Ig Nobel Prizes Announced

i-f1ee09046b937b18f2594c8b8da681f6-071004_ignobels_hmed.jpgIt's that time of year again when the most exciting set of awards for us here at Omni Brain are announced. If you don't know what the Ig Nobels are you're missing out on a very important part of science! According to some article at MSNBC "The annual no-rules awards ceremony, where flying paper airplanes and interrupting honored speakers are commonplace, pokes fun at bizarre and improbable achievements in real-life scientific research."

This year some of my favorite prizes were:

NUTRITION: Brian Wansink of Cornell University, for exploring the seemingly boundless appetites of human beings, by feeding them with a self-refilling, bottomless bowl of soup.
REFERENCE: "Bottomless Bowls: Why Visual Cues of Portion Size May Influence Intake," Brian Wansink, James E. Painter and Jill North, Obesity Research, vol. 13, no. 1, January 2005, pp. 93-100.

Of course we can't forget the Gay Bomb!

PEACE: The Air Force Wright Laboratory, Dayton, Ohio, USA, for instigating research & development on a chemical weapon -- the so-called "gay bomb" -- that will make enemy soldiers become sexually irresistible to each other.
REFERENCE: "Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals," Wright Laboratory, WL/FIVR, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, June 1, 1994.

Too bad the Air Force wasn't there to accept :(

Head over to the Annals of Improbably Research for all the exciting results!

More like this

[Originally posted in April 2007] One "trick" dieters often use is to put their food on a smaller plate. The idea is to fool yourself into thinking you're eating more food than you really are. But doesn't our stomach tell us how full we are? Actually, it doesn't. Brian Wansink has devoted his…
More tales of hilarious heuristics that lead us astray and make us fat: An appalling example of our mindless approach to eating involved an experiment with tubs of five-day-old popcorn. Moviegoers in a Chicago suburb were given free stale popcorn, some in medium-size buckets, some in large buckets…
One "trick" dieters often use is to put their food on a smaller plate. The idea is to fool yourself into thinking you're eating more food than you really are. But doesn't our stomach tell us how full we are? Actually, it doesn't. Brian Wansink has devoted his career to studying how perception of…
As Sideshow Bob once opined, television is essentially a "bottomless chum bucket," and even when I am petsitting at a house with cable I usually prefer to read over endlessly channel surfing for a nature program that I probably won't like anyway. Some programs on PBS, however, are notable…