Check out the sea floor... live

Ever wondered what the bottom of the ocean looks like? Well, now's your chance to check out streaming live HD footage from the ROV ROPOS which is currently working out at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Currently they are checking out a brand new lava flow, but later this evening and tomorrow they will be working at Ashes hydrothermal vent field (one of my study sites). While not all of the work is microbe-related (there is a lot of geology going on), the fact that they are streaming live and sharing audio conversations with other scientists on land was too cool to share. Also, they are responding to questions via twitter feed. Go check it out. This is a great example of education and outreach done right, in my opinion.

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