Stop torturing me, MIT!

Now this is just cruel: yesterday the Cambridge Science Festival kicked off - a week of science, sciart, sci-journalism and sci-education activities at MIT, Harvard, the Museum of Science, and surrounds. Am I going to be hanging out all day with my fellow-geeks in the sun (which finally came out a few days ago, right on cue)? No! Because I have to write two final papers. (At least they're about sci-law. . . )

Anyway, don't be like me. If you're in the Cambridge/Boston area, have a life and check out the Cambridge Science Festival schedule. There are talks, performances, screenings, panels, walks, etc. virtually all day today and through next weekend. For example, next Sunday afternoon you could take the kids to build rockets at Rocket Day or a guided urban eco scavenger hunt on the Charles River. (Alas, the Electric Origami workshop - "Learn how to embed lights, sensors, and other electronics into origami sculptures" - is already full, but you can get on the waitlist). And when I finish those final papers, I'll be celebrating by walking along the Charles to see FAST Light:

MIT welcomes the greater Boston community to tour architectural pavilions, sculptural installations, and artworks that incorporate sound, light and performance, from dusk until dark. The event kicks off with the launch of Otto Piene's Sky Event, when a group of students and alumni will lift a large-scale, brightly lit star over Killian Court. Kinetic and luminous projects created for FAST by MIT faculty and students will glow along the Charles and throughout the MIT campus all evening. These will highlight MIT's leadership in energy-efficient technologies while demonstrating how technology, invention and fantasy can transform the physical environment in thought-provoking, breathtaking ways.

I'd prefer some electric origami, but hey, that'll do.

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