The Pink Gene (for Tomatoes)

When you look over the assortment of sizes, shapes and colors of tomatoes displayed in the market, do you stop to consider the time and effort that went into developing them (more than ten years to create a new commercial cultivar)? But a variety of sweet, pink-skinned tomato that's popular in the Far East could speed-up the breeding of new cultivars in this region. In the search for the mutation that gives these tomatoes their pink hue, Weizmann scientists discovered a "master" gene that regulates the levels of hundreds of tomato metabolites. That gene, say the scientists, might be used as a marker that could enable tomato developers to speed up the breeding process considerably.

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If pink tomatoes aren't your thing, check out the sidebar on a postdoc in the group who is researching the medicinal properties of frankincense.

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You could have added a link to the article itself. Its even open access. Even the page that you linked to doesn't have a link. But since I found it anyway, here it is:
http://www.plosgenetics.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pgen…

from the link:

"Humans also benefit from eating these substances â known as flavonoids â as they have all sorts of antioxidant and disease-preventing properties. They not only improve our health; ..."<\blockquote>

The paper itself doesn't make any reference to health benefits and by searching pubmed, I find the evidence for that broad claim is rather thin.

The paper itself seems to be interesting, but I have one question. Why don't they mention taste anywhere? They must have tried?