More Weizmann History

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Here's another article we came across while editing material on the still-theoretical new website. Unfortunately, the article is more about the photographer than Anna Weizmann, herself.

Prof. Anna Weizmann was Chaim's younger sister, (there were a dozen brothers and sisters, all of them chemists, engineers and doctors). She was also one of the original 11 scientists (3 of whom were women) at what was then the Daniel Sieff Research Institute (est. 1934). She never married, (one article she co-authored referred to her as Miss Anna Weizmann) and she ran Dr. Chaim Weizmann's lab after his death until her own, in 1963.

From certain chance remarks, it would seem that Meir Weisgal's description of her: "charm, dry humor and acid wit" is telling. She seems to have been well-liked, but also somewhat feared, especially among underlings. She almost certainly could hold her own in an argument or scientific dispute.

Apparently, she was also happy to be part of the small band of pioneering scientists at the Institute in the pre-state and early state days, and to live in her famous brother's shadow and work to preserve his scientific legacy.

While even the little information and impressions we have are enough to fuel our imagination (not to mention a historical novel), one can't help but wonder what wisdom Anna Weizmann would impart to today's scientists, female and male.

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She looks amazing! definitely great stuff for a historical novel