How to interpret a genome-wide association study

Every issue of Nature Genetics is packed full of them, and they're the basis for the risk predictions offered by every personal genomics company - but how do you make sense of a genome-wide association study? How can you tell the difference between results you can trust and those you should treat with caution?

Over at Genomes Unzipped, Jeff Barrett (who's authored more GWAS than most) explains some of the key features of these studies, and what to keep an eye out for when interpreting their results.

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