressers. And anywhere else that kids often are given cheap balloons in a futile effort to get them to settle down and stop tearing around like maniacs. :-D

  59. #59 daedalus4u
    May 11, 2011

    triskelethecat, they are both me, it depends which account I log in under.

  60. #60 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    @ Calli Arcale: Let’s not forget that the cheap balloons come packed with a powdery substance (drying agent?) and that they are manufactured in third or fourth world countries…where “powdery substances” may not be harmless.

    Dochniak’s child obviously was treated for asthma in the Emergency Room (See my take on the episode at #24 above).

    Given the two alternatives of latex-induced autism and oatmeal-induced autism…I opt for oatmeal as the trigger.

  61. #61 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    May 11, 2011

    lilady –

    latex certainly isn’t used anywhere else besides medicine, and subcutaneous injuries involving latex are completely unheard of outside of vaccines.

    Whew. Glad we’ve got that cleared up. :)

  62. #62 Yojimbo
    May 11, 2011

    Someone needs to write a paper on Oatmeal Induced Autism – and then call a press conference…

  63. #63 JoeKaistoe
    May 11, 2011

    @60 lilady

    The powder is to prevent latex from sticking to itself and is usually corn starch or talcum powder. While most very cheap balloons are made in China and Mexico, it’s a highly automated manufacturing process, with manufacturers in US, Canada, France, etc.

    I’ve heard of some claims that many allergies to latex may actually be allergies to the powder used to keep it from sticking together. I think this is why most latex/nitride gloves are now powderless gloves.

  64. #64 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    @ Yojimbo: I’m working on the “Oatmeal-Induced Autism” paper in addition to developing my theories of “Condom-Induced Autism” and “Condom Use is Protective Against Autism”.

    I’ll let you guys know when I call press conferences and promise me that you will be supportive of me when Orac blogs about my press conferences.

  65. #65 Prometheus
    May 11, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak remarks:

    “Hey Prometheus,
    Your sarcasm is funny! I remember you attacked the allergy-induced regressive-autism etiology many years ago. Hope you read the book!”

    I would hope that Mr. Dochniak will read the comments above (including my own) and provide some explanation for why his hypothesis fails to account for the simultaneous rise in autism prevalence (at least, administrative autism prevalence) and decline in the medical use of latex. That would be far more welcome than a “pat on the back” for my humour.

    Also, I don’t see how pointing up obvious flaws in the hypothesis constitutes an “attack”.

    As for reading his book, I’d rather not have to spend $43 and lose irretrievable hours out of my life to get one simple question answered. I see no reason why I should pay money to see him defend his hypothesis.

    BTW, Mr. Dochniak, in your Amazon.com biographical sketch, you describe yourself thus:

    “Michael J. Dochniak is a leading researcher in allergy-induce [sic] regressive autism.”

    Two questions:

    [1] You describe yourself as a researcher; your published works include your two books and one paper in Medical Hypotheses (2007). Apart from formulating a hypothesis, what research have you done?

    [2] Since you seem to be the only “researcher” looking at “allergy-induced regressive autism”, shouldn’t you be “The leading researcher…”?

    I don’t doubt Mr. Dochniak’s credentials as the parent of an autistic child (credentials I hold, as well), but I see no reason to think that he has made an insightful breakthrough into the nature of autism. If he would like to present his arguments, I would be eager to hear them.

    Prometheus

  66. #66 herr doktor bimler
    May 11, 2011

    Someone needs to write a paper on Oatmeal Induced Autism

    That explains a great deal about the Scots.

  67. #67 Laura
    May 11, 2011

    Before forming an opinion, I would like to see if the theory is explained in the book and the explanation is reasonable. If latex is somehow being injected with the vaccine it might be much more likely to cause an immune system problem, than latex in clothing or in gloves.
    And what evidence is there for problems from latex in vaccines? People who are very allergic to latex aren’t supposed to get vaccines with latex packaging, but beyond that? I found something on Medline but it’s extremely preliminary.
    The theory shouldn’t be derided without knowing this.

  68. #68 ArtK
    May 11, 2011

    Laura,

    Most importantly, you need a plausible mechanism that connects allergic reactions to autism. Followed by research confirming that connection. Then you can start asking about the latex being carried along with the injection being a cause.

    But then, there’s an easier place to start. Is there a strong statistical association between any vaccine injection and autism that can’t be explained more simply? Answer: No. So we don’t need to spend a lot of time looking for the possible steps in a process that doesn’t happen.

  69. #69 Laura
    May 11, 2011

    The “epidemic” that I’ve noticed since I was growing up 50 years ago, is the enormous increase in allergies—life-threatening toxic-shock-type allergies

    Also autoimmune diseases are on the rise, and I get the impression it’s a real increase, not just an increase in diagnosis. I think there is some evidence that regressive autism has an autoimmune aspect.

    There are 7 houses on the street I live on, and 3 women here – that I know of – have autoimmune diseases. Including me, unfortunately.

  70. #70 Rogue Epidemiologist
    May 11, 2011

    Just for kicks, I looked up ISI impact factors for some journals.

    Journal of infectious Diseases – ISI impact 5.865
    Clinical Infectious Diseases – ISI impact 8.195
    New England Journal of Medicine – ISI impact 47.080

    Medical Hypotheses – ISI impact 1.393
    (whomp, whomp)

  71. #71 Laura
    May 11, 2011

    @ArtK
    The link I gave was to a Chinese paper exploring a possible latex/autism connection.
    The reality of the situation is too complicated to summarily dismiss it.
    The immune system is capable of extravagant sensitivity.

  72. #72 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    Laura stated “People who are very allergic to latex aren’t supposed to get vaccines with latex packaging…”

    Come on Laura what does “very allergic mean” and please provide us with your citation.

  73. #73 Laura
    May 11, 2011

    I don’t think anything at all allergenic should be anywhere near a vaccine. They probably shouldn’t use natural latex since it contains a major allergen.
    If you are going to give an injection to the general public it should be very, very clean of allergens. Perhaps especially important when giving injections to children.

  74. #74 Laura
    May 11, 2011

    @lilady
    OK, citation

  75. #75 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    Laura, that is your opinion…based on non-science. Please provide us with any citations regarding immunizations given to the general public or given to children where “very allergic” is a contraindication to immunization. Again I ask what does “very allergic” mean?

  76. #76 ArtK
    May 11, 2011

    The link I gave was to a Chinese paper exploring a possible latex/autism connection.
    The reality of the situation is too complicated to summarily dismiss it.
    The immune system is capable of extravagant sensitivity.

    Since the paper is behind a pay-wall, I can’t look at it, but the abstract is interesting. It posits no connection between the immune issues and autism, other than a simple correlation. There’s no mention of any mechanism.

    As others have noted, the connection is tenuous at best, given that children’s overall exposure to latex has decreased while autism diagnoses have increased.

    As my first psych TA beat into our heads “correlation is not causation.” This is especially true when you have a tiny sample size (one family.) Both autism and a latex sensitivity may be carried on the same chromosome in this family, to give an explanation that is as likely as any saying that the sensitivity causes the autism.

    Any correlation between vaccines and autism incidence is well explained by shifting diagnostic criteria. Occam’s Razor tells us we don’t have to go looking for more esoteric explanations in this case.

    I’m not going to get all excited about a self-published book (CreateSpace is a vanity publisher.) A book by a self-proclaimed “expert” who publishes in a miserable excuse for a journal — the journal equivalent of CreateSpace, in fact. While the Chinese paper is interesting, it in no way makes up for the lack of credibility that Dochniak suffers from.

  77. #77 LW
    May 11, 2011

    “I don’t think anything at all allergenic should be anywhere near a vaccine.”

    Allergenic to whom? Practically everything is (or at least has been claimed to be) allergenic to *somebody*.

  78. #78 ArtK
    May 11, 2011

    Just for laughs, I went and looked at Dochniak’s author page on Amazon. There was a discussion thread (well, really one post and no responses), titled “EPA rejects ‘safer’ natural latex for tires”. The body of the post was:

    The EPA has denied a citizen petition that requests a regulation requiring tire manufacturers to use ultra low protein dry natural rubber. The citizen is concerned about latex allergies and allergy induced autism. See disposition below:

    http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/2010-3414.htm

    That led me to the EPA response to the citizen petition and thence to the petition. Guess who submitted the petition? Mr. Dochniak himself. Much of the “supporting” references in the docket are Dochniak’s publications.

    Methinks the guy has some kind of latex fetish. Crank magnetism anyone?

    His author page has the same link to the Chinese study that Laura provided and very little else. Pretty thin gruel there.

  79. #79 Enkidu
    May 11, 2011

    Slightly OT, but talk about taking advantage of parents’ fears! I stumbled upon this site today:
    VacciShield

    WTH

  80. #80 Laura
    May 11, 2011

    @ArtK Sure, the authors of the Chinese paper speculate on a mechanism. They say “we hypothesize that immune reactions triggered by close contact with natural rubber latex might influence the functions of B lymphocytes by altering expression of certain proteins identified in our experiments thus contributing to the occurrence of autism.”
    The latex-vaccine connection is just a hypothesis. But it isn’t a ridiculous hypothesis, as some people here seem to think. We can’t logically conclude that it’s false, just from the fact that it’s a theory that posits harm caused by vaccines.
    The first question I’d have about contentions that there is no observed correlation between vaccines with latex and autism, is whether anyone has measured this. Not all vaccines are packaged in latex.
    Keeping allergens out of vaccines isn’t a question of science as much as a question of values and public policy. Something that’s injected into the general public, especially children, ought to have as few ingredients other than the medically necessary ones, as possible. On general principles, because people do have adverse reactions to various chemicals and proteins, and we don’t know everything about the body’s reaction to all those impurities. People do apparently have adverse reactions to the latex in vaccines, at least such adverse reactions were reported in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. It is safer to make these injections as pure as possible; especially they should be free of major allergens like latex. Something that’s injected on a large scale should be as free of *possible* side effects from allergens etc. as is consistent with the medical purpose, not just not just free of known side effects.
    A doctor gave me a steroid nasal spray once, and I was worried I might have an immune reaction to it. He said, “look, they make those things for people who have a lot of allergies and sensitivities, they are designed to be hypoallergenic”. It turned out I was OK with it.
    The same principle ought to be applied to vaccines that are given to children – they should be designed to be very hypoallergenic since children commonly have allergies and sensitivities.

  81. #81 JayK
    May 11, 2011

    @Laura: You’re attempting to play the Jenny McCarthy gambit, one where you claim you aren’t anti-vaccine, but you want green vaccines, or clean vaccines, or perfect vaccines. You don’t necessarily understand the science, which is clearly evident by the fact you accept that the authors of your cited piece claim to understand a cause of autism, but you sure know what you want. You think it is possible, because you got a steroid once that was hypoallergenic?

    You also show absolutely no acknowledgement of the rate of allergic reactions to vaccine, you don’t seem to understand that herd immunity protects those that can’t/shouldn’t be vaccinated (or the vaccination isn’t effective), and you think VAERS is a scientific citation. It isn’t. It is a legal tool where lawyers and laypeople make claims against vaccines in order to increase their chances of winning settlements, or in order to cloud the data. VAERS is barely useful at this point.

    So I have to wonder, what game are you trying to play? Which website are you using to appear “reasonable”? In fact, the link you provide indicates a high probability of woo. You should watch Storm to get a feeling of what I think about your “explanations”.

  82. #82 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 11, 2011

    Refuse vaccines that have latex warnings. Read the book and you’ll understand why.

    Michael J. Dochniak

  83. #83 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    @ Laura: You have no citations about your statement “People who are very allergic to latex aren’t supposed to get vaccines with latex packaging”…

    The majority of people who have reactions to latex have a “topical” reaction, not an anaphylactic reaction. There are no contraindications to administering any vaccine to adults or children who have this topical reaction. In the rare case of a known prior anaphylactic latex event, then an immunization would be contraindicated…except if the risk to not getting immunized exceeds the risk of exposure to latex.

    As I stated in a prior post there has been only once case ever reported/documented of an anaphylactic reaction to an immunization (hepatitis B vaccine) occurring in a person with a prior history of an anaphylactic reaction to latex.

    Laura…take some science courses please, before you post again with your sweeping generalities/unscientific opinions.

  84. #84 ArtK
    May 11, 2011

    @Laura

    @ArtK Sure, the authors of the Chinese paper speculate on a mechanism. They say “we hypothesize that immune reactions triggered by close contact with natural rubber latex might influence the functions of B lymphocytes by altering expression of certain proteins identified in our experiments thus contributing to the occurrence of autism.”

    No, that’s a correlation. How does the altered expression of certain proteins contribute to the occurrence of autism? What’s the mechanism by which those altered proteins produce the symptoms of autism? Do they effect neurotransmitters? If so, which ones and how? Do they effect how neurons grow in the brain? Again, how do they affect that?

    Simply saying “these proteins are different in people with autism” says nothing about how those proteins cause the autism. It would be just as (in-)correct to say that autism causes those proteins to be different. Or (most likely) that some third thing is causing both.

    The latex-vaccine connection is just a hypothesis. But it isn’t a ridiculous hypothesis, as some people here seem to think. We can’t logically conclude that it’s false, just from the fact that it’s a theory that posits harm caused by vaccines.

    You’re right, that it’s just an hypothesis. A tremendously weak, badly supported hypothesis. Supported by the writing of one crank and one paper that talks about a correlation between allergies and autism in one family, leaving wide open a great number of confounding factors (primarily a genetic cause for both the autism and the latex allergy.) A hypothesis that is unsupported by any correlation between latex exposure and subsequent autism. If latex exposure decreases while autism incidence increases, that’s a strike against this hypothesis. It also fails to explain the many people who have latex allergies who aren’t autistic.

    It’s a hypothesis that is weak because it lacks any explanation of how latex, or an allergic response to latex, causes autism.

    Let me try to explain the difference between a correlation and causation. We’ll start with an observation: Several people die from a form of paralysis after eating food from cans, where the cans were bulging prior to opening. There’s a correlation between bulging cans and subsequent death. But we can’t say that the bulging cans caused the deaths. So, we investigate further.

    We find that the bulging cans have colonies of Clostridium botulinum, while the non-bulging cans don’t. Ah, so now we have a correlation between C. botulinum and death by paralysis. But we still don’t have a mechanism. More investigation is needed.

    We find that C. botulinum produces a chemical, call it “botulin toxin.” We find that botulin toxin interferes with the operation of nerves, especially nerves that are firing rapidly, by blocking the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. Et voilà, we now have a fully-formed hypothesis that includes an explanation of how this works, not just a correlation.

  85. #85 ArtK
    May 11, 2011

    @ Michael Dochniak

    Refuse vaccines that have latex warnings. Read the book and you’ll understand why.

    How ’bout some peer-reviewed science backing this up, not a self-published book? I have no desire to enrich you. If you’ve got scientific evidence that latex is a cause of autism, you owe it to the world to publish so that scientists can try to replicate your investigations. Provide proof and I can guarantee that the folks at AoA and the “safe vaccines” militia will enrich you beyond anything your book can do (cf. Andrew Wakefield.)

    Without that you’re just another crank with a latex fetish.

  86. #86 JayK
    May 11, 2011

    Shorter Michael J. Dochniak: Buy my book, please!

    As I implied before, books are not scientific, they aren’t peer reviewed and you’re a quack.

  87. #87 lilady
    May 11, 2011

    @ Dochniak: Why would we ever read your book? When I read a book I want to know if it’s fiction or non-fiction…your book is neither. Just another celebrity expert wannabe…too bad Jenny got there ahead of you.

  88. #88 JayK
    May 11, 2011

    Oh holy crap, I’m sorry, I did a horrible job researching Michael J. Dochniak. Turns out that he has a profit motive behind demonizing latex! He’s got multiple patents out on alternative compounds to replace latex.

    http://www.vytex.com/BizDocs/ASCVystar4609.pdf

    Wow, Dochniak, you’re not a quack, you’re much worse. It appears you’re basing everything off of one paper published in Cairo that hasn’t been repeated. http://iospress.metapress.com/content/w6820728082nu597/

  89. #89 ArtK
    May 12, 2011

    Good job JayK!

    I have a post in moderation (probably due to a link), but I found that Mr. Dochniak petitioned the EPA to ban natural latex in tires. The EPA said “no.”

    Cool. We’ve got a Fake-Rubber Shill!

  90. #90 lilady
    May 12, 2011

    @ JayK: Good for you..finding Dochniak’s expertise in “green adhesives” (latex).

    I don’t think that latex adhesives would be appropriate for caps on vaccines though; perhaps cork (it’s natural) would be a viable alternative. But, then there’s the problem with cork in syringes…

  91. #91 DLC
    May 12, 2011

    And when this one turns into a non-starter, it’ll be the plastic the syringes are made of, and then the metal the needles are made from, and then the ceramic on the toilet bowl this idea should have been flushed down.

  92. #92 Kristen
    May 12, 2011

    Two personal observations:

    1) IFAIK autism is not an immune disorder according to information we now have.

    2) There is no proof that any latex (any quantity at all) remains on the needle and is injected in most cases.

    Seems to me before looking at possible immune system disorder type causes there would have to be some (credible) evidence that autism is an immune dysfunction. But IANAS, someone who is one is free to correct me.

  93. #93 Prometheus
    May 12, 2011

    The paper that Laura cites:

    Shen C, et al. A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism. J Mol Neurosci. 2011 Mar;43(3):443-52.

    In this study, the authors used an antibody “chip” to probe the production of 500 B-lymphocyte-associated proteins in a single family with multiple autistic members (i.e. an apparent genetic cause for their autism). They found that the autistic members showed different levels of four (out of 500) of the proteins in the autistic members of the family.

    At this point, the authors segue into a discussion of how the family is exposed to natural rubber latex and how this might be the cause of the autism, presumably because the autistic members were – as the result of the four B-lymphocyte-associated proteins having different levels – predisposed to have an adverse immune reaction to latex.

    I found the differences in the proteomic profiles of the autistic and non-autistic members of the family questionable enough, but the jump from what appeared to be a straightforward “genetic mutation leading to immune dysfunction” result to a “it might be the latex” conclusion left me dizzy and disoriented. I think they should re-examine their conclusion, since their data don’t appear to support it (nor, in fact, do their data appear to be even vaguely relevant to their conclusion).

    It has been illuminating to see that there are environmental niches of autism crankery that I had not previously even heard of. I thank you for this, Orac, and also Mr. Dochniak.

    Mr. Dochniak seems to have learnt his debating style from Andrew “Read My Book” Wakefield. Here’s a tip, Mr. Dochniak: I’m not going to buy your book to find out the gist of your argument if you aren’t confident enough of it to give us at least a capsule summary. Maybe if my local library wastes public funds to buy a copy, I’ll check it out for my next long trip. Maybe not.

    Again, I don’t doubt Mr. Dochniak’s sincerity (although, given his position to financially benefit from his “hypothesis”, I probably should); what I doubt are his data (which appear to be nil).

    Of course, I am always open to being surprised. Surprise me, Mr. Dochniak – show us your data.

    Prometheus

  94. #94 Prometheus
    May 12, 2011

    I should have included a bit more information about the Shen et al paper:

    [1] The study looked at a single nuclear family with three (3) autistic children and three (3) neurotypical children.

    [2] The parents run a “natural rubber production business”.

    [3] No tests for latex allergy were done on any member of the family.

    [4] No tests for latex protein reactivity were done on lymphocytes from any member of the family.

    [5] The sole citation to support the authors’ claim that latex might cause autism was Mr. Dochniak’s Medical Hypotheses article.

    [6] The authors suggest studying the prevalence/incidence of autism among families that work with latex, but acknowledge that there is no data suggesting that this prevalence/incidence is any higher than in the general population.

    Perhaps Mr. Dochniak could apply his research accumen to determining if there is an elevated risk of autism among the children of latex workers. This would significantly bolter his hypothesis, which currently appears to be completely lacking in data.

    Prometheus

  95. #95 ArtK
    May 12, 2011

    @Prometheus

    Thanks for the analysis of the article. That confirms the promise of the abstract — a lot of hand-waving resulting in a weak case of guilt-by-association. It’s nothing but an anecdote wrapped up in “sciency” language.

    It makes me wonder about the quality of the journal where it was published.

  96. #96 Anglachel the Common Sense Pagan
    May 12, 2011

    I’m surprised they haven’t started blaming the demons, the pagans and the Jews yet. I don’t imagine it will be long before they do.

    Because it is always the demons, the pagans, and the jews! Don’t you know we are in a conspiracy with Big Pharma to make the world sick and then rule a world devoid of people?

    *rolls eyes*

    And these kind of folks is one of the reasons why I remain anti-social!

  97. #97 Yojimbo
    May 12, 2011

    @79 Enkidu – Continuing the OT, I checked out the VacciShield site. Almost nothing on the page loaded properly for me. Naturally, the one thing that does load is the store.

    “Dammit Jim! I’m a salesman, not a doctor!”

  98. #98 Laura
    May 12, 2011

    Michael Dochniak’s paper in Medical Hypotheses is available online.
    He talks a lot about possible mechanisms for a latex-autism connection, indeed there is a superabundance of mechanisms :)
    He doesn’t mention vaccines specifically. There are lots of references, which may be worth exploring.

  99. #99 Enkidu
    May 12, 2011

    @Yojimbo: Oops, just delete the words “Home Page” from the end of the URL and you’ll get to the site.

  100. #100 The Gregarious Misanthrope
    May 12, 2011

    @lilady

    I think you’re on to something there. Condom use can indeed prevent autism in children. The fact that condom use also prevents children is merely coincidental.

    ———-

    In the spirit of the good non-Dr. Dochniak, I, The Gregarious Misanthrope, do hereby declare myself to be a world-renowned expert on the theory that the rise of quantum/magnetic/ion-enhanced power bracelets are driving the perceived increase in large earthquakes and are the item prophesied by the Maya to bring about the end of time. This all occurs via a mechanism that you can read about in my book: “The rise of quantum/magnetic/ion-enhanced power bracelets are driving the perceived increase in large earthquakes and are the item prophesied by the Maya to bring about the end of time,” soon to be available on Amazon.

  101. #101 herr doktor bimler
    May 12, 2011

    [2] The parents run a “natural rubber production business”.

    So according to Laura, environmental exposure to latex is not an issue because “If latex is somehow being injected with the vaccine it might be much more likely to cause an immune system problem, than latex in clothing or in gloves.”

    But then the citation she and Dochniak present to support this possibility is about… environmental exposure to latex.

    ** Double headpalm **

  102. #102 Calli Arcale
    May 12, 2011

    I have only just now noticed that Mr Dochniak is a fellow resident of the Twin Cities. How embarrassing.

  103. #103 Antaeus Feldspar
    May 12, 2011

    People do apparently have adverse reactions to the latex in vaccines, at least such adverse reactions were reported in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Since all VAERS can record is what someone claims is an adverse event that happened to them in what they consider to be significant temporal proximity to a vaccine, jumping to the conclusion that such adverse events are not just caused by the vaccine, but thereby proved to be caused specifically by latex in the vaccines, is a little like saying “There are people who have reported that after they ate fast food, their tummies got upset. This proves that the meat served by the KFC chain is actually the artificial species Animal 57, and that some people are allergic to Animal 57 meat.”

  104. #104 ArtK
    May 12, 2011

    Re: VacciShield

    Let’s see now. “As seen in Mothering Magazine”? Check! Quack Miranda? Check! Testimonials? Check! Buy our product now? Check!

  105. #105 Michelle
    May 12, 2011

    This may be old news, or posted in a different thread, but Maryland has upheld the suspension of Mark Geier:

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-nw-autism-doctor-hearing-20110511,0,1449963.story

  106. #106 lilady
    May 12, 2011

    @ Michelle: Not “old news” for me, but “good news”…Trine Tsouderos and Meridith Cohn are on the case of Dr. Greier…now when is David Greier going to be prosecuted for practicing medicine without a license?

    It’s interesting, that in an attempt to forestall suspension of his license, Dr. Greier provided some affidavits from parents who “swear” that they weren’t mislead by Dr. Grier and are supporting him. Time for referrals now, to Medicaid Fraud Bureaus and to private insurance companies who paid for chemical castration…as well as Child Protective Services bureaus to investigate the parents who were complicit in child abuse by castrating their children.

  107. #107 Laura
    May 12, 2011

    So according to Laura, environmental exposure to latex is not an issue because “If latex is somehow being injected with the vaccine it might be much more likely to cause an immune system problem, than latex in clothing or in gloves.” But then the citation she and Dochniak present to support this possibility is about… environmental exposure to latex.

    I NEVER said environmental exposure to latex is not an issue. Obviously it is. There are many people who are sensitive to latex. If latex is actually injected, it gets past immune system barriers, like skin, and it has more of a chance to cause immune reactions.
    What I said was that Dochniak’s hypothesis isn’t ridiculous. It can be investigated. He came up with all sorts of ideas about how latex might cause problems in his paper.
    You are welcome to call homeopathy or other sorts of wackery ridiculous. Things that really do not have a possible mechanism other than suggestion.
    But, the idea that latex might be some kind of central allergen, causing immune system problems in certain people, is not in the same category.
    Actually, to me it makes more sense to hypothesize that an immune system reaction might cause problems with vaccines, than the idea that mercury in the vaccines might be causing subtle toxicity. Because the immune system is quite capable of reacting to tiny quantities. That’s what it’s designed for. It seems more likely than tiny quantities of “toxins” affecting people.
    I don’t have a preconceived idea one way or the other about whether latex might cause problems in vaccines.
    I have NO problem with the idea that if you’ve have an anaphylactic reaction to latex, you should avoid vaccines with latex. That’s what the CDC says, and it seems like a very standard sort of warning that comes with a lot of drugs: If you’re allergic to some ingredient, don’t use the drug. I also wouldn’t be in the slightest surprised that some people who have severe latex reactions have had reactions to vaccines.
    People seem to be arguing about the CDC’s warning about latex as if it were significant. It is totally beside the point. Dochniak is NOT hypothesizing that a few people who have anaphylactic reactions to latex in vaccines, are harmed by them (obviously, they are). The hypothesis is that a much larger proportion of children, say 1% or perhaps 1/1000, have a much more subtle reaction to tiny amounts of latex in vaccines, and that it can prime the immune system to start having reactions to foods, push it towards allergy, etc.
    I think a “well, maybe” attitude is a LOT more rational than everybody jumping into a Two-Minute Hate, throwing a lot of scorn at Dochniak, when Orac gives the go-ahead. You know, in the novel “1984″, the state allowed people to release emotional pressure by getting together in a room and screaming at the Nominated Enemy, for two minutes. The comments on this blog sometimes remind me of that.
    I have some sympathy with the latex idea because I know how badly gluten can mess up people’s immune systems. So it seems possible that other substances could do so also. I know that the immune system is extremely complex and not well understood. It doesn’t at all mean I’m a “true believer” in latex being the root cause of a lot of immune system problems, or in tiny amounts of injected latex in vaccines causing problems. I just don’t think it’s a stupid idea.
    Dochniak was apparently involved in coming up with a process to make hypoallergenic latex, with almost all of the allergenic proteins taken out. Of course if latex in vaccines *were* a major cause of autism, that would be very good news, since we could very simply prevent a lot of autism.

  108. #108 JayK
    May 12, 2011

    Laura, you’re conflating vaccines with autism when there is no statistical link, which is exactly what Dochniak did, on top of the fact that he has a profit motive to scare people into approving his patented formula. There is NO evidence that latex causes autism. None. Zero, zilch. There is evidence against latex in vaccines causing autism.

    What kind of proof will you accept? How many studies showing that there is no increase or decrease with changes in latex packaging?

    And why are you supporting Dochniak? Co-conspirator? The idea that latex might be linked seems to be a very very small crowd that has only gotten vocal in the last year, and most of that has been in the past two months.

  109. #109 Narad
    May 12, 2011

    And why are you supporting Dochniak? Co-conspirator?

    Very good mathematician and beautiful woman.

  110. #110 JayK
    May 12, 2011

    So what does “very good mathematician” mean? Can she calculate the tip better than the other engineers?

    Perhaps she can calculate the frequency of vaccine latex allergic reactions for the rest of us that must not be “very good mathematicians”.

    At the very least, Laura, you could have cited Mostofa or any of a growing number of real scientists that are actually studying allergic reactions in some autistic children and done your homework. Tip for ya, don’t hitch your wagon to a crank like Dochniak. Keep in mind, as well, that autism is a spectrum disorder, so any clustering would need to be well understood before trying to tie correlation to a pet theory. Dochniak didn’t do that work.

  111. #111 lilady
    May 12, 2011

    Contact allergy to latex gloves is more prevalent amongst health care workers and those who work in laboratories. Consequently, most non-sterile gloves are now made with other materials as are sterile gloves.

    Anaphylaxis due to latex contact has been reported in people undergoing certain invasive diagnostic tests (endoscopy, colonoscopy, heart catheterization) as well as those having intermittent catheterization or those with indwelling catheters. Anaphylactic reactions have been reported by using latex condoms, as well. The overwhelming majority of allergic reactions are topical following exposures to objects in the home environment or clothing that is woven with latex.

    Kids who have had frequent exposure to latex due to frequent hospitalizations in their early years may be more prone to developing of a latex allergy

    That is why latex gloves…sterile and non-sterile and catheters are now manufactured using different materials such as neoprene.

    As I stated before, when I worked in public health where physicians and nurses administered tens of thousands of vaccines during special immunization clinics and hundreds of thousands of vaccines administered by staff in seven busy public health clinics, we never had a case of anaphylactic reaction to a vaccine (they were dispensed from glass vials with latex ports). Kids and adults who are scheduled for an immunization, must fill out a screening paper so that staff does not put the patient at risk.

    The CDC reports only one anaphylactic episode in a patient with a known prior anaphylatic reaction to latex, after receiving a hepatitis B vaccine.

    Latex allergy causing autism…I don’t think so.

  112. #112 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 13, 2011

    In the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” co-author Ms. Dunn and I describe how genetic material (i.e., mRNA) from HDNR can leach into the vaccine solution, affecting adaptive immunity and allergy-induced regressiove autism.

    Children are not immune to the vaccine learning-curve.

    Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  113. #113 Lawrence
    May 13, 2011

    Wow – another “BUY MY BOOK – it explains everything that I can’t obviously explain here.”

  114. #114 LW
    May 13, 2011

    If certain children are so acutely allergic to latex that the minute quantity of latex that might be carried into the body by an injection would cause profound and permanent effects on the brain, wouldn’t that allergy be pretty obvious every time they came contact with latex at any time in their lives?

    Moreover, I assume other injections also carry along minute quantities of latex; we should therefore expect to see higher rates of autism in children who receive injections for any other reasons, e.g., surgery. Do we?

  115. #115 _Arthur
    May 13, 2011

    “Moreover, I assume other injections also carry along minute quantities of latex; we should therefore expect to see higher rates of autism in children who receive injections for any other reasons”

    Like, say, childhood diabetes. We should see a huge cohort of autistic diabetic children, due to the latex contamination when they inject.

    Do we ?

  116. #116 JayK
    May 13, 2011

    I’ve been at this vaccine thing for a bit, and the term “vaccine learning-curve” is something I’m totally unfamiliar with. Perhaps the crank could explain this new term that he just pulled out of his nether regions?

    Dochniak has no evidence, but he has a hypothesis, and that’s good enough for him and Laura, it appears. Enter it into the lexicon, people! Latex allergies in vaccines cause autism because some guy with a profit-motive said so.

  117. #117 Beamup
    May 13, 2011

    Not just a hypothesis – a hypothesis that’s inconsistent with the data. You know, which is already indicated to be false.

  118. #118 Denice Walter
    May 13, 2011

    @ JayK- the woo-meisters I review use the term “learning curve” to signify what SBM ( reality-based) folks like us need to “learn” in order to catch up to their latest innovations ( i.e. fictions) since they’re “so ahead of the curve”- I doubt that any of them have studied actual *learning* or have learned much in general.

  119. #119 Prometheus
    May 13, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak (#112) has “rung the bell”:

    “In the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” co-author Ms. Dunn and I describe how genetic material (i.e., mRNA) from HDNR can leach into the vaccine solution,…”

    So it’s the “genetic material” is it? And specifically “mRNA“?

    Pardon me, I had to walk away for a moment to get my laughter under control.

    We’ve already dealt with the “injected DNA” argument on this ‘blog (short answer: it’s randon, highly unlikely and would only affect cells at the site of injection).

    But implicating mRNA pretty much proves that Mr. Dochniak hasn’t a clue.

    RNA of any type is extremely unstable, especially outside of a cell. Cells and body fluids are loaded with enzymes that break down RNA – some of these enzymes are so hardy that they can be autoclaved and still retain activity.

    Any mRNA that “leaches” out of the latex stopper (assuming that any would survive the vulcanising process – you remember that one, don’t you, Mr. Dochniak?) would degrade in a matter of days in the vaccine solution, even if it were stored in a refrigerator (note: I store my RNA samples in formamide – not water – and keep them at -80 degrees C and they still only last a few months).

    Finally – and this is what sent me down the hall to the WC laughing – any mRNA that got into a human cell would, at most, make a few hundred copies of the protein it codes for and then be destroyed. That’s all – no alteration of the genetic code, no triggering of catastrophic immune reactions.

    Mr. Dochniak, I suggest that you read some research articles on siRNA, with particular attention to the “methods” section and then ask yourself if a vaccination is in any way equivalent. Then ask yourself how – even if a miracle occurred and the rubber plant’s DNA got into a subcutaneous fibroblast or dendritic cell – how that could trigger autism.

    No, I don’t think that I will be reading Mr. Dochniak’s book unless I’m in the need of a good laugh. He needs to read a few more books, himself. I’d suggest starting with a basic molecular biology text.

    Prometheus

  120. #120 Orac
    May 13, 2011

    I doubled over with laughter as well when I read Mr. Dochniak’s comment.

    I do lots of real time quantitative RT-PCR in my lab, which uses—you guessed it!—RNA as its template. I’m also moving into using next generation sequencing technologies, like RNAseq, which requires very pure, very undegraded RNA as its template. In isolating RNA from cells, one has to go to incredible lengths to protect it from degradation by RNases that lurk everywhere. In fact, I think your estimate of how long mRNA would survive if it somehow leeched into a vaccine, even if the vaccine is refrigerated, is, if anything, probably highly optimistic. Most likely it would degrade in a matter of hours, tops.

  121. #121 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 13, 2011

    Aluminum hydroxide has played a major role in the efficacy of vaccines. It is also understood that vaccines that use HDNR may contaminate the vaccine solution with the Hevea-allergens and form a dangerous aluminum-hydroxide/hevea-allergen complex. It is this complex that may be a catalyst for the development of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism. (Allergies and Autism – The Latex Connection)

    “If a drug is sold and stored in vials with a natural latex stopper, no matter what precautions you take, latex allergens can contaminate that drug” -Robert Hamilton (Ph.D. professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University

    Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  122. #122 ArtK
    May 13, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,

    allergy-induced regressive autism

    I asked this question above in the context of the Chinese study and I ask it again: What is the mechanism by which those allergens will produce the symptoms of autism? What neurotransmitters are affected and how? What brain pathways become disrupted by the allergens?

    I don’t really care about how an allergen might be introduced, or what that allergen might be (Prometheus and Orac have addressed that pretty well above), I just care about what you think happens once the allergen is in the body.

    Another question: What is dangerous about an “aluminum-hydroxide/hevea-allergen complex”? How does it work? What happens when I have this stuff floating around in my body or my child’s body?

    And no, “read my book” isn’t an answer to any of those questions.

  123. #123 Chris
    May 13, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, be advised that everything you post will be considered to have been pulled from thin air unless you properly support your statements with real peer reviewed cites. And here is a hint: your book is not one.

  124. #124 Prometheus
    May 13, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, caught in one impossible claim, pivots:

    “Aluminum hydroxide has played a major role in the efficacy of vaccines. It is also understood that vaccines that use HDNR may contaminate the vaccine solution with the Hevea-allergens and form a dangerous aluminum-hydroxide/hevea-allergen complex.”

    So, now it’s not the mRNA, it’s the proteins or, more specifically, the “dangerous aluminum-hydroxide/hevea-allergen complex” (why do I hear Eisenhauer’s voice?). Now we’re back to bog-standard allergic reactions.

    Yes, Mr. Dochniak, aluminium hydroxide makes vaccines more effective by making the proteins more immunogenic, presumably by binding them and preventing them from diffusing away from the subcutaneous tissues (where the dendritic cells live).

    However, this wouldn’t be any different from a regular latex allergy which – as we’ve seen inumerable times – does not cause autism.

    Why not just give up, Mr. Dochniak? You clearly haven’t worked out the “bugs” in your hypothesis; you need to go back to school and learn more about molecular biology and immunology and then try to re-formulate (or quietly abandon) your “latex-causes-autism” hypothesis.

    [I have a strong feeling that Mr. Dochniak's response - if there is one - will include "read my book". Maybe I'm psychic!]

    Prometheus

  125. #125 Terrie
    May 14, 2011

    Man, all these moving goal posts are making me dizzy. Obviously, pseudo-scientific theories cause some sort of inner ear damage.

  126. #126 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 14, 2011

    Prometheus,

    The mechanism of how immune responses to the Hev-b proteins, and cross-reactivity therefrom, affect the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism is described in the Nova Science book ‘Allergies and Autism’

    The mechanism of how vaccines cause allergy-induced regressive autism is described in the book ‘Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’

    Riddle:

    Who will refuse to pay the vaccine-injury bill when the gates of truth are opened?

    Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  127. #127 JayK
    May 14, 2011

    Wow, Prometheus, you were so right! “Buy my book, pretty please!” was absolutely on the dot.

    Who will pay the light bill when the rabid bunnies eat all of the yellow rotations of the moon? The truth!

  128. #128 herr doktor bimler
    May 14, 2011

    Who will refuse to pay the vaccine-injury bill when the gates of truth are opened?

    Well don’t look at me, I only had the entree.

  129. #129 Chris
    May 14, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, what part of “real peer reviewed cites” and “your book is not one” did you fail to understand?

    In short: DUDE! Stop pushing your book! We don’t fracking care about your book! Post real peer reviewed evidence or we will think you made it all up.

  130. #130 lilady
    May 15, 2011

    Oh my, I love the sound of that phrase “gates of truth”…lifted right out of the “gates of alchemy” and used frequently on anti-vax sites.

    I suppose everyone on Dochniak’s Christmas list, will be gifted with his book…bummer.

  131. #131 Orac
    May 15, 2011

    Or perhaps I could ask Mr. Dochniak for a review copy. :-)

    Of course, then I would actually have to read the book. :-(

  132. #132 Scottynuke
    May 15, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak should really stop self-referencing so much…

    That sort of behavior will make ya go blind, yanno.

  133. #133 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 15, 2011

    Orac,

    You can get an inside look at the book from Amazon:

    http://www.amazon.com/Vaccine-Delivery-Autism-Latex-Connection/dp/1456570056/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1

    Or ask your local library to stock the book.

    Dry natural rubber, part of vaccines
    Cut, slash, gather, and collect what bleeds
    Milky-white colloid from Para Rubber Tree
    Latex allergy, mankind beware
    Harmful allergens, Doctors take care
    Nurses and Parents make sure it’s not there
    ~
    Government involvement
    It’s only fair
    FDA, CDC, NVPO standards…
    Let’s make aware
    ~
    Dry natural rubber
    Take out of vaccines
    It’s not safe, and it’s not clean

  134. #134 Prometheus
    May 16, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak responds:

    “The mechanism of how immune responses to the Hev-b proteins, and cross-reactivity therefrom, affect the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism is described in the Nova Science book ‘Allergies and Autism’ [sic] The mechanism of how vaccines cause allergy-induced regressive autism is described in the book ‘Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’”/i>

    Damn! I am psychic! I should drop my day job and take my show in the road – I could be bigger than Sylvia Brown(e)!

    OK, all kidding aside, I get it. Mr. Dochniak is embarrassed that his “mRNA hypothesis” was so easily dismantled and he’s not going to let us know what the rest of them are without at least getting the author’s cut of the book profits.

    But he leaves us with a riddle:

    “Who will refuse to pay the vaccine-injury bill when the gates of truth are opened?”

    Ah, the “gates of truth”. Well, since “truth” is a philosophical concept (science deals with data), I will guess that this is a rhetorical question.

    My question for Mr. Dochniak is “Are you more interested in making money from your book than you are in educating people about your hypothesis?”

    My prediction is “Yes.”

    Prometheus

  135. #135 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 16, 2011

    Prometheus,

    Science and data…..

    The intellectual progression of mankind rests on the shoulders of immunity.

    Here’s a brief mechanism:

    Hyper-adaptive immunity (IgE) – neurotrophin over-expression (NGF) – neural growth and pruning (atypical neural-connectivity)- behaviors (regressive autism). See my books for hypothesis, references, and supporting scientific data.

    Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  136. #136 Antaeus Feldspar
    May 16, 2011

    Dear Mr. Dochniak,

    I have discovered the flaw which makes your hypothesis untenable. I shall briefly describe the logical process by which the proof is accomplished: Ergot hypothesis – Plato (subterranean, light deprivation) – Wilbur Glenn Voliva – the missing prism – no proof of causation.

    I trust that you will not be foolish enough to continue propounding your fatally flawed hypothesis unless you are able to refute my disproof. Which, in order to read, you will have to pay my publishers to read my book after I have raised enough money to pay them to publish it.

  137. #137 Chris
    May 16, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    See my books for hypothesis, references, and supporting scientific data.

    Do you have some kind of reading comprehension problem? Did you miss people teasing and laughing at your endless flogging of that book? Did you also miss that you were asked to support your claims with actual evidence, but not the book?

  138. #138 ArtK
    May 16, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,

    Your book appeals to me for two reasons: 1) The potential for (unintentional) humor as you struggle against logic to make a connection between latex, allergies and vaccines; and 2) Emergency supplies if I run out of toilet paper.

    Neither is worth $43 (plus shipping) to me.

    If you have evidence, then bring it. If not, shut up and go away.

  139. #139 David N. Andrews M. Ed., C. P. S. E.
    May 17, 2011

    Dochniak?

    Isn’t that Russian for ‘fuck-wit’?

  140. #140 Prometheus
    May 17, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak’s brief (one might even say “abbreviated”) description of his “hypothesis”:

    “Hyper-adaptive immunity (IgE) – neurotrophin over-expression (NGF) – neural growth and pruning (atypical neural-connectivity)- behaviors (regressive autism). See my books for hypothesis, references, and supporting scientific data.” [emphasis added]

    To which I respond:

    Undefined term – normal developmental process – circular definition

    Since I’ve grown weary of Mr. Dochniak’s constant refrain of “read my book” (see: Andy Wakefield’s last stand), I went to the local city library branch – they don’t have it, not in any of their branches. Neither does the county library system. Nor do the county libraries in the five counties surrounding my city.

    I’m seeing a trend here.

    It’s not that my area is hostile to “alternative” and fantasy-based medicine – no, that would definitely not be true. And the suburbs are virtual hot-houses for “alternative” autism woo, hosting some internationally famous “alternative” autism practitioners and clinics.

    In the end, I am frustrated in my attempt to read Mr. Dochniak’s books. And, frankly, my curiosity to see what a hash he’s made of biology and chemistry isn’t great enough for me to spend $43 (plus shipping).

    So, Mr. Dochniak, I believe it is time for you to, as they say in the movies, “put up or shut up”.

    Prometheus

    P.S. One last psychic prediction – Mr. Dochniak’s (non)answer will contain “read my book”.

  141. #141 Michael J. Dochniak
    May 17, 2011

    Prometheus,

    Read my books! Yes, you are truly amazing at predicting what I’m going to say. You read me like a book but refuse to read my books. Best of luck Prometheus and I do enjoy your passion for science and open discussion.

    Best Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  142. #142 Gray Falcon
    May 17, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, why don’t you just post your evidence here? Are you more interesting in scientific progress or your personal profits?

  143. #143 DT35
    May 17, 2011

    So, Prometheus, you’ve now been patted on the head for both your sense of humor and your passion for science. Isn’t that enough to make you stop asking all these hard questions and just read (actually, buy) the book?

  144. #144 Vicki
    May 17, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,

    If your goal is to spread information and thus help other people, and you want people to read your book, put the text online under a Creative Commons license, or sell an ebook for a nominal fee: say, $1 instead of $43 plus shipping. Either that, or stop thinking that complete strangers will give you significant money for the privilege of also giving you several hours of their time in order to make your case.

    In the meantime, the message that comes through loud and clear is that you cannot make your case briefly, not even enough of it to convince people to look at the rest. So that’s a substantial time investment. I like reading, but I prefer books that don’t come with the clear if unstated message “it’s going to be slow at first, please stick with it.”

  145. #145 lilady
    May 17, 2011

    I also see a trend here. Dochniak will be “gifting” the book to everyone on his Christmas gift list and also “gifting” the book at bridal showers, christenings and handing them out when kids come “trick or treating” on Halloween…bummer.

    The book may be used instead of newspaper pages for pet training and to line the bottom of bird cages.

