The conspiracy deepens.

What conspiracy? You ask. Haven’t you heard? Big pharma is out killing alternative medicine doctors! Or at least that’s what you’ll be told if you venture towards the deep dark underbelly of quack websites. Up until now, the most prominent “victim” was autism quack, Jeff Bradstreet, who, according to police, committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest in the woods of North Carolina but who, according to antivaccine advocates and “autism biomed” quacks, must have been assassinated by a big pharma black ops team. Or something. After all, as we know, the FDA had raided his clinic the day before, and it looked as though his empire of alternative medical autism treatments was about to fall. He might even have been facing jail time. As much as I feel for his family (suicide truly sucks), when it comes to Jeff Bradstreet, the main thing that saddens me about his suicide is that he will never face justice now.

But Bradstreet is not alone. If you listen to über-quack Joe Mercola’s significant other, Erin Elizabeth over at HealthNutNews.com, you’ll find that there have been at least five alternative health practitioners who have died recently, allegedly under suspicious circumstances, and that there are five more missing. The most recent “casualty” of this big pharma black ops is Baron Holt, a 33 year old chiropractor, who died suddenly on Father’s Day. Naturally, Elizabeth is “terrified” for Joe Mercola’s safety. Who wouldn’t be?

Then, just a couple of days ago, a doctor who has been featured on this blog on multiple occasions for his cancer quackery, Nicholas Gonzalez, died suddenly on July 21. The news was announced first the day after his death by Ty Bollinger, someone whom I really need to do a post on some day given his promotion of bogus cancer cures:

It is with great sadness and a heavy heart that I write this memorial tribute for one of the greatest medical doctors of all time.

The world has lost a true hero….

Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez, a prominent alternative cancer doctor, died last night of an apparent heart attack at his home in New York City. Dr. Gonzalez was probably the world’s foremost expert on cancer, often recommended by other alternative doctors as the “go-to doctor” with the best results for supposedly “terminal” cancers like pancreatic cancer.

Dr. Nick was my friend. He loved helping people with cancer. He loved sharing his knowledge about how to treat cancer; and he loved talking about God and discussing Biblical topics as well as politics and current affairs.
After we became friends last year, he sent me several books, including a Companion Bible. We shared the same Christian faith, the same distrust of the “mainstream media,” and the same desire to spread the truth about cancer.

My condolences go to the family and, yes, even to Ty Bollinger. The sudden and unexpected death of a loved one is always devastating. However, it is inaccurate to characterize Nicholas Gonzalez as a “pioneer” in anything medical, other than cancer quackery. As you might recall, Gonzalez was best known for his claim that he could treat advanced pancreatic cancer (and a lot of other incurable malignancies) with a regimen that strongly resembled the Gerson protocol and, more closely, the variant of the Gerson protocol advocated by William Kelley.

Basically, like the Kelley protocol, the Gonzalez protocol was based on a belief in “detoxification” as a cure for cancer and the cause of cancer being a deficiency in pancreatic enzymes. Like the Kelley and Gerson protocols, the Gonzalez protocol involved frequent coffee enemas, which he rationalized as causing the smooth muscle in the bile ducts to relax, thus allowing “toxins”—isn’t it always “toxins”—into the small intestine through the common bile duct. Also, like the Gerson and Kelley protocols, the Gonzalez protocol involved taking lots of supplements and pancreatic enzyme capsules, up to 150 pills a day, as well as a vegetarian diet. Where the Gonzalez protocol differed from the Kelley protocol is that Gonzalez dispensed with the spiritual components and the neurologic “stimulation” advocated by Kelley. Also, Gonzalez would perform hair analysis and determine from that the patients’ “nutritional, mineral, and biochemical patterns and clinical status.” Based on this, he would determine a “hair analysis CT test score” and taylor the patient’s diet of “all-natural poison-free food” to prevent new tissue intoxication and to reestablish the body’s balance. Like Gerson and Kelley, Gonzalez claimed miraculous cures of advanced cancer and much better survival rates than anything conventional oncology could claim.

The main reason that Gonzalez became famous outside of alternative health circles is that he was one of the cancer quacks who craved legitimacy, like Stanislaw Burzynski. He actually published a case series in 1999 comparing eleven patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with his protocol with historical controls and concluding that his patients did much better. This tiny, poorly designed single arm case series was riddled with selection bias, questions about the correctness of diagnoses in several patients, and numerous other deficiencies that called into doubt the promising results reported. In spite of these problems, the NCI funded a randomized trial of the Gonzalez protocol to the tune of $1.4 million. The trial ran into trouble immediately with randomization, clinical trial ethics, and a lot of other issues. When the results were finally published in 2009, it was a disaster for Gonzalez. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with the Gonzalez protocol did significantly worse than those treated with conventional chemotherapy, a result that led me to characterize the protocol as worse than useless. Gonzalez’s only response was a litany of disingenuous complaints, the pharma shill gambit, and special pleading. He remained a believer and even said after Steve Jobs’ death that “if only he had come to see me first” he might have lived.

