It's now legal ...

for the government to torture and indefinitely detain individuals without criminal charge. HR 6166 ("the Military Commissions Act of 2006") passed 65 to 34 in the Senate, with 12 Democrats (including, surprise, surprise, Lieberman - but neither of the AZ Democrats) voting with the Republicans (only one of whom, Lincoln Chafee, dissented from his party line). As the WaPo notes:

Thirty-one former ambassadors, including 20 who served in Republican administrations, jointly wrote Congress this week that "to eliminate habeas corpus relief for the citizens of other countries who have fallen into our hands cannot but make a mockery" of the administration's efforts to promote democracy. They also said that it would set a precedent that could jeopardize U.S. diplomats and military personnel overseas.

Marty Lederman and Bruce Ackerman point out that many of the extraordinary powers given to the President by this bill also apply to U.S. citizens, on U.S. soil.

Habeas corpus, welcome to the future.

Glenn Greenwald has more.

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