Gleaned: Mechanical brides, lying about lying, traumatic growth, and bubba v bubba

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At Biophemera, Jessica Palmer takes a look at Mechanical Brides of the Uncanny. Actually a couple look to me a bit like cans. 

Like most junk science that just won't die, the polygraph stays with us. Even Aldrich Ames could see the polygraph was junk. NB, those who don't shy from no-lie fMRI. From the wonderful Letters of Note.

Ben Carey Notes that Enemies Can Be Good for a Childâs Growth. This should not surprise.

And in one of those science stories that's so fun I almost don't care whether it's true, the Times examines A Pattern of Sibling Risk-Taking in the Major Leagues. I should note that my brother was always a much bigger risk-taker than I was. Though he's now a doctor working for the government, and I'm a freelance writer, so maybe these things change.

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