Gonzalez was at least as high profile as Jeff Bradstreet, just in a different area of alternative medicine, but his death is clearly way less suspicious than that of Bradstreet. Of course, Bradstreet’s suicide doesn’t appear that suspicious to anyone but conspiracy cranks, either, but what’s so unusual about a guy in his late 60s dying of a sudden cardiac arrest? Sadly, nothing. It’s an all too common cause of death. None of this stops everybody’s favorite alt-med conspiracy wonk, Mike Adams, from speculating (while claiming he’s not speculating, of course!) about a conspiracy:

With respect to Dr. Gonzalez and those close to him, there are certain details of his passing which shall remain private. The things we believe are appropriate to share publicly include these facts:

  • He passed away alone, and his body was discovered some time after his passing.
  • An autopsy has not yet been performed. We are not aware of whether an autopsy is being requested.
  • Everyone close to him is shocked of his passing, knowing that he was in excellent health.

There is currently no evidence of foul play in his death. I am aware that a number of people are reporting on what appears to be a sudden wave of seemingly mysterious deaths among alternative medicine doctors and industry pioneers. There will no doubt be a tremendous amount of speculation that asks whether Dr. Gonzalez has somehow been deliberately killed. Such speculation is entirely premature, as none of us are aware of any facts which would support such a notion at this time.

We can’t rule it out, but there is presently no evidence that foul play is to blame here.

Out of respect for the partners, family members and close friends of Dr. Gonzalez who are devastated by this tragic loss of such an extraordinary human being, I am personally asking the natural health community to allow these people the time and space to grieve this devastating loss without the interference of trying to deal with “assassination theories” and similar discussions.

In other words, give it a few days, and Adams will be spewing conspiracy theories about assassination, even though it appears pretty clear that Gonzalez was just unfortunate enough to die alone of a sudden cardiac arrest. Indeed, Adams makes it explicit by following up the passage above with, “There will be an appropriate time for that analysis, and I will be personally involved in the investigation.”

I can hardly wait.

His readers, however, can’t wait. Just scroll through the comments, and you’ll find speculation about the neuromuscular blocker succinylcholine as a way to mimic a heart attack, while another mentions that the CIA “has admitted they have a frozen dart that will put someone in cardiac arrest.” There is also considerable consternation expressed over Gonzalez dying suddenly even though he was claimed to be in perfect health. Unfortunately, sometimes ventricular fibrillation or another fatal arrhythmia is the first manifestation of heart disease.

So, I guess Gonzalez is number 6.

I’m sure Erin Elizabeth will soon be adding him to her list, along with Baron Holt, who she notes, quoting an account of his death, “had been struggling with recent health issues, none were thought to be life threatening by loved ones.” Sadly, families are frequently wrong in their assessments of these things.

So, according to Elizabeth, here’s the toll thus far, not counting Nicholas Gonzalez:

  1. June 19th, 2015 – Dr Bradstreet, formerly of Florida, now practicing in Georgia was found with a gunshot wound to his chest in a river.
  2. June 21st, 2015 – Father’s Day: We have two dead chiropractors, Dr. Baron Holt and Dr. Bruce Hedendal (both reported to be fathers), in Florida; both found on the East Coast, both were presumably healthy, and both were described as very fit. We still have no cause of death listed in the articles we can find on either one. A few people have contacted me about Dr. Hedendal, 67, but admit that they were surprised by his death and still find it shocking.
  3. June 29th, 2015 – The beloved holistic Theresa Sievers MD was found murdered in her home. Also, On this very same day, June 29th, Jeffrey Whiteside MD a pulmonologist went missing , vanishing when he simply “walked away” . On the same day, Dr. Whiteside, known for his successful treatment of lung cancer, disappeared in Door County, Wisconsin, while vacationing with family.
  4. July 3rd, 2015Dr. Patrick Fitzpatrick MD goes missing.
  5. July 1oth, 2015 – Lisa Riley DO (Doctor of Osteopathic medicine) is found in her home with a gunshot wound to her head.

If you want to get an idea of just how far Elizabeth is reaching, check this out:

Interestingly, Dr. Holt (33), lived in North Carolina; which is the state where Dr. Bradstreet’s body (the first doctor to be found) was discovered two days prior. Dr. Holt was visiting Jacksonville, Florida, though, when he died there. Dr. Bradstreet (see story #1) was living in Georgia, at the time of his death; and before that, he lived in the neighboring state of Florida.

And there were a lot of coincidences between John F. Kennedy and Abraham Lincoln, too! I mean, seriously, those “coincidences” that Elizabeth dredges up are pretty pathetic. Even the birthday problem is more convincing. I wonder how hard she had to look to find them.

Here’s the problem. There are currently approximately 320 million people living in the US. When you look at large numbers with a conspiratorial eye, you can always find small series individual cases of people belonging to a group (alternative medicine practitioners, for instance) who appear to share some trait in common if that trait is defined vaguely enough. For instance, there are approximately 60,000 chiropractors and close to a million physicians in the US, some proportion of the latter being into alternative medicine, and the most that the alt med conspiracy mongers can come up with are three violent deaths (Drs. Bradstreet, Theresa Sievers, and Lisa Riley) and two—now three—deaths from what are almost certainly natural causes in a month. That’s not very many, and very prone to the clustering illusion. One thing for sure, now that cranks like Erin Elizabeth have latched on to this conspiracy theory they’ll never let it go.

