The Buzz: Obesity, Evolution and Delayed Gratification

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With the levels of obese individuals continuing to rise worldwide, new research hopes to illuminate some interesting associations related to this epidemic. On Gene Expression, Razib discusses an abstract that explores the idea that obesity might be related to the acquired genetic ability to process lactase late into life, which is common in European populations but uncommon in other parts of the world. On The Frontal Cortex, Jonah Lehrer gives us some insight on delayed gratification and the implications when it comes to certain foods. Also from Kevin Beck, a bit on Atkins mythology. Dig in!

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