The Buzz: Blogospherics and the State of Science Writing

With print publications in crisis, the issue of how scientific information will be disseminated in the future has become a recurrent topic of discussion here on ScienceBlogs and all over the web. Recently, Ed Brayton of Dispatches from the Culture Wars criticized National Geographic and the "sorry state of popular science writing" because of an error in a story, to which Chris Mooney from The Intersection responded, pointing out that the economic situation print publications are forced to operate under should be considered in criticisms of the field. For Mooney, it's not errors he finds contention with: "The 'sorry state of popular science writing' is a product of the ongoing collapse of the newspaper industry." Previous discussions in blogospherics and science journalism have been hosted by Bora from A Blog Around the Clock.

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