It would be entertaining if it didn’t serve their paranoid narrative so well.

Comments

  1. #1 shay
    August 3, 2015

    Personally, I tell people that I graduated from the U of SMC.

  2. #2 KayMarie
    August 3, 2015

    “That is how we can afford apostrophes.”

    *gigglesnort*

    Still waiting for the appropriate moment to use “theiyr’re”

  3. #3 Joseph
    Alabama
    August 4, 2015

    The ignorance on this site is overwhelming as is the ignorance of what constitutes real and scientific medicine as compared to “chemical and toxic science”. Your ignorance is only superseded by the incredible lack of compassion for a man who helped thousands and generally cared about their health. Whether Dr. Gonzales died of natural causes or was taken out by Big Pharma is irrelevant. What should be relevant to all is that modern medicine (outside of emergency care) is ineffective at best and barbaric at worst. REAL medicine before Rockefeller and Carnegie began promoting petroleum-based “medicines” at the beginning of the 20th century, was based on natural, herbal, organic and effective remedies. In fact, holistic medicine made up the core of medical school’s curriculum. It wasn’t until those controlling the previously mentioned medicines began funding the schools and thereby gaining a controlling interest in the courses taught that naturalistic medicine began to be phased out and courses in pharmacology increased. Was there an agenda? Of course, it’s called money. Anyone who believes the medical community is not capable of atrocities against mankind only need survey medical websites that show the horrifying statistics of annual deaths from medications taken as directed (not abused) – over 150,000 deaths in the U.S. each year alone. Remorse? None. If they cared, every medication that ever killed anyone from normal use would be banned. Yet, not only do they continue to produce and dispense them (again, with no second thought), they come up with new killer drugs every year. I personally was saved from a terminal disease through alternative care and never took a medication for it. I know of thousands of others. What you are calling “real science” is trying medications on sick people, if that doesn’t work, give them another. Then give them one to counter the side effects of the first two, then another, than another. If you ask a doctor specifically to show you the studies done on the combination of the 5 drugs the people are taking in combination, they have no idea what the results will be or how it will affect someone. I also know of several MDs who do not take medication (they use natural herbal products) and would never give chemotherapy to their families or themselves, yet the prescribe medications to others without a second thought. Based on the idiocy on this thread, most of you are too stupid, ignorant and non-caring to…give a flip. Same mindset as the medical community.

  4. #4 shay
    August 4, 2015

    Joseph — paragraphs are your friend.

    So is a basic understanding of how science works.

  5. #5 herr doktor bimler
    August 4, 2015

    You’d think there’s a warehouse full of them, all handed the same script to work from.

  6. #6 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    August 4, 2015

    What should be relevant to all is that modern medicine (outside of emergency care) is ineffective at best and barbaric at worst.

    What was the average life expectancy in first world countries before modern medicine and after? Did barbarians have better or worse life expectancy? What diseases responded better to pre-modern medicine than modern? How do you know?

    Thanks.

  7. #7 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    August 4, 2015

    Joseph – btw, we will punch your card so your big altie overlords will pay you for your post. We’re not welshers here.

  8. #8 Joseph
    Alabama
    August 4, 2015

    Well, can’t argue with those who can’t read, can’t see beyond their presuppositions and are essentially as dumb as a pile of rocks. Keep taking your medicine folks and pick out your headstones fairly quickly.

  9. #9 Not a Troll
    August 4, 2015

    Joseph,

    I have many concerns with pharmaceuticals and especially polypharmacy but why the flight to something that has even less claim on legitimacy outside of testimonials and to someone who is also making a great deal of money by selling it to you?

    Note that I’m referring to alternative medicine in general and not certain herbs or spices that science where has demonstrated efficacy.

  10. #10 shay
    August 4, 2015

    What should be relevant to all is that modern medicine (outside of emergency care) is ineffective at best and barbaric at worst.

    There isn’t a sane woman in the world (particularly if she’s post-menopausal) who would agree with that statement.

  11. #11 Denice Walter
    August 4, 2015

    Oh let’s see..

    – Only emergency medicine is worthwhile**
    – natural medicine worked well
    – Rockefeller petrol-based meds and med schools
    – thousands cured by alt med
    – doctors use alt med
    – thousands die from meds
    – follow the money

    My guess is Joseph has a PhD from PRN- which has the same value as the host’s ‘doctorate’

    ** as if we could separate medicine into parts- all SBM proceeds from the same basics of physio, anatomy, pharmacology etc

  12. #12 Lighthorse
    August 4, 2015

    @Joseph: I suspect that if read up on the history of various diseases and their treatment, you would be grateful for not having been born at a more perilous time in the past.

  13. #13 Joseph
    Alabama
    August 5, 2015

    Well Denice, wrong again. I’ve got a doctorate in chiropractic and a degree in nutrition. I’m privy to a lot of information the general public is unaware of. As far as your ignorance regarding “thousands” who die from medication (it’s actually over one hundred thousand – way to read only what you want to read), I only refer you to the following links: http://www.alternet.org/story/147318/100,000_americans_die_each_year_from_prescription_drugs,_while_pharma_companies_get_rich

    http://search.cdc.gov/search?query=Prescription+drug+deaths+annually&utf8=%E2%9C%93&affiliate=cdc-main (note the references to overdosing AND regular usage)

    Do your homework before you spout nonsense. The majority of the sheeple on this website only confirm the effectiveness of the media/medical brainwashing.