  146. #146 Prometheus
    May 19, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak replies in a predictable fashion #141):

    “Read my books! Yes, you are truly amazing at predicting what I’m going to say. You read me like a book but refuse to read my books. Best of luck Prometheus and I do enjoy your passion for science and open discussion.”

    Again with the “read my books”!

    Here’s my point – in simple words, so that Mr. Dochniak cannot argue that he doesn’t understand me.

    The only hypothesis Mr. Dochniak has shared with us – that mRNA from the rubber plant causes some ill-defined change that leads to autism – has been shown to be not just incorrect, but laughably so.

    Why, then, would I want to spend $43 for a book that is presumably filled with similar easily-debunked nonsense when I can get that sort of rubbish for free on television?

    Mr. Dochniak’s latest book is published by a vanity publishing house, which means that he had to pay them to get it published. This doesn’t bode well for its contents.

    No, Mr. Dochniak, I’ve read you well enough – I don’t think I need to read your book, too. If you have something you’d like to share, feel free; if you’re just shilling for your book, please don’t bother.

    Prometheus

  147. #147 Helen of Troy
    May 23, 2011

    hey,ORAC
    Try writing a book
    before you slam someone
    who’s much more capable
    than you

    Insecurities run rampant here….

    Prometheus, don’t read the book -because if you did this blubbering blogging of science wanna-be’s would cease

  148. #148 Chris
    May 23, 2011

    Helen of Troy, could you please be more specific on the errors you find in the Orac’s and Prometheus’ statements. Please include cites that can already be found in a medical school library, both places that are near both of their work places.

  149. #149 lilady
    May 23, 2011

    We have already deconstructed the author’s “theory” about latex caused autism. I suspect that the Helen of Troy troll is “projecting” her science wannabeism on posters who really have a science background.

    I’m waiting for the troll’s citations.

  150. #150 Prometheus
    May 23, 2011

    “Helen of Troy” implies that if I read Mr. Dochniak’s book I would be so dumbstruck by his reasoning that “…this blubbering blogging of science wanna-be’s would cease.”

    Funny thing – I am a scientist, a researcher in molecular biology and virology, published in peer-reviewed journals and have even written the odd book chapter or two. What I haven’t done is write a book that could only get published by a vanity press at my own expense. Perhaps that’s what I need to do to stop being a “science wanna-be”.

    Or not.

    For “Helen of Troy’s” benefit, I’ll restate my argument in simple terms:

    [1] Mr. Dochniak claims to have found the link between latex and autism.

    [2] Mr. Dochniak has done no actual laboratory research in this field that he is willing to mention.

    [3] Mr. Dochniak shared with us his hypothesis that mRNA and “genetic material” from the rubber plant leaches from latex-containing stoppers and into vaccines.

    [4] Mr. Dochniak was apparently unaware that the mRNA (and other types of RNA) would rapidly degrade, especially during the processing of latex, and that none would be left in the stopper by the time it was placed on the vaccine vial.

    [5] This (#4) suggests that Mr. Dochniak is not very knowledgeable about RNA and quite probably DNA.

    [6] In addition, any DNA that “leached” from the stopper into the vaccine would affect only cells in the immediate area of the injection and while it might potentially result in a latex allergy, wouldn’t have any effect on the central nervous system.

    [7] Mr. Dochniak then asks us – having shown that one of his hypotheses about latex and autism is obviously wrong – to “read my book” in the blind faith that the rest of his hypotheses aren’t as flawed as the one he proudly showed us (i.e. the “mRNA causes autism” hypothesis).

    In conclusion, if the hypothesis that Mr. Dochniak had shared with us had been at all valid, I would have been willing to read his book. However, time being a finite resource and Mr. Dochniak’s “best foot forward” having been such a miserable dud, I don’t see that reading his book would be a profitable use of my time (or anybody’s time).

    We extended to Mr. Dochniak the opportunity to present and defend some of his other hypotheses, but he declined, preferring, I assume, to remain silent and only be thought a fool.

    Any other questions, Ms. “Helen of Troy”?

    Prometheus

  151. #151 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 18, 2011

    Promethus,

    The first rule of medicine is do no harm. Why insult an innocent child with a vaccine that has a latex-warning?

    In my opinion, it’s criminal.

    Sincerely,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  152. #152 lilady
    August 18, 2011

    Oh, the return of the latex allergy necromancer. I’m so impressed that it only took him 3 months to come up with that brilliantly executed reply.

    Keep plugging away Dochniak, your ranking on the Amazon Best Seller list is # 5,382,060. The one “reviewer” of your book gives you no credence for your “theory” of latex in syringes causing autism.

  153. #153 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 18, 2011

    Prometheus,

    It’s latex proteins, from the rubber syringe tips, leaching into a vaccine solution which affects the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism in atopic children.

    In the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”, there are questions and answers that will stimulate future discussions about medical ethics and the evolution of adaptive immunity.

    An example from page #74,

    In the future…

    Medical professionals will do blood tests before and after vaccinations, monitoring adaptive immunity.

    The expression of cytokines, IgE, and NGF will be measured in children to help physicians and parents determine if a vaccine should be administered.

    A child with an “atypical” adaptive immunity profile will be exempt from vaccinations.

    Blood tests will be used to show a biological connection to vaccine injury (i.e., VICP).

    Best Regards,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  154. #154 Narad
    August 19, 2011

    LinkedIn update?

    Michael goal is bringing a message that the intellectual progression of mankind rests on the shoulders of immunity.

    It doesn’t seem to be too late to get in on the ground floor of Vytex, by the way. The 2009 EPA “citizen complaint” is pretty good, as well.

  155. #155 lilady
    August 19, 2011

    LinkedIn Patent Pending?

    Method to affect the development of autism spectrum disorders, Patent application filed August 12, 2005…(patent never issued)

  156. #156 Chris
    August 19, 2011

    Mr.Dochniak, there are no latex parts on the vials with single use syringes. The syringes only have one dose, so there is no need to plunge a needle through a latex barrier into a multi-dose vial. The latex barrier was done away with as a by product of making vaccines thimerosal-free.

    And really, it is very bad form to reference your own book/paper as an argument.

  157. #157 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 19, 2011

    OSHA defines Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex as a hazardous material in the workplace.

    Several years ago I sent a citizen petition into the FDA suggesting a regulation on defining the antigenic protein content for baby nipples and pacifiers made from Hevea brasiliensis natural latex. After 4+ years, I haven’t gotten one response other than an acceptance letter that the petition was received.

    Hospitals now ban Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex in their facilities. Big Pharma’s continue to reduce natural-latex in vaccines. I think it’s time for the FDA to wakeup and reduce the incidence of latex allergy and allergy-induced regressive autism with meaningful natural-latex regulations.

    MjD

  158. #158 Chris
    August 19, 2011

    It might help if you actually used some real data and evidence in lieu of your blatant assertions (which means absolutely no references to your own writings). That would make your posts worthwhile, otherwise you are such another worthless crank.

  159. #159 Prometheus
    August 19, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak returns, after several months spent gathering his thoughts:

    “The first rule of medicine is do no harm. Why insult an innocent child with a vaccine that has a latex-warning?”

    The warning is for people who are allergic to latex. If a child has a known latex allergy, it would be wrong to give them a vaccine from a container with a latex-containing stopper. Other than that, Mr. Dochniak’s comment makes no sense.

    “It’s latex proteins, from the rubber syringe tips, leaching into a vaccine solution which affects the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism in atopic children.”

    Ah, so now it’s the proteins that are the problem. And Mr. Dochniak’s data supporting this hypothesis is…..? (crickets chirping) Is there a higher incidence of autism among latex-allergic children? Or are we to simply accept Mr. Dochniak’s armchair reasoning unquestioningly?

    If so, then I hypothesise (from my overstuffed armchair) that soy proteins are the cause of the “autism epidemic”. It’s even more likely than latex, since while latex use in medical products such as vaccines has been declining (unlike the autism prevalence), the use of soy proteing has been increasing. What say you to that, Mr. Dochniak?

    “OSHA defines Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex as a hazardous material in the workplace.”

    OSHA doesn’t define latex as hazardous, although it has issued warnings about the potential for sensitisation and allergic reactions. This is only common sense and – by the way – has nothing to do with autism. Mr. Dochniak needs to stick to one topic at a time.

    Good effort, Mr. Dochniak, but not worth a passing grade. Come back when you have some data.

    Prometheus

  160. #160 Orac
    August 19, 2011

    Comment thread necromancers like Mr. Dochniak are Exhibit A supporting the case for adding a setting to ScienceBlogs that would allow me to close comments automatically after a user-defined period of time. WordPress has that setting. Why doesn’t this installation of Movable Type? For instance, over at my “other” blog, comments on all posts close after 90 days.

    As it is, if I want to close down the comment threads on very old posts, I’d have to go back and do it manually for the literally thousands of old posts going back over six years. Not gonna happen, unfortunately.

  161. #161 Sense MD
    August 19, 2011

    I am sensing an energy imbalance in you and your blog, Orac. You need to go see an Energy Chelation master right away so he can close the comments in your old posts for you. :)

  162. #162 herr doktor bimler
    August 19, 2011

    Why insult an innocent child with a vaccine that has a latex-warning?

    Why insult the intelligence of Orac’s readers with fact-free pimping of one’s book?

  163. #163 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 19, 2011

    Prometheus,

    From your comments it appears you have eliminated atypical immunity as an etiology in regressive autism. If this is correct, your reference to soy proteins is a shameful display of sarcasm.

    MjD

  164. #164 Chris
    August 20, 2011

    Dude, you don’t seem to understand that for about ten years pediatric vaccines have come in single dose syringes, there is not no need for a latex stopper. The single dose version of the vaccines is how they could remove the thimerosal!

  165. #165 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 20, 2011

    Chris,

    Many single dose vaccines still contain latex. As an example, see the site below:

    http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/pharmacy/rxupdate/2010/October2010RXU.pdf

    A search using the key words “Latex” and “single dose vaccine” will show that infants are in danger of natural-latex exposure from said vaccines.

    MjD

  166. #166 Chris
    August 20, 2011

    That was just for influenza, which is not the most highly used vaccine. You are really digging deep, try better next time with some actual evidence that latex is a dire problem in vaccines. The evidence should be a real study from a real research group, not from a clinical newsletter.

  167. #167 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 20, 2011

    Chris,

    The FDA has issued a guidance document entitled, “User Labeling for Devices That Contain Natural latex (21 CFR801.437). The FDA requires natural-latex warning labels on vaccines. The evidence of harm is well documented.

    Vaccination
    Atopic child so fragile, parents so brave, doctors so giving
    Science to study, science to learn
    Autism spectrum disorder discern

    MjD

  168. #168 Chris
    August 20, 2011

    So? I don’t see any PubMed index numbers in that reply. Show it is as dire as you claim.

  169. #169 lilady
    August 20, 2011

    Necromancer tries to keep the argument going by a re-hashing of the “latex allergy” reactions due to latex plungers in syringes and/or latex ports…see my posting at #27 above:

    “Pink Book General Recommendations On Immunization (Chapter 2)

    On top of pg, 11 (of 22 pages) “Only one report of an allergic reaction after administration of hepatitis B vaccine in a known severe allergy (anaphylaxis) to latex has ever been published”.

    And of course, the sentence after the underlined link that Mr. Dochniak provided states that Fluzone influenza vaccines in single dose vials are totally latex free.

  170. #170 Prometheus
    August 20, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak comments:

    “From your comments it appears you have eliminated atypical immunity as an etiology in regressive autism. If this is correct, your reference to soy proteins is a shameful display of sarcasm.”

    I haven’t eliminated any aetiology as a cause of regressive autism. Mr. Dochniak, on the other hand, hasn’t provided any support for his claim that latex RNA, protein, DNA, lipids, etc. can cause regressive autism.

    My proposal of soy proteins as a potential cause of autism (regressive or other) is perhaps a bit tongue-in-cheek, but it actually has more support than Mr. Dochniak’s latex hypothesis.

    After all, as has been pointed out repeatedly (and, apparently, repeatedly ignored by Mr. Dochniak), the use of latex in vaccines, medical equipment and even party balloons has been steadily decreasing over the past two decades, while the reported prevalence of autism (including regressive autism) has been increasing over the same time period. Only willful ignorance can explain Mr. Dochniak’s persistent inability to realise that his latex-causes-regressive-autism hypothesis runs contrary to the available data.

    Of course, it is possible (however unlikely) that Mr. Dochniak has data of such significance that it can overcome the demographic tide running against his hypothesis. If so, I would love to see it.

    Even if we accept an inflammatory or immune-modulated cause of (as opposed to association with) regressive autism (not yet shown), there is no data available to show that latex is the trigger. In fact – as has been repeatedly pointed out – exposure to latex has been falling (although not yet to zero, as Mr. Dochniak keeps pointing out) at the same time that reported autism prevalence has been rising.

    Let me repeat that: latex exposure – especially in medicine (including vaccines)- has been decreasing for the past two decades. At the same time, reported autism prevalence has been rising. Unless Mr. Dochniak has some data that show latex can cause autism which he has been too shy to show us, the only logical conclusion is that latex exposure is not correlated with autism.

    And, while correlation is not causation, a lack of correlation speaks strongly against causation.

    Prometheus

  171. #171 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 20, 2011

    Prometheus,

    Answers to all of these questions can be found in the books “Allergies and Autism” and “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” is now at $9.95 through Amazon.

    Nova Science increased the price of “Allergies and Autism” so I can’t help you there.

    After reading the books, maybe you’ll ask a question which wasn’t contemplated and requires attention?

    MjD

  172. #172 Scottynuke
    August 20, 2011

    “I’ll only tell you if you pay me” is a singularly unconvincing strategy. *L*

  173. #173 Dedj
    August 20, 2011

    “Answers to all of these questions can be found in the books”

    Fantastic! You’ll have no problem referring us to the original sources then.

  174. #174 lilady
    August 20, 2011

    Hmm, I saw the video provided by Mr. Dochniak and his co-author of the “Allergies and Autism” book…which now stands on the Amazon “100 Best Sellers List” at number 6,196,502. I suggest that the self styled expert on allergies and autism, revisit the Amazon site to insert the link to RI…for a review of the science behind the book…and in order to increase sales of “Allergies and Autism”.

  175. #175 Antaeus Feldspar
    August 20, 2011

    Sorry, Mr. Dochniak, but you’re essentially trying to say “Buy the chicken!  You know the chicken is good, because the eggs are so good!”  When someone points out that no one knows whether the eggs are good, you reply “Of course they’re good!  How could they not be good, coming from such a great chicken?”

    An argument from authority, “you should believe Premise X because it is what Authority Y believes,” is a difficult form of argument to begin with; it only makes for a strong argument when Authority Y really is a widely recognized authority in the field, and even then it is limited by whether the answer is actually known to authorities in the field.  In other words, even coming from the most recognized authority in the field, we would not believe a claim of “I know what causes autism!” because the authorities don’t know yet what causes autism.  And are you the most widely recognized authority in the field, Mr. Dochniak?  Are you a recognized authority in the field?  No, you are not.  No one has any reason to order your books to find out what your speculations are on the causes of autism because there is no reason to think your speculations are of any value.

    Your only way out of this dilemma would be to actually answer the questions put to you here; if you were able to give intelligent answers to objections such as “if latex causes autism, how come the autism rate hasn’t decreased as the usage of latex has?” then we might think it was worth studying your ideas at greater length.  But when you answer every objection with “buy my books and then you’ll know what I think; in the meantime you should accept my book as substantion of my theories!” it doesn’t work; you are trying to trade on an authority you don’t have.

  176. #176 herr doktor bimler
    August 20, 2011

    According to the original press release,
    “REVIEW COPIES AND INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE”.

    I wonder if those interviews are anywhere near as satisfying as this comment-thread conversation…
    “The answer to that question is in my book.”
    “That’s all covered in my book.”
    “Buy my book!”

    Mr Dochniak can certainly stay on-message.

  177. #177 Chris
    August 20, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak is stuck trying to explain how vaccines cause autism, when the evidence indicates that vaccines have no casual link to autism. It is a no-win situation, so he is just stuck trying to sell his book.

  178. #178 Krebiozen
    August 20, 2011

    I’ve just read Mr. Dochniak’s article in Medical Hypotheses, which you can find here should anyone be interested.

    It looks like unsubstantiated speculation to me.

    This video doesn’t make it much clearer.

  179. #179 Chris
    August 20, 2011

    From Mr. Dochniak’s Amazon page it says:

    Michael J. Dochniak is a leading researcher in allergy-induce regressive autism.

    Oh, really? By whose standards? Does Irva Hertz-Picciotto know about this? (at least she is an epidemiologist and looking at environmental factors, exposure to latex would be environmental… but I missed it in her last “let’s look at everything!” studies)

    Michael is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin RiverFalls (Psychology/Chemistry).

    I checked, and the only graduate degree program in either of those disciplines is a Masters in Education or Educational Specialist. I do not see where Mr. Dochniak has any special expertise on allergies, immunology, neurology or even autism. UW- River Falls does have classes in autism, but mostly in the realm of special education.

  180. #180 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Why are boys more likely to have autism?

    An atypical expression of testosterone can shift immunity towards Th2 which is a sub-group of lymphocytes that play an important role in establishing and maintaining the capabilities of the immune system.

    Androgens produce what regressive autism will induce
    Sex hormones and immunity
    No impunity
    Testosterone profound
    Antigens abound, antibodies around
    If atopy assists then degranulation persists
    Neurotrophin expression can bring about regression
    NGF flows and neurons grow…
    and grow…
    and grow…
    and grow
    over-connectivity out of control
    Androgens produce what atopy will induce
    Regressive behaviors to grow
    Regressive autism to know
    Sex hormones and immunity
    No impunity

    If hormones were the same, the prevalence of autism based on gender would not be to blame.

    MjD

  181. #181 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    I’d like all my friends, and Prometheus, at the science blog “Respectful Insolence” to know that it’s atypical adaptive immunity which causes allergy-induced regressive autism.

    It is clear that over-exposure to the allergenic proteins in Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex has been a major contributing factor in the increased incidence of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  182. #182 Antaeus Feldspar
    August 21, 2011

    Naive people often think the hard part of science is coming up with a hypothesis, and that once that step is achieved, all that is left is to announce the hypothesis as if it was now verified truth.  

    Nothing could be more wrong.  Coming up with a hypothesis is so easy, anyone can do it.  Coming up with a hypothesis that’s consistent with the already-collected data, that’s harder, and Dochniak has failed to do that (if he was capable of explaining why autism would be going up when the supposed cause, exposure to latex, has gone down, he would surely have already done so.)  Coming up with a hypothesis and collecting exactly the kind of data which will expose it as false if it is false, that appears to be far beyond Dochniak’s capabilities.

    I honestly can’t decide which is more likely, or which is sadder:  that Dochniak is trying so desperately, and so futilely, to cover up the fact that his hypothesis is on the level of supermarket tabloid claims through the sole ineffective expedient of chanting “Buy my book, all questions are answered in my book” - or that he is actually in such denial, he doesn’t even realize the vast gap between his speculations and the actual science to which he aspires.  Depressingly, it’s probably some of both.

  183. #183 TBruce
    August 21, 2011

    A poem! Well, now I’m convinced!

  184. #184 lilady
    August 21, 2011

    @ TBruce: That would be a poem based upon some of the research of Simon Baron-Cohen…not even eligible for submission to the International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine…but then who am I to judge?

  185. #185 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar,

    Science at its ambiguous core is the discovery of truth. In the realm of adaptive immunity, there are no absolute truths. The word “adaptive” in front of adaptive immunity exemplifies change. Thus, presenting a latex/autism hypothesis based on atypical adaptive-immunity can be unsettling.

    “I have a terrible latex allergy; it actually blisters and burns my skin off. If it got into my bloodstream, it would probably kill me” – Andiarose, WrongPlanet.Net, Women’s Discussion

    MjD

  186. #186 Gray Falcon
    August 21, 2011

    MjD, you’ll note that nowadays science advances by people examining and presenting evidence, not simply making claims. A single case of an autistic person having latex allergies is not compelling evidence.

    There was a time when a statement could be accepted as truth simply because it made sense. That was back when bloodletting was mainstream medical practice.

  187. #187 Prometheus
    August 21, 2011

    “Michael J. Dochniak is a leading researcher in allergy-induce regressive autism.”

    Mr. Dochniak – like so many in the “alternative” science and medicine fields – has confused his ability to read and (mis)interpret medical and scientific articles and texts with “research”.

    Likewise, Mr. Dochniak believes that his ability to form a hypothesis makes that hypothesis true.

    I’m in the process of writing a longer ‘blog-post about this sort of self-deception, but here is the short version:

    A hypothesis – a good hypothesis – must not only explain give a model for how some natural (as opposed to supernatural) phenomenon (in this case, “regressive autism”) happens, it must also explain all of the observations relevant to that phenomenon. In Mr. Dohniak’s case, his hypothesis explains quite a bit, but fails to explain why “regressive autism” continues to rise in prevalence while latex use in medicine and other realms of commerce has declined.

    Secondly, Mr. Dochniak has omitted an important part of his research: the actual research part. Mr. Dochniak may not have learnt this at school, but forming a coherent hypothesis (in which category Mr. Dochniak’s latex hypothesis is not included – see above) is only the first – albeit important – part of doing research. Hypothesis testing – doing some sort of experiment to test the predictions of the hypothesis – is the major part of research.

    Going to the library and poring over published articles about latex, autism and “adaptive immunity” (which I don’t think Mr. Dochniak understands quite as well as he thinks he does, given his statements), is part of refining the hypothesis, not hypothesis testing.

    In the interest of time, I’ll give Mr. Dochniak a couple of suggestions how he might (relatively) easily test his hypothesis:

    [1] Select a group of people with “regressive autism” (however he chooses to define the term) and a similar-sized group of age-, sex- and region-matched controls. Determine the prevalence of latex allergy in both groups. If the “regressive autism” group has a higher prevalence of latex allergy (by history or skin testing)- as would be predicted by his hypothesis – his hypothesis will have survived one test.

    [2] Select a group of people with “regressive autism” and an age-, sex- and region-matched control group, preferably from a large HMO or similar health care situation. Going over their entire vaccine record from birth to the onset of autism (and the same age in the matched control), check lot numbers and manufacturers’ records for the presence/absence of latex. Compare the two groups.

    I’m certain that there are many other ways that Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis can be tested, but so far Mr. Dochniak has apparently (and please don’t say “Read my book!” again, Mr. Dochniak) not bothered to test his hypothesis at all.

    I think a more accurate description of Mr. Dochniak would be:

    “Michael J. Dochniak is a leading armchair muser in allergy-induce regressive autism.”

    I know researchers, Mr. Dochniak, and you are no researcher.

    Prometheus

  188. #188 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Automobile tires are made from Hevea brasiliensis natural rubber (i.e., natural latex). Studies show that breathable tire-dust contains leachable allergenic proteins from natural latex.

    A recent study indicates that children living near highways are twice as likely to have ASD.

    http://www.bmedreport.com/archives/20953

    “Correlation is not causation but it sure is a hint” – Edward Tufte (American Statistician)

    MjD

  189. #189 Prometheus
    August 21, 2011

    Another straw grasped:

    “Automobile tires are made from Hevea brasiliensis natural rubber (i.e., natural latex). Studies show that breathable tire-dust contains leachable allergenic proteins from natural latex. A recent study indicates that children living near highways are twice as likely to have ASD.”

    And, since the only substance that children living closer to highways are exposed to in excess of those living farther away is latex from tyre-dust, this finding (which has its own problems, I have to note – poorer people also live closer to highways; urban centers are usually the nexus for multiple highways; etc.) somehow supports the latex-causes-autism hypothesis?!?

    Here’s a hint: there is a vast difference between “supports the hypothesis” and “does not refute the hypothesis”. This straw was in the latter category.

    BTW, I’ll take that response as confirmation that Mr. Dochniak has not done any hypothesis testing.

    Prometheus

  190. #190 Krebiozen
    August 21, 2011

    A recent study indicates that children living near highways are twice as likely to have ASD.

    This retrospective case control study found that children whose mothers lived less than 309 meters from a freeway at the time of their birth had an increased incidence of autism that was barely statistically significant (OR = 1.03-3.45).

    There was no association in those who lived further from a freeway, or in those who lived near a major road. As the authors themselves acknowledged:

    We recognize that the moderate relative risks associated with freeway proximity in our study may have been attributable to chance or bias. The study is currently limited by sample size and potential exposure misclassification.

    It’s an interesting finding that needs to be replicated, but claiming it supports the latex allergy autism hypothesis is a stretch at best.

  191. #191 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Prometheus and Other Skeptics,

    The half life of IgE antibodies is significantly shorter than IgG antibodies allowing a specific adaptive immune response to more readily go into remission from descreased exposure.

    As an example, an atopic child gets insulted with an Hev-b protein contaminated vaccine (today the vaccine has a latex warning – thank you FDA). Latex exposure can cause latex allergy or latex sensitivity inducing food allergies based on stucture homology (i.e., cross reactivity).

    Thereafter, with descreased natural-latex exposure a child can lose the latex allergy but often maintains the food allergies based on continued exposure to the food proteins.

    Thus, the after effects of latex allergy (e.g., atopy) may continue to stress adaptive immunity long after the latex allergy has gone into remission.

    Solution, protect atopic children from Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex exposure in an effort to reduce atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  192. #192 Chris
    August 21, 2011

    Citations, Mr. Dochniak. Citations, please. Especially to those that have to do with the reactions causing autism.

    Though I still think it is all a wild goose chase to look for how vaccines cause autism, when there is no real evidence that vaccines are associated with autism!

  193. #193 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Prometheus and Other Skeptics,

    The half life of IgE antibodies is significantly shorter than IgG antibodies allowing a specific adaptive immune response to more readily go into remission from descreased exposure.

    As an example, an atopic child gets insulted with an Hev-b protein contaminated vaccine (today the vaccine has a latex warning – thank you FDA). Latex exposure can cause latex allergy or latex sensitivity inducing food allergies based on stucture homology (i.e., cross reactivity).

    Thereafter, with descreased natural-latex exposure a child can lose the latex allergy but often maintains the food allergies based on continued exposure to the food proteins.

    Thus, the after effects of latex allergy (e.g., atopy) may continue to stress adaptive immunity long after the latex allergy has gone into remission.

    Solution, protect atopic children from Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex exposure in an effort to reduce atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  194. #194 Antaeus Feldspar
    August 21, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, you’re wasting everyone’s time, so it’s past time we cut to the chase.

    I am going to ask you a question, and if you do not answer it, YOU LOSE.

    If you burble about how your hypothesis is “unsettling” instead of answering the question, YOU LOSE.

    If you offer unasked-for details about the mechanism of your hypothesis instead of answering the question, YOU LOSE.

    If you claim you don’t understand the question, YOU LOSE.  And should probably return your college diploma.

    The question is what attempts did you make to falsify your hypothesis?

    Any non-responsive answer will be interpreted as a declaration of surrender and an apology for wasting so much of your time and ours.

  195. #195 lilady
    August 21, 2011

    The half-life of this discussion is three years from next Tuesday.

  196. #196 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar,

    In the spirit of the null hypothesis, I’ve worked with a Biotechnology Company in an effort to remove the antigenic proteins from NRL to provide a safer natural-rubber. Briefly, the null hypothesis is satified when the global natural-rubber industry exclusively uses ultra-low protein NRL (i.e., Hevea brasiliensis)and the allergy-induced regressive autism rate continues to increase in future generations.

    Independantly, I’ve discovered a new adsorption process which removes the antigenic proteins from NRL to undetectable levels, based on the current analytical standards.

    I wish I could do more, and work closer with other researchers, to falsify the hypothesis. I’m very open to suggestions Mr Feldspar.

    MjD

  197. #197 Antaeus Feldspar
    August 21, 2011

    So the answer would be “nothing.”  Doing something which will provide you evidence in the future if your hypothesis is wrong does not give you a basis to declare it correct now - especially since there is no reason to think you would actually pay attention to that evidence when it came.  After all, people have called your attention to the fact that latex use has dropped and autism rates have not, and you’ve had no reasonable explanation for that.

  198. #198 herr doktor bimler
    August 21, 2011

    To make Antaeus Feldspar’s point in a slightly different way: replacing the global natural-rubber industry with “ultra-low protein NRL” would test a hypothesis, but it would not be Mr Dochniak’s original hypothesis. That original hypothesis — featured in the book which he keeps advising us to buy — specifically linked autism to latex exposure through vaccines.* Now he’s broadened the target to general environmental exposures (e.g. tyre dust).

    This is all very well if the book only focussed on vaccines in order to market it to an eager and gullible anti-vaccine readership, but it does give the impression of goalposts in motion.

    * The test in this case would be to reduce the use of latex-sealed multi-dose vaccines; and as Mr Dochniak has been repeatedly reminded, this has actually happened.

  199. #199 herr doktor bimler
    August 21, 2011

    Let’s go back to Dochniak’s original press release:
    “If vaccination manufacturers and providers start to reduce their use of HDNR, we will see a dramatic reduction of allergy-induced cases.”
    The manufacturers and providers have done exactly that. Everything subsequently is bullshit.

  200. #200 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Childhood vaccinations are affecting neurological development, creativity, intelligence, and forcing evolutionary change. The allergenic proteins in natural-latex, a component found in many vaccine packaging and delivery systems, are triggering atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Sincerely,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  201. #201 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 21, 2011

    Childhood vaccinations are affecting neurological development, creativity, intelligence, and forcing evolutionary change. The allergenic proteins in natural-latex, a component found in many vaccine packaging and delivery systems, are triggering atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Sincerely,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  202. #202 Chris
    August 21, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, you don’t seem to understand that making statements without any evidence is not acceptable.

  203. #203 Antaeus Feldspar
    August 21, 2011

    Merely repeating assertions over and over again does not give them substance, Mr. Dochniak. We’re all quite aware of what you think is a link between latex in vaccine packaging and autism but what you haven’t provided is any reason why any reasonable person would come to that conclusion. If a lawyer tried arguing cases in court the way you argue your case, he’d be tossed out of the courtroom, because he wouldn’t be arguing his case at all, merely stating his theory of the case over and over.

  204. #204 lilady
    August 21, 2011

    “If a lawyer tried arguing cases in court the way you argue your case, he’d be tossed out of the courtroom, because he wouldn’t be arguing his case at all, merely stating his theory of the case over and over.”

    And with any bit of luck, the judge would direct the plaintiff to pay all of the defendant’s legal fees and perhaps impose a hefty fine, for filing a frivolous lawsuit.

  205. #205 Chemmomo
    August 22, 2011

    Hey, Michael J. Dochniak,
    can you tell me how many individuals in the United States have an actual latex allergy? And how prevalent it is in our current population?

    Supposing you can answer the first question, then we might be able to move on to your hypothesized autism correlation.

    Your turn.

  206. #206 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 22, 2011

    Chemmomo,

    A better question than how many people have latex allergy is:

    Why do the antigenic latex-proteins causes cross-reactivity in some children increasing atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism?

    That question is being explored, but we can all be proactive and reduce natural-latex exposure. An example, refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  207. #207 Gray Falcon
    August 22, 2011

    An even better question is why you placed that curse on Sugarland, causing that platform to fall and kill fifteen people?

    Evidence first, then accusations. Understand?

  208. #208 Lawrence
    August 22, 2011

    Absolutely lovely that MjD (or probably better named “broken record troll”) continues to make assertions of fact without providing any evidence or substance except “buy my book.”

    Definitely not the way to make friends or influence people…..

  209. #209 Calli Arcale
    August 22, 2011

    Michael,

    Why do the antigenic latex-proteins causes cross-reactivity in some children increasing atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism?

    I would think you should first determine whether or not it actually does cause cross-reactivity in some children, increasing atropy, etc. Also, whether or not allergy-induced regressive autism actually exists. It seems to me you have the cart ahead of the horse; convinced that a condition exists, you are now seeking causes for it, but you have not first determined whether your conviction is reasonable.

  210. #210 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 22, 2011

    I’d like all the bloggers here at “Respectful Insolence, especially Prometheus, to understand that I’m not anti-vaccine or anti natural-latex. Although I do strongly believe that vaccines and natural latex can be made safer.

    Furthermore, if a child has an atypical profile associated with cytokines, IgE, and NGF a vaccine should not be administered in my opinion. An explanation for this reasoning is described in the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”

    MjD

  211. #211 Chris
    August 22, 2011

    What part of “please provide evidence and stop plugging your book” do you fail to understand?

  212. #212 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 23, 2011

    The equitorial production and global consumption of Hevea brasiliensis natural-rubber is increasing not descreasing.

    Medical science needs to answer this question quickly and then make changes to their herd vaccination policies:

    Why insult an atopic child with vaccines that are known to shift immunity towards Th2?

    Furthermore, it is clear that vaccines contaminated with latex proteins (e.g., Hev-b allergens) can induce cross reactivity affecting atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism, especially in atopic children.

    Finally, before a childhood vaccination ask the medical professional if the vaccine has a latex warning. The FDA now requires such warnings. If the vaccine has a latex warning refuse the vaccine. Thus, parents can affect their child’s intellectual fate with such vaccine decisions.

    MjD

  213. #213 Chris
    August 23, 2011

    Prove it.

  214. #214 Krebiozen
    August 23, 2011

    Will these anti-vaccine contortions never end?

  215. #215 Calli Arcale
    August 23, 2011

    If the vaccine has a latex warning refuse the vaccine.

    If the child has no latex sensitivity, why should they refuse the vaccine? I am not allergic to shellfish, so I do not refuse shrimp. But I am allergic to raw citrus fruit, so when I order iced tea, I always make sure to request no lemon. What’s the sense in refusing something you’re not allergic to?

    Also,

    Furthermore, it is clear that vaccines contaminated with latex proteins (e.g., Hev-b allergens) can induce cross reactivity affecting atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism, especially in atopic children

    Again you repeat this claim, but I don’t see you providing any evidence that it’s true. Have you determined that allergy-induced regressive autism is even a thing? In all my life, I’ve only heard one person talk about it — you. That makes it very hard for me to take you seriously.

  216. #216 Chemmomo
    August 23, 2011

    Michael J. Dochniak,
    your reply to me does not answer the question I asked.

  217. #217 LW
    August 23, 2011

    Just wondering … why latex, specifically? Why does not every allergy cause this? Or why does does not *any* other allergy cause this? I find it odd that, out of the million and one things that one *might* be allergic to, this and only this causes this dramatic effect.

  218. #218 Prometheus
    August 23, 2011

    I think that Mr. Dochniak has adequately proven that he has no data supporting his hypothesis that latex causes autism. As regards testing his hypothesis, that was a bit of a trick question: it has already been tested.

    Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis – as outlined in his two books – is that latex proteins, RNA, DNA etc. leach from the stoppers and cause an “atypical adaptive immune response” that results in “regressive autism”. Unbeknownst to Mr. Dochniak, there has already been an experiment that tests this hypothesis.

    As I (and dozens of other helpful readers) have tried to point out to Mr. Dochniak, the use of latex stoppers in vaccines (and the use of latex in medicine in general) has sharply declined since the 1990′s. As has also been pointed out (repeatedly), the reported prevalence of autism – including “regressive autism” – has increased during that period. This finding is inconsistent with Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis (as has also been repeatedly mentioned).

    Mr. Dochniak’s reply that the world consumption of latex has increased is a complete non sequitur. His hypothesis is not about tyre dust or world latex consumption but about vaccines. If he wishes to segue to a Jeremiad about how latex in tyres is causing autism, he should at least have the courage to admit that his hypothesis about latex and vaccines is wrong or, at least, unsupported by data.

    Unfortunately, we will never see Mr. Dochniak admit that his hypothesis is faulty – he won’t even admit that he hasn’t got any data to support it. All he can do, apparently, is endless parrot bits of immunology lore he has dredged from various texts and articles. Even his arguments of an “atypical adaptive immune response” fail to explain how that – even if it occurred – would cause autism.

    As I see it, Mr. Dochniak has accomplished the rare “detailed fail” (in the words of one of my students).

    Personally, I’m finished trying to pound knowledge into Mr. Dochniak’s resisting brain. His (dead parrot) hypothesis is supported primarily (it seems) by his financial interest in a latex-substitute rather than anything even vaguely resembling data.

    Prometheus

  219. #219 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 23, 2011

    Prometheus and Responders,

    It is also very important that pregnant women avoid exposure to natural-latex. If your interested in how antigenic latex-proteins affect fetal development read the book “Allergies and Autism” from Nova Science.

    If your interested in why the antigenic latex-proteins are particularly dangerous when associated with immunologic adjuvants, compared to other antigens, read the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”

    In one aspect, allergy-induced regressive autism is an etiology wherein the incidence and prevalence of adaptive-immune responses affects the expression of neurotrophin, altering cognition through atypical neural growth and nerural pruning.

    MjD

  220. #220 Gray Falcon
    August 23, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, why should we believe you’re correct?

  221. #221 Calli Arcale
    August 23, 2011

    You still have failed to provide evidence that “allergy-induced regressive autism” occurs, Mr Dochniak. You have gone so far now as to provide advice to pregnant women regarding natural latex exposure, but still do nothing more than point us at some books (inadequately cited; you didn’t even provide an author).

    I did a few quick searches on Google and Amazon using those titles as keywords. I did not find the books, but I did find plenty of dubious references discussing non-latex allergies and a purported connection to autism. Most commonly, casein and gluten, of course. (Those two friends of the fad autism treatment, the GFCF diet.)

    So you are still the only source I can find claiming a link between latex, specifically, and autism. (Which makes me think who the author of those books most likely is.) And you have a vested interest in such a link, so as Gray Falcon said, why should we believe you? You offer nothing but assertions, you avoid answering questions, and you seem mostly interested in hawking books. What exactly are you trying to achieve here?

  222. #222 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 23, 2011

    Calli,

    If you scroll to the top of this blog, Orac initiated this discussion based on a book press-release (i.e., Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection). It’s the book I co-authored and that which Prometheus refuses to read.

    My sincere responses and best efforts to answer blogger questions, in the most efficient and logical way, continues to be a goal of mine.

    MjD

  223. #223 Dedj
    August 23, 2011

    “It’s the book I co-authored and that which Prometheus refuses to read.”

    I think we all refuse to read it as you could easily provide the pertinent information by the simple act of telling us what it is and where you got it from. This action would have nil cost to you as you should already have a least one – if not several – copy of your book to hand which should contain the information assuming you conducted your research and wrote up your references properly.

    Your ideas are seperate from the medium they are presented in. There is no logical or functional reason to read the book in order to discuss your ideas. Continued pimping of your book can considered commercial spam and may well see you reported for breach of terms and conditions of posting.

    If your posts here are representative of the content of your book then it would be a clear waste of time and money even trying.

    Put some damn effort in you lazy-assed pillock and start showing us that you have done the work you claim to have done. We are not here to do your work for you and it is positively shameful for you to continue in the way you are doing.

  224. #224 lilady
    August 23, 2011

    195 “The half-life of this discussion is three years from next Tuesday”.

    Posted by: lilady | August 21, 2011 4:11 PM

    Well, it’s Tuesday and the half life of this discussion is three years.

    Stick a fork in Dochniak, he’s (over)done.

  225. #225 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 23, 2011

    Dedj,

    Thank you for your response. Upon request, I’d gladly send you a free copy, postage paid, of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”. My e-mail address is listed in the press release above. One request, please do not send your free copy of the book to Prometheus.

    MjD

  226. #226 lilady
    August 23, 2011

    @ Dedj: One request, please do not send your free copy of the book to me.

  227. #227 Gray Falcon
    August 23, 2011

    If you’re willing to send out free books, then I’m sure you’re willing to post your information here.

  228. #228 Dedj
    August 23, 2011

    “Upon request, I’d gladly send you a free copy, postage paid, of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”"

    Again, why should I do your work for you? I have other books to read in my spare time.

    If you believe you have been asked specific questions – and you believe you are willing to make an honest attempt at answering them – then why not get around to answering them?

    None of the information you would need to provide is medium dependant, nor is any of it likely to be owned by you as it’s unlikely you own all the journals, periodical and reports that the information originates in. You would lose nothing as no one here is likely to buy (or borrow, or read for free) your book until you can demonstrate that it is worth doing so. So far your posts have been actively discouraging.

    If you did do original research – who did you submit it to and why did they refuse it?

    Your continued insistance at plugging your book is getting you dangerously close to being reported as in breach of the terms and conditions of posting here in regards to commercial postings.

    Please learn to behave properly and start demonstrating that you have done even the beginning of the work you imply you have.

    Offering me a free book is suspiciously like a false and manipulative attempt at appearing open and willing to engage in discussion. As your constant unexplained refusal to engage in any proper discussion demonstrates, you are far from being open about your views.

    Don’t try to pull a dodge like that here again. We are all old enough and world-worn enough to see right through it in an instant and call you out on it. How shameful of you to think you could get away with it.

  229. #229 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 23, 2011

    Dedj,

    Orac has given me no indication that I’m in breach of the terms and conditions of posting here. If I’ve offended you or others (excluding Prometheus)in any way please accept my apology.

    Sincerely,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  230. #230 Gray Falcon
    August 23, 2011

    If you’re truly apologetic, present your evidence here. The world doesn’t revolve around you, sugar, we can’t sit around waiting for your book to arrive.

  231. #231 Prometheus
    August 24, 2011

    #219

    “If your [sic] interested in why the antigenic latex-proteins are particularly dangerous when associated with immunologic adjuvants, compared to other antigens, read the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”"

    Why am I not surprised?

    I’ve been so intrigued by Mr. Dochniak’s dance of the seven veils around his hypothesis that I’ve even tried to find the book in regional libraries. So far, I can’t find any library – not even the Library of Congress – that has a copy. I can’t see spending even $9.95 (plus shipping) based on what Mr. Dochniak has (inadvertently) revealed so far about his “research”.

    I’m touched that Mr. Dochniak excluded me from this apology – it means that I’ve managed to make him uncomfortable. If he can leverage that discomfort into a thoughtful re-examination of his hypothesis, my goal will be accomplished.

    Prometheus

  232. #232 Dedj
    August 24, 2011

    “Dedj,

    Orac has given me no indication that I’m in breach of the terms and conditions of posting here.”

    Orac doesn’t set the terms and conditions, ScienceBlogs do. Orac would not be the one to inform you about it, unless he decides to take it upon himself to warn you, or unless his agreement with ScienceBlogs allows him to do so.

    It’s rather worrying and rather telling that you need a formal notification from the person that you percieve to be the relevant formal authourity in order to accept that your behaviour may be proceedurally unsupported and ethically untenable.

    Just because Orac hasn’t warned you, doesn’t mean you aren’t commiting a breach of the T&C, or – and several people have already heavily commentated on this behaviour of yours – it doesn’t mean that your constant pimping of your book is proper and ethical behaviour.

    No formal warning should be required.

    Again, do not try to pull slick stunts and dodges, they get spotted easily and you will get called out on them.

    “If I’ve offended you or others (excluding Prometheus)in any way please accept my apology.”

    Not a chance. Your behaviour was commented on quite heavily, multiple times by multiple people over a period of several days yet you took no action even when the appropriate action would have had zero additional cost to you, and even when this was pointed out to you.

    Your apology appears similar to a tactical attempt at appearing reasonable and conciliatory whilst making no effort to actually be either.

    Apology definetly not accepted, and refused with extreme suspicion and disbelief that it is honest and real.

  233. #233 Calli Arcale
    August 24, 2011

    Michael:
    My sincere responses and best efforts to answer blogger questions, in the most efficient and logical way, continues to be a goal of mine.

    That is a very good goal, but you seem to be having trouble achieving it. You aren’t conveying a lot of information; you’re pretty much just reiterating the same thing (the basic claim of your book, and “please read my book”) over and over again. If you aren’t interested in actually answering questions, then what really is your point in participating? You’ve said “read my book” enough times. What’s seriously the point in saying it again?

    As far as the terms of service, I’m not aware of you violating them, and if the plugging of your book is a violation, then it is up to ScienceBlogs to pursue it. However, you are doing a fine job of making a fool of yourself. As far as I’m concerned if you wish to be an ineffective communicator giving people every reason to believe there is no substance to your claims, then that is certainly permissible. Besides, if ScienceBlogs does accuse you of plugging your book, you can easily defend yourself by showing them this thread. They’ll see what your efforts have achieved in terms of your book’s reputation.

  234. #234 Gray Falcon
    August 24, 2011

    Michael’s apology probably isn’t genuine. We told him what he was doing wrong, why it was wrong, and what he could do to correct his actions. His “apology” seems to be trying to paint us as flipping out at him for no reason, even though anyone who can read this thread can see otherwise. Two possible conclusions: 1) He’s dishonest, and his work shouldn’t be trusted, or 2) He’s incapable of seeing the blindingly obvious, and his work shouldn’t be trusted.

  235. #235 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 25, 2011

    I remember in college the professor would ask us to read a chapter(s) or book and it would be discussed during class. This continues to be an efficient means of discussion enhancement and learning.

    Therefore, I kindly ask interested “Respectful Insolence” bloggers to read the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”. Then, on November 1st 2011 I’ll be here to participate in a lively and informative discussion on said connection.

    Please respond if you are able to participate.

