Myrmecos

Hello ScienceBlogs!

For a second time, that is. Some of you may remember me from Photo Synthesis, where I guest blogged for a bit a year ago. I am happy to be invited back to the borg!

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Myrmecos is not a new blog. Rather, we have been over at WordPress since 2007. I say “we”, because the blog has evolved to become more of a community. Myrmecologists (= ant scientists) smarter than I hang out in the comments and submit guest posts, and there’s a gang of top-notch nature bloggers over at WordPress carrying on a stream of apparently continuous conversation across blogs of which Myrmecos is but one little part. Kind of like here, now that I think of it. You may find many of my fellow nature-blogging sites linked in the left sidebar.

For those new to Myrmecos, what we do here is ants. And photography. Sometimes beetles and wasps. Plus a smattering of phylogenetics, social insect biology, and entomology. We have a beetle every Friday and an entomological mystery contest every Monday night.

For those following the original blog, we’ll be carrying on much as before. But in a different font, if you can stand it. Please update your bookmarks! I’ll have the new RSS feed shortly.

I’ve done my best to import old posts and comments- we had some minor setbacks- and due to circumstances I have omitted the comments for the preceding three posts. My apologies to those of you who said anything witty or insightful only to have it vanish.

Why the move? To be blunt, Scienceblogs draws a larger readership than WordPress. By relocating Myrmecos, we bring the ants a step closer to world domination.

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[update]
Never mind the bit about ants. I’ve been informed by higher powers that what we’ll be doing here is, um, squid.

Comments

  1. #1 Mike Bok
    April 13, 2010

    Movin’ on up! Congrats.

  2. #2 chezjake
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome back. Looking forward to having your full blog here.

  3. #3 Phillip IV
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome back.

    By relocating Myrmecos, we bring the ants a step closer to world domination.

    An ant step or one of your steps? Makes quite a difference regarding the actual distance.

  4. #4 NJ
    April 13, 2010

    Insert obligatory Kent Brockman quote here.

  5. #5 IanW
    April 13, 2010

    We’ve been antsy for you to get here for a long time!

  6. #6 Ted C. MacRae
    April 13, 2010

    By relocating Myrmecos, we bring the ants a step closer to world domination.

    It will also make it even harder than it already is to get at your Monday Mystery before all the points are snarfed up!

    Congratulations – great move.

  7. #7 jason
    April 13, 2010

    Congratulations, Alex! A well deserved move and, as you point out, a great opportunity to broaden your readership.

  8. #8 Adrian Thysse
    April 13, 2010

    Congrat’s Alex. However, all your ant photo’s will now have to compete for attention with flat-tummy ad’s…

    No contest!

    All links and feeds updated.

  9. #9 MissPrism
    April 13, 2010

    HURRAH! Ants are great.

  10. #10 Morgan Jackson
    April 13, 2010

    Congrats Alex! You’ll represent all entomologists well! Not sure I can deal with this new font though… too much change makes me start rocking in the corner! :)

  11. #11 Daniel MacArthur
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome (back) to the crew, Alex – it’s great to have you on board.

  12. #12 Jason
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome!

  13. #13 ThirtyFiveUp
    April 13, 2010

    PZ says you are a good guy, except you need more squid.

  14. #14 Baktru
    April 13, 2010

    “By relocating Myrmecos, we bring the ants a step closer to world domination.”

    Where most people actually try to get rid of the little buggers…

  15. #15 EMJ
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome to the team Alex!

  16. #16 aratina cage
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome to the Collective! I am in awe of your photography.

    By relocating Myrmecos, we bring the ants a step closer to world domination.

    Well, you picked a good time to do it. The fire ants are already going strong this year on their way to world domination, and they do have ways of making life a pain sometimes if you are not careful where you step.

  17. #17 Angela
    April 13, 2010

    Your first picture is … a slave maker? I guess you were serious about that world domination thing!

  18. #18 Alex Wild
    April 13, 2010

    Aratina- ah, good to hear that the fire ants are doing my bidding, the little darlings…

    And thanks, all, for the warm welcome!

  19. #19 Sarabeth
    April 13, 2010

    So glad to see you here. My children and I enjoyed reading about the ants and seeing the photos.

  20. #20 Liz Wild
    April 13, 2010

    Hey, Alex, I figured it out! :-) XXXMom

  21. #21 Johan
    April 13, 2010

    Whoo!

    I love ants. Myrmecology is one of my favorite sciences to read about outside of my own area.

    A myrmecology blog is exactly what Scienceblogs needed.

  22. #22 Alex Wild
    April 13, 2010

    Glad to hear it, Mom!

  23. #23 Sharon Astyk
    April 13, 2010

    Welcome…ants and squid. Do you do zombies too?

    Sharon

  24. #24 Alex Wild
    April 13, 2010

    Sharon: I’d love to do zombies, but where are they when you need them? Every time I order from Carolina Biological Supply, they’re backordered.

  25. #25 Tim Eisele
    April 13, 2010

    Is that true? Haven’t you posted anything about the zombie ants yet?

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/05/photogalleries/zombie-ants/

  26. #26 OrchidGrowinMan
    April 13, 2010

    Zombie Ants?

    Cool.

    That will show the cursed invicta.

    The adult female inserts a single egg into a worker ant with a hypodermic-style ovipositor in a rapid aerial attack. The egg is inserted into the thorax region, and the larva migrates to the head capsule of the worker. There are three instars, during which time worker ants appear to behave normally until just before pupariation. At pupariation, the tissue inside the ant’s head capsule is consumed, killing the ant in the process. The ant’s head usually falls off, and the mouth parts are pushed away so that the puparium is visible inside the oral cavity. The pupa completes development in the head capsule, and the adult fly emerges from the oral cavity.

    http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ent/biocontrol/parasitoids/pseudacteon.html

  27. #27 Alex Wild
    April 13, 2010

    If you folks insist on Zombie Ants, I have a couple old posts from the Photosynthesis blog here and here

  28. #28 Dior
    April 13, 2010

    Yea I’m glad you’re here, I love the ants,ants, revolution! (more coleopterids and photos please….)

  29. #29 katie
    April 13, 2010

    I just stumbled by from Pharyngula. Welcome! It’s nice to have more entomologists around and I know next to nothing about ants (I’m a quasi-Dipterist myself).

  30. #30 MemeGene
    April 14, 2010

    An ant blog? Yay! I almost became an entomologist because I loved ants (and other insects) so much while growing up. Looking forward to your posts, even the ones with non-ants. Welcome!

  31. #31 Isis the Scientist
    April 14, 2010

    Welcome back, Alex!

  32. #32 Greg Laden
    April 15, 2010

    Welcome to the colony. Now, get to work or I’ll pull your antennae off!

    Hey I just watched “Them” the other day. Great movie. Post nuclear ants. The entomology was actually not too bad given when the movie was made, and that it was a cheesy scifi movie.

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