  14. #14 Gray Falcon
    August 5, 2015

    Joseph, how many people died from smallpox last year? Think about it.

  15. #15 novalox
    August 5, 2015

    @joseph

    You better check your sources again, because they aren’t saying what you think you want them to say….

  16. #16 Gray Falcon
    August 5, 2015

    Also, Joseph, there are thousands of car accidents happen every year. Does that mean flying carpets and broomsticks work?

  17. #17 Julian Frost
    Gauteng East Rand
    August 5, 2015

    I’m privy to a lot of information the general public is unaware of.

    Suuuuuure you are.

  18. #18 Not a Troll
    August 5, 2015

    “I’m privy to a lot of information the general public is unaware of.”

    Then why not make them aware of it? I look at conventional medicine as delivered as a hot mess which is why I practice defensive medicine in my personal life. However, please show me how the alternative is not worse.

    When playing the odds it helps to have the odds. Raw numbers are fear inducing but what is the ratio of those helped to harmed? Those helped to those only separated from their wallets? Who’s watching their numbers?

    I wish the alt med union would get together to run their own studies to show how effective they are and not waste time on testimonials for things like how helpful plain water is.

    And on that note, those here have demonstrated they are open to looking into the research findings for alt med. Finding it lacking they tend toward snark but who cares? If alt med can’t pony up evidence of efficacy, they are doing nothing but shooting in the dark and that gives me less odds than medication roulette.

  19. #19 Dangerous Bacon
    August 5, 2015

    Joseph: “If they cared, every medication that ever killed anyone from normal use would be banned.”

    Well, I guess that means he wants to ban insulin, tPA, antibiotics, painkillers – and chiropractic too, since people have died after “normal” adjustments.

    In addition to Joseph’s “doctorate” in chiropractic (which sounds ever so much fancier than “degree”), I wonder just what his certification in nutrition is and whether it’s available for cash and a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

  20. #20 JGC
    August 5, 2015

    Let me ask you this, do you believe if there was a button that could be pushed and end all disease and illness, that a Pharma CEO would push that button?

    You’re really asking “If there was a button that could be pushed and enusre that not only the person pushing it but also all of his/her loved ones–parents, siblings, wives, lovers, children,grandchildren, etc. would enjoy several decades more of active and productive pain and illness free life, would a Pharma CEO would push that button?”

    And my answer is “In a heartbeat.”

  21. #21 JGC
    August 5, 2015

    What should be relevant to all is that modern medicine (outside of emergency care) is ineffective at best and barbaric at worst.

    Which is of course why, following the development of modern medicine, we saw the average US life-span for both men and women fall to an all time low.

    Oh, wait…

  22. #22 JGC
    August 5, 2015

    I’m privy to a lot of information the general public is unaware of.

    Joseph, you do understand that information you claim to have but do not produce the functional equivalent of no information whatsoever, don’t you?

  23. #23 Krebiozen
    August 5, 2015

    Joseph,

    As far as your ignorance regarding “thousands” who die from medication (it’s actually over one hundred thousand – way to read only what you want to read), I only refer you to the following links:

    I’ll respond as I have on the many previous occasions this has claim has come up here before. Closer examination find that this figure is based on a review of studies (Lazarou) (that Melody Petersen refers to in your first link), many from the 60s and 70s, and that ignores any that report no fatal adverse effects of drugs, and then extrapolates to the entire US hospital population of 1988. Given developments in medicine over the past 40-50 years it is almost certain to be badly wrong. Other estimates are far lower.

    Remember that anticoagulants, for example, kill thousands every year, but save the lives of hundreds of thousands more. Unless you have an alternative to anticoagulant drugs we are stuck with those deaths until drug companies develop safer drugs, which they are working on.

    You also need to take into account the fact that the vast majority of deaths from prescription drugs are in people who would undoubtedly have died without treatment. These are mostly elderly patients with multiple health problems who have already had their lives extended by conventional medicine. If you look at the figures, life expectancy is still creeping up. and so is active life expectancy, meaning people are living active lives for longer than ever before. For example, this US study (PDF) found that:

    Our results, supporting the hypothesis of morbidity compression, indicate that younger cohorts of elderly persons are living longer in better health.

    Not only are people living longer, but they are living longer without disabilities. How can it possibly be true that modern medicine does more harm than good?

    Do your homework before you spout nonsense.

    Right back at you. You have some things very badly wrong as I have demonstrated.

  24. #24 ann
    August 5, 2015

    What should be relevant to all is that modern medicine (outside of emergency care) is ineffective at best and barbaric at worst. REAL medicine before Rockefeller and Carnegie began promoting petroleum-based “medicines” at the beginning of the 20th century, was based on natural, herbal, organic and effective remedies. In fact, holistic medicine made up the core of medical school’s curriculum. It wasn’t until those controlling the previously mentioned medicines began funding the schools and thereby gaining a controlling interest in the courses taught that naturalistic medicine began to be phased out and courses in pharmacology increased. Was there an agenda? Of course, it’s called money.

