Does Tamiflu resistant swine flu virus really spread less well? Not so fast, says Revere

For a while that seemed to hold true. The biology seemed sound and all was very reassuring. Then, suddenly, in the 2007-2008 flu season the H1N1 seasonal influenza (not the swine flu H1N1) developed Tamiflu resistance and in a remarkably short time almost all of the H1N1 seasonal flu was resistant to Tamiflu.

Posted via web from David Dobbs's Somatic Marker

More like this

There is no way to keep up with all the flu news, so we pick and choose, usually based on some kind of point we want to make. That's both the good and the bad of this blog: the news comes with a point of view. But so does most news, and we try to make ours both explicit and scientifically as…
We started blogging on public health at the beginning of the 2004 - 2005 flu season, although we didn't concentrate on flu immediately. We intended to use the public health problem of influenza, a disease that contributes to the death of almost 40,000 US citizens a year, as a lens through which to…
by revere, cross-posted from Effect Measure Currently the only antiviral drugs effective against the swine flu (novel H1N1) virus are the two neuriminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir (trade name Tamiflu) and zanamivir (trade name Relenza). Relenza is in active form at the outset and cannot be…
Currently the only antiviral drugs effective against the swine flu (novel H1N1) virus are the two neuriminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir (trade name Tamiflu) and zanamivir (trade name Relenza). Relenza is in active form at the outset and cannot be absorbed orally. It must be inhaled, leading to…