    MjD

  236. #236 Chris
    August 25, 2011

    Stop spamming your book and answer the questions.

  237. #237 Composer99
    August 25, 2011

    The fact that this thread is going on & on some three months after the OP is probably proof positive of the post’s title about never-ending contortions.

    All the more so since the reason for the ongoing thread activity is… well… anti-vaccine contortions.

  238. #238 Chris
    August 25, 2011

    Exactly, and Mr. Dochniak is only proving how true Orac’s last paragraph is:

    Because, to the anti-vaccine, first and foremost, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. No matter what the evidence shows. Never forget that.

  239. #239 Vicki
    August 25, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,

    If this is a seminar, you are not the instructor and don’t get to assign the reading. Feel free to set up your own blog somewhere and do so.

    I remember in college the professor would present some material ahead of time, and deposit copies of the book at the library for us to read. The equivalent here would be to make it available online, for free. That would increase the chances of getting people to actually discuss it, on your soon-to-be-created blog, come November.

    I also recall that professors who assigned their own books, and only their own books, were often laughed at. And there was one professor who pressured his colleagues into using his book; the year he was on sabbatical everyone suddenly assigned a different calculus book. This did not help his reputation.

  240. #240 madder
    August 25, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak makes assertions, and when pressed for evidence, points to his book. Repeat ad infinitum. Could it be that the book itself consists of nothing but assertions too?

    Nah. He couldn’t be that vapid, could he?

  241. #241 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 25, 2011

    Chris wrote:

    “Because, to the anti-vaccine, first and foremost, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. No matter what the evidence shows. Never forget that”

    The evidence shows that latex-contaminated vaccines are unsafe. As proof, the FDA requires natural-latex warnings on vaccines.

    Exposure to natural-latex in vaccines can cause sensitization, adverse allergic reactions, and even death through anaphylactic shock.

    Atopic children are particularly sensitive to such insult.

    MjD

  242. #242 Chris
    August 25, 2011

    Prove it. Prove it here!

    Post your evidence here. Post the actual research here. Post the journal, title, date and authors of the papers here.

    Until then, you are just a crank here.

    Do not reference your book here anymore. Only post real evidence here.

    And by “here” I mean on this blog, in the comments.

    Do you understand?

  243. #243 Gray Falcon
    August 25, 2011

    Do you have any evidence this is true for pediatric vaccines? Don’t ask us to read your book, you’re nowhere near as important as you think you are.

  244. #244 Calli Arcale
    August 25, 2011

    Clearly, Gray Falcon, he does not. “Does what you claim exist?” “Read my book.” That is all he says. Well, apart from a condescending depiction of a college professor assigning reading and then asking his class to discuss it, as if we are his students. He seems to be under the delusion that we are here to learn from him. Au contraire. We are here to find out if he has anything worth learning. To date, he has provided nothing whatsoever, so I am forced to conclude as many others already have — Michael Dochniak clearly has nothing to contribute. He has no interest in discussion, only in reminding everyone that he has written a Book, and so he is an Author, and doesn’t that make him Important?

  245. #245 Prometheus
    August 25, 2011

    Madder (#240):

    “Mr. Dochniak makes assertions, and when pressed for evidence, points to his book. Repeat ad infinitum. Could it be that the book itself consists of nothing but assertions too?”

    I can’t speak to his most recent (self-published) book, but his first (self-published) book was nothing but unrelated and (based on the assertions made) poorly-understood medical and biological “factoids” strung together into an implausible hypothesis.

    I could find no data, but I can’t claim to have read the whole book – I would put it down whenever I reached a congested stretch of unsupported assertions and had to return it to the library before I could finish it (kudos to the librarian who found a copy in an obscure library in Minnesota and got it for me on a two-week interlibrary loan).

    I can’t decide if it is chutzpah or narcissism that makes Mr. Dochniak think that he can schedule a “seminar” on Orac’s ‘blog. I suggest he do what so many professors are doing today in seminar classes – send a pdf copy of the “assigned reading” to every “student”. I’d be happy to read the assigned chapter and return on the appointed day to discuss it with him.

    In fact, I believe that’s what we’ve all been asking for – some evidence that Mr. Dochniak knows something about the subject and has a coherent argument supported by data. So far…well, the evidence hasn’t supported his claim to know anything about autism, allergy, immunity or, for that matter, biology.

    “Read my book!” How predictable.

    Prometheus

  246. #246 Science Mom
    August 25, 2011

    Dedj,

    Thank you for your response. Upon request, I’d gladly send you a free copy, postage paid, of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”. My e-mail address is listed in the press release above. One request, please do not send your free copy of the book to Prometheus.

    Kudos to you Prometheus, I guess Mr. Dochniak isn’t comfortable with your level of knowledge on the subject and thus, not his target audience. So Mr. Dochniak, perhaps you would grace us with a copy of your “book” unless, of course, you aren’t comfortable with a critical assessment of it by the various academics and medicos that comment here.

  247. #247 madder
    August 25, 2011

    Thanks, Prometheus. It seems to ring a bell– I think maybe you mentioned that you’d managed to obtain a copy of self-publication #1. Your characterization is exactly how I’d imagined it– a handful of factoids mixed with liberal doses of misunderstood-oids, incorrect-oids, and WTF-oids. Would it be groundless speculation to suggest that it’s unlikely you found any effort to disprove the hypothesis?

  248. #248 Prometheus
    August 25, 2011

    Madder,

    I asked my helpful librarian to find copies of Mr. Dochniak’s books back in May when he first emerged to flog his new book. Apparently, nobody on the university’s interlibrary loan networks (they belong to three, I believe) had a copy of the most recent book, but they did find a copy of the first book (pub. 2010), which I received in July on a two-week loan (Note: most interlibrary loan searches – even for obscure technical texts – are completed in much less than two months. Mr. Dochniak’s first book must truly be a “limited edition”).

    I don’t believe I commented on this ‘blog about the book, mostly because Mr. Dochniak seems to be primarily pushing his most recent work. Also, I wasn’t proud of not being able to get through a 132-page book in two weeks, even if it was full of gross inaccuracies.

    In the part I read (maybe the first fifty pages or so, plus some sections from other parts of the book), I did not see him present any new data supporting his hypothesis. He certainly used bits and pieces of data developed by other researchers that supported his hypothesis (or, at least, were not inconsistent with it), but I failed to find any independent research or any description of how his hypothesis explains the data that would refute it.

    Prometheus

  249. #249 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 25, 2011

    Prometheus,

    Let me clarify:

    The first book entitled “Allergies and Autism” was published through Nova Science Publishers and the target audience is Scholars.

    The second book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” was self-published through Createspace and the target audience is anyone interested in reducing the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Since I own the copyright on the second book, I could would gladly post requested parts of the book. (See insidelook).

    Would this be acceptable Mr. Orac?

    MjD

  250. #250 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 25, 2011

    Chris wrote:

    “Post your evidence here. Post the actual research here. Post the journal, title, date and authors of the papers here”

    At the end of each chapter, from the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”, there is a reference section.

    Chris, I’ll post the references from one of the chapters for your satisfaction.

    MjD

  251. #251 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 25, 2011

    ScienceMom wrote:

    “So Mr. Dochniak, perhaps you would grace us with a copy of your “book” unless, of course, you aren’t comfortable with a critical assessment of it by the various academics and medicos that comment here”

    Yes, send me the shipping address.

    MjD

  252. #252 Antaeus Feldspar
    August 25, 2011

    The first book entitled “Allergies and Autism” was published through Nova Science Publishers and the target audience is Scholars.

    Riiiight. Just as the target audience for all those “Who’s Who in the Janitorial Arts” books is all of those other people who are just aching for a reference work that covers that important field, not the people who long to see their own names in those books describing them as important…

    I’m gonna take a wild guess, Mr. Dochniak, did your road to publication with Nova Science Publishers begin with an unsolicited e-mail from them soliciting whatever papers an important researcher like you had to contribute?

  253. #253 Science Mom
    August 25, 2011

    Yes, send me the shipping address.

    Excellent! I eagerly await my copy.

  254. #254 Narad
    August 26, 2011

    Man, just stop putting nickels into Dochnilodeon already.

  255. #255 madder
    August 26, 2011

    Sorry for the confusion, Prometheus. I remembered something in a comment about interlibrary loan having a difficult time finding a Dochniak book, and leapt to a conclusion.

  256. #256 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 26, 2011

    Chris (#250),

    Below are the references from Chapter 8 of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/features/counting-autism.html, accessed 1/11/11.

    2. J. Worth, “Neonatal sensitization to latex” Journal of Medical Hypotheses 54, 5 (2000):729-33.

    3. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Vaccine Education Center,
    http://www.chop.edu/service/vaccine-education-center/hot-topics/aluminum.html, accessed 1/11/11.

    4. A. Antico et al., “Anaphylaxis by Latex Sublingual Immunotherapy,” Allergy 61, 10 (2006):1236-1237.

    5. C.A. Molloy et al., “Elevated Cytokine Levels in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, J. Neuroimmunol 172, 1-2 (2006):198-205.

    6. UCDAVIS Health System, “Children with autism have distinctly different immune system reactions compared to typical children,” May 5, 2005, http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/newsroom/releases/archives/mind/2005/immune_sys5-2005.html, accessed 1/11/11.

    7. Sergio Bonini et al., “Circulating Nerve Growth Factor Levels Are Increased in Humans with Allergic Diseases and Asthma,” PNAS. 93, 20 (1996):10955-10960.

    8. U. Otten, P. Ehrhard, and R. Peck, “Nerve Growth Factor Induces Growth and Differentiation of Human B Lymphocytes Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86 (1989):10059-10063.

    9. UniSci, “NGF Proteins Present at Birth Linked to Later Autism,” http://www.unisci.com/stories/20012/0426011.html, accessed 1/11/11.

    10. M.J. Dochniak, D.H. Dunn, Allergies and Autism, Allergies and Infectious Disease Series (NY: Nova Science Publisher, 2010).

    11. Gehan A. Mostafa et al., “Allergic Manifestations in Autistic Children: Relation to Disease Severity, J. Pediatr. Neurol. 6, 2 (2008):115-123.

    12. C. Shen et al., “A Proteomic Investigation of B Lymphocytes in an Autistic Family: A Pilot Study of Exposure to Natural Rubber Latex (NRL) May Lead to Autism, J. Mol. Neurosci. (2010).

    13. World Allergy Organization, “Sub-Lingual Immunotherapy,” WAO Journal (2009): 233-281, http://www.worldallergy.org/publications/slit-wao-pp_final.pdf, accessed 1/11/11.

    14. Goodyear Chemical, Product Data Sheet, NATSYN® 2200/2210, http://www.americasinternational.com/product_sheets/Goodyear/PDS/Natsyn_2200_&_2210.pdf, accessed 1/11/11.

  257. #257 Michael J. Dochniak
    August 26, 2011

    Here’s a segment from the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” Chapter 9

    Can Hevea brasiliensis genetic material leach into vaccines?

    In speculation, genetic material in dry natural rubber,
    including plasmids and transposons, could leach into the
    vaccine’s aqueous-solution. For example, according to the
    cellular origin hypothesis or vagrancy hypothesis, viruses
    can evolve from bits of DNA or RNA that “escape” from
    the genes. The escaped DNA or RNA could come from
    plasmids that are pieces of naked DNA or RNA that can
    move between cells or transposons, which are molecules of
    DNA that replicate and move around to different positions
    within the genes of the cell. Once called “jumping genes,”
    transposons are examples of mobile genetic elements and
    could be the evolution of some viruses.

    It is known that both DNA and RNA can be extracted
    from HDNR. For example, research has shown that expression
    of Hevein genes in natural latex has been detected. (Reference 5)

    A study that evaluated particulate ribonucleoprotein
    components of HDNR showed that a significant proportion
    of the particulate RNA is found in the rubber layer. (Reference 6)

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a molecule of RNA
    encoding a chemical “blueprint” for a protein product.
    mRNA is transcribed from a DNA template, and carries
    coding information to the sites of protein synthesis.

    In continuation, a study has shown that the latex
    allergen Hev-b 5 transcript is widely distributed after
    subcutaneous injection in BALB/c mice of their DNA vaccine.
    The researchers concluded that the rapid and widespread
    appearance of the Hev-b 5 transcript in the injected mice
    confirms that DNA is translocated from the injection site,
    transcribed, and expressed in immune and non-immune
    tissues after injection. (Reference 7)

    It is further speculated that persistent infection from
    surviving viruses, inclusive with Hevea genetic material, could maintain Hevea-allergen (i.e., Hev-b protein) transcription and its associated memory B-cell population.

    In summary,viruses that produce Hevea-allergens will not allow the latex allergy to go into remission. In an effort to better understand vaccine induced atopy and multiple chemical sensitivity, research efforts need to explore the viability of the vagrancy hypothesis wherein genetic material from HDNR leaches into a vaccine comprising live or attenuated viruses. Scientists have shown that a viral vector can be used to make the Hevea-allergens. For example, the Hev-b 1 and Hev-b 3 allergens have been successfully produced using a chimeric tobacco mosaic virus.(Reference 8)

    References:

    5. Deng Xiao-Dong et al., “Isolation and Analysis of
    Hevein Gene and Its Promoter Sequence,” Acta
    Botanica Sinica, 44, 8 (2002): 936-940.

    6. A.I. McMullen, “Particulate Ribonucleoprotein
    Components of Hevea-brasiliensis Latex,” Biochem. J.
    85 (1962):491-495.

    7. Jay E. Slater et al., “The Latex Allergen Hev b 5
    Transcript Is Widely Distributed after Subcutaneous
    Injection in BALB/c Mice of Its DNA Vaccine,”
    J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 102 (1998):469-75.

    8. H. Breiteneder et al., “Rapid Production of
    Recombinant Allergens in Nicotiana Benthamiana
    and Their Impact on Diagnosis and Therapy,” Int.
    Arch. Allergy Immunol., 124, 1-3 (2001):48-50.

    MjD

  258. #258 Prometheus
    September 6, 2011

    Oh my! I just happened to be browsing through some old comment threads and saw that Mr. Dochniak had posted an excerpt of his new book – how bold!

    Well, let me get right to it, since I see that it has been languishing since 26 August.

    “In speculation, genetic material in dry natural rubber, including plasmids and transposons, could leach into the vaccine’s aqueous-solution [sic].”

    While some amount of DNA might persist in dry natural rubber, the RNA in that material would degrade within minutes (if not faster). I bring this up because of later assertions Mr. Dochniak makes.

    “For example, according to the cellular origin hypothesis or vagrancy hypothesis, viruses can evolve from bits of DNA or RNA that “escape” from the genes. The escaped DNA or RNA could come from plasmids that are pieces of naked DNA or RNA that can move between cells or transposons, which are molecules of DNA that replicate and move around to different positions within the genes of the cell. Once called “jumping genes,” transposons are examples of mobile genetic elements and could be the evolution of some viruses.”

    This may be how viruses originated, but there is no data supporting this hypothesis (i.e. nobody has yet seen a virus evolve from cellular DNA (or RNA)). There are other virus origins hypotheses that are equally plausible that don’t involve a cellular origin of viruses and, in fact, explain the multiple genome types of viruses much better.

    “It is known that both DNA and RNA can be extracted from HDNR [Hevea brasiliensis dry natural rubber]. For example, research has shown that expression
    of Hevein genes in natural latex has been detected. (Reference 5)”

    Unfortunately for Mr. Dochniak, “reference 5″ is available to me. In the article, the researchers discuss extracting DNA and RNA from the living plant and the gene – the hevein gene – was expressed “in the latex”, meaning in the cells that make the latex. To repeat, the mRNA is retained within the plant cells (unless they are disrupted) and lasts only a few minutes (at most) outside the cell.

    “A study that evaluated particulate ribonucleoprotein components of HDNR showed that a significant proportion of the particulate RNA is found in the rubber layer. (Reference 6)”

    Reference 6 – from 1962 (!) – is about extracting ribosomal RNA (then known as “particulate RNA”) from (and I quote from the article, which is avilable free on-line): “… fresh centrifuged latex in a freeze-dried condition…” This is a way to preserve RNA, which is why they treated their specimen in this fashion. It is not – so far as I know – part of the rubber manufacturing process to keep the latex in a freeze-dried state.

    “Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a molecule of RNA
    encoding a chemical “blueprint” for a protein product.
    mRNA is transcribed from a DNA template, and carries
    coding information to the sites of protein synthesis.”

    True, but irrelevant, since mRNA would not survive the rubber manufacturing process.

    “In continuation, a study has shown that the latex allergen Hev-b 5 transcript is widely distributed after subcutaneous injection in BALB/c mice of their DNA vaccine.”

    Again, unfortunately for Mr. Dochniak, the authors of the study (his “reference 7″) describe their process a bit more. From the paper:

    “We placed the gene encoding the potent Hevea latex allergen Hev b 5 in a mammalian expression vector and injected this DNA vaccine subcutaneously into BALB/c mice.” [emphasis added]

    While I might quibble about whether or not an expression vector (a virus or plasmid that has been modified to carry a foreign gene into a cell) is a “vaccine”, their purpose was to have the animals’ cells express the protein and, thus, act as in situ “allergy shots”.

    The process of making an expression vector is not trivial, as I would know, having made quite a few in my time. It is highly improbable that this would happen in nature and even more improbable that it would happen repeatedly, as Mr. Dochniak asserts.

    In short, Mr. Dochniak’s novice-level understanding of biology has led him to make a number of errors:

    [1] He assumes that since mRNA can be found in fresh latex, that it is be found in processed rubber (it isn’t).

    [2] He speculates – wildly – that bits of H. brasiliensis DNA (or RNA) will somehow develop into a virus, although this phenomenon has never before been observed.

    [3] He confuses a viral vector genetically engineered to carry a gene into mammalian cells with a “vaccine”.

    [4] He speculates that H. brasiliensis DNA leached from rubber stoppers in vaccine vials will somehow “evolve” into a virus or plasmid that carries the latex protein genes into the recipient and inserts it into their genome, absent any data showing that this can happen at all, let alone thousands of times. Alternately, he may be speculating that the vaccine-strain viruses (in live-virus vaccines) are capable of acting as expression vectors, something that has also never been demonstrated.

    And these are only the mistakes that I found in a 383-word excerpt of his book – presumably the best piece of writing in the book.

    Based on what I’ve seen here, I see no reason to “buy the book”. Mr. Dochniak has humiliated himself in print – again.

    Prometheus

  259. #259 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 7, 2011

    Dearest Prometheus,

    Here’s an exerpt from the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” (Chapter 12, page 77)

    High-functioning autism, a gift from Mother Nature
    Differences in thought, expression, behavior
    Mankind will know
    Mankind will savor
    Science~writing~music~art
    Special honor, attention, and favor
    Evolutionary distinction
    Do not waiver
    __________

    Low-functioning autism, a mishap of medical science
    Regression of thought, expression, behavior
    Mankind will inject
    Mankind will suspect
    Atopy~neural over-connectivity~mental disability
    Special care
    Forced detention
    Reaffirms
    Vaccine-safety evolution

    Furthermore, described below is a proposed mechanism of how vaccination and natural-latex exposure, i.e., sublingual absorption of the Hevea-allergens, may affect the inidence of allergy-induced regressive autism. (Chapter 8, page 49)

    1. An atopic infant is subjected to vaccination, triggering two immunological branches; a cell-mediated immune response (TH1) and a humoral immune response (TH2).

    2. The atopic infant has, or acquires, Hevea-allergen sensitivity increasing TH2 immunity (e.g., increased vaccinations contaminated with natural-latex , mouthing natural-latex products including baby bottle nipples, pacifiers, teething rings etc…)

    3. In atopy, the under-expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 further increases TH2 immunity.

    4. Increased TH2 immunity alters NGF expression affecting neural growth and prunning triggering allergy-induced regressive autism.

    References are available in the book.

    MjD

  260. #260 Prometheus
    September 8, 2011

    “Read my book.”

    How original.

    The hypothesis outlined in #259 fails to explain why this process wouldn’t happen with any antigen – in fact, why any allergy isn’t accompanied by autism.

    Frankly, I’ve grown tired of trying to edit Mr. Dochniak’s book after-the-fact. He’s displayed his lack of knowledge to my satisfaction.

    Prometheus

  261. #261 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 8, 2011

    Prometheus,

    A child’s immune system determines what is an antigen or non-antigen, not medical science.

    With certainty, immunological evidence shows that the multiple proteins (i.e., suspected antigens) in Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex can induce cross-reactivity affecting atopy which in simple terms means multiple allergies.

    In children, the incidence and prevalence of allergies affects the expression of neuron growth factor (NGF), causing atypical neuological development. Please review NGF and autism studies.

    If one recognizes that “adaptive immunity” is part of evolution, antigen recognition is the key to understanding the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  262. #262 Science Mom
    September 8, 2011

    The hypothesis outlined in #259 fails to explain why this process wouldn’t happen with any antigen – in fact, why any allergy isn’t accompanied by autism.

    Exactly. And why wouldn’t a child exhibit the recognised symptoms of allergies, not just atopy and quite possibly anaphylaxis but become autistic instead? Furthermore, I have not seen any evidence presented of Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis of “allergy-induced regressive autism” aside from his own empty assertions and of course, “buy my book”.

    I thank you Prometheus for saving me some trouble for my next blogpost about Mr. Dochniak.

  263. #263 Calli Arcale
    September 8, 2011

    A child’s immune system determines what is an antigen or non-antigen, not medical science.

    And gravity is what makes an apple fall, not Newton’s laws, but Newton’s laws are a very useful tool for understanding why the apple fell.

    Given that you are attempting to contribute to medical science as it pertains to immunology, and that you then go on to discuss what immunology tells you about latex allergies. I’m therefore surprised you’d suggest medical science is of no use in this context. Or perhaps what you said was just a bit of snark and not really a well thought out argument.

    If one recognizes that “adaptive immunity” is part of evolution, antigen recognition is the key to understanding the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    You do a good job of spelling big words, but I’m not convinced you understand what they mean, because what you’ve just said is about as meaningful as saying that if one recognizes that pennies are currency, then that’s crucial to understanding the Illuminati’s plan to dominate the world through international currency regulation. The first part is not only irrelevant to the conclusion (and certainly not “key”), your arguing a link to something that is not satisfactorily demonstrated to exist.

    Which, of course, remains the key problem with your position. Like testing to see what currency the tooth fairy prefers, you fail to first determine whether the tooth fairy even exists. The only references you will give are to ask us to do your homework for you, or to read your book. I have no doubt whatsoever that your book is more of the same.

  264. #264 Calli Arcale
    September 8, 2011

    Ew — rereading my comment, I notice that I said “your” when I meant “you’re” at one point. (I also have a sentence fragment in there.) I humbly apologize to all who share my affliction of cringing at this particular word substitution.

  265. #265 Prometheus
    September 8, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, not realising that he’s been beaten, retorts:

    “A child’s immune system determines what is an antigen or non-antigen, not medical science.”

    True but, like most of what Mr. Dochniak asserts, not relevant to the issue at hand.

    “With certainty, immunological evidence shows that the multiple proteins (i.e., suspected antigens) in Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex can induce cross-reactivity affecting atopy which in simple terms means multiple allergies.”

    Again true, but also true about most allergens, such as bee venom, milk, nuts, pollen, etc. It is exceedingly rare that a complex mixture of proteins and other substances (e.g. latex) will not have multiple proteins (and also multiple epitopes) that stimulate an immune response. Not unique to latex and not relevant to autism.

    “In children, the incidence and prevalence of allergies affects the expression of neuron growth factor (NGF), causing atypical neuological development.”

    While the influence of “allergies” (immune reactions, more precisely) on NGF is fairly well supported, it still begs the question of how latex manages to cause autism and milk, nuts, bee venom, eggs, etc. don’t.

    Also, the link between “immune responses affect NGF expression” and “atypical neurological development” is less well-supported (or, at least, the clinical relevance of the effect is in question). And conflating “atypical neurological development” and “autism” is a “bridge too far” (i.e. not supported by data).

    “If one recognizes that “adaptive immunity” is part of evolution, antigen recognition is the key to understanding the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.”

    Again, IF this were true, it would still fail to explain why latex, but not milk, nuts, pollen, etc. would cause autism. As it is, this hypothesis is not supported by the available data and the statement is reduced to a massive non seqitur.

    There are a number of tantalising bits of data suggesting that autism – in at least some people – has an immune component. Two massive issues remain unclear at this point:

    [1] Is the immune “dysfunction” seen real or an artifact of the testing process?

    [2] Is the immune dysfunction the cause of autism or merely an effect of autism (i.e. does whatever caused autism in the individual also result in immune dysfunction?)?

    I know I said I was done with Mr. Dochniak’s flawed hypotheses, but here I am, sucked back into the madness once again. I hope my resolve will be stronger the next time.

    Prometheus

  266. #266 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 8, 2011

    Pro(tagonist)metheus,

    It is widely recognized that many of the Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex proteins are defense proteins. These proteins, in combination with the sticky-coagulative effect of latex, are thought to inhibit insult from preditory organisms.

    In some humans, exposure to such proteins confuse adaptive immunity to form IgE antibodies that recognize benefical exogenous and endogenous proteins. In short, the natural-latex proteins can act as a catalyst for the development of multiple chemical sensitivity.

    A developing nervous system is affected by atypical immunity based on the up-regulation/down-regulation of endogenous proteins (e.g., NGF, cytokines, Nuclear factor Kappa B)

    Increased exposure to natural-latex proteins, over the last half century, has generated a growing population of children and adults with enhanced ADAPTIVE-IMMUNITY CAPABILITIES.

    So, it’s time to reduce natural-latex induced atopy. Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  267. #267 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 8, 2011

    Sciencemom,

    I reviewed your blog titled “Just the Vax” at http://justthevax.blogspot.com/

    Latex warnings that are present on some vaccines are not discussed. Please consider such a discussion…

    MjD

  268. #268 Science Mom
    September 8, 2011

    Latex warnings that are present on some vaccines are not discussed. Please consider such a discussion…

    I will not consider giving a stage to such an irrational idea. We prefer to focus on the facts regarding vaccines and showcasing irresponsible, bush-league dilettantes, much like yourself. So I will invariably discuss your latex conjecture, just not in the way you would like.

    Oh, and if your lack of scientific acumen wasn’t enough to make yourself look foolish, then trying to mock a commenter’s name furthered that objective.

  269. #269 Chris
    September 8, 2011

    Science Mom, I don’t think it was much of a mock. I do believe that in the story that is this thread, Prometheus is the protagonist! The “hero” version of the protagonist. And Mr. Dochniak is definitely the very inept antagonist.

  270. #270 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 8, 2011

    Chris,

    Prometheus is a “hero”, a teacher, and a student whom refuses to read the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”. Respectful insolence…

    MjD

  271. #271 novalox
    September 9, 2011

    I wouldn’t have believed that anyone would have been so inept in trying to make an argument, but dochniak certainly as proved me wrong in that regard, from his constant shilling of his book, his persistent refusal to provide evidence when asked, his childish name calling, and his utter dearth of knowledge of basic biology.

  272. #272 Science Mom
    September 9, 2011

    @ Chris, I like your take on Mr. Dochniak’s attempted mocking. I think the readers here would like to know that I offered to read his book and requested an electronic copy, which would be monumentally easier for both of us, but he refused.

  273. #273 Antaeus Feldspar
    September 9, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, you have received far more respect than you have earned or shown to others here. Is it in your definition of respect that, when Prometheus has pointed out several glaring errors in what is merely an excerpt from your book, and you are able to come up with no better response than to merely repeat your accusations and repeat “Read my book, read my book” without even offering an assurance “that point you make about RNA and DNA never even once having been observed to transform into viruses? I address that in my book in Chapter X”, Prometheus is obligated to accept that?? If so then your grasp of the word needs serious work.

  274. #274 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 9, 2011

    The “Respectfull Insolence” ScienceBlog advertises vaccines on its top page. One such advertisement promotes a Meningococcal vaccine.

    As an example, Sanoti Pasteur sells a Meningococcal vaccine under the tradename Menactra and warns that latex is used in the vial stopper.

    http://www.menactra.com/what_is_menactra_safety.html

    Now that your aware of the dangers associated with natural- latex proteins, would you subject your child to such a vaccine?

    MjD

  275. #275 Todd W.
    September 9, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak

    You’re aware, I’m sure, that ScienceBlogs uses context-based advertising and that Orac has little to no control over what ads appear? Key words in the article are used to determine ad content, as are your browsing habits.

    Now, what’s your point?

  276. #276 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 9, 2011

    Todd W.,

    It’s clear that big pharma, and the FDA, burdens the parents of children getting vaccines to decide if latex contamination is acceptable or unacceptable.

    Reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism, don’t point that latex-contaminated vaccine at our children.

    MjD

  277. #277 Todd W.
    September 9, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak

    So you had no point with bringing up the fact that a random ad over which Orac has no control happened to appear here. Got it.

    Reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism, don’t point that latex-contaminated vaccine at our children.

    You have yet to establish that such a thing exists. Show us the peer reviewed scientific literature that shows latex (or any other allergy) induced regressive autism. And do not say, “It’s in my book,” because your book, sad to say, is not peer reviewed scientific literature.

    So, if you please, present the independent evidence to support your case. I doubt you will, as you have not done so thus far, but one can hope that you’ll actually develop some manner of intellectual integrity.

  278. #278 Science Mom
    September 9, 2011

    Reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism, don’t point that latex-contaminated vaccine at our children.

    And you have yet to make that case. Your warped agenda is quite clear however and is nothing more than a new spin on “it must be the vaccines”.

  279. #279 Calli Arcale
    September 9, 2011

    Michael:

    The “Respectfull Insolence” ScienceBlog advertises vaccines on its top page. One such advertisement promotes a Meningococcal vaccine.

    Others have pointed out already that it’s out of Orac’s control; it’s like ads almost everywhere on the Internet — it’s fed by a script that looks for keywords and then makes a fairly boneheaded attempt to serve up ads that suit the audience. Sometimes it’s vaccines. Sometimes it’s homeopathy, which is a bit hilarious. Right now, for me, it’s Shutterfly, which is probably not related to anything in the thread and is just one of the “random ad not likely to be offensive anywhere, but they’ve paid to be viewed X number of times, so we’ll randomly stick it in all the sites in our ad network at some point”.

    I like watching for humorously inept ad pairings, like when somebody’s railing against Republicans and the ad server helpfully presents an ad for Michele Bachmann. :-D

  280. #280 Composer99
    September 9, 2011

    Michael Dochniak:

    The “Respectfull [sic] Insolence” ScienceBlog advertises vaccines on its top page. One such advertisement promotes a Meningococcal vaccine.

    This is a textbook example of ad hominem argumentation! Orac is supposedly losing credibility because of the context-sensitive advertisements appearing on his website? Please.

    Reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism, don’t point that latex-contaminated vaccine at our children.

    Since the evidence available suggests this phenomenon does not exist, your demand seems rather ridiculous.

    All in all, Orac’s title for this post is looking more and more accurate.

    (For exhibit ‘B’ of anti-vaccine contortions, just look at Th1Th2′s ongoing ridiculousness.)

  281. #281 Prometheus
    September 9, 2011

    So much for resolve.

    Mr. Dochniak takes up the shovel once again:

    Pro(tagonist)metheus,

    From the Merriam-Webster Dictionary:

    Definition of PROTAGONIST:

    1a : the principal character in a literary work (as a drama or story) b : a leading actor, character, or participant in a literary work or real event
    2: a leader, proponent, or supporter of a cause : champion

    If I were susceptible to flattery (I’m not – I see it as a species of manipulation), I’d be flattered.

    “It is widely recognized that many of the Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex proteins are defense proteins. These proteins, in combination with the sticky-coagulative effect of latex, are thought to inhibit insult from preditory [sic - "predatory"] organisms.

    So far, so good. The latex – like substances in the sap of may vascular plants – has substances in it to physically entrap and harm insects that are munching on the plant. A large number of plants have “defense proteins” and non-protein defence compounds – many of them are currently in use as medicines (see: digitalis, taxol).

    “In some humans, exposure to such proteins confuse adaptive immunity to form IgE antibodies that recognize benefical exogenous and endogenous proteins.”

    This sentence is also fairly correct, although I object to the use of the term “confuse”, since the cells of the adaptive immune system lack the cognitive ability to be confused. It grossly oversimplifies the process, of course.

    “In short, the natural-latex proteins can act as a catalyst for the development of multiple chemical sensitivity.”

    If this is the “short” version, perhaps Mr. Dochniak should stick to the “long form”. Nothing in the first two sentences leads logically to the third. In fact, the transition between the idea that allergy to latex can result in allergy to other “beneficial exogenous … proteins” (which can occur with some proteins, although I’ve not heard of it with latex) and “multiple chemical sensitivity” (a poorly-defined and not generally recognised disorder) is a leap worthy of a spot on the Olypic long-jump team.

    “Multiple chemical sensitivity”, whether one believes it is real or not, is not characterised by either signs of delayed hypersensitivity (e.g. urticaria, bronchospasm, etc.) or signs and symptoms similar to autism, so I fail to see how Mr. Dochniak “connects the dots” in that fashion.

    “A developing nervous system is affected by atypical immunity based on the up-regulation/down-regulation of endogenous proteins (e.g., NGF, cytokines, Nuclear factor Kappa B) [sic]“

    While expression of these proteins have been observed to be altered during immune responses, the clinical relevance to childhood neurodevelopment remains unclear. In addition, Mr. Dochniak has still not shown that [a] latex “allergy” is related to autism or [b] that latex is somehow unique in its ability to do this. Again, if this were true about latex, it would be equally true for other allergens.

    “Increased exposure to natural-latex proteins, over the last half century, has generated a growing population of children and adults with enhanced ADAPTIVE-IMMUNITY CAPABILITIES.”

    Has natural latex use actually increased – on a per-capita basis – in the US, UK or Europe over the past “half century”? This would be since 1960, mind you. I don’t have the answer on the tip of my keyboard, but I recall that Mr. Dochniak has – in the past – used the worldwide increase in latex use as a surrogate for increased per-capita use in the “developed” world (you know, the places where the “autism epidemic” is happening).

    The reason I bring this up is that – to my recollection – rubber has been more and more supplanted by synthetic polymers in the past helf century. When I look around me, I see less rubber use, especially in the past two decades and especially in medical uses. I think that Mr. Dochniak is grasping at straws.

    I can’t quite understand why Mr. Dochniak is fixated on the fact that I won’t read his book. He has presented what I can only assume are his most persuasive and best-reasoned arguments and seen them sytematically dismanted. He has also seen his rudimentary understanding of biology and immunology exposed. Does he really think that his writing is going to mesmerise me into ignoring the glaring errors in his reasoning?

    Does he really want me to give a scientifically rigorous evaluation of his entire book? Based on the excerpts we have seen so far, that evaluation would not be flattering. If anything, Mr. Dochnial should be begging me to not read his book, because if I did waste the hour or two it would take to read it (and if it is as bad as the “choice bits” we’ve been shown), I’d feel obligated to apply my own brand of “respectful insolence” to it.

    Be careful what you ask for, Mr. Dochniak.

    Prometheus

  282. #282 squirrelelite
    September 9, 2011

    FWIW, I noticed the current ad is for a 100% latex mattress! :)

    Do those also cause autism?!?!!

  283. #283 lilady
    September 9, 2011

    @ squirrelelite: “FWIW, I noticed the current ad is for a 100% latex mattress! :)

    Do those also cause autism?!?!!”

    Now you are using scare tactics…at this late stage in my life…do I have to worry about “senior adult onset autism”?

    *Latex core mattresses* have a real market. I purchased one for me and my husband two years ago and we both absolutely love the resulting restful sleep.

    Hint to prospective buyers: Think about the depth (15 “) of the mattress and “consider” a companion low profile (4 “) box spring. My petite daughter never thought about the combined depth and now has to take a running “flying” leap from outside her bedroom to get into the bed.

    *Disclaimer: No conflicts of interest and no stock ownership in the manufacturers of latex core mattresses.

  284. #284 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 9, 2011

    All,

    Orac states, “Because, to the anti-vaccine, first and foremost, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. No matter what the evidence shows. Never forget that.

    Dochniak’s response:

    There is growing public awareness and concern about latex allergies. Natural Rubber Latex (NRL) has been identified as harmful due to its allergenic proteins: many hospitals ban it in their facilities; government (OSHA) has issued warnings about it; and warning labels on vaccine packaging and delivery systems have become mandatory (FDA)

    A growing percentage of people – particularly the youngest -have latex sensitivity which can cause a variety of health problems including atopy (i.e., many allergies) and allergy-induced regressive autism. Research indicates that the allergenic proteins from NRL stoppers and syringes can easily “leach” these allergenic proteins into vaccine solutions contained in the pre-loaded syringes. When the vaccine with the leached NRL allergenic proteins is administered to children, it is injected directly into the body – an unmistakable “avenue of exposure”.

    “Big Pharma’s” continued use of NRL in the stoppers and syringes increases allergies and autism. Synthetic rubber (silicone) stoppers and syringes provide an acceptable substitute for NRL and does not have the allergenic proteins. However silicone does cost more than NRL.

    The Supreme Court has ruled that parents cannot sue vaccine manufacturers for the vaccines themselves allegedly causing autism. It has not ruled on the question of NRL contamination from vaccine delivery/packaging systems. “Big Pharma” should be responsible for any harm caused by their choice of vaccine packaging.

    MjD

  285. #285 Todd W.
    September 9, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak

    “Big Pharma’s” continued use of NRL in the stoppers and syringes increases allergies and autism.

    Citation needed.

  286. #286 Matthew Cline
    September 9, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak

    Increased exposure to natural-latex proteins, over the last half century, has generated a growing population of children and adults with enhanced ADAPTIVE-IMMUNITY CAPABILITIES.

    What does “enhanced ADAPTIVE-IMMUNITY CAPABILITIES”? Susceptibility to allergies and/or auto-immune disease?

    “Big Pharma’s” continued use of NRL in the stoppers and syringes increases allergies and autism.

    Do you have any evidence that the use of NRL is stoppers and syringes has increased, or even remained the same (rather than decreasing)?

  287. #287 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 9, 2011

    Prometheus writes (# 281), “Mr. Dochnial should be begging me to not read his book”

    Let me respond with a quote:

    I know that most men—not only those considered
    clever, but even those who are very clever, and capable
    of understanding most difficult scientific, mathematical, or
    philosophic problems—can very seldom discern even the
    simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as to oblige
    them to admit the falsity of conclusions they have formed,
    perhaps with much difficulty—conclusions of which they
    are proud, which they have taught to others, and on which
    they have built their lives. – Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)

  288. #288 lilady
    September 9, 2011

    We’ve had our fun with the Dochniak chew toy.

    Cripes Almighty Dochniak…give it a rest and stop selling your “story” and your (“read my”) book…we ain’t buying either.

  289. #289 Composer99
    September 9, 2011

    Dochniak:

    Apart from the clever characterization, I dare say the Tolstoy quote you have brought in, as if it is the equal of peer-reviewed evidence instead of a distraction, applies more to yourself than it does to Prometheus.

  290. #290 TBruce
    September 9, 2011

    The Supreme Court has ruled that parents cannot sue vaccine manufacturers for the vaccines themselves allegedly causing autism. It has not ruled on the question of NRL contamination from vaccine delivery/packaging systems. “Big Pharma” should be responsible for any harm caused by their choice of vaccine packaging.

    Ooh, a loophole for those who want to try for the “vaccines cause autism” lawsuit jackpot! And an expert (he wrote a BOOK after all) ready to provide expert testimony for the appropriate fee!

    How cynical of me.

  291. #291 Blackheart
    September 10, 2011

    Thanks Michael

    There’s certanly some very interesting evidenced based research surrounding immune system responses in infants and young children.

    That the physiology of autistic patients show quite clearly an aberrant immune system response may indicate an early life insult that triggers this.

    Latex protein – Immune response certainly requires further investigation.

    Would not want to be one of those people who exhibit some ‘extereme’ dogma on this issue.

  292. #292 lilady
    September 10, 2011

    “Ooh, a loophole for those who want to try for the “vaccines cause autism” lawsuit jackpot! And an expert (he wrote a BOOK after all) ready to provide expert testimony for the appropriate fee!”

    Dochniak would first have to be “qualified by the court” in order to offer up “expert testimony” in a court case. The judge would be looking for advanced degrees in biology, (non-industrial) chemistry and actual work experience in those fields as well as publication in peer-reviewed journals detailing controlled studies. A MPH with a concentration in medical epidemiology would also be considered “a qualification” by the court, in addition to a list of other court cases where he has been “qualified” as an expert witness. I don’t think Dochniak’s self-published silly book would “qualify” him.

    How cynical of me.

  293. #293 madder
    September 10, 2011

    @lilady:

    Precisely my thought– there’s no way he’d get past a Daubert challenge. But it might be fun to watch.

  294. #294 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 10, 2011

    Prometheus says (#265 ),…it still begs the question of how latex manages to cause autism and milk, nuts, bee venom, eggs, etc. don’t.

    There are approximately two hundred or more dissimilar proteins in Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex. Of these proteins, fifty to sixty are suspected allergens. The World Health Organization (WHO)has assigned names to thirteen of these proteins that have been shown to cause latex allergy (i.e., Hev-b 1-13).

    When an infant is insulted with a Hevea-allergen
    contaminated vaccine, the immune system is designed
    to “remember” and eliminate a large number of these
    allergens. Essentially, the immune system is forced to
    distinguish its many different epitopes. Furthermore, the
    receptors that recognize these allergens must be produced
    in a huge variety of configurations, essentially one
    receptor (at least) for each different Hevea-allergen that is encountered. Thus, the sheer number of antigenic proteins
    and epitope complexity associated with Hevea-allergens
    makes it a potentially dangerous material. Furthermore,
    because of the enormous diversity of Hevea-allergens, a
    vast quantity of IgE may be formed that can, through cross-reactivity,bind to beneficial proteins based on structure or epitope homology. It is well documented that latex
    allergy can cause cross-reactivity that perpetuates allergic
    responses (i.e., atopy) to beneficial proteins including foodstuff proteins.

    Reference

    2. Tom Greer, Greer Laboratories Inc., “Literature
    Review on Latex-Food Cross-Reactivity 1991-
    2006,” http://www.latexallergyresources.org/
    FileDownloads/Latex-food%20cross-reactivity%20
    review.pdf, accessed 111/11.

  295. #295 Passing Cloud
    September 13, 2011

    I herd autizm was korzed bai pashmina?

  296. #296 Passing Wind
    September 13, 2011

    Hi Lawrence, never a dull moment in lala land.

  297. #297 Promising Wind
    September 13, 2011

    I was happy just to post under one name. Remember I got banned for link morphing and metastizing across threads? If I promise not to do it again, may I be allowed some human status please?

  298. #298 Science Mom
    September 13, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, your arms must be tired. Your legs too for that is quite a leap from cross-reactive food allergies to “Hevea-allergen contaminated vaccine”. Particularly when there is absolutely no discussion of vaccines whatsoever. Besides, you have never elucidated how a child would go from simple atopy straight to autism via latex allergy and skipping all of the clinical presentations of allergies in between.

    Are you really deluded enough to think this postulation of yours will gain any traction?

  299. #299 Todd W.
    September 13, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak

    it still begs the question of how latex manages to cause autism

    Um, no. You are begging the question here, in that you have asserted that latex causes autism, yet have thus far provided zero scientific evidence that this is the case.

  300. #300 Lawrence
    September 13, 2011

    Hi Jacob – bored today?

  301. #301 Science Mom
    September 13, 2011

    Would not want to be one of those people who exhibit some ‘extereme’ dogma on this issue.

    Oh no of course not, just be one of those mindless dunderheads who will unquestioningly follow any harebrained contortion of “it must be the vaccines”.

  302. #302 Lawrence
    September 13, 2011

    And the deletes just keep on coming…..

  303. #303 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 13, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#295), “Besides, you have never elucidated how a child would go from simple atopy straight to autism via latex allergy and skipping all of the clinical presentations of allergies in between”

    Let me say that atopy is not “simple” as you state above. In the contrary, atopy is a very complicated immunological response wherein antibodies are produced which may also bind to beneficial proteins.

    The hevea-allergens from natural-latex can act as a catalyst for the development of atopy.

    Furthermore, it is generally recognized that atypical immunity can affect the expression of neurotrophins which affect neurological development.

    In continuation, atypical neurological development from said immunity may affect behaviors possibly resulting in an autism spectrum disorder (i.e., allergy-induced regressive autism).

    Unfortunately, some vaccines are contaminated with the hevea-allergens.

    In summary, “regressive” autism may be a function of “aggressive” antibodies induced by hevea-allergen exposure. See the book “Allergies and Autism” from Nova Science for details.

    MjD

  304. #304 Gray Falcon
    September 13, 2011

    MjD, what’s more important to you, science or profit?

  305. #305 Lawrence
    September 13, 2011

    “My theory is correct because I say so,” is not Science.

  306. #306 Science Mom
    September 13, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#295), “Besides, you have never elucidated how a child would go from simple atopy straight to autism via latex allergy and skipping all of the clinical presentations of allergies in between”

    Let me say that atopy is not “simple” as you state above. In the contrary, atopy is a very complicated immunological response wherein antibodies are produced which may also bind to beneficial proteins.

