The Buzz: Taking Data Digital

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The Internet may have largely replaced many traditional means of storing and sharing information, but as ScienceBloggers are pointing out, it has far to go before its potential is fully realized, particularly in research. On Built on Facts, Matt Springer discusses what it would take to digitize the entire Library of Congress collection—scanning the pages of all 32 million titles and finding enough server space to store the data produced. On Common Knowledge, John Wilbanks compares the functionality of published scientific journals to that of web-based publishing, arguing that the web not only improves upon the basic objectives of journals but offers the additional functions of integration, annotation, and federation. And on The Book of Trogool, librarian Dorothea Salo has devoted her entire blog to exploring the emerging field of e-research. Is it evolution, or a revolution?

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That's four librar* blogs here at ScienceBlogs, of course, with hopefully more to come. We're taking over! I'll let Dorothea introduce herself: I'm very pleased to welcome you all to The Book of Trogool, a brand-new blog about e-research. My name is Dorothea Salo, I'm an academic librarian, and I…
I'm very pleased to welcome you all to The Book of Trogool, a brand-new blog about e-research. My name is Dorothea Salo, I'm an academic librarian, and I am fascinated with the changes that computers have wrought in the academic-research enterprise. I hope to explore those changes, and particularly…
Lively welcome here at ScienceBlogs, I must say. Two posts, a soft launch, and eighteen comments already! The comments have turned up a question deserving of further discussion. On my first post, commenter Jim Lund said: E-research? Why make a distinction? Today there's only e-research and…
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