Seeing Antlers, Feeling Dendrites


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As of today, SEED has a new look and a new occasional writer. . . me! ;)

See my little essay on Christopher Reiger's Synesthesia #1 here, on the culture page. Then go explore the rest of the site. . . the new design is pretty sweet. They even have a SCIART tag for pieces like mine.

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If you read my February piece for the SEED website on art, science, and synesthesia, you'll remember Christopher Reiger's intriguingly ambiguous painting Synesthesia #1. I'm very pleased to report that it is now available as a limited edition print. I'd also like to call attention to Christopher's…
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Dymaxion SkeletonMatthew Day Jackson, 2008 I had a pleasant surprise at our Apple blogging panel last week, when my friend Christopher Reiger of Hungry Hyaena dropped by. He's posted a thoughtful response to some issues we touched on very lightly in the panel. Like Brian and I, Christopher was a…

Congratulations to you and Hooray for me! I had let my subscription run out through disorganization and neglect last year and just renewed. I'm so excited. :)

Congrats! Art is often only as good as what can be brought to it and you bring an enlightening insight to that piece. At first glance, I thought those were tree roots!

By Joe Leasure (not verified) on 12 Mar 2009 #permalink

Excellent article. Congratulations on the gig.

I hadn't realized until I read it that I do actually experience something the way a synesthete would. To me, writing is all laid out in two- or three-dimensional space. I don't really think through the connections that are made or the bits that are missing as much as I see and feel them in some imaginary space. Very handy for editing.

Today a blog, tomorrow, the world!