Exciting new discovery - a new way to cycle carbon

A new paper in Science describes the discovery of a fundamentally new carbon cycling pathway in an extreme salt-loving archaea. Check out this summary of the paper for a quick morning microbe fix. I have to read the paper carefully myself before I can really talk about it, but I did want to share this right away.

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