Advancing and Promoting your Research on the Web

I received an email a couple of weeks ago from Daniel Cromer of the Hrenya Research Group located in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His group was interested in expanding their online presence and had stumbled up the presentation I'd given a couple of years ago on Academic Blogging: Promoting your Research on the Web. He asked me if I could explore those same ideas in a short presentation to the group.

That was Monday. Sadly, I wasn't able to actually go to Colorado for the presentation -- it was all online using the GoToMeeting software. I spoke and took questions for about an hour in a session that was lively and hopefully well-received. It was a bit odd to present without having any of the visual cues from the audience that are so helpful to the speaker. Fortunately, the audience was very engaged and we had a great discussion.

The actually presentation was based on the Academic Blogging: Promoting your Research on the Web presentation but also added in some new stuff as well as some content from the Web 2.0 Community Building Strategies: The World of Science 2.0 presentation I did from last year.

While the focus was still blogging and outreach, I did end up talking a bit about Open Access and Open Notebook Science.

In any case, the slides are below, with the link to the pdf version in our IR here.

Once again, thanks to Daniel and the Hrenya Research Group for both the invitation and the warm reception.

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