The Buzz: Was the Italy Earthquake Predicted?

In the wake of Monday's earthquake in the L'Aquila region of Italy that killed over 200 people, news emerged that one Italian scientist had predicted the earthquake less than two weeks earlier. Giampaolo Giuliani's predictions were broadcast on March 28 but was dismissed by Italian authorities--and rightly so, according to ScienceBloggers. The radon-measurement technique Giuliani based his prediction on has proven to be unsuccessful in the past. "Any geologist would be celebrating a genuine, proven, method of earthquake prediction," said Chris Rowan of Highly Allochthonous, "but we're clearly not there yet."

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