Goodbye to Scienceblogs

A few weeks ago, I was notified that if I wished to continue blogging at Scienceblogs/National Geographic, I'd have to agree to new terms. After considering these terms, as well as the decision to ban pseudonymous blogging, I don't feel that the new management and I are on the same page. I have therefore decided to leave Scienceblogs.

I've had to put BioE on hiatus a few times over the past few years anyway, as my career moves in a different direction, and the odds are that my posts will be infrequent in the future. So it's as good a time to leave as any.

You can find me in the future at bioephemera.com - BioE's original home. I don't know what will happen to my archive of posts here; I'd prefer they remain in place so as not to disturb the vast network of permalinks on the interwebz, but I don't control that. If they are deleted, I'll try to archive them elsewhere.

I hope it goes without saying that I wish success to Scienceblogs and the remaining staff and bloggers. I would like to thank them for providing BioE with a great community for three years.

I would also like to thank all of my readers/peers/commenters/content-finders who kept this great conversation going. Remember what Dorothy Parker said: "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity."

Be curious, be fearless, and be well, my friends.

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