More on what US scientists can learn from the Canadian War on Science

I've been thinking a lot about this the last week or so, with media appearances already out there and more to come. The list of links I've amassed is quite impressive, a significant number to add to the post highlighting Sarah Boon's advice. But that was a week or so ago, which seems like an eternity in Donald Trump years. So perhaps it's time to take another look at the issues around science advocacy and politics in the Canadian context.

My advice? Don't bring a test tube to a Bunsen burner fight. Mobilize, protest, form partnerships, wrote op-eds and blog posts and books and articles, speak about science at every public event you get a chance, run for office, help out someone who's a science supporter run for office.

Don't want your science to be seen as political or for your "objectivity" to be compromised? Too late, the other side made it political while you weren't looking. And you're the only one that thinks you're objective. What difference will it make?

Don't worry about changing the other side's mind. Worry about mobilizing and energizing your side so they'll turn out to protest and vote and send letters and all those other good things.

Worried that you will ruin your reputation and that when the good guys come back into power your "objectivity" will be forever compromised? Worry first about getting the good guys back in power. They will understand what you went through and why you had to mobilize. And they never thought your were "objective" to begin with.

Proof? The Canadian experience. After all, even the Guardian wants to talk about How science helped to swing the Canadian election? Two or four years from now, you want them to be writing articles about how science swung the US mid-term or presidential elections.

Oh yes, back up and store your data in a safe place. If you're a government scientist or strongly connected to government funding, you might want to do you online advocacy on the anonymous side of things.

Most of the posts are post-election but there are a few from the Donald Trump president-elect period. The pre-election and pre-presidency posts are first in the list, followed by items from the last two weeks.

If I've missed anything important, please let me know in the comments or at dupuisj at gmail dot com.

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