    Well, it’s a good thing for the Rockefeller/Carnegie conspiracy that the paradigm shift coincided with such a wide variety of diseases and conditions suddenly becoming less deadly and/or disabling and/or prevalent.

    That was an amazing piece of luck, really.

    Anyone who believes the medical community is not capable of atrocities against mankind only need survey medical websites that show the horrifying statistics of annual deaths from medications taken as directed (not abused) – over 150,000 deaths in the U.S. each year alone.

    If infant mortality rates were still what they were before Carnegie and Rockefeller messed things up, there would be over 500,000 presently living children who died before the age of one every year.

    And that’s just infant mortality.

  25. #25 ann
    August 5, 2015

    REAL medicine before Rockefeller and Carnegie began promoting petroleum-based “medicines” at the beginning of the 20th century, was based on natural, herbal, organic and effective remedies.

    Such as treating everything from constipation to rashes with mercury and lead compounds now known to be toxic. For instance.

  26. #26 Lighthorse
    August 6, 2015

    REAL medicine before Rockefeller and Carnegie began promoting petroleum-based “medicines” at the beginning of the 20th century, was based on natural, herbal, organic and effective remedies.

    As ann points out, that doesn’t mean the “natural” medicines then in use were either necessarily effective or without toxicity. In one culture and another, people have been experimenting on patients with plants for millennia. Granted, many herbal remedies remain to be thoroughly investigated under current technologies, but many of them were toxic or ineffective and caused injuries and death.

  27. #27 herr doktor bimler
    August 6, 2015

    I’ve got a doctorate in chiropractic and a degree in nutrition. I’m privy to a lot of information the general public is unaware of.

    I was not previously aware that mail-order chrioquactic / nutrition diplomas came with a TSU security clearance.

  28. #28 shay
    August 6, 2015

    I’ve got a doctorate in chiropractic and a degree in nutrition.

    So you can give back-rubs and cook. That makes you great boyfriend/husband material, but hardly qualifies you to assess medical issues.

  29. #29 Herb
    August 10, 2015

    Speaking of quack doctors and remedies Orac has labeled ozone therapy as quackery. So I invite you Orac- or your many acolytes – to condemn this series of cases as quackery as well.

    The abstract essentially says that 3 confirmed cases of Ebola were treated with ozone therapy and completely resolved in 2-4 days

    http://journals.sfu.ca/africanem/index.php/AJID/article/view/3578

    A fair minded person might say after reading the abstract: “hmm..seems intriguing and since the therapy is non toxic, costs next to nothing and we have no other cure for ebola if the details in the full article (which is behind a paywall) accurately support the abstract we ought to consider an appropriate test of ozone therapy for Ebola asap.

    Instead you’ll either ignore this post (it is bit late for this thread but I will repost in a more germane post as well) or heap your usual scorn and snark. I hope I’m wrong but I’ve never ever seen you admit you might be wrong in all the years I’ve followed you.
    Let’s see what happens.

  30. #31 Narad
    August 10, 2015

    if the details in the full article (which is behind a paywall)

    No, it’s not. Perhaps you’re slow on the uptake.

    accurately support the abstract

    If one manages to struggle through the truly atrocious writing, not especially. Good to know that Robins is a podiatrist, though.

  31. #32 herr doktor bimler
    August 10, 2015

    The African Journal of Infectious Diseases is a pay-to-print vanity publisher ($300 for a 10-page PDF), AND they try to sell subscriptions. AND advertisements.
    The editor (one Clement Oladapo Adewunmi) also runs the ” African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines”, with an identical business model… he’s an equal-opportunity grifter.

  32. #33 Murmur
    UK-ia
    August 11, 2015

    #433

    I’ve managed to get the full paper…

    First off this illustrates why “case series” are not viewed as particularly high quality research: very small numbers (4 allegedly symptomatic patients, one of whom was not confirmed as having Ebola), no controls of any sort.

    Their proposed method of action for ozone takes a bit of a jump from effects on other viruses to the Ebola virus, with a scarcely conclusive statement that “Ebola appears no different”, without being able to fully substantiate that. And then moving swiftly to “in vitro” effects without any mention of in vivo effects…

    Mention is made of “numerous papers” in Europe, but without referencing them…

    At this point I stopped as what I had read so far was so poor as to not warrant any further time.

  33. […] Gonzalez: The latest victim of the pharma assassins? Respectful Insolence am 24. Juli […]

  34. #35 Nacho Mama
    Beautiful San Francisco
    September 5, 2015

    Is it just my imagination or do you have a gigantic stick up your ass? I’ve never heard of you or this dead doctors scandal. Just surfed here randomly only to find the Don Trump of oddly disrespectful mannerisms. If the murder spree is real, YOU (INSERT whatever your inappropriately abbreviated first name is HERE) would make an excellent #1 suspect. Chill out You’ll live longer.

    chow for now hunny buns! 😉

  35. #36 SH
    Canada
    September 10, 2015

    First time I’ve read this blog….
    just curious, does Big Pharma support this site or your work?

    • #37 Orac
      September 10, 2015

      No.

      Next question.