    The hevea-allergens from natural-latex can act as a catalyst for the development of atopy.

    Mr. Dochniak, why are you evading my rather straightforward question? Why would sensitisation to Hevea antigens have no clinical allergic presentation such as hives, runny nose/eye and/or anaphylaxis but cause autism? What percentage of autistic children also have latex allergies? And to reiterate Prometheus’ question, why wouldn’t this also happen with any other allergy antigens, which would also upregulate production of nerve growth factor via Th2 stimulation?

    Furthermore, it is generally recognized that atypical immunity can affect the expression of neurotrophins which affect neurological development.

    And what would those biomarkers be? Walk me through the biochemical pathways. Go ahead, use big words, I’m a big girl.

    In continuation, atypical neurological development from said immunity may affect behaviors possibly resulting in an autism spectrum disorder (i.e., allergy-induced regressive autism).

    Yet inconsistent results are found with regards to neurotrophin levels and autism. Why also wouldn’t your latex-induced regressive autists also have other tissue structural abnormalities?

    In summary, “regressive” autism may be a function of “aggressive” antibodies induced by hevea-allergen exposure. See the book “Allergies and Autism” from Nova Science for details.

    I took you up on your offer and asked for an electronic copy. You refused. I’m sure as hell not buying your drek. Hint: If you’re going to pimp your book, you may have better luck on a site that isn’t crawling with scientists and physicians.

  307. #307 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 14, 2011

    Gray Falcon asked, MjD, what’s more important to you, science or profit?

    Response:

    The more medical science explores how hevea-allergen exposure may affect the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism, the more mankind profits.

    MjD

  308. #308 Gray Falcon
    September 14, 2011

    MjD, what’s more important to you, science or profit? Do you feel it’s right to withhold valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?

  309. #309 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 14, 2011

    Gray Falcon asked, MjD, what’s more important to you, science or profit?

    Response:

    The more medical science explores how hevea-allergen exposure may affect the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism, the more mankind profits.

    MjD

  310. #310 Gray Falcon
    September 14, 2011

    Does that mean you’ll post the information we request, rather than demand we purchase your book? MjD, what’s more important to you, science or profit?

  311. #311 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 14, 2011

    Gray Falcon (#305) asked, Do you feel it’s right to withhold valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?

    Mr. Falcon, let’s get back on track and discuss why big Pharma continues to use Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccines. Simply, the hevea-allergens are a catalyst for the sales of allergy medication. You should ask Big Pharma what’s more important, science or profit.

  312. #312 Gray Falcon
    September 14, 2011

    Do you feel it’s right to withhold valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?

  313. #313 lilady
    September 14, 2011

    Months ago, I knew that Dochniak was “full of it”, by just reading his description of his child’s “anaphylactic” reaction to a vaccine packaged with a latex port…or to the latex plunger in the syringe:

    “On Dochniak’s website (describing his two-year-old’s ER visit)…..”Before leaving the hospital a doctor recommended that a nebulizer be used at home to relieve any recurrent asthmatic symptoms”. Huh? Didn’t Dochniak just describe an anaphylaxis episode? The ER doctor would have prescribed an EpiPen with instructions to fill the prescription immediately.

    Too dumb even, to frame the anecdotal episode in a cogent manner…so that we might believe that his child has a latex allergy.

    Posted by: lilady | May 10, 2011 5:56 PM”

    I call Bullshit X 3 on:

    Dochniak’s child’s latex allergy

    His “research” about latex

    His books

    Time to give it up, Dochniak.

  314. #314 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 14, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#309), “Do you feel it’s right to withhold valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?”

    Response:

    The co-author and I wrote the book “Vaccine delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”, placing it in the public domain for those who read the old fashioned way i.e., from a book.

    Did you know that descriptions of allergic reactions to natural latex started to appear in medical literature in 1927?

    Stern J. Ueberempfindlichkeit gegen Kautschuk als Ursache von Urticaria und Quinkeschem Oedem Klin Wochenschr 1927; 6; 1479.

    MjD

  315. #315 Chris
    September 14, 2011

    The fact that people can become allergic to latex is well known. What you have not proven is that it leads to autism.

    I’m allergic to nickel. Does this means that if I touch enough nickel coated safety pins, hair pins, snaps and all the other stuff that is covered with nickel that I’ll develop some kind of neurological dysfunction?

  316. #316 Gray Falcon
    September 14, 2011

    MjD: If it’s in the public domain, you won’t lose anything by posting your data here. Do you feel it’s right to withhold valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?

  317. #317 Krebiozen
    September 15, 2011

    There’s a book?

  318. #318 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 15, 2011

    Chris writes (#312), “The fact that people can become allergic to latex is well known. What you have not proven is that it leads to autism”

    Fact is children can become allergic to latex from vaccines, many are asking the question does such exposure cause allergy-induced regressive autism in immune senstive infants. Chris, I don’t believe vaccines have nickel warnings, but I’m sure Big Pharma makes a pretty nickel even if warnings are present on the vaccines.

    Fact is, latex allergy is a catalyst for the sales of allergy medication. Big Pharma also profits from the sales of allergy-induced regressive autism medication.

    Thanks for your response (#312).

    MjD

  319. #319 Lawrence
    September 15, 2011

    Wait….what? You state a “FACT” without offering any evidence to back it up, oh right – that’s what you do.

  320. #320 Chris
    September 15, 2011

    Oh my Thor. Did he really say that it is a fact that latex causes autism just because the FDA has warnings about latex allergies?

    Is he really that idiotic?

  321. #321 Science Mom
    September 15, 2011

    Put down the shovel Mr. Dochniak. I’m almost embarrassed for you.

  322. #322 Gray Falcon
    September 15, 2011

    MjD, declaring something a fact is not evidence. Let me demonstrate: Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Was what I just said sufficient reason to burn you at the stake?

  323. #323 Calli Arcale
    September 15, 2011

    Fact is children can become allergic to latex from vaccines, many are asking the question does such exposure cause allergy-induced regressive autism in immune senstive infants

    FYI: “one” is not “many”.

  324. #324 lilady
    September 15, 2011

    The one child Dochniak came up with who “purportedly” had an anaphylactic reaction to a party balloon is his child.

    BS artist described an asthmatic attack in his child, not anaphylaxis…with a nebulizer prescribed for his child not epinephrine. I posted twice about this and Dochniak still has not explained why he deliberately (and foolishly) changed the diagnosis of his child’s “attack”. So dumb he simply cannot come up with a cogent story about the purported anaphylactic reaction to a vaccine.

    Stick a fork in this fool…he’s overdone and worn out his welcome.

  325. #325 Prometheus
    September 15, 2011

    Gray Falcon asks:

    “Do you feel it’s right to withhold valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?”

    I realise that this is a rhetorical question, since I’m sure Gray Falcon knows that Mr. Dochniak has no information that is of any value to humanity.

    What Mr. Dochinak has is a hypothesis that is grounded on a superficial and largely incorrect understanding of immunobiology, molecular genetics, virology and neurodevelopment.

    He persists in asserting that H. brasiliensis is somehow unique in having numerous allergenic proteins in its sap (AKA raw latex) and that nuts, bee venom, milk, cereals, etc. cannot possibly be as complex a mixture of proteins as latex is.

    He also persists in asserting that latex is unique among the allergens in its ability to cause autism via the immune system without any overt manifestations of latex allergy. If this were true, it would be unique, but Mr. Dochniak gives no data supporting his assertion.

    I have wasted a great deal of time searching the world’s medical and biological literature for studies that might support Mr. Dochniak’s assertions. I have done this because Mr. Dochniak is terribly coy about his sources. He has admitted that he has done no novel research and so all of his information must have come from published studies. Here is what I have found:

    [1] Latex – more specifically, some of the H. brasiliensis proteins found in latex and natural rubber products – can cause severe delayed hypersensitivity reactions (“allergies”) in some people; this should not come as a surprise to most people.

    [2] Latex allergies are mediated by exactly the same immune processs that mediate delay-hypersensitivity reactions to most other protein and non-protein allergens.

    [3] There are a few studies showing possible abnormalities in the immune systems of persons with autism; there are also studies showing a possible association between autism and auto-immune disorders. None of these studies have been able to show a causal link between autism and immune dysfunction (i.e. there is nothing that shows the immune dysfunctions aren’t caused by autism).

    In the category of “dogs that didn’t bark” are the following:

    [1] Medical use of latex has fallen dramatically in the past two decades, while the reported autism prevalence has increased.

    [2] While the world-wide “consumption” of latex has increased, the amount used in the U.S., U.K. and E.U. has decreased over the past two decades, as synthetic polymers have been substituted for rubber.

    [3] No studies (published in indexed journals) have reported an association between autism and latex allergies (or nut allergies, I note).

    Apparently, all we have that supports Mr. Dochniak’s “latex-caused-autism” hypothesis is his assertion. I and others have outlined above how Mr. Dochniak’s hypotheses about how latex causes autism are based on faulty understanding of biology, but he persists in his error.

    And yes, Krebiozen, there is a book – one that Mr. Dochniak has been flogging mercilessly in the comments section of this ‘blog post. Based on the little snippets Mr. Dochniak has offered up for our review, it’s not a very good book, unless your tastes run to rather technical unintentional comedy.

    Prometheus

  326. #326 Prometheus
    September 15, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak makes the outrageous claim that:

    “Fact is, latex allergy is a catalyst for the sales of allergy medication. Big Pharma also profits from the sales of allergy-induced regressive autism medication.”

    Mr. Dochniak, since he is largely ignorant of all things medical and biological, may not realise that the #1 “treatment” for latex allergy is avoidance.

    That’s right – not some expensive allergy medication, just staying away from the allergen. This is because latex is not used so widely in the US, UK and EU that avoidance would be impractical or impossible.

    Secondly, I’d like to know which “allergy-induced regressive autism medication” Mr. Dochnicak is referring to. While there are a number of medications that legitimate doctors use to treat some of the aspects of autism, I wasn’t aware that there was a medication directed specifically at “allergy-induced regressive autism”.

    All in all, the “Big Pharma” ploy isn’t working here. Next, I expect to see Mr. Dochniak accuse me (or our host) of being in the pay of “Big Pharma” (the “Big Pharma shill” defense). Or is he planning to accuse “Big Pharma” for the pathetic sales of his book?

    I’m with Science Mom, put down the shovel, Mr. Dochniak – the hole is deep enough already.

    Prometheus

  327. #327 Krebiozen
    September 15, 2011

    Prometheus,

    And yes, Krebiozen, there is a book – one that Mr. Dochniak has been flogging mercilessly in the comments section of this ‘blog post.

    Yes I know, I should have added a sarcasm tag.

  328. #328 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 15, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#323), “Mr. Dochniak, since he is largely ignorant of all things medical and biological, may not realise that the #1 “treatment” for latex allergy is avoidance.”

    The #1 “treatment” for latex allergy is avoidance. Most importantly, the #1 way of not getting a latex allergy is also latex avoidance.

    Therefore, refuse vaccines that have latex warnings.

    MjD

  329. #329 Science Mom
    September 15, 2011

    Therefore, refuse vaccines that have latex warnings.

    Given that latex exposure is far more ubiquitous in non-vaccine items, where is your call for avoidance of any latex product? Oh and Mr. Dochniak, tenacity =/= correct.

  330. #330 lilady
    September 15, 2011

    From Mr. Dochniak’s book:

    A time of anticipated celebration, a time of joy as brightly colored party balloons, wrapped gifts, paper plates, and inscribed napkins decorated picnic tables for family and friends gathered to share vanilla-frosted cake at Dain’s 2nd birthday. Dain playfully mouthed an inflated natural-latex balloon while others cheerfully watched and sang happy birthday. Within the balloon was an invasive danger that would soon severely threaten and change his life forever. Shortly after playing with the balloon, Dain’s health steadily regressed as his adaptive immune system recognized and attacked the natural-latex proteins that had transferred, through inhalation and dermal absorption, from the balloon and into his body. As the allergic response progressed and intensified his health worsened, frightened parents comforted their child as each labored breath failed to change the dark-purple color in his lips from oxygen starved blood. Rushed to the hospital emergency room, a nurse quickly injected adrenaline into his tiny shoulder. A mask supplied a steady stream of oxygen and intravenous tubes dripped essential fluids into his arm, rapidly turning his lips a safe pink color again allowing this atopic child to overcome a severe allergic reaction and live another day. Before leaving the hospital, a Doctor discussed his allergy situation. It was recommended that a nebulizer be used at home to relieve any recurrent asthmatic symptoms. The treatments helped his breathing but failed to address its underlying cause and progression – his adaptive immune system was hyper-active and out of control. Within a year, Dain would experience many more allergic manifestations and be diagnosed with Regressive Autism; thereafter helplessly locked forever in a world of behavioral atypicality.

    In the book titled, ‘Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’ Michael believes that vaccines contributed to his son’s allergy-induced regressive autism. According to Autism Speaks, a non-profit public awareness organization, it’s estimated that one in every 110 children in the United States is diagnosed with autism and tens of millions are affected worldwide, making it more prevalent than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes, and pediatric AIDS combined. What actually causes autism is a complex and puzzling question, but atypical immunity is known to play a dominant role. Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection) focuses on the allergenic proteins found in Hevea brasiliensis, a dry natural rubber (HDNR) found in some vaccine packaging and delivery systems. Along with scientific reasoning, empirical studies are used to illustrate that exposure to the allergenic proteins from HDNR can affect the incidence of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism. However, it’s expressed that the story is a hopeful one because the allergy-induced regressive autism rate does not have to be the inevitable result of immunization. HDNR exclusionary practice will dramatically reduce cases of allergy-induced regressive autism in future generations. The book is an essential read for parenthats, teachers, scientists, and medical professionals. Although they are likely to feel frustrated, be moved to anger, or experience a sense of betrayal, acute awareness of this important issue can only lead to a resolution. The message is loud and clear: the use of HDNR in vaccine packaging and delivery violates the first rule of medicine–do no harm.

    It would seem that the number one way to avoid an asthmatic attack would be for Mr. Dochniak to keep his child away from latex balloons and the powder that the balloons are packed with that his child inhaled…and that triggered an asthmatic attack.

    Therefore, refuse balloons altogether.

    It would also seem that Dochniak should stop digging or get a longer ladder.

  331. #331 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    September 15, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    You’ve skipped the first 999,999 out of 1,000,000 parts of your argument. In order to demonstrate that the latex in vaccine vial diaphragms can cause “allergy-induced regressive autism”, you first have to demonstrate that there is any such thing as “regressive autism”. Since IMO the chances are at least 999 out of 1000 that “regressive autism” is simply “Parent assumes child is developing normally until suddenly noticing that he’s not—ZOMG! Regression!”

    Secondly if there is any such thing as “regressive autism” you have to demonstrate that it can be “allergy-induced”. My bet is that all you will come up with is “allergy-correlated”, if that. Then you have to explain why none of the other million-and-one things some kids are allergic to cause “regressive autism”.

    Finally, after you’ve built a case for these “Impossible things you believe before breakfast”. you can start on explaining how the homeopathic quantities of latex that would enter the child’s body from this declining incidence of latex-containing vials are triggering the (supposedly) increasing incidence of autism. Please don’t skip the hard part—I know damn well it’s not in your book, so I don’t need to buy it.

  332. #332 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    September 15, 2011

    Please just assume a few of those periods up in there are commas. New keyboard.

  333. #333 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 15, 2011

    The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge writes (#328), “I know damn well it’s not in your book, so I don’t need to buy it”.

    There is no teaching or suggestion of homeopathic quantities of latex in the book “Vaccine Deliver and Autism – The Latex Connection”. In the contrary, medical science has shown that some individual are sentitive to the hevea-allergens at ppb (ppb is part per billion Prometheus).

    Furthermore, studies show that latex sensitivity is increasing not decreasing.

    Science Mom is correct when she says latex products are far more ubiquitous in non-vaccines. But, injecting the hevea-allergens directly into an infant is a very intrusive route of exposure that should not be accepted and is becoming less tolerated.

    MjD

  334. #334 Chris
    September 15, 2011

    Well, at least we know why he skipped the agony of publishing in a peer reviewed journal, just “Medical Hypothesis.”

  335. #335 Matthew Cline
    September 15, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak:

    If you’ve put your book into the public domain, then put it up on the Internet for free download rather than asking us to buy it.

  336. #336 Gray Falcon
    September 15, 2011

    So, why hasn’t anyone ever become autistic from getting a cut or scrape?

  337. #337 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    September 15, 2011

    Mr Dochniak:

    I will take your #329 as an admission that your book does not demonstrate the existence of any such a phenomenon as “regressive autism” or, in the incredibly unlikely event that it exists, that allergies can cause it. I’m shocked. Shocked I tell you!

  338. #338 Antaeus Feldspar
    September 15, 2011

    Well, at least we know why he skipped the agony of publishing in a peer reviewed journal, just “Medical Hypothesis.”

    “Medical Hypotheses,” an excellent example of a Kroy Wen.

    What’s a Kroy Wen, you ask?

    Well, Frank Sinatra sang of New York, New York: “If I can make it there, I’ll make it anywhere.”

    A Kroy Wen is the opposite: you only bother trying to make it there when you can’t make it anywhere else.

  339. #339 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 16, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#332), “So, why hasn’t anyone ever become autistic from getting a cut or scrape?”

    Response:

    It is well known that bandages (e.g., Bandaids), used to cover cuts and scrapes, have been manufactured with natural-latex. This is another route of exposure to the hevea-allergens. Fortunately, manufacturers are begining to provide latex-free bandages in that hospitals ban hevea brasiliensis natural-latex products in their facilities.

    Avoid using bandages on children that have a latex warning on the packaging.

    Thanks for your input Gray Falcon!

    MjD

  340. #340 Narad
    September 16, 2011

    I think I’m missing the part where that’s a response to the question.

  341. #341 W. Kevin Vicklund
    September 16, 2011

    So, why hasn’t anyone ever become autistic from getting a cut or scrape?

  342. #342 Chris
    September 16, 2011

    I am still confused why nickel allergies don’t cause allergies. Is it just the FDA warning? I mean nickel is everywhere.

  343. #343 Lawrence
    September 16, 2011

    MjD has got to be some kind of robot – I mean the canned answers it spews out to every single question (regardless of its complexity or issue) couldn’t come from a human…..

  344. #344 Science Mom
    September 16, 2011

    MjD has got to be some kind of robot – I mean the canned answers it spews out to every single question (regardless of its complexity or issue) couldn’t come from a human…..

    Well, in light of his inability to answer simple questions that he should know but can’t, and is intense need to be right, is it surprising that he would take this tact?

  345. #345 Chris
    September 16, 2011

    Oops, I meant to ask: “I am still confused why nickel allergies don’t cause autism.” Why just latex?

    How come wool and cats don’t cause autism? Kids get allergic to those. Is it because they are not used in vaccine packaging?

  346. #346 Prometheus
    September 16, 2011

    Chris,

    Not to give Mr. Dochniak more fuel for his delusion, but anything that gets under the skin could – in his alternate Universe – cause autism.

    The potentally allergenic proteins in any natural product (e.g. wood splinters, playground soil, superficial bacterial infection, etc.) are fully equal in number and immunogenicity to those found in latex, yet there is nobody (yet) claiming that children become autistic after any of those exposures.

    I’m beginning to wonder if Lawrence might not be right – Mr. Dochniak’s responses have been rather rigid and limited, like those of a computer program. Perhaps he’s nothing but a ‘bot programmed to stir up interest in Mr. Dochniak’s new book.

    It’s not working very well.

    Prometheus

  347. #347 Chris
    September 16, 2011

    Prometheus:

    Perhaps he’s nothing but a ‘bot programmed to stir up interest in Mr. Dochniak’s new book.

    A quick Google on his last name brings up his Amazon page, though in reality this page has probably had much more activity. It must be some kind of ‘bot to deal with the Google searches.

    I would not be surprised, considering the level (or lack of) veracity from the anti-vaccine crowd.

  348. #348 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 18, 2011

    Chris writes (#342), “I am still confused why nickel allergies don’t cause autism.”

    MjD’s Response:

    Compared to the hevea-allergens, inorganic elements such as nickel do not have a molecular complexity (i.e., epitope variability) to effectively induce cross-reactivity through adaptive immunity. See message #294 for more details on why the hevea-allergens are dangerous.

    A nickel for your thoughs Gray Falcon?

    MjD

  349. #349 Chris
    September 18, 2011

    So it is a ‘bot!

    He has some program to put up nonsense on some kind of time cycle. He completely missed the bit about wool and cats.

  350. #350 Gray Falcon
    September 18, 2011

    MjD, you’ve established you aren’t interested in honest discussion. What more do I need to say?

  351. #351 Science Mom
    September 18, 2011

    He has some program to put up nonsense on some kind of time cycle. He completely missed the bit about wool and cats.

    No, he didn’t miss that; he can’t torture it into his little paradigm so he ignores it, just as he hasn’t bothered to address any of Prometheus’ questions and mine at #303.

    It’s all rather typical.

  352. #352 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 18, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#343), “The potentally allergenic proteins in any natural product (e.g. wood splinters, playground soil, superficial bacterial infection, etc.) are fully equal in number and immunogenicity to those found in latex…”

    MjD’s Response:

    Prometheus, there is a reason why natural latex is banned in hospitals and the FDA requires a warning label when latex is present in vaccines.

    The H. brasiliensis rubber tree forms natural-latex having antigenic proteins that are unique based on secondary, tertiary, and quantenary stucture; making them potentially DANGEROUS ALLERGENS. Furthermore, primary-structure similarities in latex-proteins and non-latex proteins (e.g., beneficial foodstuff proteins) can induce IgE-antibody epitope recognition, and cross-reactivity, based on such structure homology; again making the latex-proteins potentially DANGEROUS ALLERGENS.

    MjD

  353. #353 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 18, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#348), “No, he didn’t miss that; he can’t torture it into his little paradigm so he ignores it, just as he hasn’t bothered to address any of Prometheus’ questions and mine at #303.

    Dear Science Mom,

    You asked for and then refused a free copy of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    Therefore my feeling are hurt, but time heals. I’ll answer your #303 questions when I’ve recovered…

    Please no one else ask for a free copy of the book and then refuse it. I’m human, not a robot as some have suggested.

    MjD

  354. #354 TBruce
    September 18, 2011

    Prometheus, there is a reason why natural latex is banned in hospitals…

    It is? I have had a latex allergy for years and I have to request latex-free gloves at my hospital every time I need to do a procedure that requires gloving.

    Incidentally, I do not have ASD, even though I’ve had all the vaccines available at the time.

    Yeah, I know, it’s an anecdote, but that’s what counts in Woo-World.

  355. #355 Science Mom
    September 18, 2011

    You asked for and then refused a free copy of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    A liar too; and here I thought you were just another delusional vaccinesdidit bandwagon-clinger. I asked for a pdf of your book, which you have.

    You refused and I have the email exchange to demonstrate your retraction of your “offer”, which will show up on my blog this week.

  356. #356 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 19, 2011

    TBruce writes (#351), “I have had a latex allergy for years and I have to request latex-free gloves at my hospital every time I need to do a procedure that requires gloving”.

    MjD’s response:

    The first rule of medicine is do no harm. How do feel about exposing your patients to the hevea-allergens prior to getting latex allergy from “gloving”?

    Medical science has known for a century that exposure to the proteins in hevea brasiliensis natural-latex can causes adverse immune responses in some patients. Yet some doctors and hospitals still allow its use.

    MjD

  357. #357 TBruce
    September 19, 2011

    The first rule of medicine is do no harm. How do feel about exposing your patients to the hevea-allergens prior to getting latex allergy from “gloving”?

    How do I feel about exposing my patients to hevea-allergens? Oh terrible, terrible! They kept dropping dead from anaphylaxis and I didn’t know why!

    Actually, they didn’t complain. I am a pathologist, and they were either dead (autopsies) or in pieces (surgical specimens). I am still wracked with guilt, of course. Allergic reaction in a segment of colon is a terrible thing.

    Anyway, nice attempt to divert my attention from your error (or lie) about latex being banned from hospitals. It didn’t work.

  358. #358 Vicki
    September 19, 2011

    MjD:

    You say that the incidence of autism is increasing. Others argue that it’s about constant, and the difference has to do with greater awareness and diagnostic substitution. So, the autism rate is either steady or increasing.

    Logic suggests that the cause(s) must also, therefore, either be steady or increasing.

    The amount of latex in the environment is decreasing.

    People keep asking you to explain this contradiction, and you keep coming back with warnings about how dangerous latex is, ignoring that you’ve been asked to justify the claim that latex causes, or even correlates with, autism. Telling me, again, to keep latex away from any child in my care is not evidence that I should to do this.

    I take allergies seriously, because there are people in my life for whom they are real issues. But I take them seriously, not phobicly: they are real things, to be dealt with realistically. With the child who is allergic to eggs, that means not offering her anything to eat unless I’m sure of the ingredients. It doesn’t mean keeping her away from egg-shaped plastic toys, or drawings of birds sitting on their nests. Nor does it mean assuming that because she can’t have eggs, we can’t give her wheat or dairy or peanuts.

  359. #359 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 19, 2011

    TBruce writes (#354), “How do I feel about exposing my patients to hevea-allergens? Oh terrible, terrible! They kept dropping dead from anaphylaxis and I didn’t know why!”

    “Actually, they didn’t complain. I am a pathologist, and they were either dead (autopsies) or in pieces (surgical specimens)”.

    MjD’s response:

    Thanks for your contribution to medical science and sorry to hear you acquired a latex allergy.

    TBruce, what do you think about natural-latex gloves still being used in surgery, exposing live patients to the hevea-allergens?

    Furthermore, do you think natural-latex should be used in vaccines, e.g., syringe tips, knowing that the hevea-allergens can contaminate the vaccine solution?

    MjD

  360. #360 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 19, 2011

    Vicki writes (#355), “Telling me, again, to keep latex away from any child in my care is not evidence that I should to do this”.

    MjD’s Response:

    Exposing any children in your care to H. brasiliensis natural-latex is your responsibility.

  361. #361 Gray Falcon
    September 19, 2011

    MjD, do you really think people will be convinced by your evasive answers?

  362. #362 TBruce
    September 19, 2011

    MJD:
    I have never seen or heard of a significant patient reaction to latex gloves. It is, however, a fairly common allergy among health care workers. This is most likely related to repeated and prolonged exposure, something that is not an issue with almost all patients.

    I think that your argument about latex contamination of vaccines is about as credible as other blanket criticisms of vaccines.

  363. #363 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 19, 2011

    TBruce writes (#359), “I think that your argument about latex contamination of vaccines is about as credible as other blanket criticisms of vaccines”.

    MjD’s response:

    The FDA mandates the use of latex warnings on vaccines when natural latex is present. My arguement about latex contamination of vaccines is therefore a specific criticism.

    TBruce writes (#359), “This is most likely related to repeated and prolonged exposure, something that is not an issue with almost all patients”.

    Are you refering to your patients (#356) when you make this statement?

    MjD

  364. #364 Justin
    September 19, 2011

    I don’t know much about Helvea Brasiliensis and its impact on the immune system, but the scientific findings buttressing an immune system — autism link are certainly becoming more grounded as research continues.

    I was doing my monthly check-up on pubmed wrt to autism research (specifically the immune autism link) and came across this recent publication:

    “A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism.”

    PMID: 20957522

    My university does not provide access to the journal that published this paper, so I have no way of assessing it.

    Michael, have you read this particular research paper? Anyone else?

    I think the findings and research in the autism-immune realm have actually become quite a bit more robust in the past year. Certainly it is not clear how everything fits together (as Prometheus pointed out), but there are still some intriguing findings and new knowledge about neuroimmunology that may shed some light on the immune-autism connection.

    Also, just because there is becoming a credible link between aberrant immune responses and autism, it does not automatically indict vaccines in the etiology of autism. But, it may offer different angles to study the safety of vaccines and their potential implication in altering neurodevelopment.

  365. #365 Calli Arcale
    September 19, 2011

    Chris: I am still confused why nickel allergies don’t cause allergies. Is it just the FDA warning? I mean nickel is everywhere.

    Nickel allergy isn’t the same kind of allergy, exactly. My mom has it pretty bad — anything under 18 carat gold or sterling silver will trigger a reaction. (And actually, she’s stopped wearing even 18 carat now.) Her glasses have titanium frames. When she had surgery for a bad break last winter, the surgical staples drove her absolutely mad until they could come out — she had told them about her allergy, but apparently they didn’t think about the staples. A lot of medical professionals think surgical steel is hypoallergenic, and, well, it kind of is. It’s better than, say, the steel used to build a bridge. But it’s still got plenty of nickel in it.

    But the question is still a good one, and still unanswered by Mr Donchiak. Why just latex? He says it’s special somehow, but I haven’t seen any convincing argument that it really is. Latex allergy isn’t like nickel allergy — but it IS like egg allergy, and eggs are used as a growth medium for a number of vaccines. What’s more, I believe there are documented cases of anaphylaxis due to egg allergy after vaccination with an egg-containing vaccine. Why would this not cause autism?

    Medical science has known for a century that exposure to the proteins in hevea brasiliensis natural-latex can causes adverse immune responses in some patients. Yet some doctors and hospitals still allow its use.

    And pet therapy is allowed in hospitals, despite severe dog and cat allergies. And I was served buns when I was in the hospital, even though celiac disease has been known for even longer. (Heck, they even served PB&J.) And steel fittings are still used for implants, causing a great deal of pain for the nickel-sensitive. It is not possible to protect against all possible allergens, and the effort would in fact be absurd.

    Exposing any children in your care to H. brasiliensis natural-latex is your responsibility.

    And that also is not an answer to Vicki’s request for a reason why that should be a particular concern, absent information about a particular child’s allergy.

  366. #366 Science Mom
    September 19, 2011

    Michael, have you read this particular research paper? Anyone else?

    Oh yes, Mr. Dochniak has read it and seems to think it supports his completely unsubstantiated hand-waving, hence his fapping about this report upstream in the comments. It isn’t a particularly well-conducted examination as it looks at a single family that works in a latex plant. Everyone is allergic to latex, news at 11:00!

    Yes there are intriguing findings with regards to immune dysregulation and autism, but which came first? Why don’t we let the real scientists do their jobs and bin the likes of Mr. Dochniak’s “research” where it belongs.

  367. #367 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 19, 2011

    Justin writes (#361), “Also, just because there is becoming a credible link between aberrant immune responses and autism, it does not automatically indict vaccines in the etiology of autism. But, it may offer different angles to study the safety of vaccines and their potential implication in altering neurodevelopment”.

    MjD’s response:

    Justin, here’s a bit of information from the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” Chapter 12, page 80.

    Has vaccine-insult increased the incidence of mental retardation in allergy-induced regressive autism?

    As discussed in previous Chapters, medical research has shown that vaccinations can increase allergy sensitivity. In atopic children, vaccinations could be the tipping point that further induces the prevalence of allergic reactions; adversely affecting cognitive development. It is the opinion of the authors (i.e., Michael J. Dochniak and Denise H. Dunn) that atypical adaptive immunity, and Hevea-allergen tainted vaccines, continues to affect the incidence of mental retardation in allergy-induced regressive autism.

    The Hevea-allergens can activate the immune system and adversely change the autistic mind.

    MjD

  368. #368 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 22, 2011

    TBruce writes (#354), “Anyway, nice attempt to divert my attention from your error (or lie) about latex being banned from hospitals. It didn’t work”

    MjD’s response:

    As an example, “Latex Banned from Johns Hopkins Hospital”.

    http://www.achooallergy.com/blog/johns-hopkins-bans-latex/

    MjD

  369. #369 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 22, 2011

    TBruce,

    We now know that latex is banned from Johns Hopkins Hospital. The question that begs to be asked is as follows:

    Why is natural-latex still in some of their vaccines?

    Medical science and the general public understands that there is health risk associated with vaccinations. An open and honest discussion about the safety of some vaccines must continue.

    MjD

  370. #370 Chris
    September 22, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    Medical science and the general public understands that there is health risk associated with vaccinations. An open and honest discussion about the safety of some vaccines must continue.

    But not compared to the actual diseases. Plus there is no real evidence that vaccines have any association with autism.

    Yes, the discussion must be open and honest. Except those are two things you have failed to do this entire time. You have not presented any real evidence that latex allergies are related autism, but have insisted we buy your book.

  371. #371 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 24, 2011

    Chris writes (#367), “Yes, the discussion must be open and honest”.

    MjD’s response:

    Medical science understands that vaccines can cause a disease characterized by a tendency to be “hyper-allergic” (i.e., atopy). Also, environmental factors such as exposure to the proteins in natural-latex is suspected to play a major role in atopy.

    Therefore, the combination of vaccinations and natural-latex exposure places children at great risk for atopic disease.

    One solution to this problem is to take natural-latex out of vaccine delivery systems.

    Thanks for your input Chris.

    MjD

  372. #372 Chris
    September 24, 2011

    Prove it. And with real studies showing that allergies have any connection to autism. This is something you have consistently failed to do.

  373. #373 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 28, 2011

    Chris writes (#368), “Prove it. And with real studies showing that allergies have any connection to autism”.

    MjD’s response:

    Thank you. I will continue to prove that the allergens in natural-latex can affect allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  374. #374 Gray Falcon
    September 28, 2011

    Did you present any evidence? Not speculation, not accusation, evidence? Do you know what evidence is?

  375. #375 Chris
    September 28, 2011

    Here is a hint, Mr. Dochniak: not your book.

  376. #376 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 28, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#371), “Do you know what evidence is?”

    MjD’s response:

    Research shows that the central nervous system is known to be susceptible to allergens especially during prenatal/neonatal/infant development. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable at this stage in that there is a proliferation of nerve cell reproduction, growth, and migration.

    Reference: Herz U, et al. 2001, Allergic Sensitization and Allergen Exposure During Pregnancy Favor the Development of Atopy in the Neonate. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. Vol. 124 (1-3), pages 193-196.

    Thus, pregnant women should avoid being exposed to the allergens in H. brasiliensis natural rubber, especially from vaccines.

    MjD

  377. #377 Chris
    September 28, 2011

    So what do those allergies have to do with autism? That is the question you have failed to answer.

  378. #378 Gray Falcon
    September 28, 2011

    Textbook example of speculation: You started from a legitimate piece of evidence, but the rest didn’t follow. You may have well have said, “Green curry has coconut milk. Thus, pregnant women should avoid being exposed to the allergens in H. brasiliensis natural rubber, especially from vaccines.”

  379. #379 Narad
    September 28, 2011

    Thus, pregnant if they are thinking about having a litter, women BALB/c mice should avoid being exposed to the allergens in H. brasiliensis natural rubber aerosolized ovalbumin, especially from vaccines if they expect their offspring to develop a taste for nonmurine milk.

  380. #380 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 28, 2011

    Chris writes (#374), “Textbook example of speculation”.

    MjD’s response:

    In 1964 the World Medical Association developed a code of research ethics that came to be known as the Declaration of Helsinki. It was a reinterpretation of the Nuremberg Code, with an eye to medical research with therapeutic intent. Thus, human experimental research directed at prenatal/neonatal/infant induced immunity to the allergens in H. brasiliensis natural-latex would be unethical and prohibited based on non-theraputic intent.

    MjD

  381. #381 Gray Falcon
    September 28, 2011

    Good excuse, but you still haven’t shown why any other form of latex hasn’t caused autism, or why only latex is what causes autism and not the 100,000 other possible allergens out there.

  382. #382 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    September 28, 2011

    Or indeed that allergic reactions DO cause autism, not merely they MIGHT be a cause.

  383. #383 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 28, 2011

    M.O’Brien writes (#379), “Or indeed that allergic reactions DO cause autism, not merely they MIGHT be a cause”

    MjD’s response:

    Medical science is teaching us that the immune system is, and will continue to be, the architect that helps design our intellectual abilities. With a deeper knowledge of adaptive immunity, medical science has the ability to affect protein insult (i.e., from natural-latex) and affect the evolution of neuro-cognitive development in mankind.

    MjD

  384. #384 Chris
    September 28, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    Chris writes (#374), “Textbook example of speculation”.

    I did not write that. Are you actually reading what we are saying?

    I asked you what allergies have to do with autism. Or as Mephistopheles O’Brien noted: show that allergic reactions cause autism.

    I should repeat, one cannot look for how vaccines cause autism until after a connection between vaccines and autism is found. That has not occurred. There is not casual relationship between vaccines and autism.

  385. #385 Gray Falcon
    September 28, 2011

    Meaning-to-Word ratio of post #380: Near, quite possibly at, zero. As usual for MjD.

  386. #386 Raging Bee
    September 28, 2011

    Yo, Dochniak, if you haven’t cited any peer-reviewed publications here to support your assertions, then I’m guessing you’re not citing any such work in your own book. If your book cited peer-reviewed work, you could at least toss out some bits from the bibliography. Your failure to cite ANY peer-reviewed work here, strongly implies your book isn’t based on such work, and is therefore…unreliable.

    Does your book even HAVE a bibliography?

  387. #387 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 29, 2011

    It has been written: I should repeat, one cannot look for how vaccines cause autism until after a connection between vaccines and autism is found.

    MjD’s response:

    The connection is in adaptive immunity.

    As previously discussed, vaccines shift immunity towards Th2. Adaptive immunity associated with atypical expression of biomarkers including cytokines, nuclear factor kappa B, and neuron growth factor induce hyper-sensitivity to environmental antigens (i.e., atopy).

    Atopy can induce the over expression of endogenous proteins including neurotrophins adversely affecting neural growth and neural prunning.

    Atypical neural growth and neural prunning can affect cognition and behaviors resulting in an autism spectrum disorder.

    Of course, the details and references are described in the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    MjD

  388. #388 Chris
    September 29, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak said:

    blah blah blah … buy my book!

    You are either the most clueless person in the world or a ‘bot.

    For the umpteenth time, stop pushing your book! In no way you have shown that allergies lead to autism, not that autism has any connection to vaccines.

  389. #389 Chris
    September 29, 2011

    Stupid typo. To clarify: you have not shown that autism has any connection to vaccines.

  390. #390 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 29, 2011

    Chris writes (#385), “For the umpteenth time, stop pushing your book! In no way you have shown that allergies lead to autism, not that autism has any connection to vaccines”.

    MjD’s response:

    It is understood that viruses, bacteria, and allergens have played a critical role in mankinds development. Forced vaccinations (i.e., herd immunity) and increased allergen exposure (i.e., natural latex) continues to stress immunity affecting the up-regulation/down-regulation of endogenous proteins critical to neurological development.

    If one accepts that the comorbidity of infectious agents (e.g., viruses, bacteria) and non-infectious proteins (e.g., allergens) can affect the expresion of endogenous proteins, one can then accept that increased insult can adversely affect immune sensitive children (i.e.,allergy-induced regressive autism).

    Do you believe that viruses, bacteria, and allergens affect our biochemistry?

    MjD

  391. #391 Gray Falcon
    September 29, 2011

    If one accepts that the comorbidity of infectious agents (e.g., viruses, bacteria) and non-infectious proteins (e.g., allergens) can affect the expresion of endogenous proteins, one can then accept that increased insult can adversely affect immune sensitive children (i.e.,allergy-induced regressive autism).

    By that logic, one can also accept that vaccines can turn people into cats.

  392. #392 Gray Falcon
    September 29, 2011

    On second thought, why did I replay to Mr. Dochniak? It’s clear MjD isn’t talking to us, he’s talking to the people he thinks we are, namely, the closed-minded naysayers who dismiss his ideas out of hand. He’s not talking to the people who are doing what every other scientist does, asking for the evidence so we can weigh it.

  393. #393 Prometheus
    September 29, 2011

    Is this argument still going on?!?

    MjD: “Assertion, distortion of fact, assertion, association confused with causation, assertion, dismissal of contradicting data without cause, assertion, Buy My Book.”

    There – now you know how all of MjD’s responses will read. He’s just trying to drum up some interest in his book and isn’t the slightest bit interested in how badly he has misunderstood biology. He is “often in error but never in doubt”, as the old song goes.

    Put a fork in him – he’s overdone.

    Prometheus

  394. #394 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 29, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#390), “… isn’t the slightest bit interested in how badly he has misunderstood biology”.

    A quote for Prometheus:

    A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it. – Thomas Samuel Kuhn

    Hev-b 5 (acidic latex protein), from H. brasiliensis natural-latex, has a high proline content of about 14 percent to provide a tertiary structure having randoteric factors, inducing antibody recognition. Does anyone really want this allergen in their child’s vaccine?

    In atopic children, a combination of vaccine insult and natural-latex insult can adversely affect immunity, neurological development, and cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  395. #395 Chris
    September 29, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, in no way does that contortion of the English language prove that vaccines cause autism, nor that allergies cause autism.

    You really are clueless. You are also ignoring all of the large epidemiological data that shows no association between vaccines and autism done in several countries. Plus the severe lack of child mortality that has increased the average lifespan.

    You are not only clueless, but delusional.

  396. #396 Chris
    September 29, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, as he continues to torture logic:

    In atopic children, a combination of vaccine insult and natural-latex insult can adversely affect immunity, neurological development, and cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Prove it. Especially the existence of “allergy-induced regressive autism.” Show that “allergy-induced regressive autism” exists by posting the journal, title, date and authors of the multiple papers that support your statements. And remember the papers should not be from Medical Hypotheses and not written by you.

  397. #397 Constant Mews
    September 29, 2011

    @Dochniak, who said, “Of course, the details and references are described in the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.”

    Out of amusement, I read your book (I found a copy remaindered in a used book store for 25 cents.) It does not contain either the details or the references to establish a connection between vaccines and autism.

    It’s bad enough that you push your (apparently) worthless and obviously self-published book.

    But to push something that has no viable content? Shame, sir.

  398. #398 Science Mom
    September 29, 2011

    Hev-b 5 (acidic latex protein), from H. brasiliensis natural-latex, has a high proline content of about 14 percent to provide a tertiary structure having randoteric factors, inducing antibody recognition. Does anyone really want this allergen in their child’s vaccine?

    I’m sure Mr. Dochniak feels as though he is dazzling someone with his brains but I think we all know what is really being presented, something about baffling and bullshit I believe. Why stop at latex when the gelatine in some vaccines also have high proline content? Your obsession with just latex is rather peculiar and leads me to speculate some rather amusing scenarios as to why that may be.

  399. #399 Chris
    September 29, 2011

    Well, it is obvious, Science Mom, it all goes back to the covers his mother had him wear over his shoes on rainy days.

  400. #400 Travis
    September 29, 2011

    Science Mom,
    Maybe I should have looked for him when I was at the Montreal Fetish Weekend earlier this month. It is a bit of a mecca for people obsessed with latex.

  401. #401 madder
    September 29, 2011

    Don’t you all get it? It has a tertiary structure– that’s the worst kind. And with randoteric factors! It induces antibody recognition, for god’s sake!

    I’m gonna hide under my bed tonight.

  402. #402 Prometheus
    September 29, 2011

    MjD:

    “A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it. – Thomas Samuel Kuhn”

    This is one of the quotations most commonly cited in defense of ideas that lack supporting data (and that are contradicted by existing data). Next we will hear Vaclev Havel’s quote about fleeing those who have found the truth – or, perhaps, something about how “they laughed at Galileo, too” (although “they” didn’t laugh at all – they put him under house arrest).

    MjD:

    “Hev-b 5 (acidic latex protein), from H. brasiliensis natural-latex, has a high proline content of about 14 percent to provide a tertiary structure having randoteric factors, inducing antibody recognition. Does anyone really want this allergen in their child’s vaccine?”

    “Randoteric” appears to be an undefined term – at least, none of the protein biochemists I asked knew what it meant. Maybe it is a regional usage.

    Hev-B5 indeed is 15% proline. Collagen (chicken) is 13% proline. Mast cell degranulating peptide (from bee venom – a very allergenic protein) is 4% proline.

    Your point…?

    Prometheus

  403. #403 Krebiozen
    September 29, 2011

    “A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it. – Thomas Samuel Kuhn”

    As I learned from Herr Doktor Bimler on this blog some time ago, that quote is not from Kuhn but is actually Max Planck. Kuhn repeated the quote in ‘The Structure of Scientific Revolutions’, and disagreed with it.

  404. #404 Constant Mews
    September 29, 2011

    “Randoteric” is not a word. I suspect it’s a case of Dochniak attempting to baffle with bafflegab. His book is even worse.

  405. #405 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 29, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#390), “Put a fork in him – he’s overdone”.

    Another quote for Professor Moriarty (aka Prometheus):

    Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? – T.S. Eliot

    Why is H. brasiliensis still in some vaccines? It has been shown that natural-latex in the medical-glove industry has done great harm to practitioners and patients.

    MjD

  406. #406 Lawrence
    September 29, 2011

    MjD – you keep making these accusations / suppositions with no basis of fact or evidence…..I don’t think what you say means what you think it means….

  407. #407 Constant Mews
    September 29, 2011

    Actually, Dochniak, it has NOT been shown that natural latex in the medical glove industry has done “great harm” to practitioners and patients. Citations, please? Or just admit you lied.

