Editor's Selections: Video Games, Reality TV, and Fantasizing

Here are my Research Blogging Editor's Selections for this week.

  • You're running down a corridor in a castle that's under attack by terrorists. Or are their neuroscientists, trying to figure out just how it is that people get involved in the narrative "flow" of a video game? Neuroskeptic explains how your brain gets in on the game.
  • Reality TV might be good for more than just entertainment. Is it possible that reality TV could actually engender romance among the participants, even on shows (like American Idol) that aren't about romance itself (like The Bachelor)? At the new PsySociety blog, Melanie calls on social psychology to explain this phenomenon. Is Reality TV a soulmate machine?
  • Another new psychology blog has a post about TV as well, this week. Over at Psych Your Mind, Amie asks if the extent to which we daydream about our favorite TV, book, or movie characters can be captured by a psychological measure, and if so, what that means. Are you a fantasizer?

That's it for this week... Check back next week for more great psychology and neuroscience blogging!

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