  36. #38 Emerson Williams
    September 28, 2015

    I agree with The Questioner below. This commentary is every bit as biased and self-interested as any other agenda-based website. It is also possibly a tired and outdated opinion. My mother-in-law’s doctor, a respected medical oncologist at Yale Medical School, did not dismiss either Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez, or the other alternative cancer doctor specialists as “quacks.” Certainly, the jury is still out on the overall effectiveness of their treatments. But it is not a foregone conclusion that they are ineffective for every patient. True scientific inquiry, at least as I learned it in school, requires a critical, yet simultaneously, willing and open mind, flexible and humble enough to adjust to, and integrate new, and sometimes, problematic and competing data. There is no doubt that other than allopathic physicians have achieved some notable successes, which may be difficult to track in conventional clinical trials. That means little to a person (like my mother-in-law) who has been discharged by her allopathic physician, and is willing to try alternative care. Hope is a powerful agent, as well, and not to be sneered at. The tone of this article is anything but scientific. More importantly, it is disrespectful to a physician who is not around to defend himself and died after a full life of doing what he apparently, sincerely believed was helping others. With the literally hundreds of thousands of documented cases of medical malpractice (some with serious, or irreversible injury) in our country per year, I do not take issue with Dr. Gonzalez giving people who would otherwise have no hope, hope. Would that the author of this article be so fortunate as to make a difference in the lives of others, rather than masquerading as an objective scientific observer. Never met Dr. Gonzalez, but may he RIP.

  37. #39 Gray Falcon
    September 28, 2015

    Emerson- False hope is worse than no hope.

  38. #40 Narad
    September 28, 2015

    That means little to a person (like my mother-in-law) who has been discharged by her allopathic physician, and is willing to try alternative care.

    The alternative to “allopathic” is “homeopathic.” The Gonzalez protocol was 100% allopathic.

    Please try to keep your neologisms straight.

  39. #41 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    September 28, 2015

    There is no doubt that other than allopathic physicians have achieved some notable successes, which may be difficult to track in conventional clinical trials.

    Who had those notable successes? What was notable about them? What success rates did they have and how did they compare to the current standard of care for the same diseases? Why are the successes difficult to track in conventional clinical trials? If the successes can’t be tracked under rigorous conditions, how do you differentiate them from background noise? Thanks in advance.

  40. #42 shay
    September 28, 2015

    Emerson — the alternative to “no hope” is not “hope”. It is “having your MIL’s bank account drained to pay a mountebank for treatment that has not been demonstrated will improve her chances one iota.”

    Are you prepared to hold altmed to the same standards you hold science-based medicine?

  41. #43 shay
    September 28, 2015

    ” it is disrespectful to a physician who is not around to defend himself and died after a full life of doing what he apparently, sincerely believed was helping others.”

    But he did not help others, his own research proved that. Regardless of his sincerely held beliefs, his protocol is useless.

    Does this not matter?

  42. #44 JGC
    September 28, 2015

    Certainly, the jury is still out on the overall effectiveness of their treatments.

    It’s less a case of a jury not being out but that there isn’t any evidence suggesting these treatments are effective for a jury to consider.

  43. #45 Sweet
    US
    September 29, 2015

    Hmm….what happen to Royal Raymond Rife? Anyone? There’s one for you.

  44. #46 ChrisP
    September 30, 2015

    Hmm….what happen to Royal Raymond Rife? Anyone? There’s one for you.

    He died aged 83 on August 5th 1971.

  45. #47 LouV
    France
    September 30, 2015

    With the literally hundreds of thousands of documented cases of medical malpractice (some with serious, or irreversible injury) in our country per year, I do not take issue with Dr. Gonzalez giving people who would otherwise have no hope, hope.

    Except that the indignation of the author and a lot of regular commenters come from the fact that alternative therapies should be held to the same rigourous standards than science-based medicine. We aren’t denying the cases of medical malpractice ; we are angry that alternative therapies don’t have an equally severe supervision on malpractice (among other things).

  46. #48 Narad
    September 30, 2015

    With the literally hundreds of thousands of documented cases of medical malpractice (some with serious, or irreversible injury) in our country per year….

    I presume that you are not using “malpractice” in its usual legal sense, so I was wondering whether you might proceed to the aforemention documentation, in all its excruciatingly literal detail.

    This involves some sort of Excel mess, right?

  47. #49 ann
    September 30, 2015

    With the literally hundreds of thousands of documented cases of medical malpractice (some with serious, or irreversible injury) in our country per year, I do not take issue with Dr. Gonzalez giving people who would otherwise have no hope, hope.

    Do you take issue with him for the two documented cases of medical malpractice he committed, one of which resulted in serious and irreversible injury and the other of which resulted in the early death of a woman who had a form of cancer that’s usually not only treatable but curable?

    http://www.leagle.com/decision/199963069FSupp2d561_1580/GONZALEZ%20v.%20GRAY

    http://www.leagle.com/decision/1997400173Misc2d227_1372.xml/CHARELL%20v.%20GONZALEZ

  48. #50 ann
    September 30, 2015

    To say nothing of the numerous documented cases of negligence, incompetence and other forms of professional misconduct he also committed:

    http://www.casewatch.org/board/med/gonzalez1994.pdf

    Do you take issue with those?

    How about you, Nacho Mama? Got any sassy comments for those patients?

