Nature special issue a treasure trove for personal genomics fans

The latest issue of Nature contains an embarrassment of riches for those of us interested in personal genomics, and indeed I'm having trouble figuring out which article to write about first.

Just look at the options: there's a review on approaches to tracking down the missing heritability of common diseases; there's a potentially highly controversial plea from Chicago researcher Bruce Lahn for acknowledgment that "genetic diversity contributes to variation across numerous physical, physiological and cognitive domains" between human populations; and there's an advance online publication describing the highest-resolution survey yet performed of large-scale structural variation in the human genome (on which I am proud to be fifteenth author!), accompanied by a tidy News and Views piece from John Armour.
Any of these would provide ample fodder for a post, but right now I only have time to write about one. Hmmm...

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My vote goes to the Bruce Lahn opinion piece!