In Praise of AMO Physics

I'm at DAMOP this week, though it took longer to get here than it should've-- severe storms yesterday canceled the flight I was supposed to take from Baltimore to Columbus, so I had to rebook to the 6am departure this morning, whee. I think this is the first time I've ever had a flight canceled while I was at the airport, though which is kind of amazing.

Anyway, I missed most of the morning session, and I'm short on sleep, but I saw some cool talks already, and expect to write about some of them tomorrow. For the moment, though, here's a post I wrote for Forbes yesterday talking about why Atomic, Molecular, and Optical (AMO) physics is a great subfield to work in, and not just a refuge for people who couldn't hack it as particle physicists. This skews very heavily toward experimental AMO, too, because that's my background, but AMO theory has a lot of nice features, too.

And now it's just about time for the next batch of talks to start, so I'm off to hear more about awesome physics involving atoms...

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