  49. #51 Truthhertz
    October 14, 2015

    You stinking vile sociopaths. We’ll be coming for you……

  50. #52 Narad
    October 14, 2015

    You stinking vile sociopaths. We’ll be coming for you……

    Given that it took “yall” two-and-a-half months to so much as find the post, this doesn’t come off as a particularly compelling communiqué.

    Plus, we have HAARP, the Mossad, and the best one-time pads that money can buy.

  51. #53 herr doktor bimler
    October 14, 2015

    Given that it took “yall” two-and-a-half months to so much as find the post,

    Dealing with a Truther here. That dope won’t smoke itself.

  52. #54 Militant Agnostic
    Hiding under my bed in response to Thruthhertz's threat.
    October 14, 2015

    Narad

    Plus, we have HAARP, the Mossad, and the best one-time pads that money can buy.

    Isn’t HAARP being shut down? Or is that what we want them to think.

  53. #55 herr doktor bimler
    October 15, 2015

    best one-time pads that money can buy.

    Enough of that. I don’t talk about your day-job, do I?

  54. #56 Alain
    October 15, 2015

    You stinking vile sociopaths. We’ll be coming for you……

    How about we come after you for impersonating a psychiatrist without a license?

    Gunnery sergeant Hartman

  55. #57 Ida Montgomery
    usa
    October 15, 2015

    Truth is sometimes greater than fiction so it’s harder to believe Everyone knows that the cancer drug industry is real big business Had a friend, who was a nurse practitioner, was invited by a doctor she worked for at the time. that was invited to attend a huge conference, in the city. . . She related to me just how huge the dug business had expanded. I was the only one she told as it was to be kept confidential I am one who truly believe that a cure for cancer is here, however, if revealed and initiated, they would lose billions in revenue. It’s the same old process of who they consider expendable. Just think of the enormous pay checks these people are receiving. They are not about to give any of it up So that’s where the real corruption begins. Called process of elimination. Which is the most important to them, lives or money. Guess what they chose! My friend passed away several years ago. with cancer. What a financial burden on these guys if all the cancer treatment centers had to close. Whoops! Maybe they would consider suicide too. (It’s always the little guy verses the BIG GUY. They will win

    one way or another.

  56. #58 doug
    October 15, 2015

    Hiding under my bed in response to Thruthhertz’s threat.

    After your service as a privateer aboard the Antelope? I would have thought that would have hardened you against such something so huffety-puffety. Or did that one fat ball (lordy, that sounds a little rude out of context) leave you shell shocked?

    Anyway, he’ll never find you now that you’re back in Sherbrooke 😉

  57. #59 doug
    October 15, 2015

    ^ superfluous such

  58. #60 Narad
    October 15, 2015

    Enough of that. I don’t talk about your day-job, do I?

    I wound up making about $4 an hour on the paper that caused me to think about quality metrics in stochastic subsamples to start with, so it’s just as well.

    Oh, wait.

  59. #61 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    October 15, 2015

    @Ida Montgomery – to recap:
    1. Pharmaceuticals are big business, but nobody has noticed.
    2. You believe there are cancer cures being suppressed by big pharmaceutical companies to protect their existing products. Even though it would cost millions to create and prove such a cure, which would be money down the drain that the board and investors would question management about. Even though the people involved in the research are deprived of their ability to publish their work, enhance their careers, and possibly win Nobel prizes. Even though the only real way to legally prevent someone else developing the same thing would be to patent it, which would make the information public. Even though the first company to market such a drug would make huge bucks if they wanted – more than enough to compensate for the loss of existing products. Even though a soon-to-be-ex-employee with a thumb drive could take that secret and use it to negotiate a separation agreement large enough to raise questions?

    I’m willing to believe that companies would do all kinds of things that are borderline or outright illegal for short term gain. I believe this because of the news – companies do bribe people, they do sell in places they aren’t allowed to (often by a series of sham companies), they do configure automobiles to act one way when tested and another way when on the highway (sort of an automotive double slit experiment – if a diesel engine is going down the highway and there is no emissions test equipment attached, does it emit oxides of nitrogen?).

    It strikes me as unlikely that they’d act against their own interests by suppressing a cancer cure. But I could be surprised. I’d need more than a feeling to believe that.

  60. #62 Dangerous Bacon
    October 15, 2015

    ” Had a friend, who was a nurse practitioner, was invited by a doctor she worked for at the time. that was invited to attend a huge conference, in the city. . . She related to me just how huge the dug business had expanded. I was the only one she told as it was to be kept confidential”

    Whoops, cat is really out of the bag now!

    “My friend (the nurse practitioner) passed away several years ago. with cancer. ”

    Same thing happens to physicians, researchers, drug company execs and all the rest of the Medical Mafia. They avoid researching real cures, suppress the proven alternative ones and march happily off to the grave. The money’s just too good.

  61. #63 Dangerous Bacon
    October 15, 2015

    “If the murder spree is real, YOU (INSERT whatever your inappropriately abbreviated first name is HERE) would make an excellent #1 suspect.”

    True, Orac has never supplied alibis for all the times in question. Omigod.

    Speaking of Gunnery Sgt. Hartman: he would like you to wake up and get your day started.

  62. #64 Murmur
    UK-ia
    October 15, 2015

    #461

    *Sigh*

    You, as many others, assume that the pharmaceutical industry is one huge monolithic structure, which is far from true.

