Aesthetic Tech

On Universe, Claire L. Evans takes us all the way back to 1966, when an event called 9 Evenings happened in New York City. This "epic art salon" brought together ten artists with a bevy of engineers from Bell Laboratories, who "helped the artists with complex technical components to their pieces." FM transmitters, infrared cameras, amplifiers and photoelectric cells contributed to "performances, installations, and dances that blended technology with fine art to somewhat legendary effect." Claire has pictures and video of the event on Universe. And on Bioephemera, Jessica Palmer shows us a "clever little feat of engineering and product design," a watch which displays the time in braille. Called the Haptica, this watch has a novel aesthetic informed by its function, making it (shall we say) timeless.

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