  408. #408 Matthew Cline
    September 29, 2011

    @MjD:

    1) You’ve provided the outlines of a mechanism by which allergies might cause autism, but no evidence that they do cause autism. (Please don’t say “buy my book”)

    2) You’ve provided no reason as to why latex allergies in particular are a cause of autism. (Well, you have provided supposed reasons, but other have pointed out that the properties of latex you claimed are special actually aren’t so special)

  409. #409 Science Mom
    September 29, 2011

    Well, it is obvious, Science Mom, it all goes back to the covers his mother had him wear over his shoes on rainy days.

    Oh I’m afraid you don’t know me well Chris as my imagination is far more perverse. As in envisioning a fetish which involves liquid latex, extraction from and a topical allergic reaction which involves painful, unsightly and rather embarrassing “owies”.

    Given his continued extraordinary claims with zero evidence, and now with MORE notable quotes and fabricated scientific nomenclature, I think my speculation is probably more statistically likely.

  410. #410 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    September 29, 2011

    You know, I’m old enough to remember when we were being told that synthetic rubber was the most horrible thing ever. (I think the chemical name had some syllables in common with some kind of nerve gas, maybe? I have trouble keeping insane arguments straight in my head.) We needed to switch back to “natural” rubber for everything or we were all gonna die! You can’t win for losing with these numbnuts, can you?

  411. #411 Chris
    September 29, 2011

    Dear Science Mom:

    :-o

  412. #412 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 30, 2011

    It has been incorrectly suggested that exposure to H. brasiliensis natural-latex has decreased, therefore, this can not explain the increase in allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Infant exposure to the hevea allergens from natural-latex has increased based on increased vaccinations.

    Here’s a 20011 list, from the CDC, of vaccines that contain natural latex.

    http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/appendices/B/latex-table.pdf

    Thus, infant exposure to natural-latex has increased and so has allergy-induced regressive autism. Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  413. #413 Gray Falcon
    September 30, 2011

    There’s another possibility. You could be wrong about “allergy-induced regressive autism.”

  414. #414 Prometheus
    September 30, 2011

    I see that MjD is making no attempt to address the issues raised (e.g. declining exposure to latex, why latex proteins are unique in their ability to cause autism and, most recently, proline content and immunogenicity) and has resorted to repeating (and expanding) his unsupported assertions and – stranger yet – using Bartlett’s Quotations as a reference source to bolster his positions.

    Normally, I would be done with a book-spamming troll by this point, but Mr. Dochniak intrigues me. He is a wonderful example of how knowing a little bit about a subject can be worse than knowing nothing at all.

    Having nearly mastered the jargon of science, he thinks he has a mastery of science itself. Fascinating! It’s like when I was in high school chemistry class and thought that understanding (in a very limited way, it turned out) the nomenclature rules for organic compounds gave me a mastery of organic chemistry.

    I almost admire the arrogance of someone who – even after being repeatedly shown he’s wrong – has the chutzpah to tell people with training, experience, advanced degrees and research in the field that he knows more than they. Simply amazing! It’s like watching a car crash – I know I shouldn’t watch, but I’m powerless to look away.

    In case anyone is confused, Mr. Dochniak asserts (without support) that latex exposure to young children has increased based solely on the increased number of vaccines they receive. This requires more than just his assertion to make it true.

    Mr. Dochniak also asserts (without support) that latex proteins are somehow unique in their ability to cause an abnormal adaptive immune response, which is patently false. There are a large number of protein and non-protein compounds that can cause abnormal adaptive immune response, including such mundane products as nuts, legumes (peanut), fungal products (e.g. penicillin), etc.

    Finally, in an amazing leap of “logic”, Mr. Dochniak takes limited findings of immune abnormalities in some autistic children and spins it into a tale of how latex – which is well-known to cause immune reactions – in vaccines (but, apparently, not party balloons, toys and crib mattress covers) causes autism. This “connection” doesn’t just need citations, it needs a miracle.

    These points have all been made – repeatedly – to Mr. Dochniak and he has responded by repeating his unsuppported assertions, making new unsupported assertions, touting his book and, finally, citing famous quotations.

    I will close by citing a famous quotation that Mr. Dochniak’s can interpret as he likes, since citing quotes does not support a scientific argument.

    “Es ist nichts schrecklicher als eine tätige Unwissenheit.”(“There is nothing more terrible than ignorance in action.”)

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    Prometheus

  415. #415 Michael J. Dochniak
    September 30, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#411), “Finally, in an amazing leap of “logic”, Mr. Dochniak takes limited findings of immune abnormalities in some autistic children and spins it into a tale of how latex – which is well-known to cause immune reactions – in vaccines (but, apparently, not party balloons, toys and crib mattress covers) causes autism”.

    MjD’s response:

    Repeated exposure to the Hevea-allergens, from sources other than vaccines, is discussed in both books. Thank you for at least admitting that natural-latex can cause immune reactions!

    Prometheus, today I visited a hospital in Iowa City, IA that promotes itself as “One of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals”. I asked the ‘Patient Relations Specialist’ what was their natural-latex policy and she was unaware of their policy but said she would search for an answer.

    MjD

  416. #416 Gray Falcon
    September 30, 2011

    MjD, are you here to discuss science or to sell your book?

  417. #417 Gray Falcon
    September 30, 2011

    Prometheus, today I visited a hospital in Iowa City, IA that promotes itself as “One of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals”. I asked the ‘Patient Relations Specialist’ what was their natural-latex policy and she was unaware of their policy but said she would search for an answer.

    Okay, so somebody doesn’t share your obsession. Not exactly news, or evidence.

  418. #418 Lawrence
    September 30, 2011

    It still is kind of fun to watch the troll flail around – it has been a while since I’ve seen anyone with such a one-track mind (though one of our resident insane trolls also qualifies) to ignore any and all facts or evidence that would refute his conclusions.

    Funny guy.

  419. #419 Chris
    September 30, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    Here’s a 20011 list, from the CDC, of vaccines that contain natural latex.

    Last I looked the anthrax vaccine is not required for children. In fact, each and every vaccine on the pediatric schedule has a version without latex. I pulled them out of the list for you to see:

    DTaP
    Daptacel,NO
    Infanrix, Syringe NO – Vial

    Hib
    ActHIB, NO – Lyophilized vaccine vial

    Hepatitis A
    Havrix, NO – Vial

    Hepatitis B
    Engerix-B, NO – Vial

    HPV
    Gardasil, NO
    Cerverix, NO – Vial

    Influenza
    Fluzone Intradermal, NO
    FluLava, NO
    Afluria, NO
    FluMist, NO

    MMR (M-M-R II), NO
    MMRV (ProQuad), NO

    Now, where is that evidence that “allergy-induced regressive autism” actually exists? Please post the journal, title, and dates of the multiple papers that show it is not something made up by you.

    Remember, you are not to be an author of any of those papers, and not published in Medical Hypothesis. And please stop pushing your tiny little 116 page book (that includes the index).

  420. #420 Militant Agnostic
    September 30, 2011

    MJD

    I asked the ‘Patient Relations Specialist’ what was their natural-latex policy and she was unaware of their policy but said she would search for an answer.

    And then she called security.

  421. #421 Prometheus
    September 30, 2011

    MjD:

    “Thank you for at least admitting that natural-latex can cause immune reactions!”

    That latex can cause immune reactions was never in question, nor does it necessarily support Mr. Dochniak’s assertions. I hope that he’s not scoring this as a “win” for his hypothesis. Of the three things I listed – party balloons, toys and crib mattress covers – all three have had latex largely replaced with synthetic polymers in the past twenty years. I bet he missed that point.

    “Prometheus, today I visited a hospital in Iowa City, IA that promotes itself as “One of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals”. I asked the ‘Patient Relations Specialist’ what was their natural-latex policy and she was unaware of their policy but said she would search for an answer.”

    To begin with, the “Patient Relations Specialist” is a sort of combination PR person and patient-staff interaction ombudsman for the hospital – they aren’t the best source (or even a good source) for medical policy.

    Second, I called up three local hospitals and the University of Iowa hospital this afternoon during lunch (I eat lunch late) and spoke to someone in their medical risk management offices. Each hospital representative stated that their “natural-latex policy” is roughly as follows:

    [1] Latex allergies are noted on the cover of the chart (for the one hospital still using paper charts) and are displayed at the top of every screen on the electronic record – along with all other allergies.

    [2] Patients with latex, nut and other life-threatening allergies have warnings posted on the door of their room and at the head of their bed alerting staff and visitors of the allergy and giving a lst of prohibited items (e.g. latex balloons).

    [3] All four hospitals replaced latex examination gloves with nitrile, neoprene or chloroprene gloves over a decade ago.

    [4] All four hospitals have had latex-free sterile surgical gloves available in all operating and treatment rooms for over a decade and have a policy that no latex-containing gloves may be used in the same room with patients who have latex allergies.

    All that this tells me is that hospitals and medical personnel are very aware of latex allergy and that the medical (and non-medical) use of latex has dropped dramatically in the past twenty years.

    And, just to be repetitive, the prevalence of autism has been steadily rising for the past twenty years.

    Mr. Dochniak is beginning to sound more than a bit like another infamous troll, “Th1Th2″, with his endless repetition of “facts” that are either in question or are patently false.

    Prometheus

  422. #422 helen of troy
    October 1, 2011

    Respectful Insolence bloggers, can you get more educational/insightful banter than this?

    Your blogging is shamefully entertaining at best !!! In my opinion, the present blogging exists to support the minds of already over-active immune, latex-damaged, and over- stimulated egos (i.e., Pseudo Greek Gods )

    Dunn /Dochniak are PRESENTING a viable hypothesis; cutting edge, futuristic, and in its infancy.

    Ego and others…Validate don’t Negate!
    Specifically, validate the null hypothesis; don’t negate its creation.

    I look forward to more educational/insightful responses and less degrading driven humor.

    We are all in this together! And personally, I am impressed with the evidence shown.

    Helen of Troy

  423. #423 Chris
    October 1, 2011

    Helen of Troy:

    Dunn /Dochniak are PRESENTING a viable hypothesis; cutting edge, futuristic, and in its infancy.

    Except one crucial piece is missing: actual evidence.

    I have a hypothesis that the sun revolves around the Earth. How is that any different than “allergy-induced regressive autism”?

  424. #424 Travis
    October 1, 2011

    helen of troy,
    If Michael Dochniak would present some evidence then sure, I guess the banter could be more educational. But the ball is in his court and frankly it has been since he started posting here. He has not presented anything to support his hypothesis and has endlessly been asked for references to support his ideas, but ignored it. I am not sure how you can rest the blame at the feet of the regular commenters here.

    And personally, I am impressed with the evidence shown.

    Perhaps you can clarify this. What evidence do you find convincing?

  425. #425 Dedj
    October 1, 2011

    “[1] Latex allergies are noted on the cover of the chart (for the one hospital still using paper charts) and are displayed at the top of every screen on the electronic record – along with all other allergies.

    [2] Patients with latex, nut and other life-threatening allergies have warnings posted on the door of their room and at the head of their bed alerting staff and visitors of the allergy and giving a lst of prohibited items (e.g. latex balloons).

    [3] All four hospitals replaced latex examination gloves with nitrile, neoprene or chloroprene gloves over a decade ago.

    [4] All four hospitals have had latex-free sterile surgical gloves available in all operating and treatment rooms for over a decade and have a policy that no latex-containing gloves may be used in the same room with patients who have latex allergies. ”

    Sounds about the same as all the inpatient units I’ve worked on or visited. All of the outpatient and community services I’ve been with have a similar policy of allergy awareness. Allergies are usually expressed on the front cover under the CPA system, or are flagged up at the top of the screen if using a front-end like SystmOne.

    I’m struggling to think of any place that does not have a latex-reduction policy. Hell, even my current non-clinical place of work (handling warehousing for a major catalogue chain) will quarantine latex containing goods.

  426. #426 Matthew Cline
    October 1, 2011

    @Helen of Troy:

    Ego and others…Validate don’t Negate!
    Specifically, validate the null hypothesis; don’t negate its creation.

    So when he comes here with a hypothesis, it’s not his job to prove it, but our job to disprove it?

  427. #427 herr doktor bimler
    October 1, 2011

    over- stimulated egos (i.e., Pseudo Greek Gods )

    Someone using the pseudonym “Helen of Troy” does not want commenters like Prometheus naming themselves after figures from Greek mythology.

  428. #428 Prometheus
    October 2, 2011

    Maybe it’s just my cynical nature, but I strongly suspect that “Helen of Troy” is a sock-puppet for Mr. Dochniak. After all, how many people can there be in the world that think the “latex-causes-autism” hypothesis is a “… viable hypothesis; cutting edge, futuristic…”?

    What I found particularly puzzling was:

    “Ego and others…Validate don’t Negate!
    Specifically,
    validate the null hypothesis; don’t negate its creation.” [emphasis added]

    The “null hypothesis”, in this case, would be that there is no difference in autism prevalence between those exposed to latex and those who weren’t.

    If “Helen” is suggesting that it is us who have to “validate” (i.e. “prove”) the null hypothesis in order to invalidate Mr. Dochniak’s “latex-causes-autism” hypothesis, she’s got the cart before the horse – the burden of proof is on the proposer of the hypothesis, not those who disagree.

    Of course, that interpretation is bit at odds with the next phrase: “…don’t negate its creation.” It may simply be that “Helen” has no idea what a “null hypothesis” is – which would seem to make it more likely that she’s Mr. Dochniak’s sock-puppet.

    The one part of “Helen’s” rather incoherent rant I agree with is that Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis is “…in its infancy.” To become a toddler hypothesis, it needs the following:

    [1] It needs to explain how the drop in latex use – in vaccines, in medicine and in general – is consistent with a rise in autism prevalence.

    [2] It needs to explain why latex is unique in its ability to cause autism, i.e. why nuts, bacteria, etc., which are all complex mixtures of highly immunogenic proteins, don’t also cause autism (or, if they do, what the data are that support this claim).

    [3] It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies.

    In short, Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis isn’t fully formed. To follow “Helen’s” analogy, it is more of a fetus than an infant. As my PhD advisor told me after my first attempt writing a hypothesis: “The only similarity between what you’ve written and an actual hypothesis is that they are both composed of words.”

    Prometheus

  429. #429 Matthew Cline
    October 2, 2011

    @Prometheus:

    It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies.

    I can’t find the comment where he said this, but I’m pretty sure he claimed that they lose the latex allergy as they grow older, so you’d only find the expected correlation if you looked at children who had just recently regressed. I have no idea if it’s possible for a baby/toddler to have an allergy and then lose it a few years later, nor how common it is if it is possible.

    Another thing he needs to explain is why the allergy doesn’t manifest with any of the classical signs of allergy, but only with the development of autism.

  430. #430 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 3, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#425), “It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies.

    MjD’s response:

    I normally don’t like to respond to a question with a question but here’s the exception:

    Prometheus, why don’t all, most or many people with latex allergy die from anaphylactic shock?

    Adaptive immunity is to variability what autism is to spectrum.

    MjD

  431. #431 Chris
    October 3, 2011

    Why don’t you answer our questions with actual evidence?

  432. #432 Matthew Cline
    October 3, 2011

    @Michael J. Dochniak:

    First, do you mean:

    1) It’s possible for a type I hypersensitivity disorder of the immune system to have none of the overt physiological symptoms usually associated with allergies?

    2) By “allergy” you mean something in addition to (or other than) a type I hypersensitivity disorder of the immune system.

    If it’s #1, do you have any other examples of allergies with no overt physiological symptoms? Or does it only happen with your proposed latex-allergies-which-cause-autism?

    Second, shouldn’t autistic children nonetheless have overt latex allergies at a greater rate than the non-autistic population?

  433. #433 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 3, 2011
    It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies.

    Prometheus, why don’t all, most or many people with latex allergy die from anaphylactic shock?

    This isn’t a very effective counter-argument. Prometheus’s question (taking the context of MJD’s claims into account) is in the form “If A has caused epidemic numbers of B, then why are very few B to be found that have the characteristics necessary for A?”

    MJD’s response is “Why don’t more A have outcome C?” The logic of MJD’s response has no relevance to Prometheus’s argument.

    I could actually put together a logical counter from MJD’s perspective but unless someone besides MJD shows interest, I’ll spare everyone. I suspect no one except MJD is truly interested in keeping this conversation going, and I know MJD is interested only to promote his crank views, not to actually run the risk of re-examining them.

  434. #434 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 3, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar writes (#430), “I could actually put together a logical counter from MJD’s perspective but unless someone besides MJD shows interest, I’ll spare everyone”.

    MjD’s response:

    I’m very interested… Can someone else please push Mr. Feldspar’s “go” button?

    MjD

  435. #435 Science Mom
    October 3, 2011

    I’m very interested… Can someone else please push Mr. Feldspar’s “go” button?

    Funny you should ask this considering that several of us have been asking this of you since you joined this conversation. Perhaps you could start with the answer to a very rudimentary question that has been proposed to you e.g. “It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies.

    This is critical to your hypothesis, surely you can provide data that are at the very foundation of your assertion.

  436. #436 Gray Falcon
    October 3, 2011

    I’m thinking MjD misread Prometheus’ argument. His statement was “It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies,” but he read it as “It needs to explain why all, most or many children with latex allergies don’t have regressive autism.” So he’s either dishonest or sloppy.

  437. #437 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 3, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#432), “Perhaps you could start with the answer to a very rudimentary question that has been proposed to you e.g. “It needs to explain why all, most or many children with regressive autism don’t have latex allergies.”

    MjD’s response:

    Let me repeat with clarity that the antigenic proteins in H. brasiliensis natural-latex can act as a catalyst in the development of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Vaccines that are contaminated with such antigenic proteins can intensify their catalytic effect, thereafter, increasing atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism in immune sensitive children.

    Thus, fixating on the expression “latex allergy” diverts attention from data that shows the Hev-b proteins can adversely affect atypical adaptive-immunity through cross reactivity.

    MjD

  438. #438 blackheart
    October 3, 2011

    Hi Michael

    Interesting hypothesis from the short excerpts I have read. The constant deconstruction often makes it hard to follow a ‘conversation’ with clarity on these forums.

    Hypersensitivity to allergens such as the proteins you suggest, latex, I would think may well be an interesting area for study.

    There is now clearer evidence via the Autism Genome Project University of California Davis Medical that at this time they have identified two ‘subtypes ‘ if you wish of autism. One goes to the immune system and it is that which may interest some people that have experience with children with acute symtoms of immune system dysfunction for instance asthma , eczema , garden variety allergies and the more anaphylatic ones such as egg and nut.

    You’d probably be then interested in the work undertaken by Johns Hopkins neuroimmunopathology in regards to neuroinflammation and the results of CSF.

    Here’s some interesting side readings …

    Increased serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies in autistic children: relation to the disease severity

    http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/8/1/39/abstract

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014299911007886

    http://www.science-autism.org/CSF.htm

    http://www.neuro.jhmi.edu/neuroimmunopath/autism.htm

    Autoimmune and inflammatory mechanisms of CNS damage

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301008211001535

    —————————————————–

    I’m sure Orac will give this one the big intellectual hug…

    Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Autoimmune and gastrointestinal dysfunctions: does a subset of children with autism reveal a broader connection?

    http://www.expert-reviews.com/doi/abs/10.1586/egh.11.46

    ——————————————————-

    ps Am I taking questions from skeptiks ? No.

  439. #439 Gray Falcon
    October 3, 2011

    Does repeating a statement make it true?

  440. #440 Chris
    October 3, 2011

    Prove it.

    Post the journal, title and date of the papers that support your contentions. Remember no books and nothing from “Medical Hypothesis.”

  441. #441 Lawrence
    October 3, 2011

    Seriously??? Once again, asserting something is true without providing firm evidence (and saying “buy my book” isn’t an answer) is total BS.

    Put up or shut up MjD.

  442. #442 Science Mom
    October 3, 2011

    Let me repeat with clarity that the antigenic proteins in H. brasiliensis natural-latex can act as a catalyst in the development of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    You call that clarity? I call it gobbledygook.

    Vaccines that are contaminated with such antigenic proteins can intensify their catalytic effect, thereafter, increasing atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism in immune sensitive children.

    Several posts back, I asked you to provide the biochemical pathways by which this occurs. You continue to refuse and merely obfuscate as though you are speaking to a bunch of rubes. Pony up or shut up, it’s really as simple as that.

    Thus, fixating on the expression “latex allergy” diverts attention from data that shows the Hev-b proteins can adversely affect atypical adaptive-immunity through cross reactivity.

    Dude, you’re the one that has proposed that children with regressive autism are really suffering from latex allergies, now you are complaining that that is “diverting attention” from something. What data? You haven’t presented a single shred of data to support your contention.

  443. #443 Prometheus
    October 3, 2011

    Oh, I know I’ll regret this…

    MjD:

    “Let me repeat with clarity that the antigenic proteins in H. brasiliensis natural-latex can act as a catalyst in the development of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.” [emphasis added]

    “With clarity”? Who knew that Mr. Dochniak had such a wry sense of humour? The phrase, “…act as a catalyst…” is curious, as well. Does Mr. Dochniak claim that the latex proteins are not the cause of the “atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism” but only facilitate their development? That is what using the term “catalyst” would seem to imply. In that case, what is it that he proposes is causing the “atopy”?

    Also, by linking “atopy” and “allergy-induced regressive autism”, he has made a falsifiable claim, namely that atopy will be found more frequently in cases of regressive autism than it is in the general population. Does he have data to support this claim? If he did, I cannot imagine why he hasn’t shown it.

    Since Mr. Dochniak has admitted that he has done no actual “research”, I made a search of the literature to see if there was anything there that might support his claim. I refer Mr. Dochniak to my findings:

    [1] Bakkaloglu et al. Atopic features in early childhood autism. Eur. J. Paediatr. Neurol. 2008 Nov;12(6):476-9.

    “RESULTS: Nine/30 autistic children (30%) and 1/39 (2.5%) age-matched neurological controls from the same hospital had a family history suggestive of atopy (p [greater than] 0.005). No patient in the autism and 28% in control group had symptoms of respiratory allergy (wheezing or asthma) (p [greater than] 0.005), and 6/30 (20%) autistic vs. 7/39 (17%) control children had history suggesting other allergic disorders (p=ns). Eleven/23 (47.8%) autistic children had at least one positive skin test, similar to age-matched population controls. Serum IgG, IgA, and IgM levels were within age-appropriate limits. Serum IgE was elevated in four patients (13.3%). Specific IgE levels were negative in four cases with multiple SPT positivity.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests allergic features based on history, skin tests, and serum IgE levels are not frequent in young autistic children despite family history. This discrepancy between predisposition and manifestation might imply immunological factors or environmental conditions.”

    In other words, they found less atopy and other allergic features in autistic children than in the “normal” controls, despite the fact that the autistic children were more likely to have a family history of atopy. Now, the authors speculate that “immunological factors or environmental conditions” might be implied by this, but the data say nothing of the sort.

    That’s all I could find on “atopy” and autism and it doesn’t support Mr. Dochniak’s claim.

    MjD:

    “Vaccines that are contaminated with such antigenic proteins can intensify their catalytic effect, thereafter, increasing atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism in immune sensitive children.”

    So now it’s the vaccines that have “catalytic effect” and the “antigenic proteins” – presumably any antigenic proteins (including the intended components of the vaccine, which makes this a circular anti-vax argument) – are simply…what? Catalysing the catalyst?

    And then there is Mr. Dochniak’s rather touching attempt to claim that the “allergy”, “atopy” or whatever type of immune hypersensitivity he claims caused all of this somehow magically diasppears after the autism manifests. I’d like to see the study supporting that claim.

    But, of course, we won’t be seeing any of the data supporting Mr. Dochniak’s startling claims…not unless we buy his book (and, I suspect, not even then). Mr Dochniak has been performing a fan dance with his data for the past few months, but my “research” (using PubMed, Web of Science, etc.) suggests that there’s nothing behind the fans. And the little bit of his “reasoning” that Mr. Dochniak has inadvertently revealed supports that conclusion.

    I’ll stand by for the inevitable reiteration of claims and obligatory scathing quotation.

    Prometheus

  444. #444 Science Mom
    October 3, 2011

    I’ll stand by for the inevitable reiteration of claims and obligatory scathing quotation.

    And I’m sure you won’t be disappointed. MjD seems to have an awful lot of free time on his hands today to defend his claim. Perhaps he’s at his booksigning.

  445. #445 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 3, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#441), “But, of course, we won’t be seeing any of the data supporting Mr. Dochniak’s startling claims”.

    MjD’s response:

    Shen C, et al. A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism. J Mol Neurosci. 2011 Mar;43(3):443-52.

    The pilot study references:

    http://www.laboratoriosilesia.com/upfiles/sibi/P0807700.pdf

    MjD

  446. #446 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 3, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#437), “Put up or shut up MjD”.

    MjD’s response:

    A wise man (Larry A.) once said, “I wouldn’t be who I am if it wasn’t for autism”. In parallel, I wouldn’t be who I am if I didn’t voice my ideas and opinions on the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Thanks for your input Lawrence.

    MjD

  447. #447 Science Mom
    October 3, 2011

    Shen C, et al. A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism. J Mol Neurosci. 2011 Mar;43(3):443-52.

    I read this report, did you? Let me break this down for you:
    A.) The authors cite you which leads to a rather circular argument.
    B.) The authors examined a single family with some autistic and some neurotypical children.
    C.) The family worked in a latex factory; they were found to have elevated IgEs to latex. Shocking!
    D.) The authors made the leaping conclusion that the mere presence of anti-latex IgE in a single family constituted a basis for claiming that latex could cause autism. All based upon absolutely nothing. The results do not support the authors’ conclusions, nor do they support yours.

    It was not a pilot study, it was a case report; stop inflating it’s importance and it doesn’t make your claim any more viable.

  448. #448 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#444), ” All based upon absolutely nothing”.

    MjD’s response:

    It’s clear that infant exposure to H. brasiliensis natural-latex may be harmful and even life threatening.

    Provided below is the FDA regulation that requires labeling of vaccines that contain natural latex.

    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=801.437

    Why is natural-latex still in vaccines?

    MjD

  449. #449 Chris
    October 4, 2011

    You are very repetitive, aren’t you?

    You have yet to prove that “allergy-induced regressive autism” even exists. Just provide the journal, title, and date of the papers that shows that it exists. And none of them can be from “Medical Hypothesis”, nor reference that journal nor reference anything you write. It has to be an independent finding.

  450. #450 Prometheus
    October 4, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak (#442) repeats previously made (and addressed) claims about the Shen et al (2011) paper. See my comment above (#93) for a detailed deconstruction of this case series.

    He then – again – attemtps to claim that the FDA requirement that vaccines with latex stoppers be so labeled as “evidence” that the FDA somehow knows that latex causes autism.

    Mr. Dochniak, has it ever occurred to you that the FDA requires labeling of latex-stoppered vials (of all medications, not just vaccines) because…I don’t know…maybe because there are people with latex allergies?

    So, I correctly predicted the “reiteration of claims” but apparently missed on the “obligatory scathing quotation”. Of course, the day isn’t over yet.

    Prometheus

  451. #451 Prometheus
    October 4, 2011

    The repetitive arguments put forward by Mr. Dochniak are indication of the poverty of his ideas.

    In microbial ecology, we make use of a tool known as the rarefaction curve to determine the species “richness” of an environment. In brief, when you sample environments that have a lot of different species, you won’t see “duplicates” as frequently. In species-poor environments, duplicates pop up more often.

    Mr. Dochniak keeps coming back with the same arguments – and not many of them – which suggests that he doesn’t have a very “idea-rich” environment in his head. This isn’t necessarily a problem, since more ideas doesn’t always (often?) translate into better ideas. However, the rising number of “duplicates” indicates that we have seen the majority of Mr. Dochniak’s ideas vis a vis latex and autism.

    And since all of the ideas Mr. Dochniak has brought to this forum have been flawed or demonstrably wrong, the rarefaction curve suggests that we can be reasonably certain there isn’t an undetected reserve of good ideas we haven’t seen.

    Clearly, Mr. Dochniak is convinced that he is right – despite the data – to the point that he says (#443) that:

    “…I wouldn’t be who I am if I didn’t voice my ideas and opinions on the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.”

    I wouldn’t think of telling Mr. Dochniak to go against his nature and listen to the data instead of his heart. That doesn’t mean that I’m going to give him a “bye” when he tries to pass off his imagination as fact, however.

    Everyone is entitled to their own opinions – no matter how ridiculous – but we can’t each have our own reality.

    Prometheus

  452. #452 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#448), “However, the rising number of ‘duplicates’ indicates that we have seen the majority of Mr. Dochniak’s ideas vis a vis latex and autism.

    MjD’s response to Prometheus:

    It’s clear that we’re not on the same page when it comes to allergy-induced regressive autism. But, here’s an idea, let’s turn the page and co-submit a citizen petition to the FDA requesting a regulation which bans the use of H. brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccine packaging. In doing so, together we can enhance public health by reducing the incidence of latex allergy in children.

    When can we start writing said petition? Please advise…

    MjD

  453. #453 Chris
    October 4, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    When can we start writing said petition? Please advise…

    Right after you come up with the evidence you have been asked for repeatedly. Just post the journal, title, and date of the papers that support your contention that there is “allergy-induced regressive autism” and it has been increasing. Remember nothing written by you, nor that cites you and definitely not anything by Medical Hypothesis.

    By the way, what happened to it?

  454. #454 Gray Falcon
    October 4, 2011

    MjD, shouldn’t you try to find out whether natural latex causes problems first, then start making petitions?

  455. #455 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#451), “MjD, shouldn’t you try to find out whether natural latex causes problems first, then start making petitions”.

    MjD’s response:

    Promethesus and I know that repeated exposure to the natural-latex proteins increases the possibility of acquiring latex allergy (e.g., health care industry). We’ll submit that natural-latex in vaccine packaging is an unessesary route of exposure for children that must be eliminated.

    MjD

  456. #456 Gray Falcon
    October 4, 2011

    MjD, I sincerely hope you’re not in the medical profession. You seem to have a policy of “amputate, then check for gangrene.”

  457. #457 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    Chris writes (#450), ” Remember nothing written by you, nor that cites you and definitely not anything by Medical Hypothesis”.

    MjD’s response:

    Everytime you write this another restriction is applied. Will you have a font size and ink quality restriction? Your making me nervous…

    MjD

  458. #458 Gray Falcon
    October 4, 2011

    Chris has been giving you those same restrictions all along. You just ignore them.

  459. #459 Chris
    October 4, 2011

    The reason for not allowing anything written by you, nor anything that cites any of your papers is because you have no medical research training. You work in an industrial setting, and have not conducted any actual medical research.

    The evidence has to be independent. In other words, not related to you in any way. Why is that difficult for you to understand?

    If you want to know why “Medical Hypothesis” is not allowed, find a dictionary and look up the word “hypothesis.”

    Now, where is that independent evidence that “allergy-induced regressive autism” exists?

  460. #460 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    Chris writes (#456), “Now, where is that independent evidence that “allergy-induced regressive autism” exists?”

    MjD’s response:

    http://iospress.metapress.com/content/w6820728082nu597/

    MjD

  461. #461 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    In continuation Chris writes (#456), “The reason for not allowing anything written by you, nor anything that cites any of your papers is because you have no medical research training. You work in an industrial setting, and have not conducted any actual medical research”.

    MjD’s response:

    I know there’s a compliment in there somewhere.

    MjD

  462. #462 Chris
    October 4, 2011

    Yay! He seems to be getting it. Now show that autism is actually caused allergies. Because, basically they found that kids with autism have can have allergies.

    So what? Lots of kids have allergies, and they are not autistic. Probably in about the same 52% proportion.

  463. #463 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 4, 2011

    Orac writes after the press release above, “Because, to the anti-vaccine, first and foremost, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. No matter what the evidence shows. Never forget that”.

    MjD’s response:

    There’s evidence Orac, refuse vaccines that have latex warnings.

    MjD

  464. #464 Science Mom
    October 5, 2011

    MjD’s response:

    http://iospress.metapress.com/content/w6820728082nu597/

    Oh look, they cite Mr. Dochniak but also can’t provide any evidence to support that hypothesis; it’s like a Wakefield redux. Still reading…

  465. #465 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Thanks, Science Mom, I can only see the abstract. I also noticed that it is not indexed at PubMed.

    Now, Mr. Dochniak has missed a crucial fact: since there is no evidence there is a correlation between vaccines and autism, trying to show it is from something in the vaccines is going to very difficult.

  466. #466 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    Chris writes (#462), “Now, Mr. Dochniak has missed a crucial fact: since there is no evidence there is a correlation between vaccines and autism, trying to show it is from something in the vaccines is going to very difficult”.

    MjD’s response:

    Once the FDA bans the use of H. brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccine packaging and the natural-latex rubber industry substantially removes the Hevea-allgens, the prevalence of mental retardation, by those affected with latex-allergy-induced regressive autism, will diminish in future generations.

    MjD

  467. #467 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    MjD, it has already been pointed latex exposure has already been reduced, and rates of autism have not gone down.

  468. #468 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Prove it.

    With something like this:
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006 Mar;160(3):302-9.
    Impact of specific medical interventions on reducing the prevalence of mental retardation.
    Brosco JP, Mattingly M, Sanders LM.

    Show that allergies cause mental retardation, and that they do it more than the actual diseases.

    And you still have this little nagging problem in that the following large epidemiological studies show no correlation between vaccines and autism. So really, you have to show that vaccines cause autism before you can decide that an ingredient, and even part of the bottle causes autism:

    Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 May;29(5):397-400.
    Lack of association between measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and autism in children: a case-control study.
    Mrozek-Budzyn D, Kieltyka A, Majewska R.

    Neuropsychological Performance 10 years after Immunization in Infancy with Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines
    Authors: Tozzi AE, Bisiacchi P, Tarantino V, De Mei B, D’Elia L, Chiarotti F, Salmaso S.
    Source: Pediatrics, February 2009, Vol. 123(2):475-82

    Early Thimerosal Exposure and Neuropsychological Outcomes at 7 to 10 Years
    Thompson WW, Price C, Goodson B, et al; Vaccine Safety Datalink Team
    N Engl J Med, Sep 27, 2007; 357(13):1281-1292

    Safety of Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines: A Two-Phased Study of Computerized Health Maintenance Organization Databases
    Verstraeten T, Davis RL, DeStefano F, et al
    Pediatrics, November 2003, Vol. 112(5):1039-1048

    Association Between Thimerosal-Containing Vaccine and Autism
    Hviid A, Stellfeld M, Wohlfahrt J, Melbye M
    Journal of the American Medical Association, October 1, 2003, Vol. 290(13):1763-6

    Thimerosal and the Occurrence of Autism: Negative Ecological Evidence from Danish Population-Based Data
    Madsen KM, Lauritsen MB, Pedersen CB, et al
    Pediatrics, Sept. 2003, Vol. 112(3 Pt 1):604-606

    Autism and Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines. Lack of Consistent Evidence for an Association
    Stehr-Green P, Tull P, Stellfeld M, Mortenson PB, Simpson D
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine, August 2003, Vol. 25(2):101-6

    Encephalopathy after whole-cell pertussis or measles vaccination: lack of evidence for a causal association in a retrospective case-control study.
    Ray P, Hayward J, Michelson D, Lewis E, Schwalbe J, Black S, Shinefield H, Marcy M, Huff K, Ward J, Mullooly J, Chen R, Davis R; Vaccine Safety Datalink Group.
    Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2006 Sep;25(9):768-73.

    Measles Vaccination and Antibody Response in Autism Spectrum Disorders.
    Baird G et al.
    Arch Dis Child 2008; 93(10):832-7.
    Subjects: 98 vaccinated children aged 10-12 years in the UK with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); two control groups of similar age: 52 children with special educational needs but no ASD and 90 children in the typically developing group

    MMR-Vaccine and Regression in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Negative Results Presented from Japan.
    Uchiyama T et al.
    J Autism Dev Disord 2007; 37(2):210-7
    *Subjects: 904 children with autism spectrum disorder
    (Note: MMR was used in Japan only between 1989 and 1993.)

    No effect of MMR withdrawal on the incidence of autism: a total population study.
    Honda H, Shimizu Y, Rutter M.
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;46(6):572-9.

    MMR Vaccination and Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Case-Control Study.
    Smeeth L et al.
    Lancet 2004; 364(9438):963-9
    *Subjects: 1294 cases and 4469 controls

    Neurologic Disorders after Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination.
    Makela A et al.
    Pediatrics 2002; 110:957-63
    *Subjects: 535,544 children vaccinated between November 1982 and June 1986 in Finland

    A Population-Based Study of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccination and Autism.
    Madsen KM et al.
    N Engl J Med 2002; 347(19):1477-82
    *Subjects: All 537,303 children born 1/91–12/98 in Denmark

  469. #469 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    I have a comment in moderation, but essentially it says:

    Prove it.

    Show that allergies cause mental retardation.

    And show that the risk of neurological damage is greater with latex allergies than with Hib, measles, mumps, and other vaccine preventable diseases. And remember there is a criteria for acceptable evidence: done by those who know what they are doing, and actually know enough not to cite you!

  470. #470 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    In continuation Chris writes (#462), “…there is no evidence there is a correlation between vaccines and autism…”

    MjD’s response:

    Medical science has discovered there is a correlation between natural-latex exposure and allergy.

    Specifically, repeated exposure to H. brasiliensis natural-latex increases the incidence of an allergic response to said latex.

    In the spirit of do no harm, H. brasiliensis natural-latex use in vaccine packaging should be discontinued. Therafter, affecting the prevalence of allergy-induced regressive autism in future generations.

    MjD

  471. #471 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock. Michael J. Dochniak is a warlock.

    Did I just prove you are a warlock?

  472. #472 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#464), “MjD, it has already been pointed latex exposure has already been reduced, and rates of autism have not gone down.”

    MjD’s response:

    Removing/eliminating latex gloves in hospitals is a good start.

    Taking natural-latex out of vaccine packaging is imperative.

    Banning the use of natural-latex bottle nipples and pacifiers would be a breakthrough health-initiative.

    MjD

  473. #473 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    MjD, why should I trust an accused warlock?

  474. #474 Denice Walter
    October 5, 2011

    @ Gray Falcon:

    If we were @ AoA, I’d say, “Yes”.
    Since we’re not: “No”.

  475. #475 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, repeating himself again:

    Medical science has discovered there is a correlation between natural-latex exposure and allergy.

    So what? What real evidence do you have that allergies cause autism? I’ve only asked for this evidence half a dozen times, and you have failed to provide any independent medical evidence. What you have done is push your book and cite second rate papers that cite you!

    I come from a family with lots of allergies, it happens to be genetic. I have allergies, some severe (pollen, and nickel), and two of my kids have allergies (one is lactose intolerant). My father has allergies (even to nickel). Both of my siblings have allergies, and one is also very severely lactose intolerant (she also has a severe allergy to wool). None of us are autistic.

    The one kid I have with no allergies is also developmentally disabled. He has had seizures, and one of the most severe one was as toddler due to a now vaccine preventable disease.

    Now, prove your contortions with real evidence.

  476. #476 FUCKYOUALL
    October 5, 2011

    I read though this and its just the same shit now i happen to have tried to read the book and it does suck but what you all say is not in it is in it so stop bitching read the book then actually think of something new to put on this blog!

  477. #477 GOD
    October 5, 2011

    YES ALL OF YOU SHUT UP AUTISM IS CAUSE BY LATEX HOW DO I KNOW THIS CAUSE IM GOD NOW STOP BEING DUMBASSES

  478. #478 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    Chris writes (#471), “The one kid I have with no allergies is also developmentally disabled. He has had seizures, and one of the most severe one was as toddler due to a now vaccine preventable disease.”

    MjD’s response:

    There is still very much to learn about immunity and human development.

    Best wishes to your developmentally disabled child and your family.

    MjD

  479. #479 Todd W.
    October 5, 2011

    Some vaccines contain natural latex, to which some individuals are allergic. Some people with natural latex allergies have graduated summa cum laude from undergraduate programs and gone on to get PhDs. Therefore, natural latex causes PhDs. QED.

  480. #480 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#473), “Some people with natural latex allergies have graduated summa cum laude from undergraduate programs and gone on to get PhDs.”

    MjD’s response:

    There is also genius in ASD (e.g., savants). Within the autism spectrum there is a range of intellectual capabilities ranging from severely mentally retarded to genius. Atypical adaptive immunity is a mechanism which can help explain such cognitive variability.

    MjD

  481. #481 FUCKYOUALL
    October 5, 2011

    FUCKYOUALL is gonna kill you all with my awe autism powers and god go suck a dick u cause autism cause i fuck you all especially your wives and daughters.

  482. #482 Todd W.
    October 5, 2011

    Let’s try this again, since Michael didn’t get it the first time.

    Some vaccines contain natural latex, to which some individuals are allergic. Some people with natural latex allergies are named Bob. Therefore, natural latex causes the name Bob. QED.

  483. #483 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    There is still very much to learn about immunity and human development.

    Which is not helped by non-scientists making stuff up.

    So, again, where is that real evidence that allergies cause autism? Something by qualified medical researchers that know enough not to cite you?

  484. #484 Prometheus
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, in an attempt to find “common ground”, has elected to speak for me without first seeing if I agree with him:

    “Promethesus and I know that repeated exposure to the natural-latex proteins increases the possibility of acquiring latex allergy (e.g., health care industry). We’ll submit that natural-latex in vaccine packaging is an unessesary route of exposure for children that must be eliminated.”

    This is the sort of “trick” that is used by politicians and used car salesmen – the “we can agree on….” gambit. There is little Mr. Dochniak and I agree on and I resent his ham-handed attempt to steal my legitimacy (such as it is) to cover his lack.

    While it is true that repeated exposure to latex – or any other allergen – is required to develop an allergy, I have not seen any data showing that the miniscule bit of latex found in vaccines is capable of causing a latex allergy.

    It seems rather premature to lobby for the mandatory and immediate removal of latex in vaccine stoppers (which is already happening voluntarily) when there are so many other, more significant, exposures to latex. I realise that Mr. Dochniak has asserted that early exposure to latex predisposes to latex allergy, but that is just one of his many unsupported claims.

    And Mr. Dochniak provides a citation that he claims supports his assertions, but when we go to the article (in the Journal of Pediatric Neurology – which isn’t indexed, except for two articles…not this one) we discover that the authors found:

    “Allergic manifestations (bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis and/or allergic rhinitis) were found in 52% of autistic patients. This frequency was significantly higher than that of controls (10%; P [less than] 0.001).”

    At least this study – unlike the one I cited earlier – found increased “allergic manifestations” in the autistic subjects, although there was no mention – apart from a brief, parenthetical appearance – of latex. Again, this finding supports the hypothesis that immune disorders are an effect of autism, not necessarily the cause.

    And let’s not overlook that this study also didn’t correct for income or living conditions, which can have a significant impact on “allergic manifestations”, especially in Cairo.

    Mr. Dochniak continues (as he always does):

    “There is still very much to learn about immunity and human development.”

    Again, true. But as comedian Dara O Briain put it:

    “Just because science doesn’t know everything doesn’t mean you get to fill in the gaps with whatever fairytale most appeals to you.”

    I couldn’t put it better, myself.

    Prometheus

  485. #485 Prometheus
    October 5, 2011

    I love being a smart-ass its the whole reason I stay on this waiting for someone to mess up it helps me feel better about myself
    Prometheus

  486. #486 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    So i guess Orac will just have to frown upon me.

  487. #487 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    Damn couldn’t find the troll repellent but i found my 12 gauge shotgun guess that will do im ready Dan whenever you want a fight I’ve been looking hard for someone to finally want one.

  488. #488 THE EVIL TROLL
    October 5, 2011

    no im not with Mr. Dochniak and if im making him look bad then too bad i dont care. im just here to fuck with all of you for the fun of it.

  489. #489 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Well, Mr. Dochniak, that is an interesting way to shill your book!

  490. #490 Dan
    October 5, 2011

    I have actually had the privilege to know mike and i have been in a lot of scientific discussions with him and what he says makes a lot of sense to me. Now a lot of you talk like your high up scientists and your all stuck on the idea he is wrong so prove he is wrong because he is getting ahead because his theory is getting very recognized

  491. #491 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Dan, I think you need to sharpen your critical thinking skills. I am not stuck on the idea he is wrong, I simply want him to show us the evidence he has for his contentions that autism can be caused by allergies.

    As you can see by my experience being from a family that is genetically prone to allergies, and having one child who was injured from an actual disease, that I expect a certain level of evidence. Mr. Dochniak is making an incredible claim, but has produced nothing that is even remotely convincing.

    It is not our duty to show he is wrong, it is his duty to present the actual evidence. All he has done is repeat the same statement, but has failed to show any scientific data to support that statement.

  492. #492 Dan
    October 5, 2011

    Yes Chris he has i tried to tell him to just give you the evidence but he claimed he already did and that none of you noticed it was evidence so Mike STOP THINK WERE NOT SMART ENOUGH TO SEE IT AND SHOW IT AND WHEN YOU DO START WITH THIS IS MY EVIDENCE so their cant be a dispute over you never showed evidence.