    This particular (former) senior nurse attended many, many drug company sponsored events over the years (only way to get funding for running conferences much of the time) and observed repeatedly that any given company will spend MORE time slagging off their competitors than plugging their own products.

    If any company could get a commercial advantage over the others, e.g. by patenting a wonder drug for cancer, they would do so as they would be able to hammer competitors into the ground and steal their market share.

    Also your argument assumes that “cancer” is one, single clinical entity: it isn’t, as even us mental health bods know…

  63. #65 Militant Agnostic
    October 15, 2015

    Doug @462

    Cut me some slack, I am a broken man on Halifax pier.

  64. #66 Militant Agnostic
    October 15, 2015

    MOB @465

    the only real way to legally prevent someone else developing the same thing would be to patent it, which would make the information public.

    We need to use this one more often. A lot of people don’t think this one through.

    sort of an automotive double slit experiment – if a diesel engine is going down the highway and there is no emissions test equipment attached, does it emit oxides of nitrogen?

    I used to drive a VW Heisenberg, but every time I looked at the speedometer I got lost.

  65. #67 MI Dawn
    October 15, 2015

    We’re all the Last of Barrett’s Privateers instead of being Bonnie Offit? I LIKE that idea…. 🙂

  66. #68 herr doktor bimler
    October 15, 2015

    I used to drive a VW Heisenberg, but every time I looked at the speedometer I got lost.

    The GPS system will show your location but not your velocity.

  67. #69 shay
    looking for a bat
    October 15, 2015

    MA, doug and Dawn — stop. I mean it. It took forever to get rid of that earworm the last time.

    She related to me just how huge the dug business had expanded. I was the only one she told as it was to be kept confidential

    It was a huge conference but you were the only one who knew about it?

  68. #70 shay
    October 15, 2015

    Visualize if you can a correctly closed quote.

  69. #71 doug
    October 15, 2015

    shay, I offer as alternative worms:

    I Don’t Want a Bunny Wunny by Tom Paxton
    The I.P.D. by Sue Edmonds & Lian Tanner

  70. #72 Denice Walter
    October 15, 2015

    @ MI Dawn:

    Unbelievably I do NOT know that tune at all.
    HOWEVER in an odd way, we ARE all Barrett’s ‘privateers’
    ( or choose another descriptive ) if you mean Stephen Barrett of Quackwatch.
    At any rate, I am one.

  71. #73 MI Dawn
    October 16, 2015

    @Denice Walter: to spare poor shay’s feelings, I won’t post a youtube link. But no, I don’t mean Dr Barrett. It’s an English folk song. My favorite version was done by The Crimson Pirates (http://www.crimsonpirates.com/CP/Welcome.html). The things you learn at Renaissance Faires! 🙂

  72. #74 Denice Walter
    October 16, 2015

    @ MI Dawn,

    As you might know I am not an aficionado of Renaissance Faires- AND I might have to wear a ((shudder)) dress there.

    Anyway, while studying literature I had the extreme pleasure of taking a class where the prof brought in an accomplished music student to play and sing English folk songs. He was actually entertaining and the session really made sense because reading the songs was quite another thing from hearing them performed. But no pirate songs.

  73. #75 MI Dawn
    October 16, 2015

    @DW: Nah. You wouldn’t have to wear a dress. Plenty of women wear their normal clothing…or chain mail. Personally, I enjoy dressing up as a wench (and my partner enjoys how I look in a bodice….). But Ren Faires aren’t everyone’s thing, and I respect that.

    That would have been a fun class. Wish my English Lit teacher had done that. OTOH, my HS world lit teacher told us all sorts of fun tales about the stories he had us read…

  74. #76 Denice Walter
    October 16, 2015

    Dawn.

    My world lit prof took us out of doors to a hillside to read Greek plays aloud and served us red wine. He was from Italy.
    I attended interesting universities.

    -btw- I own what I refer to as an Evil Faery Dress which is a 2 piece formal I wore to a wedding. It has a handkerchief hem and hanging pieces of tulle – all black, of course. Imagine Helena Bonham Carter at an awards show and you’ll get the idea – not that I look anything like HBC.

  75. #77 dsd
    October 16, 2015

    author of the article, i truly hope a great tragedy befalls you soon, where you will be forced to make a much needed mental transformation, from a putrid low-life cunt who badmouths (deceased) people that were willing to risk public humiliation to help others, to something more. such a shame, such a waste of air you are

  76. #78 Chris
    October 16, 2015

    dsd, well aren’t you a little ray of sunshine! Please tell us all about the benefits of putting coffee up your bum.

  77. #79 herr doktor bimler
    October 16, 2015

    DSD sounds nice.

  78. #80 Militant Agnostic
    October 16, 2015

    MI Dawn

    It’s an English folk song.

    Apparently you are unaware that Canada is not part of England. The song that must not be mentioned for the sake of Shay was written by Stan Rogers and first released in 1976.

    To get rid of you earworm, I recommend a glass of Garnet’s Home Made Beer.

  79. #81 Chris
    October 16, 2015

    hdb: “DSD sounds nice.”

    I am sure that he/she is quite adorable, in a kind of Dunning Kruger way.

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