Update on Southwestern jaguars

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Last week I reported that AZ Game and Fish had recently captured, collared and released a jaguar for the first time. At that time, folks were speculating whether the specimen was “Macho B,” a male that had been seen in the area a number of times over the past 13 years. This turns out to be the case.

This evening the Arizona Republic is reporting that “Macho B” was found to be immobile in the field today and upon transport to the Phoenix Zoo was diagnosed with “severe and unrecoverable kidney failure.” He was therefore euthanized.

It is now believed that the 16 year old male was the oldest wild jaguar in the world.

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Some suspect that he was initially able to be captured because he was ill and weak. :(

That plus being darted and handled has been known to impair an animal's health. One could speculate that the stress and the drug metabolites were more than his old kidneys could handle.

By JohnnieCanuck (not verified) on 04 Mar 2009 #permalink