Interesting Comparison: Economics and Relativity

I caught this interesting sentence over at Marginal Revolution:

as consumption approaches satiation, workers reduce their hours of work to prevent themselves from actually reaching satiation. More technically, as workers approach satiation, their labor supply curves start to "bend backwards." The result is that rising labor demand stemming from rising productivity raises wages yet reduces employment.

Reminds me of relativity. Thus, one would assume that satiation, like the speed of light, is a level of consumption that a workers can never reach.

I have no idea whether this comparison is apt. Both the economics and the physics are above my pay-grade. The original sentence stems from a question and answer that Bryan Caplan asked on his micro midterm.

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I just found your post because I had the same idea. Not sure whether satiation is the speed of light(~) but I'll keep thinking about it.