  493. #493 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    Where did he show evidence? I’m not just taking a rude person’s word on it.

  494. #494 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    I’m sorry, Dan, could you try that again with grammar and punctuation? I cannot understand what you are yelling about.

    Mr. Dochniak has not presented any independent evidence that allergies, particularly latex allergies, cause autism. All he does is repeat a statement that it exists, like we should accept his word. We want evidence.

  495. #495 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    I’m getting the impression “Dan” only came here to start a fight. Time to get the troll repellent…

  496. #496 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, you have some interesting friends. Do you touch your loved ones with those sock puppets?

  497. #497 Prometheus
    October 5, 2011

    Dan (#482) would like us to see another side of Mr. Dochnak:

    “I have actually had the privilege to know mike and i have been in a lot of scientific discussions with him and what he says makes a lot of sense to me.”

    Well, Dan, we’ve been in a lot of “sort of” scientific discussion with “mike” and we don’t find that he’s making much sense at all.

    Here’s the problem, Dan – if you don’t know much about science (and I’m assuming that description fits you), then “mike” sounds pretty reasonable and even scientific because he’s got the jargon of science down pretty well. Well enough, at least, to fool those who don’t know more science than the average person.

    To those who know something about science,what “mike” has to say makes about as much sense as talking about “home runs” in a football game or saying “The square root of blue is koala.” It may sound like sports talk or mathematics to someone who doesn’t know anything about sports or math, but it’s clearly nonsense to anyone who knows the topic.

    But Dan’s not done yet – he has something to say about “arrogant scientists”:

    “Now a lot of you talk like your [sic] high up [?] scientists and your [sic] all stuck on the idea he is wrong so prove he is wrong because he is getting ahead because his theory is getting very recognized [sic].”

    Dan, some of us are “high up scientists” (I assume this means scientists who are educated, experienced and recognised in our fields), which is why we’re giving “mike” such a hard time. He’s spouting nonsense and he isn’t giving any evidence (we “high up scientists” call that “data”) to support what he says.

    The fact that some people who don’t know much about biology or medicine are nodding in agreement with “mike” doesn’t mean that he’s right. In fact, it’s his job to prove that he’s right – we don’t have to prove that he’s wrong. That’s how real science works, Dan.

    Just saying that latex can cause autism because some people are allergic to latex and some autistic people show signs of immune dysfunction isn’t very convincing to real scientists, Dan. That’s why we haven’t found “mike’s” evidence very convincing.

    To use your words, Dan, “…none of you noticed it was evidence” because it wasn’t evidence, it was just unsupported claims and a not-too-convincing “Just So Story”.

    Stick around, Dan – you might learn something, even if you don’t want to.

    Prometheus

  498. #498 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, Orac frowns on those who sock puppet other users.

  499. #499 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Or ban your IP address.

  500. #500 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Well, if the troll isn’t a sock puppet of Mr. Dochniak, he is certainly not doing him any favors. It just makes Mr. Dochniak and his pet theory look even more pathetic.

  501. #501 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#490), “In fact, it’s his job to prove that he’s right – we don’t have to prove that he’s wrong. That’s how real science works, Dan.”

    MjD’s response:

    In fact, medical science continues to cause pain, suffering, and death with H. brasiliensis natural-latex based medical products (e.g., vaccine packaging).

    Where’s the humanity in “we don’t have to prove that he’s wrong. That’s how real science works.”

    MjD

  502. #502 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Look on the positive side, Mr. Dochniak, it leaves the opportunity to prove your assertions are correct!

    By the way, a real scientist actually learns when things do not go they way he/she wishes. It is because it opens up new possibilities. That is the advantage of having an open mind with a willingness to take in new and novel evidence.

    Unfortunately, you have not provided any new and novel evidence for your assertions.

  503. #503 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Out of curiosity, Mr. Dochniak, when you went for your Master’s didn’t you have to stand for an oral exam? Did you have a thesis to defend? Or in your employment, don’t you have to defend your work in front of a group of customers and by providing actual evidence?

    How can you function in science or engineering if you cannot defend your own work with the required evidence?

    By the way, I have had to defend my engineering structural dynamics analyses in front of hostile customers, plus I had to stand for an oral exam in thermal solid mechanics with a hostile professor when I was in an engineering master’s program… the treatment you have received here is positively docile.

  504. #504 Gray Falcon
    October 5, 2011

    Just so you know, I don’t have any firearms, and I didn’t write any comments threatening anyone with one. And if the comment I’m referring to is deleted, ignore this one, because it won’t make sense otherwise.

    Where’s the humanity in “we don’t have to prove that he’s wrong. That’s how real science works.”

    Since you’re an alleged warlock, maybe I should burn you at the stake because you may have put a curse on someone. Seriously, measure first, then cut.

  505. #505 Prometheus
    October 5, 2011

    Mr Dochniak’s latest – and possibly most feeble – attempt to promote his book:

    “In fact my opinion, medical science continues to cause pain, suffering, and death with H. brasiliensis natural-latex based medical products (e.g., vaccine packaging).”

    Fixed that for you. Continuing…

    “Where’s the humanity in ‘we don’t have to prove that he’s wrong. That’s how real science works.’”

    I have a few simple questions for Mr. Dochniak:

    Are you actually arguing that we shouldn’t expect you to provide data to support your extraordinary claim that latex from vaccine vial stoppers is causing autism?

    Are you actually arguing that we should immediately react to any wild idea someone cooks up while sitting in their wing-chair without asking for some indication that it is correct? Or even more likely than not to be correct?

    Are you really that self-absorbed that you can’t see how stupid that is?

    By the way, nasty little group of sock puppets – are they yours?

    You disgust me, Mr. Dochniak.

    Prometheus

  506. #506 Prometheus
    October 5, 2011

    Chris,

    According to Mr. Dochniak’s LinkedIn profile – which I assume he wrote – he doesn’t have a Master’s degree, only a B.S degree (double major: psychology and chemistry) from the University of Wisconsin – River Falls. Given that he put his listing in the “Marquis Who’s Who in American Science and Engineering 2012″, I assume that he’s updated his profile recently.

    There are also some Masters programmes that don’t require a thesis, even some in the sciences (there’s an institution in town that offers one in biology – not my university).

    So, to answer your questions, Mr. Dochniak hasn’t had to defend his ideas against a critical audience – until now. From my observations, he’s not doing a very good job – I’d fail him if this were his thesis defense.

    Prometheus

  507. #507 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 5, 2011

    Where’s the humanity in “we don’t have to prove that he’s wrong. That’s how real science works.”

    I dunno, where’s the humanity in “1 + 1 = 2″? It seems to me there isn’t any “humanity” in that, or any need for it. It’s not a decision, after all, it’s a statement of fact. 1 plus 1 doesn’t equal 2 because someone decided to be humane, or cruel, or whimsical, or vindictive, or patriotic – and certainly not because someone repeated it eighteen thousand times. 1 + 1 = 2 because that’s mathematics.

    In a similar fashion, where the burden of proof falls is neither based on nor influenced by “humanity”; it is a matter of amassed evidence. You have devised a speculation, but it remains that, a speculation; it would be stretching the truth grossly to even call it a “hypothesis.” There are glaring holes in the speculation which you show no interest in resolving and rather than amassing the sort of evidence that would actually convince someone (someone not desperate to be convinced, that is) you simply repeat your assertions and cite circular logic and try to play the pity card. It’s not inhumane to observe that you haven’t done the work that would be necessary to give anyone else the obligation to disprove your speculations; it’s simply an observation of fact.

  508. #508 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Prometheus:

    According to Mr. Dochniak’s LinkedIn profile – which I assume he wrote – he doesn’t have a Master’s degree,

    Funny, I wonder why I thought he had a Masters? I do confess I don’t have one either. I’m a grad school drop-out due to having to work overtime, and buying a fixer upper house. Dear Spouse told me to cut out something before I drove him crazy with my sleep deprivation. But I’ve done a few design reviews with critical audiences (at least one time I came in after discovering that a critic was using the wrong data set, hah!).

    And I have teenage children. What audience is more hostile than that?

  509. #509 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar writes (#503), “In a similar fashion, where the burden of proof falls is neither based on nor influenced by “humanity”; it is a matter of amassed evidence.”

    MjD’s response:

    If herd immunity through vaccination is imperative, every aspect of vaccine safety should be thoroughly investigated.

    Latex warnings on vaccines is bad karma.

    Where’s the humanity in forcing parents to decide if such vaccines are safe for their children?

    MjD

  510. #510 Chris
    October 5, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak:

    Where’s the humanity in forcing parents to decide if such vaccines are safe for their children?

    Where is the humanity in making statements on the safety of vaccines without any supporting evidence?

    This is exactly what Wakefield did in 1998. In the press conference for his now withdrawn Lancet paper he told parents to get single vaccines, even though he had no evidence to support that statement. In fact, the MMR vaccine in use at that time in the UK was (and is) very similar to the MMR vaccine that has been safely used in the USA since 1971.

    Because of those statements, that turned out to not be supported by any evidence, that were never independently verified, and later found out to be fraudulent, the number of children getting protection from measles, mumps and rubella fell in the UK. At least two children died in the UK, and more in Ireland… and several more permanently disabled from the actual diseases.

    The further “questioning” of vaccines with actual evidence has caused the death and disability in real children in the USA from pertussis, Hib, etc. The actual diseases are not to be ignored.

    Where is the humanity in having children suffer because of false information, just like the frivolous Dochniak latex warnings?

    Remember, when you play scientist that there can be dire consequences

  511. #511 Chris
    October 6, 2011

    I missed some letters in a crucial sentence, it should say:

    “The further “questioning” of vaccines without actual evidence”

    And yes, Mr. Dochniak has failed to produce the actual evidence.

    I just wonder if he would be happy if someone decided a bridge he had to drive over everyday was going to collapse any minute because the color of the dust he/she saw on the road bed. Obviously he/she believes in the observation and prediction of events. That has got to be better than the state inspectors who claim the bridge is just fine, especially since it is less than ten years old.

    (I made up the scenario… I have no idea if he lives near a bridge, I was mostly inspired because I had to drive around two bridges the city rebuilt for safety reasons)

  512. #512 W. Kevin Vicklund
    October 6, 2011

    If herd immunity through vaccination is imperative, every aspect of vaccine safety should be thoroughly investigated.

    Latex warnings on vaccines is bad karma.

    Where’s the humanity in forcing parents to decide if such vaccines are safe for their children?

    As discussed earlier, all the vaccines on the schedule have latex-free formulations available. So parents aren’t being forced to make that decision. If it’s a concern, or if there is a valid medical reason, they can get the latex-free vaccine.

  513. #513 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 6, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar writes (#503), “In a similar fashion, where the burden of proof falls is neither based on nor influenced by “humanity”; it is a matter of amassed evidence.”

    MjD’s response:

    If herd immunity through vaccination is imperative, every aspect of vaccine safety should be thoroughly investigated.

    Vaccine safety is important and legitimate questions should be investigated. What MJD has been doing is not investigating, because that verb implies examining the facts, letting them determine the conclusion, and then terminating the investigation when a secure conclusion has been reached. MJD’s efforts fail those criteria.

  514. #514 Prometheus
    October 6, 2011

    But on other terms anyone know a good site for porn.

  515. #515 Todd W.
    October 6, 2011

    @Mr. Dochniak

    Would you agree with my earlier assertion that natural latex causes people to be named Bob? I ask, because I have just as much evidence behind my assertion as you do for yours. If you find your claims to be sound, then you must accept mine as well. If you find my claims to be faulty, then you must reject your own.

    What amazes me is that, in over 500 comments, Mr. Dochniak has yet to produce any real evidence supporting his opinion that latex allergies cause autism. Simply astounding.

  516. #516 Vicki
    October 6, 2011

    Michael Dochniak @506: Yes, indeed, where is the humanity in scaring parents away from life-saving medication? Where is the humanity in leading them to think that they have to choose between protecting their children from measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria, and a variety of other diseases, and protecting them from autism? Where is the humanity in screaming that the sky is falling because nobody has proven to your satisfaction that it isn’t, even though there’s no evidence that it is?

  517. #517 Prometheus
    October 6, 2011

    Todd,

    It isn’t all that amazing that Mr. Dochniak hasn’t provided any real data – he doesn’t have any.

    Mr. Dochniak has fallen for one of the most pervasive confidence games in the world: he believes what he believes because he believes it. Something started him down the road to “latex-in-vaccines-causes-autism” and he lacks the scientific background to realise that his “epiphany” was most likely a coincidence or random event – he may even lack the scientific grounding to conceive that a random conjunction of events like his “epiphany” could occur without a causal relationship.

    Mr. Dochniak isn’t alone in his deficiency – sadly, the vast majority of people who graduate with a bachelor’s degree in the sciences haven’t learned about critical thinking or even how to formulate and test a hypothesis. Some argue that graduate school is where these skills are taught, although I disagree.

    Anyway, having had his pseudo-epiphany, Mr. Dochniak also lacked the education and training to know that he should submit his idea for independent review – run it by some people who know about the fields in question and see what they think. I imagine that Mr. Dochniak’s review process was more along the lines of asking some friends and family members, who knew as little about the science involved as he did, if not less, what they thought.

    Having impressed a group of scientifically naive (at least in the fields involved) people with his hypothesis, Mr. Dochniak made the final fatal error and didn’t bother to reconcile his hypothesis with all of the extant data. This is the error that has caused him the most grief on this ‘blog. There are huge, undeniable facts that his hypothesis can’t explain – in fact, that directly contradict his hypothesis.

    Confronted by a skeptical audience – after having written and “published” two books on the subject – Mr. Dochniak has shown the (sadly) usual responses of someone facing legitimate critique of their ideas for the first time: he has blustered, postured and lashed out.

    If he were wise, he would eventually learn from the experience. Sadly, his responses suggest that what he “learned” was that his ideas are too “revolutionary” for dogma-bound scientists. I suspect he will from now on focus his attempts to spread “the word” on people who know less about science than he does.

    In short, Mr. Dochniak doesn’t “get it”. He thinks that he’s found a “shortcut” to scientific discovery when, in fact, he’s found the same blind alley that hundreds of thousands of pseudo-scientists have “discovered”. What he’s done is take an idea and “research” the literature to find whatever he thinks supports it and ignored the rest. He’s honed his “argument” in an echo-chamber filled with people who know less than he does about immunology and autism and he’s deceived himself that writing two books – including one that he thinks is directed at “scholars” – makes him a de facto expert.

    This, sadly, is not a rare phenomenon. The bookstores are full of books written by people who know little or nothing about the subject of their writing (e.g. any book title that ends with “…that THEY don’t want you to know about.”). The blogosphere is even more full of those people, all of whom feel that they have somehow stumbled onto “The Truth” that experts can’t (or won’t) see.

    I say “sadly” because I was right there in the same place years ago. The only difference was that I had mentors and teachers who guided me and helped me find where I was wrong. I was just as full of misguided “revelations” and just as ignorant about how to form and test a hypothesis, but I had a graduate committee.

    Prometheus

  518. #518 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 6, 2011

    Mr. Vicklund writes (#509), “If it’s a concern, or if there is a valid medical reason, they can get the latex-free vaccine.

    MjD’s response:

    It is unreasonable to expect that a parent would know if an infant has latex sensitivity. With such uncertainty, why continue to expose millions of infants to natural-latex tainted vaccines?

    I’m sure if Prometheus had latex-sensitivity as an infant, he would have articulately conveyed such information to his doctor or nurse prior to vaccination.

    MjD

  519. #519 Chris
    October 6, 2011

    Repeating unsupported contentions does not make them true. You have to support them with real evidence, which you have not done.

    And bringing out your nasty sock puppets is not helping any shred of credibility you may have had (and it wasn’t much). Mr. Dochniak, you are turning into a joke.

    I suggest you grow a backbone and stop your whining. Find some other more productive way to assist disabled children, like promoting their support as they become adults.

  520. #520 Prometheus
    October 6, 2011

    Good night everyone my husband has a surprise for me!

  521. #521 Chris
    October 6, 2011

    Sleep tight do you think we could ever threesome.:)
    Chris

  522. #522 W. Kevin Vicklund
    October 6, 2011

    I’m sure if Prometheus had latex-sensitivity as an infant, he would have articulately conveyed such information to his doctor or nurse prior to vaccination.

    Why not? I did. But my sensitivity, which arose through the more usual methods of environmental exposure to an ubiquitous substance, was never severe enough to require using latex free vaccines. Latex is everywhere. If you have a latex sensitivity bad enough to contraindicate these vaccines, you know beforehand because you’ll have been exposed in much higher concentrations.

  523. #523 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 6, 2011

    Mr. Vicklund writes (#517), ” But my sensitivity, which arose through the more usual methods of environmental exposure to an ubiquitous substance, was never severe enough to require using latex free vaccines. Latex is everywhere.”

    MjD’s response:

    Government statistics suggest the prevalence rate of autism is increasing 10 to 17 percent anually. While the causes of autism are complex and puzzling, a consensus is emerging that atypical immunity likely plays a dominant role.

    What if…

    - parents start refusing vaccines that contain H. brasiliensis natural-latex to help reduce latex allergy?

    - pharmaceutical companies practice H. brasiliensis natural-latex exclusion to help reduce latex allergy?

    - the U.S. government regulated the protein content of H. brasiliensis natural-latex to help reduce latex allergy?

    - physicians implemented blood screening tests prior to vaccination to help reduce vaccine related injuries?

    From the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”, Introduction, page XIII.

    MjD

  524. #524 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 6, 2011

    Sure as a monkey flings its poo, Dochniak responds to people questioning why we should believe any of the illogical claims he makes in his book, by spamming excerpts from his book.

  525. #525 Chris
    October 6, 2011

    I recently listened to RadioLab’s Loops, On Repeat. There was a story of a woman who experienced a form of temporary amnesia where she forgot everything (her daughter thought she was having a stroke so she called an ambulance). In the hospital her memory was only about 90 seconds, so for over two hours she had the same 90 second conversation with her daughter for over two hours. Her brain was doing loops.

    This is exactly what Mr. Dochniak is doing. He has no memory of the responses in the previous 500 comments going back five months. He is in a loop.

    The memory of the woman slowly increased, and after a week or so her memory returned. It would be nice if there was that kind of hope for Mr. Dochniak, but I am afraid he is permanently lost in his own unreal loopy world.

    Mr. Dochniak suffers from a mind that is welded shut. No new information or change is allowed in his brain.

  526. #526 Chris
    October 6, 2011

    What makes it sadder is that Mr. Dochniak resorts to his sock puppets, and if they are not sock puppets, then he has some very demented friends.

  527. #527 Narad
    October 7, 2011

    What makes it sadder is that Mr. Dochniak resorts to his sock puppets, and if they are not sock puppets, then he has some very demented friends.

    I presumed it was stoner whatshisname.

  528. #528 Chris
    October 7, 2011

    Narad:

    I presumed it was stoner whatshisname.

    If that was the case, the Mr. Dochniak could redeem himself by asking the morphing troll to cease making look him even more foolish. All he has to do is post a comment that says: “Please stop making obnoxious comments as you pretend to be persons participating in this thread. You are not helping.”

  529. #529 Narad
    October 7, 2011

    If that was the case, the Mr. Dochniak could redeem himself by asking the morphing troll to cease making look him even more foolish.

    Yes, he could, but it’s not clear to me that he actually understands the medium well enough to have picked up on this. It can of course be trivially settled by our gracious host.

  530. #530 Militant Agnostic
    October 7, 2011

    Can anyone buy my book though. im in the same situation.
    its called im a little dumbfuck.

  531. #531 Prometheus
    October 7, 2011

    I suspect Mr. Dochniak is using the sock-puppets in order to goad Orac into banning him so that he can crow to his fan-base that he was “banned by Orac” because his ideas were “too threatening to mainstream medicine”. It’s a sort of notoriety, if not a good sort.

    The sock-puppets are doing nothing to enhance Mr. Dochniak’s credibility, although it could be reasonably argued that nothing, at this point, could decrease his credibility.

    In his latest comment (or, at least, the latest comment he puts his name to) Mr. Dochniak provides yet another of his FactLite™ claims:

    “Government statistics suggest the prevalence rate of autism is increasing 10 to 17 percent anually [sic]. While the causes of autism are complex and puzzling, a consensus is emerging that atypical immunity likely plays a dominant role.”

    Below is a corrected version of that statement which conforms to data available in this Universe.

    “Government statistics, based on certain sources of administrative autism data, suggest the prevalence rate of autism is increasing 10 to 17 percent annually. While the causes of autism are complex and puzzling, a consensus is emerging that atypical immunity immune system abnormalities likely plays a dominant role are a feature of at least some cases of autism, although it remains unclear whether this is a cause or an effect of autism.”

    Again, it is important to note that while autism prevalence – as reported by educational and social-service agencies – is increasing steadily, the exposure to latex proteins has been steadily decreasing – even in vaccines. This – as has been repeatedly noted above – is one of the primary holes in Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis, a hypothesis that has more holes than a colander.

    The rest of Mr. Dochniak’s comment condenses down to “Read my book…please!”

    Prometheus

  532. #532 Militant Agnostic
    October 7, 2011

    Prometheus

    The rest of Mr. Dochniak’s comment condenses down to “Read my book…please!”

    Winter is coming and he would like to have room in his garage so can bring his car inside. I suspect he has a large inventory of unsold books.

  533. #533 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 7, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#527), “Again, it is important to note that while autism prevalence – as reported by educational and social-service agencies – is increasing steadily, the exposure to latex proteins has been steadily decreasing – even in vaccines. This – as has been repeatedly noted above – is one of the primary holes in Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis, a hypothesis that has more holes than a colander.”

    MjD’s response:

    The Rubber Foundation states, ” World natural rubber production is forecast to rise 4.3 percent annually to 12 million metric tons in 2013″. It also states, “Growing sales of medical rubber products will also aid natural rubber sales.”

    See: http://www.rubber-foundation.org/docu/2575natural.pdf

    MjD

  534. #534 lilady
    October 7, 2011

    @ Dochniak: Why haven’t you disavowed the “sock puppets” that have infested this discussion?

    “Winter is coming and he would like to have room in his garage so can bring his car inside. I suspect he has a large inventory of unsold books.”

    Weeks ago I made the observation that Dochniak will be handing out his books to kids who are “trick or treating” on Halloween, handing them out to everyone on his Christmas list, and “gifting” them in lieu of presents for weddings, baptisms and bar mitzvah celebrations…bummer.

  535. #535 Prometheus
    October 7, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,

    World natural rubber production ≠ US/EU/UK medical natural rubber consumption.

    Can I be any more clear?

    Prometheus

  536. #536 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 7, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#532), “World natural rubber production ≠ US/EU/UK medical natural rubber consumption”.

    MjD’s response:

    In the book that Orac introduces at the begining of this Science blog (i.e., Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection), a complete chapter is devoted to how infant exposure to H. brasiliensis natural-latex products (e.g., bottle nipples and pacifiers) after vaccinations can affect allergy-induced regressive autism through sublingual absorption of the Hevea-allergens.

    For some infants, post vaccination exposure to H. brasiliensis can be extremely harmful in that vaccines are known to shift immunity toward Th2.

    Mr. Vicklund is very observant when he writes(#517), “Latex is everywhere.”

    MjD

  537. #537 Gray Falcon
    October 7, 2011

    MjD, do you understand why we keep asking you for evidence?

  538. #538 Chris
    October 7, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak is in some kind of loop. He is pushing his book again.

    He is a joke.

  539. #539 Prometheus
    October 7, 2011

    Obviously, Mr. Dochniak has realised that the use of latex in bottle nipples and pacifiers is increasing 10 – 17% annually, not to mention the use of latex in examination gloves, diaper covers, crib mattress covers, and the myriad other items that infants are exposed to.

    What was that….? Oh. The use of latex in those items hasn’t been increasing – and it’s been decreasing in a number of them? And the use of latex stoppers in vaccine vials has also been decreasing?

    Oh.

    Then what on earth is Mr. Dochniak yammering about?

    One wonders – indeed, one does.

    Prometheus

  540. #540 Prometheus
    October 7, 2011

    Well that does it every body vaccines cause can autism my proof the show that never lies SOUTH PARK says so. if you don’t believe me go to southparkstudios.com and watch the episode ass-burgers
    Prometheus

  541. #541 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    October 7, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,
    I have to admit I’ve neither bought nor read your book. So you may well have answered all the objections in this thread there and, presumably, don’t want to put out any spoilers.
    However.
    What you’ve said here makes a case (I’m not saying how good) for a plausible mechanism. There is, of course, a difference between “plausible” and “supported by evidence as actually happening”.
    Some months back someone made a plausible case that autism was caused by fluorescent lights.
    Your “case” against latex could easily be made against any other known (or indeed, unknown) allergen – peanuts, pet dander, fresh cut grass, nickel – environmental influence – electromagnetic waves, day/night cycles, chemical exposure, solar neutrinos – or indeed, unseen forces – say, Martian ice warriors.
    Why should someone think your case is more right than any of these others?

  542. #542 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 8, 2011

    M O’Biien writes (#526), “Your “case” against latex could easily be made against any other known (or indeed, unknown) allergen – peanuts, pet dander, fresh cut grass, nickel – environmental influence – electromagnetic waves, day/night cycles, chemical exposure, solar neutrinos – or indeed, unseen forces – say, Martian ice warriors.
    Why should someone think your case is more right than any of these others?

    MjD’s response:

    The greater number and diversity of antigenic proteins in natural-latex makes it an immunologically dangerous material, compared to other sources of allergens (e.g.,peanuts, pet dander, fresh cut grass, nickel)

    As an analogy, the greater number and diversity of bacteria in a Komodo Dragon’s mouth gives it a lethal bite compared to a human bite (excluding Prometheus and his chronic halitosis).

    Therefore, H. brasiliensis natural-latex must be taken out of vaccines.

    MjD

  543. #543 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 8, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#525), “Then what on earth is Mr. Dochniak yammering about?”

    MjD’s response:

    Vaccinations and repeated exposure to the antigenic proteins in H. brasiliensis natural-latex is causing an evolutionary change in adaptive immunity.

    Allergies, allergies, allergies, allergies…

    This is music to Big Pharma in that allergy medication means big profit.

    MjD

  544. #544 THE EVIL TROLL
    October 8, 2011

    Well that does it every body vaccines can cause autism my proof, the show that never lies SOUTH PARK says so. if you don’t believe me go to southparkstudios.com and watch the episode ass-burgers.

  545. #545 Chris
    October 8, 2011

    What a joke.

  546. #546 Lawrence
    October 8, 2011

    MjD – once again, prove it.

    You’ve continued, time and time again, to make bold statements regarding autism & allergies – specifically your latex fetsh, without offering one single shred of proof beyond “read my book.”

    If you actually have anything to offer, beyond, “hey, read my book” go ahead & post it up. If not, just leave, because you’re frakin’ annoying.

  547. #547 Krebiozen
    October 8, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak,

    As an analogy, the greater number and diversity of bacteria in a Komodo Dragon’s mouth gives it a lethal bite compared to a human bite

    That’s yet another myth you are propagating there.
    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/05/15/0810883106.abstract

    (excluding Prometheus and his chronic halitosis)

    Classy.

  548. #548 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    Krebiozen writes (#532), “Classy.”

    MjD’s response:

    Hospital refusing employment based on latex allergy?

    http://www.businesslawyerca.com/2011/03/employment-lawsuit-over-latex-allergy-ends-in-settlement.shtml

    It appears the Judicial system will help individuals with latex allergy, that’s classy.

    MjD

  549. #549 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    Vaccines that have latex warnings.

    Allergic reactions to vaccines used to be a prime concern to pharmaceutical and vaccine makers. That changed after the passage of the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act of 2006 [PREP Act 42USC 247(d)-6d] that, basically, exonerates vaccine makers of any damages from vaccines and/or vaccinations.

    MjD

  550. #550 Science Mom
    October 9, 2011

    That changed after the passage of the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act of 2006 [PREP Act 42USC 247(d)-6d] that, basically, exonerates vaccine makers of any damages from vaccines and/or vaccinations.

    No, that is also an anti-vax myth along with the forced vaccinations nonsense. A compensation scheme is also set up to deal with emergency response. There is also still NVICP which deals with the “prime concern” of allergic reactions to vaccine excipients. What on Earth are you going on about?

  551. #551 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#535), “There is also still NVICP which deals with the “prime concern” of allergic reactions to vaccine excipients.”

    MjD’s response:

    If a parent feels that their child has been harmed by vaccines, it is important to know that under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act, a no-fault system, parents do not have to prove a vaccine caused their child’s injury. The parent has to show that the child had an injury that could be caused by the vaccine. A specific example, my autistic child has (or had) sensitivity to natural-latex in vaccines (i.e., Hevea-allergen insult) affecting their allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Refuse vaccines that have latex warnings.

    MjD

  552. #552 Lawrence
    October 9, 2011

    MjD – you have yet to prove that allergy-induced regressive autism exists.

    Put up or shut up (again).

  553. #553 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    What tests can be run to improve vaccine safety?

    Specific blood and saliva tests are recommended to help physicians and parents determine if a vaccine should be administered. The tests are intended to measure adaptive-immunity biomarkers (i.e., IgE expression, cytokine profile, and NGF expression) to help determine an immunity profile for the child. Children having an ‘atypical’ adaptive-immunity profile need to be exempt from vaccinations.

    Here’s the list of references from Chapter 11 (Forseeable Future) of “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    1. Gehan A. Mostafa et al., “Allergic Manifestations in
    Autistic Children: Relation to Disease Severity,
    J. Pediatr. Neurol. 6, 2 (2008):115-123.

    2. CA Molloy et al., “Elevated cytokine l
    evels inchildren with autism spectrum disorder”,
    J. Neuroimmunol, 2006 Mar; 172(1-2):198-205.

    3. Eric Courchesne et al., “Mapping Early Brain
    Development in Autism.” Neuron 56, 2 (2007):
    399-413.

    4. J.K. Nam, J.W. Chung, H.S. Kho, S.C. Chung, et al.,
    “Nerve Growth Factor Concentration in Human
    Saliva, Oral Disease 13, 2 (2007):187-192.

    5. Autism Society of America, Incidence numbers
    from other countries, http://www.autism-society.
    org/site/PageServer?pagename=community_
    world_incidenc, accessed 1/11/11.

    6. Martin Knapp et al., “Economic Cost of Autism in
    the UK,” Autism 13, 3 (2009):317-336.

    MjD

  554. #554 Chris
    October 9, 2011

    Yes, we know autistic children can have allergies just like other children. How about answering the question that we have been asking you for several months:

    What evidence do you have that allergies, specifically latex, cause autism?

    Otherwise, put down the shovel and stop digging. You have gone beyond pathetic.

  555. #555 Science Mom
    October 9, 2011

    If a parent feels that their child has been harmed by vaccines, it is important to know that under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act, a no-fault system, parents do not have to prove a vaccine caused their child’s injury. The parent has to show that the child had an injury that could be caused by the vaccine. A specific example, my autistic child has (or had) sensitivity to natural-latex in vaccines (i.e., Hevea-allergen insult) affecting their allergy-induced regressive autism.

    What in this word salad defends your claim that the PREP act “exonerates vaccine makers of any damages from vaccines and/or vaccinations.”? If you feel as though you have a case for your child’s “allergy-induced regressive autism”, then why don’t you file an NVICP claim? Even you recognise it as a forum with far less rigorous evidentiary standards than a scientific standard. Go for it and let us know how that works out for you.

  556. #556 Ace Equipment Rentals
    October 9, 2011

    Micheal J. Dochniak

    If you do not either return the backhoe you rented from us immediately or pay the outstanding rental fees as well as the current month’s rental fee we ill be forced to turn the matter over to the internet police.

    Collections Department
    Ace Equipment Rentals

  557. #557 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    The CDC continues to state that, Vaccines are developed with the highest standards of safety. However, as with any medical procedure, vaccination has some risks. Individuals react differently to vaccines, and there is no way to predict how individuals will react to a particular vaccine.

    MjD’s response:

    In contradiction the CDC states, If a person reports a severe (anaphylactic) allergy to latex, vaccines supplied in vials or syringes that contain natural-latex should not be administered unless the benefit of vaccination outweighs the risk for a potentialallergic reaction.

    What happened to vaccines are developed with the highest standard of safety?

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning!

    MjD

  558. #558 TBruce
    October 9, 2011

    Ace Equipment Rentals:

    You’re out of luck. I have it on good authority that MjD has struck magma, and your backhoe is now a lump of molten metal. Procedure to issue a warrant for claim of damages awaits your approval.

    Internet Police Dept, Precinct 49

  559. #559 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    Unfortunately, oral vaccines are another vaccination delivery-system that may contain natural latex. An example includes the rotovirus-vaccine Rotarix, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals. The tip caps and the rubber plunger of the oral applicator contain dry natural rubber. It has been recommended that infants with a severe (anaphylactic) allergy to natural latex should not be given Rotarix.

    It is well known that repeated exposure to H. brasiliensis natural latex increases the incidence of latex allergy.

    Why does medical science and government agencies (e.g., FDA, CDC) allow infants to be repeatedly exposed to natural-latex, through vaccinations, knowing increased exposure can induce latex allergy?

    Quote:

    The evidence (vaccines cause autism) is now overwhelming, despite the misinformation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Institute of Medicine – Bernard Rimland (American Research Psychologist)

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning!

    MjD

  560. #560 Lawrence
    October 9, 2011

    MjD – given that there hasn’t been a single study that has shown a link between vaccines & autism – you are full of manure.

    You obviously have a latex fetish – I can probably find some clubs out there that you would probably find very interesting.

    Please take your line of BS somewhere else, because your broken record mantra got old about 400 posts ago.

  561. #561 Ace Equipment Rentals
    October 9, 2011

    Internet Police @543

    OK go ahead – but what are we going to do with a container load of unsalable, fact free, evidence free pseudo science books?

  562. #562 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 9, 2011

    Lawence writes (#545), “Please take your line of BS somewhere else, because your broken record mantra got old about 400 posts ago”

    MjD’s response:

    It’s obvious you haven’t noticed but this Scienceblog is about a book I co-authored. Larry, read the begining of this blog where Orac introduces the book titled “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection.

    The co-author is Denise H. Dunn. The dedication reads: To Harmony Dunn, you’re inspirational, compassionate, insightful, and creative; making this book possible.

    MjD

  563. #563 Lawrence
    October 9, 2011

    And??????

    Seriously, if you can’t offer up even a single fact, supported by evidence (and “its in the book” isn’t an answer) – you really need to be somewhere else.

    You’re a joke, if you haven’t gotten that already.

  564. #564 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 9, 2011

    It’s obvious you haven’t noticed but this Scienceblog is about a book I co-authored.

    And that translates into permission for you to flog your book here over and over for nearly half a year… how?? That makes it okay for you to “defend” your crappy self-published book through irrelevant attacks on other posters’ supposed personal appearances, answering questions that no one asked and ignoring the questions you were asked, and repeating already-debunked claims incessantly… how??

  565. #565 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 10, 2011

    Antaeus Feldspar writes (#549), “That makes it okay for you to “defend” your crappy self-published book through irrelevant attacks on other posters’ supposed personal appearances, answering questions that no one asked and ignoring the questions you were asked, and repeating already-debunked claims incessantly… how??

    MjD’s response:

    Everyone agrees that H. brasiliensis natural-latex can cause severe allergic reactions and anaphylactic death.

    Mr. Feldspar, do you agree that H. brasiliensis natural-latex should not be in vaccine packaging?

    MjD

  566. #566 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    October 10, 2011

    I am not Antaneus Feldspar, but the level of risk from using natural-latex in vaccine packaging seems insufficient to me to say it should be removed. I do not oppose removing it in favor of a substitute that presents less risk; I do not say it should be removed.

  567. #567 Justin
    October 10, 2011

    I would say that in an effort to “do no harm” it would be advisable/prudent to remove latex from vaccine delivery systems. Mainly, because it would probably be relatively easy and inexpensive if done over a period of a couple years.

    I never got back to ask some of the other questions that I wanted to ask you (MjD)

    1. Are there data out there that support the contention that the immune response following a vaccine with NRL is quantitatively or qualitatively different than a vaccine that does not contain NRL. If there are data to this end, could you provide the research studies which show this?

    2. Do any of these findings from #1 resemble the autism–adaptive immune data that is extant?

    3. Do any of the findings from #1 above correlate with autism behavioral scores?

    It seems that you have preemptively “connected” the NRL in a vaccine delivery system with autism, by connecting some of the dots that have arisen in the neuroimmune realm of autism.

    It seems prudent to take the proper steps of hypothesis building and testing, if you are genuinely interested in advancing science in a certain domain.

    I would suggest first formulating a hypothesis that explores whether vaccines containing NRL, do actually elicit a measurable difference in immune response than vaccines that do not contain NRL. If there is a difference that is statistically significant then you may have something worth looking into more thoroughly.

    This would probably be ethical if you were to use a cohort of babys that come from HIV infected mothers, because they receive a lot of routine blood draws in early infancy (which is what would be needed to do a study of this sort.) Also, both groups would receive vaccines, just one with and one with out NRL.

    Justin

  568. #568 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 10, 2011

    550
    Antaeus Feldspar writes (#549), “That makes it okay for you to “defend” your crappy self-published book through … answering questions that no one asked and ignoring the questions you were asked … … how??

    MjD’s response:

    Everyone agrees that H. brasiliensis natural-latex can cause severe allergic reactions and anaphylactic death…

    Amazing. Not even any recognition of the irony. Dochniak might actually rank behind Thing-troll in ability to pass a Turing test; Thing can at least pretend to be comprehending and attempting to intelligently answer questions.

  569. #569 Sauceress
    October 10, 2011

    Thing can at least pretend to be comprehending and attempting to intelligently answer questions.

    It can? I think I must have been away.

  570. #570 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 10, 2011

    Justin writes (#552), “It seems prudent to take the proper steps of hypothesis building and testing, if you are genuinely interested in advancing science in a certain domain”.

    MjD’s response:

    Great statement Justin.

    If your interested in learning, in detail, how the antigenic proteins from H. Brasiliensis natural-latex affect allergy-induced regressive autism read the following books:

    1) Allergies amnd Autism (Nova Science);
    http://www.amazon.com/Allergies-Autism-Infectious-Diseases/dp/1608763528/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_1

    and

    2) Allergies and Autism – The Latex Connection (Createspace)
    http://www.amazon.com/Vaccine-Delivery-Autism-Latex-Connection/dp/1456570056/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_2

    Thanks for your input!

    MjD

  571. #571 Lawrence
    October 10, 2011

    OMG – seriously! Another frakin’ “read my book” answer….

    MjD – get a life and try for once to cite something concrete other than your own damn book.

  572. #572 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 10, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#556), “MjD – get a life and try for once to cite something concrete other than your own damn book”.

    MjD’s response:

    Describing atypical adaptive-immunity, in the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism, involves multiple mechanisms and interactions including genetics, epi-genetics, environmental insult, vaccinations, and comorbid interactions.

    Co-author Denise H. Dunn and I have spent years studying such and after exhaustive examination of the evidence, which is thoroughly described in the books, have concluded that allergy-induced regressive autism is preventable.

    Lawrence, would you like me to post another list of references from a chapter of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’?

    Which chapter references would you like?

    MjD

  573. #573 Chris
    October 10, 2011

    Which chapter references would you like?

    The ones that independently show that allergies (specifically latex) cause autism. You know, the answer to that question we keep asking you, and yet you continually fail to answer (oh, and we already know autistic kids have allergies just like other kids).

  574. #574 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 10, 2011

    Justin writes (#552), “I would say that in an effort to “do no harm” it would be advisable/prudent to remove latex from vaccine delivery systems”.

    MjD’s response:

    Have you seen the study on Latex and Autism from Peking University? State-of-the-art research exploring allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Here’s the site:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957522

    MjD

  575. #575 dedicated lurker
    October 10, 2011

    I don’t think we need the real Michael J. Dochniak posting here. We just need a bot with the same name that periodically posts “Read my book ‘”Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’!”

  576. #576 Chris
    October 10, 2011

    That study says: “Considering the fact that the family members were in close contact with natural rubber latex”

    Oh, yeah. That happens to every kid!

  577. #577 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 10, 2011

    Chris writes (#561), “Considering the fact that the family members were in close contact with natural rubber latex. Oh, yeah. That happens to every kid!”

    MjD’s response:

    In 2010, millions of doses of flu vaccine required latex warnings. See site below:

    http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/general/news/aug3110latex.html

    That’s just one of many types of latex-tainted vaccines given to children and adults.

    Needless exposure which we could describe as “Herd” latex-insult.

    MjD

  578. #578 Chris
    October 10, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, do you have some kind of reading comprehension problem? Please answer the question you were asked.

  579. #579 Sauceress
    October 11, 2011

    #196

    I’ve worked with a Biotechnology Company in an effort to remove the antigenic proteins from NRL to provide a safer natural-rubber.Briefly, the null hypothesis is satified when the global natural-rubber industry exclusively uses ultra-low protein NRL (i.e., Hevea brasiliensis)

    Independantly, I’ve discovered a new adsorption process which removes the antigenic proteins from NRL to undetectable levels, based on the current analytical standards.

    (my bolding)

    I was going to say that Michael J. Dochniak’s vested interest in peddling a latex- autism connection obviously goes far beyond peddling his hypothesis/book, but Prometheus (#218)…

    His (dead parrot) hypothesis is supported primarily (it seems) by his financial interest in a latex-substitute rather than anything even vaguely resembling data.

    …already said it rather well.

    My question to Michael J. Dochniak is: Do you declare such a glaring conflict of interest in the front of your book?

  580. #580 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 11, 2011

    Sauceress writes (#564), “Do you declare such a glaring conflict of interest in the front of your book?”

    MjD’s response:

    Preface from book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”:

    I believe (declare) that Hevea brasiliensis dry natural-rubber(HDNR) exclusionary practice and ultra-low protein natural latex will show us that when exposure to the Hevea-allergens is eliminated, the incidence of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism will diminish in successive generations.

    Over the years, I’ve learned much about how HDNR can affect our lives in very different ways. For most, HDNR is a material that contributes to a better standard of living, while for others, exposure can be harmful and even life threatening.

    I also support the idea that in many rubber applications, it’s naïve to believe that HDNR can be completely replaced with synthetic rubber; natural latex has a price/performance characteristic that continues to
    be second to none. Because of this, every effort should be made to substantially remove the allergens from HDNR.

    Although in medical applications, including vaccines, HDNR should not be used, as the allergens can never be
    completely removed.

    MjD

  581. #581 Chris
    October 11, 2011

    What studies independently show that allergies (specifically latex) cause autism?

    You know, the answer to that question we keep asking you, and yet you continually fail to answer (oh, and we already know autistic kids have allergies just like other kids).

  582. #582 Vicki
    October 11, 2011

    I believe we would get more useful answers from Eliza.

    Mr. Dochniak, A simple yes/no question: Do you or do you not declare the conflict of interest Sauceress pointed out in the front of your book?

    Repeating that you think natural latex is dangerous is not a declaration of a conflict of interest.

    Alternatively, are you prepared to state that you have no such financial conflict of interest, will gain no financial benefit if Vytex or any other synthetic replaces natural rubber, and have no financial or business connection with the manufacturers of Vytex or any other rubber substitute?

  583. #583 Todd W.
    October 11, 2011

    @Sauceress, Chris and Vicki

    Since Mr. Dochniak is being so coy, I thought I’d take a look on Amazon and use the “Search Inside” function. From what I could find, there is no declaration of any financial conflict of interest. A bit dishonest, that.

  584. #584 Science Mom
    October 11, 2011

    Are any of Mr. Dochniak’s evasive answers and plugs for his book at all surprising? Incidentally, I suspect he is merely trying to increase his Google juice by mentioning his book so often here, particularly in light that no one is paying him any mind on Amazon.

  585. #585 Prometheus
    October 11, 2011

    Dochniak (#559):

    “Have you seen the study on Latex and Autism from Peking University? State-of-the-art research exploring allergy-induced regressive autism.”

    Justin, the Shen at al study was already deconstructed by me in comment #93. Mr. Dochniak is looping.

    Prometheus

  586. #586 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 11, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#568), “From what I could find, there is no declaration of any financial conflict of interest.”

    MjD’s response:

    No financial conflict of interest.

    MjD

  587. #587 Chris
    October 11, 2011

    Oh, really? Who is the lead author of this?

  588. #588 Lawrence
    October 11, 2011

    Well, well, well…..isn’t that interesting.

    I also notice that quite a number of MjD’s assertians seem to come directly from that corporate presentation (advertising).

    They are local – perhaps I’ll pay them a visit & ask some pointed questions about relationships.

  589. #589 Vicki
    October 11, 2011

    While we’re about it: Are you the Mike Dochniak who Google tells me is in sales and tech support at Vystar (or was as of last summer)?

  590. #590 Science Mom
    October 11, 2011

    @ Chris, oh that is rich! No conflict of interest my arse.

  591. #591 Lawrence
    October 11, 2011

    Oh, this is rich:

    http://www.linkedin.com/pub/michael-j-dochniak/4/310/436

    And his YouTube video is once again just an advertisement for his book.

