Morning dip - Finding Waldo, not finding serotonin, and Varmus goes Daily Show

Notables from my morning feedscan:

The vision folks at Barrow study "Where's Waldo?" to figure out search strategies.

A virtual-reality helmet claims to to feed all five senses. Interesting if true.

Winner best-and-worsrt headline writing in a press release: Prawnography shows captive bred prawns lack lust And in second place, running, um, close behind: Scatological clues lead to an intimate view, which actually looks at some pretty interesting group dynamics in lemurs during their annual birthing time, when babies are at risk of being murdered.

Neurotopia continues a good series on the problems with the serotonin theory of depression.

Science goes cool: Harold Varmus, head of Sloan-Kettering, of Obama's science advisory council, Nobelist, former NIH director, and author of "The Art and Politics of Science," goes on Jon Stewart's Daily Show. In which we learn -- hurray! -- Varmus was once an English Ph.D. student. Man is also funny. "As you know from ... having a few moments with my book ..."

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