The Buzz: Megafloods and Supervolcanoes: Oh, My!

i-881a203d118e5df24096c19fb46a0ead-mount-st-helens-wamsh1.jpg

Last weekend, some ultra-powerful movers, shakers, and carvers of our planet caught ScienceBloggers' attentions. First, researchers debated the potential for Mt. Saint Helens to form a supervolcano, an extraordinarily large volcano with the potential to cause massive wildlife destruction and devastating impacts on climate. Bloggers also discussed two megafloods: one that permanently separated Great Britain from continental Europe, and another that firmly established the topography, soils, and agriculture of the Pacific Northwest. While the Pleistocene epoch may not have been the most turbulent in Earth's history, it was clearly far from quiet.

More like this

Mt. Saint Helens in Washington state, USA I'm back from my sojourn to New England and its time to play catch up. First things first! There has been a lot of chatter in my inbox and on the comments here at Eruptions about the study/press release from Graham Hill's research group talking about the…
Hundreds of thousands of years ago, one of the largest floods in Earth's history turned us into an island and changed the course of our history. Britain was not always isolated from our continental neighbours. In the Pleistocene era, we were linked to France by a land ridge called the Weald-Artois…
The End of the Line: a must see Non-rational lines, empathy, and animal research Mt. Saint Helens: Supervolcano? Francis Collins "upbeat" about impact of common disease genetics The NAS and Geoengineering
Mt. Saint Helens erupting in 2004. I had a chance to watch a new NOVA special that airs May 5 (PBS) on the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruption cycles at Mt. Saint Helens, along with the recovery of the blast zone from the 1980 eruption. It is a fitting episode as we approach the 30th anniversary of…