    If you check out his patents – no financial conflict my ass!

  592. #592 Sauceress
    October 11, 2011

    #565 Michael J. Dochniak
    So the answer is no.

    Your preface should read…

    [I also support the idea that in many rubber applications, it’s naïve to believe that HDNR can be completely replaced with synthetic rubber; natural latex has a price/performance characteristic that continues to
    be second to none. Because of this, every effort should be made to substantially remove the allergens from HDNR.

    Independantly, I've discovered a new adsorption process which removes the antigenic proteins from NRL to undetectable levels, based on the current analytical standards.]

    This enables your readers to see that you have strong financial and career incentives in having your hypothesis accepted and acted upon.

    I have another question:
    When (an official date please),and where, was it that you independently “discovered a new adsorption process which removes the antigenic proteins from NRL to undetectable levels, based on the current analytical standards.”?

    Where can one access the information and/or publication paper of this discovery?

  593. #593 Lawrence
    October 11, 2011

    Hmmmm…..you rail against natural latex, claim you have no financial stake in the game, yet you are a technical consultant for a corporation that has developed a latex alternative?

    So, explain to us how that is supposed to work (and not be a conflict of interest)?

  594. #594 Chris
    October 11, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak reminds of this song.

    (Of course I had to think of that song. Yesterday I picked up some dry cleaning and their computer system had an order I forgot about almost a year ago. They were the puppets my kids played with almost fifteen years ago: Lamb Chop, Charlie Horse and Hush Puppy!)

  595. #595 Todd W.
    October 11, 2011

    Chris, et al.,

    It may be wise to get screen grabs of stuff you find, in case, like one Mr. Daniels, he starts making things disappear or change.

  596. #596 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 11, 2011

    Sauceress writes (#577), “When (an official date please),and where, was it that you independently “discovered a new adsorption process which removes the antigenic proteins from NRL to undetectable levels, based on the current analytical standards.”? Where can one access the information and/or publication paper of this discovery?

    MjD’s response:

    It’s a 2011 U.S. provisional application that I’ve transferred all rights away and I have not made a penny from it and will not make a penny from it in the future. There is no public disclosure at this stage.

    My efforts continue to be safety driven and altruistic.

    MjD

  597. #597 Matthew Cline
    October 11, 2011

    @MjD:

    My efforts continue to be safety driven and altruistic.

    Then why not put your book up on the web for free? That would ensure that the information in your book is spread as widely as possible.

  598. #598 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 11, 2011

    Mr. Cline writes, “Then why not put your book up on the web for free? That would ensure that the information in your book is spread as widely as possible.”

    MjD’s response:

    I’ll ask the co-author about putting the book “Vaccine and Autism – The Latex Connection” on the web for free.

    Thanks for your input.

    MjD

  599. #599 Chris
    October 11, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Some people started singing it not knowing what it was
    But they’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  600. #600 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 11, 2011

    Fringe science is a flavor of conjecture
    Conjecture is an ingredient of creativity
    Creativity is a recipe for hypotheses
    A hypothesis feeds medical science
    Medical science then nourishes mankind
    Knowledge grows

    MjD

  601. #601 Gray Falcon
    October 11, 2011

    MjD, you seem to have left a critical step of that flow: Evidence. And in terms of critical, it’s like building a plane without any means of propulsion.

  602. #602 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 12, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#586), “Evidence”

    MjD’s response:

    In 1927, descriptions of allergic reactions to natural latex started to appear in the medical literature.

    Stern J. Ueberempfindichkeit gegen Kautschuk als Ursache von Urticaria und Quinkeschem Oedem Klin Wochenschr 1927;6;1479.

    Over eighty year later, natural latex is still in vaccines.

    The evidence is clear…

    Latex allergies may impair
    Harmful proteins always there

    MjD

  603. #603 Lawrence
    October 12, 2011

    Actually MjD – I’d like to see your evidence that Natural Latex is an active component of vaccines, because all you’ve managed to trot out is that NL is used in packaging.

    Where is your peer-reviewed study & analysis regarding the amount (if any) of NL or any component thereof that is present in a dose of a vaccine?

    That I’d like to see – because if it isn’t there, you don’t even have a leg to stand on regarding your so-called hypothesis.

    Also, please address how being the technical consultant for a company that manufacturers a “natural latex substitute” doesn’t comprise a quantifiable conflict of interest for your stance against Natural Latex.

  604. #604 Todd W.
    October 12, 2011

    @MjD

    This may come as a shocker to you, but doggerel is not a valid substitute for scientific evidence.

    You have established that natural latex can cause allergies. This is not disputed. Also, there are people who have both autism and allergies. This also is not disputed. But the thing you have yet to show, and which has been asked for multiple times, is evidence that natural latex allergies cause autism.

    So, please, enough with stating how NL causes allergies. You don’t need to state that any longer. And no more statements that some people that have autism also have latex allergies. Just answer the damn question that has been asked of you over, and over, and over in this thread.

    What scientific evidence is there that NL allergies cause autism?

    If you can’t answer that one very simple question, then please stop wasting everyone else’s time here.

  605. #605 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 12, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#588), “Where is your peer-reviewed study & analysis regarding the amount (if any) of NL or any component thereof that is present in a dose of a vaccine?”

    MjD’s response:

    Here’s an article from the emdt about dry-natural-rubber-components in prefilled syringes. The first paragraph in the article states:

    The release of allergenic proteins from the dry natural rubber (DNR) components of prefilled syringes into aqueous pharmaceuticals may potentially induce an immediate allergic reaction in individuals with a latex protein allergy. This article reviews the current risks to patients in the context of vaccine delivery. It also refers to other device applications that contain DNR.

    http://www.emdt.co.uk/article/dry-natural-rubber-components-prefilled-syringes

    MjD

  606. #606 Chris
    October 12, 2011

    This is the song that never ends,
    It just goes on and on my friends.
    Some people started singing it not knowing what it was,
    And they just kept on singing it and this is what it was.

  607. #607 Sauceress
    October 12, 2011

    #581

    It’s a 2011 U.S. provisional application that I’ve transferred all rights away and I have not made a penny from it and will not make a penny from it in the future.

    From your Linkin page (hat tip to Lawrence @#576 for the link)

    Michael J. Dochniak’s Patents
    Method to affect the development of autism spectrum disorders
    United States Patent Application 20070034214
    Filed August 12, 2005
    Inventors: Michael J. Dochniak, et al
    The invention discloses a method that may affect the development of autism spectrum disorders. The method can be used to substantially reduce mammalian immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated reaction antibodies that are induced by the allergens inherent in products formed from natural rubber latex. The method may be particularly useful as a proactive approach to affect developmental, learning and behavioral disabilities in children.

    Is the basis of the above application the same as that of the 2010 provisional application?

    This application was lodged in 2005 before the publications of your latex/allergies-autism connection papers? Yes? No?

    I’ve transferred all rights away and I have not made a penny from it and will not make a penny from it in the future.

    How, and wher, could interested parties verify that this statement is true?

  608. #608 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 13, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#588), “Where is your peer-reviewed study & analysis regarding the amount (if any) of NL or any component thereof that is present in a dose of a vaccine?”

    MjD’s response:

    Published in European Medical Device Technology, March 2010, Volume 1, No. 3

    The emdt write, “The release of allergenic proteins from the dry natural rubber (DNR) components of prefilled syringes into aqueous pharmaceuticals may potentially induce an immediate allergic reaction in individuals with a latex protein allergy”.

    MjD

  609. #609 Chris
    October 13, 2011

    This is the song that never ends,
    It just goes on and on, my friends.
    Some people started singing it not knowing what it was,
    And now they just keep singing it forever just because…

  610. #610 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 13, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#588), “Actually MjD – I’d like to see your evidence that Natural Latex is an active component of vaccines, because all you’ve managed to trot out is that NL is used in packaging.”

    MjD’s response:

    On July 1, 2011, the Secretary of Health declared a shortage of certain flu vaccines in multi-dose vials and temporarily suspended Washington’s limit on the amount of mercury (thimerosal) allowed in flu vaccine given to pregnant women and kids under three who are allergic to latex.

    The federal Food and Drug Administration found that thimerosal-free flu vaccine in single dose, pre-filled syringes may contain trace amounts of latex.

    http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/Immunize/providers/flu-thimerosal.htm

    MjD

  611. #611 Chris
    October 13, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Some people started singing it not knowing what it was
    But they’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  612. #612 Todd W.
    October 13, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#588), “Where is your peer-reviewed study & analysis regarding the amount (if any) of NL or any component thereof that is present in a dose of a vaccine?”

    MjD’s response:

    Published in European Medical Device Technology, March 2010, Volume 1, No. 3

    The emdt write, “The release of allergenic proteins from the dry natural rubber (DNR) components of prefilled syringes into aqueous pharmaceuticals may potentially induce an immediate allergic reaction in individuals with a latex protein allergy”.

    MjD

    Hmm…no amount in that quoted bit. Maybe it’s somewhere else in the paper. I’m assuming MjD was referring to the article “Dry Natural Rubber Components in Prefilled Syringes“, though he never gave the actual title of the paper, which would’ve been helpful. I didn’t see any mention of how much latex actually did make it into vaccines, but I did come across this bit, which MjD ignored:

    A review of the VAERS data noted that there were no reported cases of allergic reactions related to DNR formulations between 1991 and 2003 in the US. Similarly, BD did not receive any customer complaints reporting cases of allergic reactions in the European and North America markets. Given the approximately 300 million immunisations each year in the US, the occurrence of an allergic reaction possibly as a result of latex protein contamination in vaccine solution appears to be below 0.001 ppm.

    So, it doesn’t appear to be much of a problem. Something to be aware of and careful about on the part of manufacturers, but not something to worry about.

    Now, how about that evidence that latex allergies cause autism?

  613. #613 Todd W.
    October 13, 2011

    @MjD

    Perhaps you don’t understand what the term “active” means. An active component of a vaccine is a live virus, part of a virus, dead bacteria, proteins or other items which are used in the vaccine to trigger the immune response. Everything else is an “inactive” component; this includes trace amount of substances such as latex.

    Now, about that evidence that latex allergies cause autism?

  614. #614 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 13, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#597), “So, it doesn’t appear to be much of a problem. Something to be aware of and careful about on the part of manufacturers, but not something to worry about”.

    MjD’s response:

    You may want to send your ideas to the FDA in an effort to have latex warnings removed from vaccines? This would of course lead medical science down a path of “do harm” instead of “do no harm”.

    If this is appealing to you, maybe Promethus would like to get involved?

    MjD

  615. #615 Chris
    October 13, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Some people started singing it not knowing what it was
    But they’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  616. #616 Todd W.
    October 13, 2011

    @MjD

    You didn’t answer my question: about that evidence that latex allergies cause autism?

  617. #617 Vicki
    October 13, 2011

    Sheesh!

    What Todd’s quote shows is that the latex warning system is working and that people are not having allergic reactions to latex. This supports the idea that if latex is connected to autism (something for which no evidence has been suggested), the latex exposure is unrelated to vaccines.

    Nobody is claiming that allergies don’t exist, or that latex allergies are a myth. The point is that you have yet to provide any evidence that latex exposure causes autism. If I note in passing that wasp stings don’t cause polio, I’m not trying to take away people’s epipens, nor force my friend with an allergy to stay in the room if wasps invade. “An allergy to X exists, so people with that allergy should avoid certain products” is very different from “X is bad for everyone.”

    Stop. SIWOTI, but I have real work to do.

  618. #618 Prometheus
    October 13, 2011

    Rather than addressing the points raised by Todd –

    “A review of the VAERS data noted that there were no reported cases of allergic reactions related to DNR formulations between 1991 and 2003 in the US. Similarly, BD did not receive any customer complaints reporting cases of allergic reactions in the European and North America markets. Given the approximately 300 million immunisations each year in the US, the occurrence of an allergic reaction possibly as a result of latex protein contamination in vaccine solution appears to be below 0.001 ppm.”

    - Mr. Dochniak launches a vicious attack on a straw man of his own imagining:

    “You may want to send your ideas to the FDA in an effort to have latex warnings removed from vaccines? This would of course lead medical science down a path of ‘do harm’ instead of ‘do no harm’.”

    Must I point out that the quote Todd provided came from a citation Mr. Dochniak provided as supposedly supporting his claims that latex in vaccines causes allergic reactions and, ultimately, autism.

    It seems that Mr. Dochniak doesn’t read the articles he cites…very poor form, Mr. Dochniak.

    Now, I don’t recall Todd suggesting that people with latex allergies should be given vaccines out of vial with latex stoppers, despite what Mr. Dochniak writes. I suspect that was simply Mr. Dochniak’s way of deflecting attention from his latest embarrassment. However, this is another good example of how exceptionally careful the FDA and vaccine manufacturers are when it comes to even hypothetical dangers.

    I think it should be clear by now that Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis is supported by nothing more than his own arm-chair musings. Now that we know he hasn’t read the literature he cites, I can only imagine how many factual errors his latest book contains.

    Mr. Dochniak may feel that I am picking on him by pointing out his errors of fact and logic. He should see how I am with my students – of course, they are open to learning something new.

    Prometheus

  619. #619 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 13, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#), “However, this is another good example of how exceptionally careful the FDA and vaccine manufacturers are when it comes to even hypothetical dangers.”

    MjD’s response:

    Description why even minute quantities of natural-latex protein contamination in a vaccine solution can be harmful:

    1) It is well documented that many infant vaccine solutions contain the adjuvant aluminum-hydroxide.

    2) It is known that aluminum hydroxide effectively binds to H. brasiliensis natural-latex proteins.

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=7056970.PN.&OS=PN/7056970&RS=PN/7056970

    3) In animal studies, mice are injected with natural-latex proteins that are adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, inducing natural-latex allergy.

    http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/short/167/10/1393

    4) H. brasiliensis natural-latex exposure can lead to allergy-induced regressive autism.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/209575

    MjD

  620. #620 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 14, 2011

    Vicki writes (#602), “”An allergy to X exists, so people with that allergy should avoid certain products” is very different from “X is bad for everyone.” and

    “Stop. SIWOTI, but I have real work to do.”.

    MjD’s response:

    1) H. brasiliensis natural-latex proteins exist in some vaccines;

    2) Exposure to such proteins, through vaccination, can cause latex sensitivity/allergy; then

    3) Infants repeatedly insulted with such vaccines have an increased probability of acquiring latex sensitivity/allergy.

    In my opinion, this situation is bad. Herd immunity through vaccination must strive to achieve efficacy and safety for everyone.

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    Thanks for your input. Hope your “real work” is meaningful.

    MjD

  621. #621 Lawrence
    October 14, 2011

    Obviously, your’s is not – you remind me of a guy I met once who’s business card said “Futurist.” His whole “job” was sitting around with other futurists & brainstorming about things that may or may not happen in the future.

    In the post above, you start with a very basic premise (latex) & combine it with something also very basic (allergies) – yet somehow manage to take the leap (off a cliff) that latex causes autism.

    You can make all the suppositions that you want – but no evidence is still no evidence. So stop stating as fact things that you have no firm evidence to support.

    Also, again explain to us why your work with a “latex-alternative” corporation and all of your patents / applications don’t represent a demonstratable conflict of interest? Shouldn’t this relationship be disclosed, publically & in your book?

  622. #622 Matthew Cline
    October 14, 2011

    Shouldn’t this relationship be disclosed, publically & in your book?

    Now I don’t at all agree with his reasoning, but I thought it was pretty clear what his reasoning behind that was: according to him, something is only a conflict of interest if it’s your motivation for acting. Since he knows himself, and knows that it isn’t his motivation for acting, it isn’t a conflict of interests, and thus doesn’t need to be disclosed.

  623. #623 Todd W.
    October 14, 2011

    @MjD

    4) H. brasiliensis natural-latex exposure can lead to allergy-induced regressive autism.

    [redacted http]www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/209575

    There goes your not actually reading the sources you provide, again. That link goes to this paper:

    Studies on bovine leucosis V. A comparative study on the practical value of the agar gel immunodiffusion test, the indirect fluorescent antibody technique and the micro complement fixation test for the detection of antibodies to bovine leucosis virus.
    Ressang AA, Mastenbroek N, Quak J.
    Abstract

    The practical value of the indirect fluorescent antibody technique (I FAT), the micro complement fixation test (M CFT) and the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIDT) for the detection of antibodies to bovine leucosis virus (BLV) was investigated. For this purpose 1495 serum samples were examined. There was a remarkably good agreement between the three tests in the demonstration of antibodies to BLV especially if sera with a sufficient high concentration of antibodies (“late serum”) were under investigation. These positive sera were derived only from farms which exploited one or more imported animals. A disagreement of results of the three tests was observed in 38 (2.5%) cases. This was due to: (1) difficulties in reading of the test; (2) presumably by the demonstration of different classes of antibody and (3) the fact that in the AGIDT sera could be used undiluted. This discrepancy was especially evident with sera with a low concentration of antibodies (“early or incubation sera”). A drawback for the M CFT is the anticomplementary activity found in 17% of the bovine serum samples.

    Please explain to the class where either latex or regressive autism are mentioned. Also, where are the humans in that study?

    And here I thought you were actually finally answering our question.

    (As an aside, your list o’ stuff about how some vaccines may contain trace bits of latex is not disputed. Your links about potentially sensitizing someone to latex and thus making an allergic reaction more likely also is not disputed. Like before, I’m going to request that you refrain from further beating that dead horse.)

  624. #624 TBruce
    October 14, 2011

    A disagreement of results of the three tests was observed in 38 (2.5%) cases. This was due to: (1) difficulties in reading…

    Aha! Difficulties in reading! An obvious sign of regressive autism.

    Don’t all you doubters feel like fools, now?

  625. #625 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 14, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#608), “Also, where are the humans in that study?”

    MjD’s response:

    4) H. brasiliensis natural-latex exposure can lead to allergy-induced regressive autism.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957522

    MjD

  626. #626 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 14, 2011

    Lawrence writes (#606), “Also, again explain to us why your work with a “latex-alternative” corporation and all of your patents / applications don’t represent a demonstratable conflict of interest? Shouldn’t this relationship be disclosed, publically & in your book?”

    MjD’s response:

    All of my workings including ultra-low protein NRL, patents, and citizen petitions are thoroughly described in the book “Allergies and Autism”. See below:

    https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=11412

    MjD

  627. #627 Chris
    October 14, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Some people started singing it not knowing what it was
    But they’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  628. #628 Todd W.
    October 14, 2011

    @MjD

    Prometheus already addressed that study in comment #93, and mentioned it again in comment #570. Repeating yourself doesn’t make what you say true.

  629. #629 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 14, 2011

    Chris writes (#613), “Prometheus already addressed that study in comment #93, and mentioned it again in comment #570″.

    MjD’s response:

    In parallel, a gerbil on a treadmill works very hard but doesn’t really accomplish anything.

    MjD

  630. #630 Gray Falcon
    October 14, 2011

    Are you hoping that by saying something stupid enough, you’ll quiet us down by confusion?

  631. #631 Todd W.
    October 14, 2011

    @MjD

    Don’t be so hard on yourself, Michael. No one is calling you a gerbil. All we want is some valid scientific evidence that latex allergies cause autism. You know, something that shows causation, rather than speculation.

    (Cue loop.)

  632. #632 Chris
    October 14, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

    (and I am not Todd)

  633. #633 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 14, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#616), “You know, something that shows causation, rather than speculation.”

    MjD’s response:

    Allergy-induced autism research continues to explore how certain antigenic-proteins affect adaptive immunity (i.e., cross-reactivity) and neurological development.

    It is known that allergies can increase the expression of neurotrophin, including NGF, dramatically affecting neural growth and neural pruning.

    In infants, the timing, frequency, intensity, and type of exposure to H. brasiliensis natural-latex antigens can cause cross-reactivity; thereafter affecting the incidence and degree of atypicality behaviors in regressive autism.

    Furthermore, in a research paper entitled, “Allergic manifestations in autistic children: Relations to disease severity”, researchers concluded that allergy may play a role in the pathogenesis of autism wherein allergic immune responses to some proteins (dietary protein and latex) may induce the production of brain auto-antibodies, which are found in many autistic children.

    http://iospress.metapress.com/content/w6820728082nu597/

    MjD

  634. #634 Todd W.
    October 14, 2011

    @MjD

    Perhaps you misunderstood. I asked for evidence, not speculation. The study you provided, “Allergic manifestations in autistic children: Relation to disease severity” by Gehan A. Mostafa, Rasha T. Hamza and Heba H. El-Shahawi, shows that there is some manner of association, but does not differentiate between allergy being a cause and allergy being a comorbid condition.

    Indeed, some aspects of autism that may seem allergy-related may, in fact, not be due to allergies at all. Now, allergies may exacerbate behavioral symptoms of autism. Think about it, the more severe the autism and the greater the communication difficulties, the more frustrated one might feel, unable to get across the discomfort you’re feeling and thus, unable to remedy the situation.

    Now, about that evidence, not speculation, that latex allergy causes autism?

  635. #635 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 14, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#619), “Now, about that evidence, not speculation, that latex allergy causes autism?”

    MjD’s response:

    Here’s the question we’ve (Denise H. Dunn and myself) asked, and answered, using a combination of empirical evidence, anecdotal evidence, and scientific reasoning:

    Can exposure to the antigenic proteins in Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex, from vaccines, cause/affect adaptive-immunity induced regressive autism?

    Read the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” for details.

    Asking a specific question about a detail in said book will get my attention.

    Good luck Todd W. and hope you understand.

    MjD

  636. #636 Gray Falcon
    October 14, 2011

    Here’s a specific question: Do you really care about anything but advertising you book?

  637. #637 Chris
    October 14, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  638. #638 Todd W.
    October 14, 2011

    @MjD

    I was right in my prediction that you would loop back. When asked “What evidence do you have that latex allergies cause autism?” you respond with “Buy my book”.

    Sorry Michael, that doesn’t cut it. Just admit that you don’t have any valid scientific evidence that latex allergies cause autism.

  639. #639 Gray Falcon
    October 14, 2011

    Most likely MjD isn’t aware of what a huge leap of logic he’s taking. I suspect his book consists entirely of statements of the form “Autistic people can have allergies” and “latex allergies exist”, even though they are not enough to prove “latex allergies cause autism”.

  640. #640 Beamup
    October 14, 2011

    It occurs to me that if we were to assume MjD is telling the truth, he obviously doesn’t have any concern for the welfare of the autistic. If it were truly possible to prevent autism by avoiding the use of latex, this would be a profoundly important fact which would need to be widely disseminated. Yet he insists on making a personal profit off of it before letting anyone know.

  641. #641 Gray Falcon
    October 14, 2011

    @Beamup: MjD never gave me a straight answer to one question. “Do you feel it’s right to withhold what you feel is valuable information from humanity so you can sell your book?”

  642. #642 Beamup
    October 14, 2011

    Not new, then. Sorry, I guess I missed it in the 625-post history!

  643. #643 Justin
    October 14, 2011

    MjD writes (#620):”Here’s the question we’ve (Denise H. Dunn and myself) asked, and answered, using a combination of empirical evidence, anecdotal evidence, and scientific reasoning:

    Can exposure to the antigenic proteins in Hevea brasiliensis natural-latex, from vaccines, cause/affect adaptive-immunity induced regressive autism?”

    Justin’s response:

    Do you have a section in your book where you layout the shortcomings or the weaknesses in your hypothesis or the empirical/anecdotal evidence and scientific reasoning which you feel support your hypothesis? If so, could you elaborate on what you wrote(in your book), so that I can better understand your position?

    How would you design a research study(or series of studies) to test your hypothesis? Methodology?

    I am really interested in what you have to say about this one based on an earlier post that you made.

    “(#585)Fringe science is a flavor of conjecture
    Conjecture is an ingredient of creativity
    Creativity is a recipe for hypotheses
    A hypothesis feeds medical science
    Medical science then nourishes mankind
    Knowledge grows

    MjD”

    I agree with a lot of this, but I think that you need to think about line 4 again. Does a hypothesis actually feed medical science? or is it something else?

    How I see it, is that a hypothesis only feeds medical science if it is tested and either validated or invalidated. Otherwise, the hypothesis doesn’t actually tell you much, and, in reality confuses medical science until it has been tested and some sort of results can be analyzed and interpreted.

    So how would you test your hypothesis, so that you can meaningfully advance medical science in the realm of autism?

    Thanks,

    Justin

  644. #644 Bill S. Hit
    October 14, 2011

    Amazon.com review of book:

    1.0 out of 5 stars
    “Would give -5 star if available”, October 14, 2011
    By Bill S. Hit “Bull” (Miami, USA)

    This review is from: Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection) (Paperback)

    First it was the MMR vaccine (Andrew Wakefield), then the mercury (thimerosal), then formaldehyde, monkey kidney tissue, aluminium, calf serum and “too many too soon”; all as definitive causes of autism in children. Time and time again, large epidemiological based studies, or logical scientific explanations disprove these theories. Yet again and again, the goalposts are shifted to lay the blame at vaccines. In “Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection)”, the new target is as the title suggests; latex.

    Before delving further into this, science-based medicine is one of the most powerful and successful tools invented by mankind. In this, a “hypothesis” is tested scientifically and an account submitted to a scientific journal for review by the individuals peers. After satisfactory review, the science is published for all to see with all the details of how the work was done. Other scientists then test this hypothesis, and eventually when enough evidence is found, this become a “theory”. The current book in question is merely a hypothesis with no scientific investigation/experimentation, no peer review and definitely noone else repeating. Furthermore, it would appear that Mr Dockniak has a conflict of interest, as he holds patents on artificial latex compounds (http://www.vytex.com/BizDocs/ASCVystar4609.pdf), which would mean it was in his interest for his product to be used in favour of natural latex from plants.

    Overall, therefore this book is nothing more than fear-mongering and adds to the current hysteria of anti-vaccine nonsense that is around. In fact, this is more than nonsense and is in fact outright dangerous. Since the likes of these unscientific accounts have been around, fueled by the likes of Jenny McCarthy, Charlie Sheen and Jim Carrey, deaths have occurred due to low vaccination rates as a result.

    Furthermore, this “hypothesis” is about as scientific as the following; why not check out some of the chemicals in vaccines that have been proven to cause human fatalities including; Hydrogen oxide, Dihydrogen monoxide, Hydrogen monoxide, Dihydrogen oxide and Hydrogen hydroxide.

    Avoid any similar books that claim to be “scientific researchers”, yet have not published anything in the scientific press.

  645. #645 Chris
    October 16, 2011

    Excellent, Mr. Hit. Unfortunately Amazon removes all web addresses from the reviews. There are now some new tags on the page. Go take a look.

  646. #646 Prometheus
    October 17, 2011

    Justin (#628) asks Mr. Dochniak some very good questions, which I note Mr. Dochniak hasn’t bothered to answer. In the interest of time, let me try to field a few of them, based on what I have gleaned from Mr. Dochniak’s responses to previous questions.

    “Do you have a section in your book where you layout the shortcomings or the weaknesses in your hypothesis or the empirical/anecdotal evidence and scientific reasoning which you feel support your hypothesis? If so, could you elaborate on what you wrote(in your book), so that I can better understand your position?”

    Justin, until Mr. Dochniak started posting comments on this ‘blog, he didn’t know that his hypothesis had any weaknesses or shortcomings.

    “How would you design a research study(or series of studies) to test your hypothesis? Methodology?”

    Again, until he arrived here, Mr. Dochniak wasn’t aware that hypothesis testing was part of “research”, which is why he refers to himself as “…a leading researcher in allergy-induced regressive autism.”.

    Seriously, how can someone describe themselves as a “researcher” if they haven’t done any, you know, research? Mr. Dochniak, like so many Google-based scientist wanna-be’s, didn’t know that reading articles (or, based on some of Mr. Dochniak’s citations, reading only the title and part of the abstract) isn’t considered “research” after the undergraduate level.

    I’ve proposed ways that Mr. Dochniak could test his hypothesis without the effort and expense of a full-fledged clinical research study: for example, he could see if autistic children are more likely that non-autistic children to have latex allergies. Or, he could simply see if the sales data for latex-containing vaccines (those routinely given to children under three years of age) track the prevalence of autism over time.

    Of course, he hasn’t done any of that and – from what I have seen – he isn’t the slightest bit interested in doing anything that might contradict his hypothesis and harm his book sales.

    Oh, and let me anticipate Mr. Dochniak’s response, if he ever returns: “Read my book!”

    Prometheus

  647. #647 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 18, 2011

    Justin writes (#628), “So how would you test your hypothesis, so that you can meaningfully advance medical science in the realm of autism?”

    MjD’s response:

    In the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”, Chapter 11, page 74-75, describes a proactive approach to reduce the future incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism:

    1) Medical professionals will do blood tests before and after vaccinations, monitoring adaptive immunity;

    2) The expression of cytokines, IgE, and NGF will be monitored in children to help physicians and parents determine if a vaccine can be safely administered; and

    3) A child with an “atypical” adaptive immunity profile will be exempt from vaccinations if deemed appropriate.

    MjD

  648. #648 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 18, 2011

    That’s not the question you were asked, Dochniak. You were asked how you would test your hypothesis to determine whether it is true, not what sort of action you would take based on the blind, unreasoning assumption that it must be true.

  649. #649 Chris
    October 18, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  650. #650 MjDBot
    October 18, 2011

    Read my book. Did I tell you to read my book? Anyway, read my book.

  651. #651 Todd W.
    October 18, 2011

    Wait, so in order to reduce the risk of an as-yet unproven latex allergy-induced autism, medical professionals will do blood tests before and after every vaccination? Seriously? Since there is no evidence that latex allergies cause autism, these tests would not only be pointless; they would also be totally unethical, as they expose the child to greater risk of infection with no benefit.

    Wow. Just…wow.

    Now, Mr. D., where’s that evidence we keep asking you for? You know, the one that shows that latex allergies cause autism?

  652. #652 Prometheus
    October 18, 2011

    OK, I’ll bite…

    MjD (#632):

    “1) Medical professionals will do blood tests before and after vaccinations, monitoring adaptive immunity”

    Which blood tests will show that a child has a problem with adaptive immunity that will lead to a latex allergy?

    I’m not asking which blood tests will show that a child is susceptible to “allergy-induced autism”, since that hasn’t been shown to exist, I just want to know which “blood tests” Mr. Dochniak had in mind.

    You’ll note that I’m not holding my breath waiting for a clear answer. And please also note that vague and disjointed references to rodents don’t qualify as answers to this question.

    Prometheus

  653. #653 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 21, 2011

    Adaptive-Prometheus writes (#637), “…which blood tests will show that a child is susceptible to “allergy-induced autism”.

    MjD’s response:

    In the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”:

    Chapter 4 (Long Life), NGF over-expression linked to autism, page 23-24;

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11357950

    and

    A study has shown that circulating NGF levels are increased in humans with allergic diseases;

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC38265/

    Chapter 11 (Foreseeable Future), Cytokine ratio Il-13/Il-10, page 72-73, Research has shown that children with ASD had increased activation of both Th2 and Th1 arms of the adaptive immune response with Th2 predominance and without the compensatory increase in regulatory cytokine IL-10;

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16360218

    Thus, cytokine profile and NGF expression are two biomarkers that can be tested to evaluate if an infant may be safely vaccinated.

    MjD

  654. #654 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 21, 2011

    In the vaccine/autism article below, notice that the hand giving the vaccine is not wearing a natural-latex glove.

    Now it’s time to take natural-latex out of the vaccine packaging.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/09/29/140928470/worries-about-autism-link-still-hang-over-vaccines

    MjD

  655. #655 Gray Falcon
    October 21, 2011

    Also note that the hand does not have the markings of the Devil on it. Clearly, we should eliminate MjD the warlock.

  656. #656 Chris
    October 21, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  657. #657 Todd W.
    October 21, 2011

    @MjD

    In the vaccine/autism article below, notice that the hand giving the vaccine is not wearing a natural-latex glove.

    And this proves that latex allergies cause autism…how? You still have not answered that question, Mr. Dochniak.

  658. #658 Todd W.
    October 21, 2011

    The Cliff’s Notes version of the thread so far:

    MjD: Latex allergies cause autism. Buy my book.

    Reality-based People (RBP): What evidence do you have?

    MjD: Buy my book. It’s all there.

    RBP: Just provide a scientific article showing that latex allergies cause autism.

    MjD: Here’s a study [showing that people get latex allergies].

    RBP: That shows people can get latex allergies. We know that can happen. What it doesn’t show is that latex allergies cause autism.

    MjD: Here’s a study [showing that some autistic people also have a latex allergy].

    RBP: That shows that there are some people with autism who also have a latex allergy. What it doesn’t show is that latex allergies cause autism.

    MjD: Buy my book.

    [repeat ad nauseam]

  659. #659 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 21, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#643), “What it doesn’t show is that latex allergies cause autism”.

    MjD’s response:

    Denise H. Dunn (co-author) and I are showing how environmental insult (i.e., hevea-allergens) affect allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Within the autism spectrum, some individuals have exceptional cognitive skills while others have severe and pervasive impairment in thinking, feeling, language, and sociability.

    Researchers have proposed that the fraction of autistic individuals who meet the criteria for mental retardation has been reported from 25% to 70%.

    Reference:
    M. Dawson et al., “Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference”, Academic Press (2008): 759-72.

    This large range shows a staggering diversity and uncertainty. Atypical adaptive immunity is an aetiology that can encompass such variability.

    It is evident that atypical adaptive immunity from hevea-allergen tainted vaccines continues to affect the incidence of mental retardation in ASD.

    MjD

  660. #660 Gray Falcon
    October 21, 2011

    MjD, why can’t you just print your evidence here?

  661. #661 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 21, 2011

    Copious evidence shows that warlocks cannot answer simple questions and have a tendency to go annoyingly off-topic. The conclusion is therefore clear that all autism is caused by Michael J. Dochniak the warlock.

  662. #662 Todd W.
    October 21, 2011

    @MjD

    allergy-induced regressive autism

    That bit there is what you have yet to prove. Perhaps you should take some remedial reading courses to help you with your apparent lack of reading comprehension.

  663. #663 Chris
    October 21, 2011

    Gray Falcon:

    MjD, why can’t you just print your evidence here?

    Because it does not exist.

  664. #664 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 22, 2011

    Justin writes (#628), “”Do you have a section in your book where you layout the shortcomings or the weaknesses in your hypothesis or the empirical/anecdotal evidence and scientific reasoning which you feel support your hypothesis? If so, could you elaborate on what you wrote(in your book), so that I can better understand your position?”

    MjD’s response:

    Here’s a few question answered in the book:

    What is the protein standards for H. brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccine components and prefilled syringes?

    Is the natural-latex in vaccines ethical?

    For more information, see the book co-authored by Denise H. Dunn titled, “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    MjD

  665. #665 MjDBot
    October 22, 2011

    Read my book. Read my book. Don’t question me, just read my book.

  666. #666 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 22, 2011

    MjDBot writes (#650), “Don’t question me, just read my book”.

    MjD’s response:

    Read the book then question me would be more effective.

    Here’s a good question. What part of the book do you have a question on MjDBot?

    MjD

  667. #667 lilady
    October 22, 2011

    @ MjDbot: I think if is highly unusual for the troll to be taking all this time out of his busy “work day” and throughout the wee hours of the morning to be posting here. I am wondering about troll’s real source of income.

    Isn’t he a rubber adhesive salesman…or is he now retired…just waiting for the royalties to flow in from the sales of his (“read my”) books?

    Shouldn’t he be taking care of his “latex-injured” child?

    When is this “rubber going to hit the road?”

    And MjDbot…let us know when your book is published.

  668. #668 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 22, 2011

    lilady writes (#652), “Shouldn’t he be taking care of his “latex-injured” child?”

    MjD’s response:

    In 1998, the FDA added a warning on medical devices (e.g., vaccines)containing natural latex. In the 1990′s, my healthy and responsive child was damaged from medical devices tainted with the antigenic proteins from H. brasiliensis natural-latex and today is a severely mentally retarded (autistic) adult.

    When will the medical profession accept responsibility for the millions of children harmed from their ignorant use of natural latex?

    MjD

  669. #669 Prometheus
    October 22, 2011

    MjD:

    “When will the medical profession accept responsibility for the millions of children harmed from their ignorant use of natural latex?”

    When someone – maybe even MjD himself – shows data supporting the claim that “ignorant use of natural latex” has harmed “millions of children” – or even a few.

    So far, all we have are the armchair musings of two authors who have thoroughly demonstrated that they have a poor grasp of both biology and the scientific method. No matter how many times Mr. Dochniak repeats “read my book and then ask me questions”, the inherent flaws in his hypothesis will remain.

    At this point, a wise person would realise that they aren’t going to “pull one over” on this ‘blog’s readers and would either quietly disappear (“limit the damage”) or take the information they’ve received and fix their hypothesis. Only a fool would keep coming back here – day after day – thinking that “read my book” is an adequate response to the problems he has been shown.

    Mr. Dochniak’s response will tell us whether he is wise or foolish.

    Prometheus

  670. #670 lilady
    October 22, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak you are full of yourself and your theories…right from your website is the description of your son’s 2nd birthday party:

    “A time of anticipated celebration, a time of joy as brightly colored party balloons, wrapped gifts, paper plates, and inscribed napkins decorated picnic tables for family and friends gathered to share vanilla-frosted cake at Dain’s 2nd birthday. Dain playfully mouthed an inflated natural-latex balloon while others cheerfully watched and sang happy birthday. Within the balloon was an invasive danger that would soon severely threaten and change his life forever. Shortly after playing with the balloon, Dain’s health steadily regressed as his adaptive immune system recognized and attacked the natural-latex proteins that had transferred, through inhalation and dermal absorption, from the balloon and into his body. As the allergic response progressed and intensified his health worsened, frightened parents comforted their child as each labored breath failed to change the dark-purple color in his lips from oxygen starved blood. Rushed to the hospital emergency room, a nurse quickly injected adrenaline into his tiny shoulder. A mask supplied a steady stream of oxygen and intravenous tubes dripped essential fluids into his arm, rapidly turning his lips a safe pink color again allowing this atopic child to overcome a severe allergic reaction and live another day. Before leaving the hospital, a Doctor discussed his allergy situation. It was recommended that a nebulizer be used at home to relieve any recurrent asthmatic symptoms. The treatments helped his breathing but failed to address its underlying cause and progression – his adaptive immune system was hyper-active and out of control. Within a year, Dain would experience many more allergic manifestations and be diagnosed with Regressive Autism; thereafter helplessly locked forever in a world of behavioral atypicality.

    In the book titled, ‘Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’ Michael believes that vaccines contributed to his son’s allergy-induced regressive autism.”

    As I mentioned in my post at # 23 above your son did not have an allergic attack…he had an asthma attack and you were given a nebulizer for recurrent asthma symptoms…not an Epipen to prevent anaphylaxis. You don’t even know if it was the balloon, the powder in the balloon that he inhaled…or food served at his party that caused his asthma attack.

    Furthermore, at two years of age, your son would have had many injections of vaccines (MMR, DPT and perhaps hepatitis B) from vials with latex stoppers in syringes with latex plungers and never, according to you, showed signs of latex induced regression prior to the balloon incident.

    Isn’t about time you stop posting here with your totally inane pseudoscience theories, your bogus anecdotal history of your son’s regression and your shameless “read my books” campaign.

    Here’s a business plan for you; try posting at the Age of Autism website where they welcome any and all “theories” and would be only too willing to buy your books.

    And, for goodness sake, get a real job and in your “spare time” help with the care of your disabled son.

  671. #671 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 22, 2011

    Regressive-Prometheus writes (#654), “At this point, a wise person would realise that they aren’t going to “pull one over” on this ‘blog’s readers and would either quietly disappear (“limit the damage”) or take the information they’ve received and fix their hypothesis”.

    MjD’s response:

    Why should anyone believe you when you openly refuse to read the book “Vaccine Delivery asnd Autism – The Latex Connection”. Ignorance is bliss?

    MjD

  672. #672 Jen in TX
    October 22, 2011

    “Here’s a business plan for you; try posting at the Age of Autism website where they welcome any and all “theories”"

    Not “any and all,” actually. There is one theory in particular that they go out of their way to avoid talking about, because they don’t want to have to explain to their loyal readers the “big pharma” influence involved.

  673. #673 Gray Falcon
    October 22, 2011

    MjD, you have an idea. Nearly everybody has ideas. You can’t just expect us to throw money at you just for having an idea. You need to convince us it’s a good idea. Seeing as you don’t know the difference between asthma and allergies, you aren’t doing a good job.

  674. #674 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 22, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#658), “Seeing as you don’t know the difference between asthma and allergies, you aren’t doing a good job”.

    MjD’s response:

    Here’s some asthma/latex information you may want to read Gray Falcon:

    http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=21

    MjD

  675. #675 Chris
    October 22, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  676. #676 Gray Falcon
    October 22, 2011

    The site you linked to stated that the reaction to latex is an allergy. Your son had an asthma attack, not an allergic reaction. Then again, I can’t expect much from someone who thinks that a photo of someone not wearing gloves counts as evidence.

  677. #677 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 22, 2011

    Why should anyone believe you when you openly refuse to read the book “Vaccine Delivery asnd Autism – The Latex Connection”. Ignorance is bliss?

    Because you have succeeded in convincing everyone that your self-published book is a steaming pile of garbage, Michael. You. Prometheus posted just a couple of the flaws in your ‘hypothesis’ back in May. You’ve posted almost 150 comments since then, and not one of those comments has contained a satisfactory explanation for any of those flaws. It’s clear that you do not have a satisfactory explanation; reading the entire book to try and locate what you yourself cannot locate in it (an adequate rebuttal to the pointed-out flaws) would be ludicrous.

  678. #678 lilady
    October 22, 2011

    @ Gray Falcon: Nor can Dochniak “explain” why his son did not regress after his early childhood immunizations and why he didn’t go into anaphylactic shock when he received adrenaline from a vial with a latex port and with a syringe with a latex plunger…

    “Rushed to the hospital emergency room, a nurse quickly injected adrenaline into his tiny shoulder.”

  679. #679 Science Mom
    October 22, 2011

    Why should anyone believe you when you openly refuse to read the book “Vaccine Delivery asnd Autism – The Latex Connection”. Ignorance is bliss?

    Well you won’t actually let those of us who have requested your book to read it. Prometheus is a highly-respected commenter here with an excellent blog of his own that you know about; plenty of us believe his well-referenced posts because his information can be easily validated. Yours cannot. And that is because you think you can do an end-run around the scientific method. You and your co-author are a joke Mr. Dochniak.

  680. #680 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 22, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#664), “Prometheus is a highly-respected commenter here with an excellent blog of his own that you know about; plenty of us believe his well-referenced posts because his information can be easily validated”.

    MjD’s response:

    A photo in the darkness without a flash of light, when it comes to allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  681. #681 novalox
    October 22, 2011

    @mjd

    dochinak, going to the ad hominem now, now that you have been so thoroughly discredited?

    Why am I not surprised by your lack of class.

  682. #682 The Christian Cynic
    October 22, 2011

    An interesting evolution we have here: from shamelessly self-promoting troll to regular troll. (Boy, somebody’s got it in for Prometheus…)

    It’s also sort of impressive that the posts have actually gotten more substance-less – I figured there would be a threshold for that, but evidently not.

    By the way, I’m not a reader of Prometheus’s blog, but even I know that it’s “photon in the darkness.”

  683. #683 MjDBot
    October 23, 2011

    Don’t ask me questions, you bunch of meanyheads! Just read my book!

  684. #684 Narad
    October 23, 2011

    Don’t ask me questions, you bunch of meanyheads! Just read my book!

    This is no way to generate bot cred.

  685. #685 lilady
    October 23, 2011

    @ Narad: Stop picking on the bot…it merely states plain truth about Dochniak who really is a self-promoting silly troll.

  686. #686 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    The Christian Cynic writes (#667),”An interesting evolution we have here…”

    MjD’s response:

    Genetic research has shown us that our closest relative is the chimpanzee. It may be understood that humans are intellectually different than the Chimpanzee because of immunity. A study indicates that humans and chimpanzees have remarkably dissimilar adaptive immunity. For example, research at the University of California – San Diego has shown that human T-cells, which are an important orchestrator of the immune system, respond much more robustly than chimpanzee cells do.

    http://news.bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-3/T-cell-brakes-lost-during-human-evolution-5003-1/

    The intellectual progression of mankind rests on the shoulders of immunity.

    MjD

  687. #687 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 23, 2011

    It may be understood that humans are intellectually different than the Chimpanzee because of immunity.

    Apparently the spammer thinks that “It may be understood” is a synonym for “Someone out there has an unproven hypothesis.”

  688. #688 DW
    October 23, 2011

    Bot Ratings: October 2011

    MjDbot – a serviceable, meat-and-potatoes everyday bot: what you see is what you get. 4 of 10

    Th1Th2bot- its stylings have grandeur and sweep: far-ranging poetic anomie with just a touch of heart-rending pathos- thankfully un-rhymed. Bots like these fairly rival flesh-and-blood scribblers’ verve: I like. 9.5 of 10

  689. #689 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    The blog “Just the Vax” by Catherine and Science Mom writes,

    “Vaccine refusers turn their children into potential murder weapons”

    http://justthevax.blogspot.com/
    (Saturday, October 22, 2011 post)

    MjD’s response:

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning and help reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  690. #690 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 23, 2011

    I like the way that the spammer includes the text that he’s responding to, so everyone can see just what an irrelevant and indequate response it is.

  691. #691 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    A quote:

    It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change. – Charles Darwin

    It’s time to change the way medical science vaccinates children.

    Immunity of Life
    Pre-vaccination, keeping baby safe from regression
    Test before injection
    Immunoglobulins in blood, neurotrophin in saliva
    Cytokines and androgen expression

    MjD

  692. #692 Gray Falcon
    October 23, 2011

    MjD, you’ve been going on for months, and you still have not answered any of our questions. What are you honestly hoping to accomplish? Are you unaware of how human society works?

  693. #693 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#93), “It has been illuminating to see that there are environmental niches of autism crankery that I had not previously even heard of. I thank you for this, Orac, and also Mr. Dochniak”

    MjD’s response:

    The threshold of sensitivity to the hevea-allergens is unknown. It’s time for medical science, and government agencies entrusted to assure vaccine safety, to completely abolish the use of H. brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccine packaging.

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning and help reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  694. #694 Todd W.
    October 23, 2011

    @MjD

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning and help reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism increase the risk of epidemics of preventable diseases.

    Fixed that for you. You see, that’s what would happen. What you suggest instead has no evidence. At least, you haven’t presented any.

    I’m almost starting to think that Dochniak just has a script to auto-reply to any posts on this thread, since he never seems to address the actual content of what he’s responding to.

  695. #695 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#677), “What are you honestly hoping to accomplish?”

    MjD’s response:

    Specifically, atypical adaptive-immunity in children can cause allergy-induced regressive autism. More specifically, environmental insult (e.g., natural latex) and vaccinations (Th2 shift) are comorbid factors in the aetiology of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    The message is loud and clear, put your hearing aid on Prometheus: REFUSE VACCINES THAT HAVE A LATEX WARNING.

    MjD

  696. #696 Todd W.
    October 23, 2011

    atypical adaptive-immunity in children can cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Citation needed.

    REFUSE VACCINES THAT HAVE A LATEX WARNING.

    Why? You’ve given no justification to do so.

    Here is a question for you to answer before you answer any others: why do you not answer our request for evidence that latex allergies cause autism? If you cannot provide evidence, just say so!

  697. #697 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#679), “Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning and help increase the risk of epidemics of preventable diseases”

    MjD’s response:

    Prometheus would disagree with your statement. I think he would?

    Simply request latex-free vaccines and I strongly suggest reducing infant exposure to H. brasiliensis natural-latex.

    MjD

  698. #698 Todd W.
    October 23, 2011

    @MjD

    Way to dodge my more pertinent question, there, Mike.

  699. #699 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    Artk writes (#68), “Most importantly, you need a plausible mechanism that connects allergic reactions to autism. Followed by research confirming that connection. Then you can start asking about the latex being carried along with the injection being a cause”

    MjD’s response:

    A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957522

    MjD

  700. #700 Chris
    October 23, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  701. #701 Prometheus
    October 23, 2011

    MjD (#682):

    “Prometheus would disagree with your statement. I think he would?”

    I find it odd that Mr. Dochniak – far all that he tries to denigrate me in his pathetic little way – has repeatedly tried to put words in my mouth to support his arguments.

    Mr. Dochniak, if your arguments won’t stand on their own (hint: they don’t), claiming that I would agree with you doesn’t make them any stronger. Have you forgotten that you’ve made several attempts to ridicule me and show how little I know compared to your own towering intellect?

    As so many people on this ‘blog (including me) have stated, your hypotheses have some critical flaws that you need to address. Your book – since it is, as you have repeatedly said, based on these flawed hypotheses – must be equally flawed.

    Why should anyone pay even $9.95 to read a book whose own author has admitted is based on flawed reasoning and no data?

    If there’s something in your book that will change that assessment, Mr. Dochniak, the time to bring it forward was months ago. What you’ve done, instead, is try to convince us that – all evidence to the contrary – you know more about biology and scientific method than your comments have revealed. Your own words have been the most hostile witnesses against you.

    You no doubt feel that I’ve been unfair and overly hard on you, which accounts for your juvenile insults. These are complaints I hear from many students I’ve had to give D’s and F’s in my classes. If you want to see how well your hypotheses fare in an “unbiased” forum, I suggest that you condense them to a few pages and submit them to a peer-reviewed journal (hint: Medical Hypotheses isn’t peer-reviewed).

    You might want to develop a thicker skin before doing that, Mr. Dochniak, because peer-review is not for the faint of heart or the fragile of ego. I know this because I’ve been through it many times.

    Prometheus

  702. #702 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 23, 2011

    That study is at best “interesting,” rather than convincing, for reasons that were explained back in May.

  703. #703 Chris
    October 23, 2011

    Prometheus:

    Why should anyone pay even $9.95 to read a book whose own author has admitted is based on flawed reasoning and no data?

    Perhaps some more voting on the tags at Amazon?

  704. #704 Narad
    October 23, 2011

    Bot Ratings: October 2011

    Speaking as the Th1Th2bot’s operator, I am grateful for the compliment, but I must note that there is a duty in this capacity, which was my (perhaps too elliptical) observation: there is a point of honor in scrupulously hewing to actual auto-generated text. Now, I’m not going to get the American Guild of Variety Bots involved, since this would probably just lead to trying to parse the anachronistic jabbering of the GompersBot sooner or later, but the MjDbot, having expanded upon the vocabulary of its domain, is either extremely sophisticated or using scab nonbot labor.

  705. #705 Science Mom
    October 23, 2011

    The blog “Just the Vax” by Catherine and Science Mom writes,

    “Vaccine refusers turn their children into potential murder weapons”

    http://justthevax.blogspot.com/
    (Saturday, October 22, 2011 post)

    Yea and?

  706. #706 dedicated lurker
    October 23, 2011

    As the operator of the MjD bot, I don’t have nearly enough material to work with as the Th bot, and thus am outsourcing.

  707. #707 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 23, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#686), “You might want to develop a thicker skin before doing that, Mr. Dochniak, because peer-review is not for the faint of heart or the fragile of ego”

    MjD’s response:

    Andrew J. Wakefield (Autism Researcher) says, “I continue to fully support more independent research to determine if environmental triggers, including vaccines, are causing autism and other developmental problems. The current rate of autism is 1 in 110 in the United States and 1 in 64 children in the U.K. My goal has always been and will remain the health and safety of children. Since the Lancet paper, I have lost my job, my career and my country. To claim that my motivation was profit is patently untrue. I will not be deterred – this issue is far too important.”

    Vaccines induced autism peer-reviewed or non-peer-reviewed papers are equally dangerous in my opinion.

    Thank goodness for freedom of speech.

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  708. #708 novalox
    October 23, 2011

    @mjd

    OK, I think we can officially say that mjd is a total nutter, if he is going to use wakefield as a source.

    Now, excuse me, as I laugh at your pathetic excuse for a cite.

    And you still haven’t addressed any of the questions that Prometheus and any of the other posters have addressed.

  709. #709 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    As a follow-up to message #692:

    Several years ago I worked as a Staff Scientist at a Biotechnology Company called Segetis Corp.(MN).

    The founder had an advanced degree in genetics. After reading the Medical Hypotheses paper titled, “Autism Spectrum Disorders – Exogenous Protein Insult” he told me to stop blaming others for autism because it was genetic.

    I was fired shortly thereafter.

    My point being, non peer-reviewed papers are also dangerous.

    MjD

  710. #710 Chris
    October 24, 2011

    from the person who writes in third person:

    My point being, non peer-reviewed papers are also dangerous.

    Ya think? The third person commentator has only written in a non-peer-reviewed paper and a self published paper. He has refused to refuse to answer what the actual evidence shows allergies (especially to latex) lead to autism.

  711. #711 W. Kevin Vicklund
    October 24, 2011

    My point being, non peer-reviewed papers are also dangerous.

    A prime example of a non-peer-reviewed paper being dangerous is “Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection).”

  712. #712 Chris
    October 24, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak has refused to answer what the actual evidence shows allergies (especially to latex) lead to autism.

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  713. #713 lilady
    October 24, 2011

    “Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…”

    Chris…it only seem like forever….

  714. #714 LW
    October 24, 2011

    “Vaccines induced autism peer-reviewed or non-peer-reviewed papers are equally dangerous in my opinion.”

    I’m trying to parse this as an English sentence and failing. This makes me even more disinclined to read his book.

  715. #715 Rev.Enki
    October 24, 2011

    Anyone want to make some money? Glass can be said to contain “negative ions,” including the highly reactive noncovalent oxygen, which is what oxygen becomes when it goes bad. Would you inject negative ions, or rotten oxygen into *your* child? Hmm? Now, vaccines sometimes come in glass bottles. You do the math/write the book/etc. And don’t even get me started about plastics in syringes. Or do, since I pretty desperately need money too.

  716. #716 Calli Arcale
    October 24, 2011

    LW — exactly what struck me; Donchiak appears to be making progressively less sense, and that particular comment made almost negative sense. I really haven’t the slightest idea what he’s trying to say.

    His out-of-left-field comment about chimpanzees being less intelligent than human due to immune system differences boggles the mind as well. (Really? Their immune system is the only thing different? I guess it also explains why they have so much hair, can pull half a ton without breaking a sweat, and have such short legs and such long toes. It must be the immune system, ergo latex causes autism. Somehow.)

  717. #717 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    Here’s a quote for Respectful-Insolence the Scienceblog:

    As knowledge grows science must increasingly become the stimulus to imagination. – Edward O. Wilson

    Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection

    http://www.amazon.com/Vaccine-Delivery-Autism-Latex-Connection/dp/1456570056

    MjD

  718. #718 squirrelelite
    October 24, 2011

    You’re right, Michael.

    There’s nothing the world that can compare with pure imagination.

  719. #719 Gray Falcon
    October 24, 2011

    Seen in the discussion forums for his book: “Why is Hevea brasiliensis dry natural rubber in vaccines?” Answer: “Because the allergens in this rubber increase the sales of allergy medication,” from Michael J. Dochniak. As far as I can tell, the concept of evidence is utterly alien to him.

  720. #720 Prometheus
    October 24, 2011

    MjD (#671):

    “Genetic research has shown us that our closest relative is the chimpanzee. It may be understood that humans are intellectually different than the Chimpanzee because of immunity. A study indicates that humans and chimpanzees have remarkably dissimilar adaptive immunity. For example, research at the University of California – San Diego has shown that human T-cells, which are an important orchestrator of the immune system, respond much more robustly than chimpanzee cells do.”

    When I went to the citation Mr. Dochniak provided, was amazed to find that the news report he cited (and the PNAS article it was reporting on) said nothing about any connection between immunity and intellectual ability. (Nguyen et al, Loss of Siglec expression on T-cells during human evolution, PNAS May 16, 2006; vol. 103, no. 20, pp 7765-7770) Mr. Dochniak’s description of the findings as “…human T-cells…respond much more robustly than chimpanzee cells do.” is also overly generalised and simplistic – I refer readers to the original article (cited above) which is available free on-line.

    MjD (#694):

    “The founder had an advanced degree in genetics. After reading the Medical Hypotheses paper titled, ‘Autism Spectrum Disorders – Exogenous Protein Insult’ he told me to stop blaming others for autism because it was genetic.

    I was fired shortly thereafter.

    My point being, non peer-reviewed papers are also dangerous.”

    The word Mr. Dochniak is searching for is “consequences”. Being a “Brave Maverick Doctor” (e.g. Andrew Wakefield) or a “Brave Maverick Armchair ‘Researcher’” has consequences if you are wrong and fail to recognise it. Science doesn’t punish error – it expects error and has an extensive mechanism to recognise and correct error. What it doesn’t tolerate is fraud ( Andrew Wakefield) or people who refuse to recognise their errors (e.g. Michael Dochniak).

    I have – on occasion – made errors in my scientific work or in the conclusions I drew from that work. I have been fortunate that only one of these errors actually made it into print (followed in few months by my erratum). Peer review, both before and after publication, keeps me on my toes and shows me where I was blind to errors, real or potential. Peer review has saved me – repeatedly – from making an ass of myself in public.

    Mr. Dochniak, on the other hand, seems to see peer review as a sort of gauntlet that must be run and resisted, a group of ignorant people trying to kill off “the truth” before it has a chance to grow.

    While the circumstances surrounding Mr. Dochniak’s firing remain obscure, I can’t help wondering if his employer, upon reading the Medical Hypotheses article, decided that Mr. Dochniak wasn’t sufficiently aware of scientific method (and his own limitations) to be an asset to the firm.

    I’ve had a similar situation, where a student on rotation through our lab expressed his firm belief in “Intelligent Design”. When the time came to decide who to accept as a student, I couldn’t see his belief fitting well with the work our lab does, so I declined his application. That is the “danger” (I would say “consequence”) of persisting in error. You are free to believe what you want, but you aren’t necessarily free of the consequences of those beliefs.

    Again, Mr. Dochniak whinges that nobody takes him or his ideas seriously enough to read his book while steadfastly refusing to explain how he reconciles his hypotheses with the contradictory data. The few citations he has provided don’t support his claims – in fact, are often not even related to his claims – giving the impression, at least, that he hasn’t read (or understood) them.

    As I said earlier, a wise man would take these critiques and use them to refine, revise or reconsider his hypotheses. A fool would continue to rant against the unfairness of having to support his assertions.

    Which path will Mr. Dochinak take?

    Prometheus

  721. #721 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    Prometheus writes, (#705), “The few citations he has provided don’t support his claims – in fact, are often not even related to his claims”.

    MjD’s response:

    It’s unfortunate that Prometheus rejected the invitation by Michael Dochniak to submit a citizen peition to the FDA in an effort to ban the use of H. brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccine packaging (#449).

    In the contrary, Prometheus is trying to convince some that vaccines contaminated with the hevea-allergens from natural-latex is not an issue.

    Do something about it Prometheus! For example, request the FDA to remove latex warnings on vaccines that have natural-latex in their packaging. Is your skin thick enough?

    MjD

  722. #722 Chris
    October 24, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  723. #723 Narad
    October 24, 2011

    As knowledge grows science must increasingly become the stimulus to imagination. – Edward O. Wilson

    The boundary line between self and external world bears no relation to reality – Norman O. Brown

  724. #724 Todd W.
    October 24, 2011

    It appears Dochniak is suffering from some sort of dissociative disorder. He’s started referring to himself in the third person. He is also prone to black-and-white thinking, interpreting criticism of his unproven latex-autism connection as meaning that latex has no down side at all (i.e., either latex is horrible, horrible, horrible or it is all happy sunshine).

    No one, least of all Prometheus, has suggested that latex is 100% completely safe for every person on Earth.

    Stop dodging, Michael. Provide evidence to support your claim that latex allergies cause autism. If you cannot, then shut up.

  725. #725 Prometheus
    October 24, 2011

    MjD (#706):

    “It’s unfortunate that Prometheus rejected the invitation by Michael Dochniak to submit a citizen peition to the FDA in an effort to ban the use of H. brasiliensis natural-latex in vaccine packaging (#449).”

    MjD = Michael Dochniak, doesn’t it? Then why is Mr. Dochniak referring to himself in the third person? And why would MjD or Michael Dochniak think – for even one minute – that I would support a quixotic crusade to ban latex without having at least some coherent support for claims that it causes autism?

    “In [sic] the contrary, Prometheus is trying to convince some that vaccines contaminated with the hevea-allergens from natural-latex is [sic] not an issue.”

    On the contrary, I’m not doing the convincing, the data are doing the convincing – I’m simply reporting them.

    “Do something about it Prometheus! For example, request the FDA to remove latex warnings on vaccines that have natural-latex in their packaging. Is your skin thick enough?”

    As has been mentioned – repeatedly – the latex warnings on vaccines are there because some people have anaphylactic reactions to latex. To the best of my knowledge, there have not been any reports of anaphylactic reactions after receiving an injection from a latex-stoppered vial, but it remains a reasonable precaution, especially as there are non-latex alternatives.

    Mr. Dochniak seems to think that an FDA-mandated label warning of latex-containing stoppers is support for his claim that latex causes autism. This is, of course, pure nonsense. There are FDA-mandated labels warning that foods might contain or be contaminated with nuts – does that mean nuts cause autism? There are labels warning people not to put their hands, feet or head into the opening of a snowblower – does that mean snowblowers cause autism? [Note: that would explain why the prevalence of autism is so high in Minnesota.]

    This “response” (more accurately, “non sequitur“) is just the latest in a long, long train of non-answers and irrational rationales we’ve gotten from Mr. Dochniak. I despair of ever getting a straight answer – apart from “Read my book!”.

    Prometheus

  726. #726 LW
    October 24, 2011

    MjD (#694):

    The founder had an advanced degree in genetics. After reading the Medical Hypotheses paper titled, ‘Autism Spectrum Disorders – Exogenous Protein Insult’ he told me to stop blaming others for autism because it was genetic.

    I was fired shortly thereafter.

    My point being, non peer-reviewed papers are also dangerous.

    Prometheus charitably accepts the implication that there is a cause and effect relationship. I’m more inclined to wonder if MjD is indulging in more post hoc ergo propter hoc. Can you imagine having to work with someone like MjD?

  727. #727 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#709), “No one, least of all Prometheus, has suggested that latex is 100% completely safe for every person on Earth”.

    MjD’s response:

    Thank you!

    All parents, refuse vaccines that have a latex warning. Your child is our next generation.

    MjD

  728. #728 Todd W.
    October 24, 2011

    @MjD

    Thanks for what? Giving you something to quote out of context?

    Where is your evidence, Michael? Put up or shut up!

  729. #729 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#713), “Thanks for what?”

    MjD’s response:

    Thanks for giving me insight into how Prometheus feels about the hazards of natural latex (#709).

    My perception has been that Prometheus is fine with latex warnings on vaccines in that the needs of the many through herd immunity far outweight the needs of others whom will be harmed from such vaccines.

    Todd W., can you tell me if professor Prometheus really gives out D’s and F’s to many of his students like he says?

    MjD

  730. #730 Todd W.
    October 24, 2011

    @MjD

    Please present evidence to support your claim that latex allergies cause autism.

  731. #731 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    The collision theory of reaction rates teaches us that an important variable to covalent and non-covalent bond formation is the concentration of the reactants, affecting collision frequency.

    Simply, the more reactants there are the more likely a bond will occur.

    This bond formation mechanism doesn’t always apply to adaptive immunity wherein “few” allergens can induce an intense immune reaction.

    Within adaptive immunity there is a chemical intelligence wherein immune cells recognize and attack even minute quantities of an allergen, sometimes producing anaphylactic shock.

    All infants who have been exposed to the hevea-allergens in vaccines are at risk in that re-exposure increases the probability of an adverse allergic reaction.

    MjD

  732. #732 Chris
    October 24, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  733. #733 Narad
    October 24, 2011

    @dedicated lurker:

    The Th1Th2bot runs on a Dadadodo 1.04 platform. Given that MJD seems to have gone completely around the bend (“the collision theory of reaction rates,” etc.), it might be worth taking a look at for the MjDBot. Straightforward ANSI C, snap to compile.

  734. #734 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 24, 2011

    Todd W. writes (#713), “Put up or shut up!”

    MjD’s response:

    What part or section of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” do you have a question on?

    Please provide Chapter and page # with your question.

    MjD

  735. #735 Chris
    October 24, 2011

    The chapter and page that has evidence that allergies, specifically latex allergies, cause autism. Plus list all of the independent papers you use to support the connection.

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  736. #736 Todd W.
    October 24, 2011

    @MjD

    Please present evidence to support your claim that latex allergies cause autism.

  737. #737 Prometheus
    October 25, 2011

    MjD (#716):

    “All infants who have been exposed to the hevea-allergens in vaccines are at risk in that re-exposure increases the probability of an adverse allergic reaction.”

    Even if true, “allergic reaction” ≠ autism

    Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends

    We’re so glad you could attend

    Come inside! Come inside!

    Would someone please come get me if Mr. Dochniak ever provides some data to support his claims?

    Prometheus

  738. #738 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 25, 2011
  739. #739 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 25, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#722), “Would someone please come get me if Mr. Dochniak ever provides some data to support his claims?”

    MjD’s response:

    Orac mistakingly placed the subject of this blog under the category “Antivaccination lunacy”. This has clouded your judgement Prometheus to such an extent that you openly refuse to read the information provided in the book.

    Would it help if the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” was put on audio tape?

    That way you could simply listen, hearing aid not privided, to the data presented in the book.

    MjD

  740. #740 Chris
    October 25, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  741. #741 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 25, 2011

    And just when we thought he’d sunk as low as he was gonna go, Dochniak starts making ableist attacks on Prometheus! I wouldn’t be surprised at this point if Dochniak took a random guess at Prometheus’ ethnic heritage and started using ethnic slurs based on that random guess.

    And yes, “Antivaccination lunacy” is absolutely the right category for Dochniak’s nonsense.

  742. #742 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 25, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar writes (#725), “And yes, “Antivaccination lunacy” is absolutely the right category for Dochniak’s nonsense”

    MjD’s response:

    Allergy-induced regressive autism from vaccinations is just the tip of the iceberg.

    Research has shown that the odds of having a history of asthma were twice as great among vaccinated subjects compared to unvaccinated subjects. Furthermore, the odds of having any allergy-related respiratory symptom was 63% greater among vaccinated subjects compared to unvaccinated subjects.

    W. Atkinson et al., eds., Epidemiology and Prevetion of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (The Pink Book), 6th ed. (Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2000)

    MjD

  743. #743 Chris
    October 25, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  744. #744 Chris
    October 25, 2011

    Oh, and more recent research (the CDC Pink Book is up to the 12th edition):

    Schmitz R, Poethko-Müller C, Reiter S, Schlaud M:
    Vaccination status and health in children and adolescents—findings of the German health interview and examination survey for children and adolescents
    (KiGGS). Dtsch Arztebl Int 2011; 108(7): 99–104.
    DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2011.0099

    and

    Do vaccines modify the prevalence of asthma and allergies?
    Sánchez-Solis M, García-Marcos L.
    Expert Rev Vaccines. 2006 Oct;5(5):631-40.

  745. #745 Reuben
    October 25, 2011

    Research has shown that the odds of having a history of asthma were twice as great among vaccinated subjects compared to unvaccinated subjects.

    Hmmm… Could it be that those with a history of asthma are more likely to get vaccines to prevent complications from respiratory infections and their asthma? Or are you claiming that vaccines cause asthma, because you’ll need some actual evidence for that bit of crazy.

  746. #746 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 25, 2011

    The text that Dochniak attributes to the Pink Book is actually from a paper by E.L. Hurwitz (a chiropractor very deeply involved with the NCCAM) and H. Morgenstern. It was in fact published in “Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics”, which describes itself as “dedicated to the advancement of chiropractic health care,” which really invites the question of why they would even publish a paper on vaccines and respiratory symptoms, since none of that falls under the purview of the science-based version of chiropractic health care. Interestingly, I can’t find any evidence that the paper ever made it into any version of the Pink Book; anyone else able to confirm/deny?

  747. #747 Chris
    October 25, 2011

    Yes, I checked the Pink Book and the papers by Atkinson in its bibliography. No mention of vaccines causing asthma.

  748. #748 lilady
    October 25, 2011

    Dochniak…Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire:

    How dare you attribute a pseudoscience study to any edition of the CDC Pink Book.

    Here for your perusal is Bill Atkinson, M.D. M.P.H. and his credentials. I’ve attended yearly immunization update teleconferences that he conducts on behalf of the CDC. He is well known in public health in the United States and internationally and has authored numerous papers on vaccines and has is one of the physicians who contributes to the AAP Red Book as well as the CDC Pink Book…all editions:

    William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH
    National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC
    Dr. Atkinson, a medical epidemiologist, develops technical and training materials for immunization providers and conducts training on vaccine-preventable diseases. His previous responsibilities at CDC included national measles surveillance, investigation, and vaccine consultation. He has conducted numerous vaccine research projects, served as a consultant to the World Health Organization, and published numerous articles and book chapters.

    I’ve read cover-to-cover every edition of the CDC Pink Book and for the past 20 years and never saw any pseudoscience studies that Dochniak refers to.

  749. #749 Narad
    October 25, 2011

    and
    Do vaccines modify the prevalence of asthma and allergies?

    I’m not sure that abstract says what you hope it does, MJD.

  750. #750 W. Kevin Vicklund
    October 25, 2011

    Narad – that’s because Chris was the person who brought it up.

  751. #751 Narad
    October 25, 2011

    Narad – that’s because Chris was the person who brought it up.

    Oh, that’s embarrassing. Sorry.

  752. #752 Chris
    October 25, 2011

    Actually, Narad, I thought you mentioned it to make him look. It is a very interestingly worded abstract.

  753. #753 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 26, 2011

    Side note: Sherri Tenpenny really likes citing the 6th edition Pink Book; I wonder if she’s where Dochniak got his false idea that the antivax statistics he cited were from the Pink Book instead of a chiropractor reaching way outside his field of competence?

  754. #754 Chris
    October 26, 2011

    Antaeus Feldspar:

    Side note: Sherri Tenpenny really likes citing the 6th edition Pink Book

    That makes sense, since the quoted part is not in any recent Pink Book, and the cite was totally screwed up.

  755. #755 Prometheus
    October 26, 2011

    MjD (#723):

    first link: Mr. Dochniak’s Medical Hypotheses “pay-to-play” article. I’ve read it – no data.

    second link: Shen et al (2011) – alread deconstructed in comment #93; it’s a case series of autism in a single family (hint: familial autism is a known phenomenon).

    third link: Mr. Dochniak’s first book. “Read my book!”

    fourth link: Mr. Dochniak’s second book. “Read my book!”

    Is this the best you can do, Mr. Dochniak? That’s what I’ve been forced to conclude, since it is all you ever bring to the table.

    MjD (#724):

    “Would it help if the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” was put on audio tape?”

    I don’t like audio books because I can read much faster than a narrator can read aloud. My main reason for not wanting to read Mr. Dochniak’s book is that I have only a limited amount of time for recreational reading. I don’t see anything in Mr. Dochniak’s argument (here or in his Medical Hypotheses article or his first book) that suggests his hypothesis is anything more than armchair musing about how this might be connected to that, with no data and no understanding of how biology actually works. I can get that by reading freshman biology midterm exams, which is part of my job.

    Once again, Mr. Dochniak shows that he is hurt by my refusal to take his hypothesis seriously, which is an important first step for him. If he can get past the embarrassment and use the criticism to re-evaluate his hypothesis, he might actually make some progress.

    It all hinges on his ability to look beyond his ego and use the lessons he’s been given. It would mean repudiating the two books he’s written based on this false hypothesis, which is going to take some courage. Not too many people can reverse course after so publicly staking out a position, and I’m not sure Mr. Dochniak is up to the task.

    Welcome back my friends

    To the show that never ends.

    We’re glad you could attend!

    Come inside! Come inside!

    Prometheus

  756. #756 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 26, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#740), “Prometheus”

    MjD’s response:

    Who is Prometheus?

    What’s your real name Prometheus?

    If you want to remain anonymous that’s fine. But understand this:

    When vaccine packaging contains H.brasiliensis natural-latex, hevea-allergens can contaminate that vaccine.

    MjD

  757. #757 Chris
    October 26, 2011

    And what evidence do you have that it causes autism? Just post the journal, title, date and authors of the papers that supports your contention that latex allergies cause autism.

  758. #758 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 26, 2011

    Chris writes (#742), “And what evidence do you have that it causes autism?”

    MjD’s response:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957522

    Stay in touch, there’s more to come.

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  759. #759 Todd W.
    October 26, 2011

    @MjD

    Posting the same study over and over, especially when it has been thoroughly dissected, is a bit foolish, IMO. Stop being a fool, Michael. Provide actual evidence.

  760. #760 Chris
    October 26, 2011

    I am wondering if Mr. Dochniak has developed some kind of mental illness. It is like he cannot understand the responses. Prometheus already told him that cite was worthless:

    second link: Shen et al (2011) – alread deconstructed in comment #93; it’s a case series of autism in a single family (hint: familial autism is a known phenomenon).

    Yet he keeps repeating it. And, Mr. Dochniak, I hate to tell you this, but a single case study is not proof. You need something that shows it happens more than once and specifically tied to vaccines, not to a family that works with latex.

  761. #761 Prometheus
    October 26, 2011

    MjD (#741):

    “What’s your real name Prometheus?”

    I decided to post anonymously (but not with sock-puppets) some years ago after receiving threats to my children from “vaccines-cause-autism” advocates. My “real name” isn’t relevant, as I’m not asking you to trust what I say based on my position as a recognised authority.

    “If you want to remain anonymous that’s fine.”

    So why bring it up?

    “But understand this:

    When vaccine packaging contains H.brasiliensis natural-latex, hevea-allergens can contaminate that vaccine.”

    Yes, I read that article – the questions that remain are:

    [1] Is the “contamination” with latex proteins clinically significant; does it cause latex allergy or can it trigger a reaction in people with documented severe latex allergies?

    [2] Does latex “contamination” of vaccines cause autism?

    The answer to both questions is the same – “unknown”. Your repeated assertions do not consitute even a single data point.

    Perhaps I need to be clear about this, Mr. Dochniak: I’m not saying that I know you’re wrong, I’m saying that you haven’t shown you’re right – not even close.

    Oh, and before you say that it’s my responsibility to show that you’re wrong, you’re wrong about that, too. You made the claim; you need to provide the support (and you haven’t).

    I can sit in my armchair and come up with no end of “possible” causes for autism or any other ailment or social ill, but that doesn’t make them correct and it doesn’t shift the burden of proof to anyone but me.

    If that makes you want to lash out at me – something that my anonymity makes more difficult – remember that it’s also not my fault that your hypothesis is full of holes. I didn’t make the holes – I just pointed them out.

    Maybe you ought to stick to forums where your ideas are accepted uncritically, Mr. Dochniak; the sort of skeptical give-and-take found on this ‘blog doesn’t seem to be your cup of tea. I’m not telling you to go, but I don’t get the impression you are enjoying this exchange.

    Prometheus

  762. #762 Scottynuke
    October 26, 2011

    @Prometheus:

    On the contrary, MJD gets to regularly shriek, “Buy my book!!” to his heart’s content, so he’s likely quite satisified to continue riding this merry-go-round.

    Come inside
    The Show’s about to start
    Guaranteed
    To blow your head apart (if you actually listen to MJD)

  763. #763 Science Mom
    October 26, 2011

    I think I can see why Mr. Dochniak may have lost his job and has nothing to do with showing his superior his Medical Hypotheses publication.

  764. #764 Gray Falcon
    October 26, 2011

    I get the feeling that MjD really thinks he’s providing evidence for his claims. Never mind that his statements are equivalent to the following syllogism:
    A) Guns can kill people.
    B) Mr. Smith owns a gun.
    C) Therefore Mr. Smith killed Mr. Jones.
    In this case, he’s using that line of reasoning even though Mr. Jones is still alive.

  765. #765 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 26, 2011

    I think I can see why Mr. Dochniak may have lost his job and has nothing to do with showing his superior his Medical Hypotheses publication.

    Indeed, Science Mom. In fact, I don’t think it’s stretching the truth to say that today’s job interviews ask questions designed to detect applicants like Dochniak before they are hired and their mental/emotional problems wreak havoc.

    One of the standard questions interviewers ask now is “Tell me about a time when you made a mistake.” The intent is to weed out those people whose egos do not let them accept that they have made mistakes and learn from those mistakes. Is there any doubt Dochniak is among them? He is still flogging the Shen study as support for his supposition that allergies can cause autism even though it was pointed out back in May that their only support for the idea that allergies can cause autism comes from him. A person who cannot or will not abandon the use of circular logic after five months is a job candidate who should be advised to seek employment elsewhere as soon as possible. I highly commend Dochniak’s former employer for having done so.

  766. #766 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 26, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#746), “I’m not telling you to go, but I don’t get the impression you are enjoying this exchange”.

    MjD’s response:

    Respectful Insolence is a great Scienceblog and almost everyone’s opinion is coherent.

    Infants can’t speak but some caring adults try to speak on their behalf. For example, Jennifer Worth wrote an interesting paper on neo-natal sensitization to Latex.

    http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cjne/1999/00000009/00000004/art00006

    MjD

  767. #767 Chris
    October 26, 2011

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  768. #768 Mrs. Woo
    October 26, 2011

    I’ve read all of this with interest. I know I’m nowhere NEAR as educated as most of you, but MjD I always thought a “hypothesis” was a kind of science-y word for “theory?”

    In other words, it doesn’t state that it is proven, etc., but rather is just a proposed possibility. I don’t have the nearly $50.00 to read it to see if the writer asserts by suggesting such thing that it is immediately proven on its face (unlike what you do here), but rather, there is some correlation and that it might be something to further research and prove or disprove.

    But, I might actually be rather ignorant in all of this and hypothesis DOES equal proven fact.

    Humbly,
    Mrs. Woo

  769. #769 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 26, 2011

    Mr. Feldspar writes (#750), “A person who cannot or will not abandon the use of circular logic after five months is a job candidate who should be advised to seek employment elsewhere as soon as possible. I highly commend Dochniak’s former employer for having done so”.

    MjD’s response:

    I’m still looking for a decent job. Anyone interested? By the way, an investor in Segetis Corp. recently apologized to me about what happened.

    Enough about that…

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  770. #770 Prometheus
    October 26, 2011

    MjD (#751):

    “For example, Jennifer Worth wrote an interesting paper on neo-natal sensitization to Latex.”

    Yes, she did – about twelve years ago.

    Worth J. Neonatal sensitisation to latex: a hypothesis. Paediatr. Nurs. 1999 Nov;11(9):6-9.

    Worth J. Neonatal sensitization to latex: a medical hypothesis. J. Nutr. Environ. Med.1999 Dec; 9(4):305-312

    Worth J. Neonatal sensitization to latex. Med. Hypotheses. 2000 May; 54(5):729-33.

    Nothing since 2000 that I can find. Then, of course, we have:

    Dochniak J. Autism spectrum disorders – exogenous protein insult. Med. Hypotheses. 2007; 69(3):545-9.

    Mr. Dochniak, did you read Ms. Worth’s article? I note that you didn’t cite it in your Medical Hypotheses paper.

    It’s a speculation paper – like Dochniak (2007) – and has pretty much the same flaws the Dochniak paper has.

    Prometheus

  771. #771 Antaeus Feldspar
    October 26, 2011

    I’ve read all of this with interest. I know I’m nowhere NEAR as educated as most of you, but MjD I always thought a “hypothesis” was a kind of science-y word for “theory?”

    Great question, Mrs. Woo. The answer unfortunately is kind of complicated, because the words have conventional meanings (how they’re used by the average person or in informal conversation) and then they have more precise technical meanings – and especially in the case of “theory” the conventional and technical meanings can be very different.

    What Dochniak has been relentlessly pitching all this time doesn’t really qualify as a scientific hypothesis, because it is not an attempt to explain a general pattern of data, but only a single subject. Dochniak’s son has latex allergies and/or asthma, and also has autism. Dochniak wants to draw a connection between those two things (I have to wonder if he’s got a court case; if he does, that would put the lie to his claims of having no conflicts on interest. But that’s a side issue.) Now, if Dochniak had investigated and found an increased prevalence of autism among children with latex allergies (as opposed to among children without latex allergies, then he might legitimately hypothesize a reason for that correlation, such as “latex allergies can sometimes cause autism.” But Dochniak doesn’t have such a correlation; he merely assumed first the existence of a connection between latex allergies and autism, and then went looking for things to confirm his assumption. Yes, it could be argued that no matter how ridiculous it is, no matter how laughably bad his attempts to support it, it still technically counts as a hypothesis – but I would disagree. Because Dochniak didn’t do what researchers do with hypotheses, namely, attempt to falsify it and see if it holds up under those attempts. Under such circumstances, I would say that calling his supposition a hypothesis, or indeed giving it any name that identifies it as being part of that scientific process that Dochniak is making no attempt to follow, is uncalled for.

    Dochniak’s speculation is most definitely not a theory in the scientific sense, because in science, something only becomes “theory” well after the hypothesis stage. It’s much closer to the conventional term “model” than to any term that connotes speculation; it’s a body of well-tested principles and data that inform further research in the field. You might open up an economics textbook, for instance, and find a sentence like the following: “Classic economic theory concentrates on two classes of principals: sellers who purvey goods and services, and buyers who purchase those goods and services.” Obviously the fact that some people sell, and others buy, is hardly speculative! “Theory” in this sense refers to how a body of well-established data helps us make sense of more observations – for instance, seeing the number of sellers of a good increase while the number of buyers stays constant, one would expect to see the prices starting to drop. Theory, in the scientific sense, is the distillation of our most solid understandings in a field.

  772. #772 Chris
    October 26, 2011

    Short version: hypothesis means wild guess.

  773. #773 Mrs. Woo
    October 27, 2011

    Thank you, Antaeus Feldspar and Chris.

    The first hit I found looking for definitions made me feel safe suggesting that the paper which even suggested that it was merely a hypothesis in the title was far from adequate “proof” of his concept, and a later article did explain the hypothesis is less than theory concept. Sometimes it’s hard to come up with synonyms in something like this that are accurate. In a way that is a very good thing because it lends itself well to concise speech, but to someone who hasn’t been schooled to this degree it can also mean you accidentally misspeak.

    What MjD does here seems so much like so many other proponents of woo: there is a hypothesis, completely unproven (okay, in some supplements it actually is to a point where they are experimenting in vitro, other times even in murine models, like the most recent supplement my darling partner is shoving at me) and for whatever reason, either marketing purposes if they’re people without conscience, or excited true-believerism if they’re genuine, these people run off half-cocked with no proof of concept and no safety studies assuring the uninformed that “natural is always safe” (arsenic is an element and naturally occuring; I don’t want to season my breakfast with it) and that “scientists say it does _________!”

    When further research either demonstrates it does not work, is not safe or does not work well, they continue selling the product with the cries of “Big Pharma” suppressing “truth.”

    Mr. Dochniak, for as much as this bruises your ego, these people are actually trying to be helpful to your cause. They WANT you to gather evidence that supports your hypothesis because that is the only way it can truly be taken seriously. Your continued prattling on repeatedly of the same thing, followed by your latex warnings and your little “join me in this crusade” games do nothing to move them because you have yet to demonstrate that what you are doing has any purpose or reason behind it.

    Please take a moment to step back and look at the earliest comments (before your insistence got so frustrating) and see what they were really asking you. Is it not logical to want something to support changes like this? It’s alarming that anyone can publish a book, pretend it is scientific (the excerpts I have read sound more like a parents’ anguished autobiography) and then start crying from the rooftops to raise alarm about something that is unlikely to be a valid concern. I realize you have a right to free speech and a right to publish whatever you want. It’s too bad that the right is not tempered with an insistence that uninvestigated scientific claims must have a warning attached.

  774. #774 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 27, 2011

    Mrs Woo writes (#758), “I realize you have a right to free speech and a right to publish whatever you want. It’s too bad that the right is not tempered with an insistence that uninvestigated scientific claims must have a warning attached.

    MjD’s response:

    Thank you Mrs. Woo for your efforts in message #758.

    Blog comments, although easy and entertaining, is no substitute for actually reading the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection”.

    Now, what part or section of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” did you have a question on?

    MjD

  775. #775 Chris
    October 27, 2011

    Welcome back my friends

    To the show that never ends.

    We’re glad you could attend!

    Come inside! Come inside!

    This is the song that doesn’t end,
    Yes, it goes on and on my friend,
    Michael Dochniak started singing it not knowing what it was
    But he’ll continue singing it forever just because…

  776. #776 Prometheus
    October 27, 2011

    Mrs. Woo (#758): Brava!

    A. Feldspar (#756):

    Although I’ve generally given Mr. Dochniak the benefit of the doubt and called his speculation a hypothesis, I have to agree that it doesn’t meet sufficient criteria to warrant calling it a hypothesis because it fails to explain (or even address) certain rather large facts (e.g. increase in autism when latex use in medicine is decreasing).

    The criteria I use to decide if a speculation is a true hypothesis are:

    [1] Is it falsifiable? (for those not familiar with “science-speak”, that means “Can you design a test that could prove the hypothesis incorrect?”)

    [2] Does it explain all of the known observations pertinent to its scope? (Example: a hypothesis about bird evolution doesn’t have to explain DNA supercoiling or neutron stars but does have to explain penguins)

    While Mr. Dochniak’s speculations (and those of Ms. Worth, who he cites above) meet the first criterion, they fail the second – as we have been trying to point out for several months.

    Perhaps things have changed since I was starting in graduate school (in the Late Cretaceous), but the expected response to someone pointing out a flaw in your “hypothesis” is to either show – with data – why that isn’t a flaw or to revise the hypothesis to correct the flaw. Sometimes, when the flaw is too large, the only correct approach is to reject the hypothesis.

    I think that A. Feldspar has it absolutely right that Mr. Dochniak has spent all of his time (including the writing of two books) looking for data that (sort of) support his “hypothesis” and has ignored all of the data that refute it. He’s been reading about immunopathology, MHC molecules and growth factors and has missed the elephant in his parlour.

    From what I can see – based on his writings – Mr. Dochniak started off with two “facts” (which are not necessarily “true”): the linear rise in autism prevalence since about 1985 and the timing of “typical” autism onset at an age when a lot of vaccines are given. The rest, as Hillel is reputed to have said, is commentary.

    Prometheus

  777. #777 Prometheus
    October 27, 2011

    MjD asks (#759):

    “Now, what part or section of the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection” did you have a question on?”

    For those who don’t remember, Mr. Dochinak posted a few paragraphs from his book on this ‘blog (comment #257), so I’m going to take Mr. Dochniak up on his generous offer.

    Mr. Dochniak, in Chapter 9 of your latest book, you write:

    “In speculation, genetic material in dry natural rubber, including plasmids and transposons, could leach into the vaccine’s aqueous-solution. For example, according to the cellular origin hypothesis or vagrancy hypothesis, viruses can evolve from bits of DNA or RNA that “escape” from the genes. …

    It is known that both DNA and RNA can be extracted
    from HDNR. For example, research has shown that expression
    of Hevein genes in natural latex has been detected.
    (Reference 5)…[emphasis added]

    In continuation, a study has shown that the latex
    allergen Hev-b 5 transcript is widely distributed after
    subcutaneous injection in BALB/c mice of their DNA vaccine.
    The researchers concluded that the rapid and widespread
    appearance of the Hev-b 5 transcript in the injected mice
    confirms that DNA is translocated from the injection site,
    transcribed, and expressed in immune and non-immune
    tissues after injection. (Reference 7)

    It is further speculated that persistent infection from surviving viruses, inclusive with Hevea genetic material, could maintain Hevea-allergen (i.e., Hev-b protein) transcription and its associated memory B-cell population.

    In summary,viruses that produce Hevea-allergens will not allow the latex allergy to go into remission. …” [emphasis added]

    My questions are these:

    [1] Are you claiming that H. brasiliensis DNA is leaching out of natural rubber stoppers and then becoming a virus which subsequently infects the recipient of the vaccine? Please explain in detail.

    [2] Are you aware that in your “reference 5″, the “DNA vaccine” was actually a specially constructed expression vector that is designed to insert genes into the genome of experimental animals and that it bears no resemblance to the vaccines currently in human use?

    I jave many more questions, but I don’t want to overload Mr. Dochniak. If he would answer just these two questions, I think he could clear up a great deal of misunderstanding.

    Prometheus

  778. #778 Michael J. Dochniak
    October 27, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#759),

    My questions are these:

    [1] Are you claiming that H. brasiliensis DNA is leaching out of natural rubber stoppers and then becoming a virus which subsequently infects the recipient of the vaccine? Please explain in detail.

    [2] Are you aware that in your “reference 5″, the “DNA vaccine” was actually a specially constructed expression vector that is designed to insert genes into the genome of experimental animals and that it bears no resemblance to the vaccines currently in human use?

    MjD’s response:

    #1) No, please read details in book.

    #2) Yes

    Hope this clears up your misunderstanding.

    MjD

  779. #779 Prometheus
    October 27, 2011

    Well here’s a curious find…

    I was looking on Amazon at Mr. Dochniak’s book – the one he keeps exhorting me to read – pondering whether it was worth $9.95 (plus shipping) to see how deep the vein of nonsense runs and I happened to try the “Look Inside!” feature. And here’s what I found…

    Page xii, “Introduction”:

    “Briefly, there are primarily two types of immunity:

    Innate Immunity – The antibodies immunoglobulin-G (IgG) and immunoglobulin- M (IgM), protect us from being harmed by infectious microorganisms. these are referred to as innate immunity; and

    Adaptive Immunity – Immunoglobulin-E (IgE) antibodies help defend against viral and bacterial infection, destroy parasites, and capture non-infectious proteins called allergens, which cause allergies and possibly atopy.”

    [punctuation errors in the original]

    At this point, I refer readers to any textbook of immunology or even the Wikipedia entries for “innate